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Pancreatic Neoplasms: HELP
Articles by Jeanine M. Genkinger
Based on 13 articles published since 2010
(Why 13 articles?)
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Between 2010 and 2020, J. Genkinger wrote the following 13 articles about Pancreatic Neoplasms.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Review Central adiposity, obesity during early adulthood, and pancreatic cancer mortality in a pooled analysis of cohort studies. 2015

Genkinger, J M / Kitahara, C M / Bernstein, L / Berrington de Gonzalez, A / Brotzman, M / Elena, J W / Giles, G G / Hartge, P / Singh, P N / Stolzenberg-Solomon, R Z / Weiderpass, E / Adami, H-O / Anderson, K E / Beane-Freeman, L E / Buring, J E / Fraser, G E / Fuchs, C S / Gapstur, S M / Gaziano, J M / Helzlsouer, K J / Lacey, J V / Linet, M S / Liu, J J / Park, Y / Peters, U / Purdue, M P / Robien, K / Schairer, C / Sesso, H D / Visvanathan, K / White, E / Wolk, A / Wolpin, B M / Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, A / Jacobs, E J. ·Department of Epidemiology, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University, New York Herbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center, Columbia University Medical Center, New York jg3081@columbia.edu. · Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, NIH, DHHS, Bethesda. · Division of Cancer Etiology, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte. · Westat, Rockville. · Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences, National Cancer Institute, NIH, DHHS, Bethesda, USA. · Cancer Epidemiology Centre, Cancer Council of Victoria, and Centre for Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Melbourne School of Population and Global Health, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia. · Department of Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Population Medicine and The Center for Health Research, Loma Linda University School of Medicine, Loma Linda, USA. · Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Tromsø, The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø Department of Research, Cancer Registry of Norway, Oslo, Norway Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden Genetic Epidemiology Group, Folkhälsan Research Center, Helsinki, Finland. · Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston. · Division of Epidemiology and Community Health, School of Public Health, and Masonic Cancer Center, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis. · Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston Division of Preventive Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston. · Channing Laboratory, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston. · Epidemiology Research Program, American Cancer Society, Atlanta. · Division of Aging, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston Massachusetts Veterans Epidemiology Research and Information Center, Geriatric Research Education and Clinical Center, VA Boston Healthcare System, Boston. · The Prevention & Research Center, Mercy Medical Center, Baltimore Department of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore. · Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, NIH, DHHS, Bethesda Division of Public Health Sciences, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis. · Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle Department of Epidemiology, University of Washington, Seattle. · Department of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences, Milken Institute School of Public Health, George Washington University, Washington. · Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston Division of Preventive Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston Division of Aging, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston. · Department of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore Department of Medical Oncology, Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center, John Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, USA. · Division of Nutritional Epidemiology, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. · Department of Population Health and Perlmutter Cancer Center, New York University, New York, USA. ·Ann Oncol · Pubmed #26347100.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Body mass index (BMI), a measure of obesity typically assessed in middle age or later, is known to be positively associated with pancreatic cancer. However, little evidence exists regarding the influence of central adiposity, a high BMI during early adulthood, and weight gain after early adulthood on pancreatic cancer risk. DESIGN: We conducted a pooled analysis of individual-level data from 20 prospective cohort studies in the National Cancer Institute BMI and Mortality Cohort Consortium to examine the association of pancreatic cancer mortality with measures of central adiposity (e.g. waist circumference; n = 647 478; 1947 pancreatic cancer deaths), BMI during early adulthood (ages 18-21 years) and BMI change between early adulthood and cohort enrollment, mostly in middle age or later (n = 1 096 492; 3223 pancreatic cancer deaths). Multivariable hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using Cox proportional hazards regression models. RESULTS: Higher waist-to-hip ratio (HR = 1.09, 95% CI 1.02-1.17 per 0.1 increment) and waist circumference (HR = 1.07, 95% CI 1.00-1.14 per 10 cm) were associated with increased risk of pancreatic cancer mortality, even when adjusted for BMI at baseline. BMI during early adulthood was associated with increased pancreatic cancer mortality (HR = 1.18, 95% CI 1.11-1.25 per 5 kg/m(2)), with increased risk observed in both overweight and obese individuals (compared with BMI of 21.0 to <23 kg/m(2), HR = 1.36, 95% CI 1.20-1.55 for BMI 25.0 < 27.5 kg/m(2), HR = 1.48, 95% CI 1.20-1.84 for BMI 27.5 to <30 kg/m(2), HR = 1.43, 95% CI 1.11-1.85 for BMI ≥30 kg/m(2)). BMI gain after early adulthood, adjusted for early adult BMI, was less strongly associated with pancreatic cancer mortality (HR = 1.05, 95% CI 1.01-1.10 per 5 kg/m(2)). CONCLUSIONS: Our results support an association between pancreatic cancer mortality and central obesity, independent of BMI, and also suggest that being overweight or obese during early adulthood may be important in influencing pancreatic cancer mortality risk later in life.

