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Pancreatic Neoplasms: HELP
Articles by Georgios Gemenetzis
Based on 12 articles published since 2010
(Why 12 articles?)
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Between 2010 and 2020, Georgios Gemenetzis wrote the following 12 articles about Pancreatic Neoplasms.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Review Lessons learned from 29 lymphoepithelial cysts of the pancreas: institutional experience and review of the literature. 2018

Groot, Vincent P / Thakker, Sameer S / Gemenetzis, Georgios / Noë, Michaël / Javed, Ammar A / Burkhart, Richard A / Noveiry, Behnoud B / Cameron, John L / Weiss, Matthew J / VandenBussche, Christopher J / Fishman, Elliot K / Hruban, Ralph H / Wolfgang, Christopher L / Lennon, Anne Marie / He, Jin. ·Department of Surgery, The Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA; Department of Surgery, UMC Utrecht Cancer Center, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands. · Department of Surgery, The Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA. · Department of Pathology, The Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA. · Department of Gastroenterology, The Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA. · Department of Radiology, The Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA. · Department of Surgery, The Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA; Department of Gastroenterology, The Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA; Department of Radiology, The Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA. · Department of Surgery, The Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA. Electronic address: jhe11@jhmi.edu. ·HPB (Oxford) · Pubmed #29530477.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Lymphoepithelial cysts (LECs) are rare pancreatic cystic lesions. Since LECs are benign, preoperative diagnosis is important to differentiate from a cystic neoplasm and avoid unnecessary surgery. The aim of this study was to identify clinical, radiographic and cytopathologic features associated with LECs. METHODS: A retrospective review was performed of patients diagnosed with LEC between 1995 and 2017 at our hospital. Clinicopathologic and radiographic imaging features were documented. RESULTS: Of 29 patients with pancreatic LEC, 