2 Review Dairy products and pancreatic cancer risk: a pooled analysis of 14 cohort studies. 2014

Genkinger, J M / Wang, M / Li, R / Albanes, D / Anderson, K E / Bernstein, L / van den Brandt, P A / English, D R / Freudenheim, J L / Fuchs, C S / Gapstur, S M / Giles, G G / Goldbohm, R A / Håkansson, N / Horn-Ross, P L / Koushik, A / Marshall, J R / McCullough, M L / Miller, A B / Robien, K / Rohan, T E / Schairer, C / Silverman, D T / Stolzenberg-Solomon, R Z / Virtamo, J / Willett, W C / Wolk, A / Ziegler, R G / Smith-Warner, S A. ·Department of Epidemiology, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University, New York jg3081@columbia.edu. · Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston Department of Biostatistics, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston. · Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston. · Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, NIH, DHHS, Bethesda. · Division of Epidemiology and Community Health, School of Public Health, Masonic Cancer Center, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis. · Division of Cancer Etiology, Department of Population Science, Beckman Research Institute and City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, USA. · Department of Epidemiology, School for Oncology and Developmental Biology (GROW), Maastricht University, Maastricht, The Netherlands. · Cancer Epidemiology Centre, Cancer Council of Victoria, Centre for Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Melbourne School of Population and Global Health, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia. · Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, University at Buffalo, State University of New York, Buffalo. · Division of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston. · Epidemiology Research Program, American Cancer Society, Atlanta, USA. · Department of Prevention and Health, TNO Quality of Life, Leiden, The Netherlands. · Division of Nutritional Epidemiology, National Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden. · Cancer Prevention Institute of California, Fremont, USA. · Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, University of Montreal, Montreal. · Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health and Health Services, George Washington University, Washington, DC. · Department of Epidemiology and Population Health, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, USA. · Department of Chronic Disease Prevention, National Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland. · Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston Department of Nutrition, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, USA. · Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston Department of Nutrition, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, USA. ·Ann Oncol · Pubmed #24631943.

ABSTRACT: Pancreatic cancer has few early symptoms, is usually diagnosed at late stages, and has a high case-fatality rate. Identifying modifiable risk factors is crucial to reducing pancreatic cancer morbidity and mortality. Prior studies have suggested that specific foods and nutrients, such as dairy products and constituents, may play a role in pancreatic carcinogenesis. In this pooled analysis of the primary data from 14 prospective cohort studies, 2212 incident pancreatic cancer cases were identified during follow-up among 862 680 individuals. Adjusting for smoking habits, personal history of diabetes, alcohol intake, body mass index (BMI), and energy intake, multivariable study-specific hazard ratios (MVHR) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using the Cox proportional hazards models and then pooled using a random effects model. There was no association between total milk intake and pancreatic cancer risk (MVHR = 0.98, 95% CI = 0.82-1.18 comparing ≥500 with 1-69.9 g/day). Similarly, intakes of low-fat milk, whole milk, cheese, cottage cheese, yogurt, and ice-cream were not associated with pancreatic cancer risk. No statistically significant association was observed between dietary (MVHR = 0.96, 95% CI = 0.77-1.19) and total calcium (MVHR = 0.89, 95% CI = 0.71-1.12) intake and pancreatic cancer risk overall when comparing intakes ≥1300 with <500 mg/day. In addition, null associations were observed for dietary and total vitamin D intake and pancreatic cancer risk. Findings were consistent within sex, smoking status, and BMI strata or when the case definition was limited to pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Overall, these findings do not support the hypothesis that consumption of dairy foods, calcium, or vitamin D during adulthood is associated with pancreatic cancer risk.

3 Article Experimental microdissection enables functional harmonisation of pancreatic cancer subtypes. 2019

Maurer, Carlo / Holmstrom, Sam R / He, Jing / Laise, Pasquale / Su, Tao / Ahmed, Aqeel / Hibshoosh, Hanina / Chabot, John A / Oberstein, Paul E / Sepulveda, Antonia R / Genkinger, Jeanine M / Zhang, Jiapeng / Iuga, Alina C / Bansal, Mukesh / Califano, Andrea / Olive, Kenneth P. ·Herbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York, USA. · Department of Medicine, Division of Digestiveand Liver Diseases, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York, USA. · Department of Pathology and Cell Biology, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York, USA. · Department of Biomedical Informatics, Columbia Unicersity Medical Center, New York, New York, USA. · Department Systems Biology, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York, USA. · Department of Surgery, Division of GI/EndocrineSurgery, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York, USA. · Department of Medicine, Division of Hematology and Oncology, New York University Langone Medical Center, New York, New York, USA. · Department of Epidemiology, Mailman School of Public Health, New York, New York, USA. · Department of Computer Science and Engineering, University of California, San Diego, California, USA. · PsychoGenics Inc, Paramus, New Jersey, USA. ·Gut · Pubmed #30658994.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) has among the highest stromal fractions of any cancer and this has DESIGN: We used laser capture microdissection (LCM) and RNA sequencing to profile the expression of 60 matched pairs of human PDA malignant epithelium and stroma samples. We then used these data to train a computational model that allowed us to infer tissue composition and generate virtual compartment-specific expression profiles from bulk gene expression cohorts. RESULTS: Our analysis found significant variation in the tissue composition of pancreatic tumours from different public cohorts. Computational removal of stromal gene expression resulted in the reclassification of some tumours, reconciling functional differences between different cohorts. Furthermore, we established a novel classification signature from a total of 110 purified human PDA stroma samples, finding two groups that differ in the extracellular matrix-associated and immune-associated processes. Lastly, a systematic evaluation of cross-compartment subtypes spanning four patient cohorts indicated partial dependence between epithelial and stromal molecular subtypes. CONCLUSION: Our findings add clarity to the nature and number of molecular subtypes in PDA, expand our understanding of global transcriptional programmes in the stroma and harmonise the results of molecular subtyping efforts across independent cohorts.

4 Article None 2018

McWilliams, Robert R / Wieben, Eric D / Chaffee, Kari G / Antwi, Samuel O / Raskin, Leon / Olopade, Olufunmilayo I / Li, Donghui / Highsmith, W Edward / Colon-Otero, Gerardo / Khanna, Lauren G / Permuth, Jennifer B / Olson, Janet E / Frucht, Harold / Genkinger, Jeanine / Zheng, Wei / Blot, William J / Wu, Lang / Almada, Luciana L / Fernandez-Zapico, Martin E / Sicotte, Hugues / Pedersen, Katrina S / Petersen, Gloria M. ·Department of Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota. Mcwilliams.robert@mayo.edu. · Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota. · Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota. · Department of Health Sciences Research, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota. · Department of Health Sciences Research, Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, Florida. · Division of Epidemiology, Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Nashville, Tennessee. · Departments of Medicine and Human Genetics, University of Chicago Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois. · Department of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas. · Department of Medicine, Division of Hematology/Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, Florida. · Department of Medicine, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York. · Departments of Cancer Epidemiology and Gastrointestinal Oncology, Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, Florida. · Department of Epidemiology, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York. · Herbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center, New York, New York. · Schulze Center for Novel Therapeutics, Division of Oncology Research, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota. · Division of Oncology, Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri. ·Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev · Pubmed #30038052.

ABSTRACT:

5 Article Comparison of the diagnostic accuracy of three current guidelines for the evaluation of asymptomatic pancreatic cystic neoplasms. 2017

Xu, Ming-Ming / Yin, Shi / Siddiqui, Ali A / Salem, Ronald R / Schrope, Beth / Sethi, Amrita / Poneros, John M / Gress, Frank G / Genkinger, Jeanine M / Do, Catherine / Brooks, Christian A / Chabot, John A / Kluger, Michael D / Kowalski, Thomas / Loren, David E / Aslanian, Harry / Farrell, James J / Gonda, Tamas A. ·aDivision of Digestive and Liver Diseases, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY bDivision of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Thomas Jefferson University Medical Center, Philadelphia, PA cSection of Surgical Oncology, Division of Surgery, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT dPancreas Center, Division of Surgery eDepartment of Epidemiology, Mailman School of Public Health fHerbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY gSection of Digestive Disease, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA. ·Medicine (Baltimore) · Pubmed #28858107.

ABSTRACT: Asymptomatic pancreatic cysts are a common clinical problem but only a minority of these cases progress to cancer. Our aim was to compare the accuracy to detect malignancy of the 2015 American Gastroenterological Association (AGA), the 2012 International Consensus/Fukuoka (Fukuoka guidelines [FG]), and the 2010 American College of Radiology (ACR) guidelines.We conducted a retrospective study at 3 referral centers for all patients who underwent resection for an asymptomatic pancreatic cyst between January 2008 and December 2013. We compared the accuracy of 3 guidelines in predicting high-grade dysplasia (HGD) or cancer in resected cysts. We performed logistic regression analyses to examine the association between cyst features and risk of HGD or cancer.A total of 269 patients met inclusion criteria. A total of 228 (84.8%) had a benign diagnosis or low-grade dysplasia on surgical pathology, and 41 patients (15.2%) had either HGD (n = 14) or invasive cancer (n = 27). Of the 41 patients with HGD or cancer on resection, only 3 patients would have met the AGA guideline's indications for resection based on the preoperative cyst characteristics, whereas 30/41 patients would have met the FG criteria for resection and 22/41 patients met the ACR criteria. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value of HGD, and/or cancer of the AGA guidelines were 7.3%, 88.2%, 10%, and 84.1%, compared to 73.2%, 45.6%, 19.5%, and 90.4% for the FG and 53.7%, 61%, 19.8%, and 88% for the ACR guidelines. In multivariable analysis, cyst size >3 cm, compared to ≤3 cm, (odds ratio [OR] = 2.08, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.11, 4.2) and each year increase in age (OR = 1.07, 95% CI = 1.03, 1.11) were positively associated with risk of HGD or cancer on resection.In patients with asymptomatic branch duct-intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms or mucinous cystic neoplasms who underwent resection, the prevalence rate of HGD or cancer was 15.2%. Using the 2015 AGA criteria for resection would have missed 92.6% of patients with HGD or cancer. The more "inclusive" FG and ACR had a higher sensitivity for HGD or cancer but lower specificity. Given the current deficiencies of these guidelines, it will be important to determine the acceptable rate of false-positives in order to prevent a single true-positive.

6 Article Self-Reported Questionnaire Detects Family History of Cancer in a Pancreatic Cancer Screening Program. 2017

Lucas, Aimee L / Tarlecki, Adam / Van Beck, Kellie / Lipton, Casey / RoyChoudhury, Arindam / Levinson, Elana / Kumar, Sheila / Chung, Wendy K / Frucht, Harold / Genkinger, Jeanine M. ·Henry D. Janowitz Division of Gastroenterology, Samuel Bronfman Department of Medicine, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, One Gustave L. Levy Place, Box 1069, New York, NY, 10029, USA. aimee.lucas@mssm.edu. · Department of Epidemiology, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University, New York, NY, 10032, USA. · Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Medicine, Columbia University, New York, NY, 10032, USA. · Department of Biostatistics, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University, New York, NY, 10032, USA. · Cancer Genetics Program, New York Presbyterian Hospital, New York, NY, 10032, USA. · National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, 20892, USA. · Division of Molecular Genetics, Department of Pediatrics, Columbia University, New York, NY, 10032, USA. · Herbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center, Columbia University, New York, NY, 10032, USA. ·J Genet Couns · Pubmed #28039657.

ABSTRACT: Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is a leading cause of cancer death; approximately 5-10% of PDAC is hereditary. Self-administered health history questionnaires (HHQs) may provide a low-cost method to detail family history (FH) of malignancy. Pancreas Center patients were asked to enroll in a registry; 149 with PDAC completed a HHQ which included FH data. Patients with FH of PDAC, or concern for inherited PDAC syndrome, were separately evaluated in a Prevention Program and additionally met with a genetic counselor (GC) to assess PDAC risk (n = 61). FH obtained through GC and HHQ were compared using Wilcoxon signed-rank sum and generalized linear mixed models with Poisson distribution. Agreement between GC and HHQ risk-assessment was assessed using kappa (κ) statistic. In the Prevention Program, HHQ was as precise in detecting FH of cancer as the GC (all p > 0.05). GC and HHQ demonstrated substantial agreement in risk-stratification of the Prevention Program cohort (κ = 0.73, 95% CI 0.59-0.87.) The sensitivity of the HHQ to detect a patient at elevated risk (i.e., moderate- or high-risk) of PDAC, compared to GC, was 82.9% (95% CI 67.3-92.3%) with a specificity of 95% (95% CI 73.1-99.7%). However, seven patients who were classified as average-risk by the HHQ were found to be at an elevated-risk of PDAC by the GC. In the PDAC cohort, 30/149 (20.1%) reported at least one first-degree relative (FDR) with PDAC. The limited sensitivity of the HHQ to detect patients at elevated risk of PDAC in the Prevention Program cohort suggests that a GC adds value in risk-assessment in this population. The HHQ may offer an opportunity to identify high-risk patients in a PDAC population.

7 Article Loss of PTEN expression is associated with poor prognosis in patients with intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms of the pancreas. 2013

Garcia-Carracedo, Dario / Turk, Andrew T / Fine, Stuart A / Akhavan, Nathan / Tweel, Benjamin C / Parsons, Ramon / Chabot, John A / Allendorf, John D / Genkinger, Jeanine M / Remotti, Helen E / Su, Gloria H. ·Authors' Affiliations: Herbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center; Departments of Pathology, Surgery, and Otolaryngology/Head and Neck Surgery; Institute for Cancer Genetics, Columbia University Medical Center; and The Department of Epidemiology, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University, New York, New York. ·Clin Cancer Res · Pubmed #24132918.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: Previously, we reported PIK3CA gene mutations in high-grade intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMN). However, the contribution of phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase pathway (PI3K) dysregulation to pancreatic carcinogenesis is not fully understood and its prognostic value unknown. We investigated the dysregulation of the PI3K signaling pathway in IPMN and its clinical implication. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: Thirty-six IPMN specimens were examined by novel mutant-enriched sequencing methods for hot-spot mutations in the PIK3CA and AKT1 genes. PIK3CA and AKT1 gene amplifications and loss of heterozygosity at the PTEN locus were also evaluated. In addition, the expression levels of PDPK1/PDK1, PTEN, and Ki67 were analyzed by immunohistochemistry. RESULTS: Three cases carrying the E17K mutation in the AKT1 gene and one case harboring the H1047R mutation in the PIK3CA gene were detected among the 36 cases. PDK1 was significantly overexpressed in the high-grade IPMN versus low-grade IPMN (P = 0.034) and in pancreatic and intestinal-type of IPMN versus gastric-type of IPMN (P = 0.020). Loss of PTEN expression was strongly associated with presence of invasive carcinoma and poor survival in these IPMN patients (P = 0.014). CONCLUSION: This is the first report of AKT1 mutations in IPMN. Our data indicate that oncogenic activation of the PI3K pathway can contribute to the progression of IPMN, in particular loss of PTEN expression. This finding suggests the potential employment of PI3K pathway-targeted therapies for IPMN patients. The incorporation of PTEN expression status in making surgical decisions may also benefit IPMN patients and should warrant further investigation.

8 Article Intake of fruits and vegetables and risk of pancreatic cancer in a pooled analysis of 14 cohort studies. 2012

Koushik, Anita / Spiegelman, Donna / Albanes, Demetrius / Anderson, Kristin E / Bernstein, Leslie / van den Brandt, Piet A / Bergkvist, Leif / English, Dallas R / Freudenheim, Jo L / Fuchs, Charles S / Genkinger, Jeanine M / Giles, Graham G / Goldbohm, R Alexandra / Horn-Ross, Pamela L / Männistö, Satu / McCullough, Marjorie L / Millen, Amy E / Miller, Anthony B / Robien, Kim / Rohan, Thomas E / Schatzkin, Arthur / Shikany, James M / Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael Z / Willett, Walter C / Wolk, Alicja / Ziegler, Regina G / Smith-Warner, Stephanie A. ·University of Montreal Hospital Research Centre (CRCHUM), Montreal, Quebec, Canada. anita.koushik@umontreal.ca ·Am J Epidemiol · Pubmed #22875754.

ABSTRACT: Fruit and vegetable intake may protect against pancreatic cancer, since fruits and vegetables are rich in potentially cancer-preventive nutrients. Most case-control studies have found inverse associations between fruit and vegetable intake and pancreatic cancer risk, although bias due to reporting error cannot be ruled out. In most prospective studies, inverse associations have been weaker and imprecise because of small numbers of cases. The authors examined fruit and vegetable intake in relation to pancreatic cancer risk in a pooled analysis of 14 prospective studies from North America, Europe, and Australia (study periods between 1980 and 2005). Relative risks and 2-sided 95% confidence intervals were estimated separately for the 14 studies using the Cox proportional hazards model and were then pooled using a random-effects model. Of 862,584 men and women followed for 7-20 years, 2,212 developed pancreatic cancer. The pooled multivariate relative risks of pancreatic cancer per 100-g/day increase in intake were 1.01 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.99, 1.03) for total fruits and vegetables, 1.01 (95% CI: 0.99, 1.03) for total fruits, and 1.02 (95% CI: 0.99, 1.06) for total vegetables. Associations were similar for men and women separately and across studies. These results suggest that fruit and vegetable intake during adulthood is not associated with a reduced pancreatic cancer risk.

9 Article Coffee, tea, and sugar-sweetened carbonated soft drink intake and pancreatic cancer risk: a pooled analysis of 14 cohort studies. 2012

Genkinger, Jeanine M / Li, Ruifeng / Spiegelman, Donna / Anderson, Kristin E / Albanes, Demetrius / Bergkvist, Leif / Bernstein, Leslie / Black, Amanda / van den Brandt, Piet A / English, Dallas R / Freudenheim, Jo L / Fuchs, Charles S / Giles, Graham G / Giovannucci, Edward / Goldbohm, R Alexandra / Horn-Ross, Pamela L / Jacobs, Eric J / Koushik, Anita / Männistö, Satu / Marshall, James R / Miller, Anthony B / Patel, Alpa V / Robien, Kim / Rohan, Thomas E / Schairer, Catherine / Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael / Wolk, Alicja / Ziegler, Regina G / Smith-Warner, Stephanie A. ·Mailman School of Public Health, 722 w 168th St, Rm 803, New York, NY 10032, USA. jg3081@columbia.edu ·Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev · Pubmed #22194529.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Coffee has been hypothesized to have pro- and anticarcinogenic properties, whereas tea may contain anticarcinogenic compounds. Studies assessing coffee intake and pancreatic cancer risk have yielded mixed results, whereas findings for tea intake have mostly been null. Sugar-sweetened carbonated soft drink (SSB) intake has been associated with higher circulating levels of insulin, which may promote carcinogenesis. Few prospective studies have examined SSB intake and pancreatic cancer risk; results have been heterogeneous. METHODS: In this pooled analysis from 14 prospective cohort studies, 2,185 incident pancreatic cancer cases were identified among 853,894 individuals during follow-up. Multivariate (MV) study-specific relative risks (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated using Cox proportional hazards models and then pooled using a random-effects model. RESULTS: No statistically significant associations were observed between pancreatic cancer risk and intake of coffee (MVRR = 1.10; 95% CI, 0.81-1.48 comparing ≥900 to <0 g/d; 237g ≈ 8oz), tea (MVRR = 0.96; 95% CI, 0.78-1.16 comparing ≥400 to 0 g/d; 237g ≈ 8oz), or SSB (MVRR = 1.19; 95% CI, 0.98-1.46 comparing ≥250 to 0 g/d; 355g ≈ 12oz; P value, test for between-studies heterogeneity > 0.05). These associations were consistent across levels of sex, smoking status, and body mass index. When modeled as a continuous variable, a positive association was evident for SSB (MVRR = 1.06; 95% CI, 1.02-1.12). CONCLUSION AND IMPACT: Overall, no associations were observed for intakes of coffee or tea during adulthood and pancreatic cancer risk. Although we were only able to examine modest intake of SSB, there was a suggestive, modest positive association for risk of pancreatic cancer for intakes of SSB.

10 Article A pooled analysis of 14 cohort studies of anthropometric factors and pancreatic cancer risk. 2011

Genkinger, Jeanine M / Spiegelman, Donna / Anderson, Kristin E / Bernstein, Leslie / van den Brandt, Piet A / Calle, Eugenia E / English, Dallas R / Folsom, Aaron R / Freudenheim, Jo L / Fuchs, Charles S / Giles, Graham G / Giovannucci, Edward / Horn-Ross, Pamela L / Larsson, Susanna C / Leitzmann, Michael / Männistö, Satu / Marshall, James R / Miller, Anthony B / Patel, Alpa V / Rohan, Thomas E / Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael Z / Verhage, Bas A J / Virtamo, Jarmo / Willcox, Bradley J / Wolk, Alicja / Ziegler, Regina G / Smith-Warner, Stephanie A. ·Department of Epidemiology, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University, New York, NY 10032, USA. jg3081@columbia.edu ·Int J Cancer · Pubmed #21105029.

ABSTRACT: Epidemiologic studies of pancreatic cancer risk have reported null or nonsignificant positive associations for obesity, while associations for height have been null. Waist and hip circumference have been evaluated infrequently. A pooled analysis of 14 cohort studies on 846,340 individuals was conducted; 2,135 individuals were diagnosed with pancreatic cancer during follow-up. Study-specific relative risks (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated by Cox proportional hazards models, and then pooled using a random effects model. Compared to individuals with a body mass index (BMI) at baseline between 21-22.9 kg/m(2) , pancreatic cancer risk was 47% higher (95%CI:23-75%) among obese (BMI ≥ 30 kg/m(2) ) individuals. A positive association was observed for BMI in early adulthood (pooled multivariate [MV]RR = 1.30, 95%CI = 1.09-1.56 comparing BMI ≥ 25 kg/m(2) to a BMI between 21 and 22.9 kg/m(2) ). Compared to individuals who were not overweight in early adulthood (BMI < 25 kg/m(2) ) and not obese at baseline (BMI < 30 kg/m(2) ), pancreatic cancer risk was 54% higher (95%CI = 24-93%) for those who were overweight in early adulthood and obese at baseline. We observed a 40% higher risk among individuals who had gained BMI ≥ 10 kg/m(2) between BMI at baseline and younger ages compared to individuals whose BMI remained stable. Results were either similar or slightly stronger among never smokers. A positive association was observed between waist to hip ratio (WHR) and pancreatic cancer risk (pooled MVRR = 1.35 comparing the highest versus lowest quartile, 95%CI = 1.03-1.78). BMI and WHR were positively associated with pancreatic cancer risk. Maintaining normal body weight may offer a feasible approach to reducing morbidity and mortality from pancreatic cancer.

11 Article One hundred thirty resections for pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor: evaluating the impact of minimally invasive and parenchyma-sparing techniques. 2010

DiNorcia, Joseph / Lee, Minna K / Reavey, Patrick L / Genkinger, Jeanine M / Lee, James A / Schrope, Beth A / Chabot, John A / Allendorf, John D. ·College of Physicians and Surgeons, Department of Surgery, Columbia University, 161 Fort Washington Avenue, Suite 820, New York, NY 10032, USA. ·J Gastrointest Surg · Pubmed #20824378.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Increasingly, surgeons apply minimally invasive and parenchyma-sparing techniques to the management of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor (PNET). The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of these approaches on patient outcomes. METHODS: We retrospectively collected data on patients with PNET and compared perioperative and pathologic variables. Survival was analyzed using the Kaplan-Meier method. Factors influencing survival were evaluated using a Cox proportional hazards model. RESULTS: One hundred thirty patients underwent resection for PNET. Traditional resections included 43 pancreaticoduodenectomies (PD), 38 open distal pancreatectomies (DP), and four total pancreatectomies. Minimally invasive and parenchyma-sparing resections included 25 laparoscopic DP, 11 central pancreatectomies, five enucleations, three partial pancreatectomies, and one laparoscopic-assisted PD. Compared to traditional resections, the minimally invasive and parenchyma-sparing resections had shorter hospital stays. By univariate analysis of neuroendocrine carcinoma, liver metastases and positive resection margins correlated with poor survival. There was an increase in minimally invasive or parenchyma-sparing resections over the study period with no differences in morbidity, mortality, or survival. CONCLUSION: In this series, there has been a significant increase in minimally invasive and parenchyma-sparing techniques for PNET. This shift did not increase morbidity or compromise survival. In addition, minimally invasive and parenchyma-sparing operations yielded shorter hospital stays.

12 Article Pancreaticoduodenectomy can be performed safely in patients aged 80 years and older. 2010

Lee, Minna K / Dinorcia, Joseph / Reavey, Patrick L / Holden, Marc M / Genkinger, Jeanine M / Lee, James A / Schrope, Beth A / Chabot, John A / Allendorf, John D. ·Department of Surgery, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, 161 Fort Washington Avenue, Suite 820, New York, NY 10032-3784, USA. ·J Gastrointest Surg · Pubmed #20824366.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Surgery offers the only chance for cure in patients with pancreatic cancer, and a growing number of elderly patients are being offered resection. We examined outcomes after pancreaticoduodenectomy in patients 80 years and older. METHODS: We retrospectively collected data on pancreaticoduodenectomy patients from 1992 to 2009 to compare outcomes between patients older and younger than 80 years. Variables were compared using t-, Wilcoxon rank-sum, or Fisher's exact tests. Survival was compared using Kaplan-Meier analysis and log-rank test. RESULTS: Patients 80 years and older who underwent pancreaticoduodenectomy were similar with respect to sex, race, blood loss, operative times, reoperation, length of stay, and readmission compared to younger patients. There were no differences in overall complications (47% vs. 51%, p = 0.54), major complications (19% vs. 25%, p = 0.25), and mortality (5% vs. 4%, p = 0.53) when comparing older to younger patients. In a subset who underwent pancreaticoduodenectomy for ductal adenocarcinoma, older patients (n = 45) had a median survival time of 11.6 months compared to 18.1 months in younger patients (n = 346; p < 0.01). CONCLUSION: Pancreaticoduodenectomy can be performed safely in select patients 80 years and older. Age alone should not dissuade surgeons from offering patients resection, though elderly patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma appear to have shorter survival than younger patients with the same disease.

13 Article Available carbohydrates, glycemic load, and pancreatic cancer: is there a link? 2010

Meinhold, Cari L / Dodd, Kevin W / Jiao, Li / Flood, Andrew / Shikany, James M / Genkinger, Jeanine M / Hayes, Richard B / Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael Z. ·National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Department of Health and Human Services, Rockville, Maryland 20852, USA. ·Am J Epidemiol · Pubmed #20452999.

ABSTRACT: High-carbohydrate diets have been linked to pancreatic cancer risk in case-control studies, but prospective studies have shown mostly null results. The authors investigated the associations of glycemic load, glycemic index, and carbohydrate intake with pancreatic cancer risk in the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial. Dietary intake was assessed by using a self-administered questionnaire. Between 1998 and 2006 (median follow-up = 6.5 years), 266 incident, confirmed pancreatic cancers were identified among 109,175 participants. Hazards ratios and 95% confidence intervals were adjusted for sex, smoking, body mass index, and total energy. Overall, elevated risks for pancreatic cancer were observed in the 90th versus 10th percentile of glycemic load (hazards ratio (HR) = 1.45, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.05, 2.00), available carbohydrate (HR = 1.47, 95% CI: 1.05, 2.06), and sucrose (HR = 1.37, 95% CI: 0.99, 1.89) intake. The positive association for available carbohydrate intake was observed during the first 4 years of follow-up (HR(<2 years) = 2.60, 95% CI: 1.34, 5.06; HR(2-<4 years) = 1.94, 95% CI: 1.06, 3.55) but not subsequently (HR = 0.86, 95% CI: 0.52, 1.44); the opposite pattern was observed for total fat and saturated fat intake. Rather than being causal, the short-term increase in pancreatic cancer risk associated with high available carbohydrate and low fat intake may be capturing dietary changes associated with subclinical disease.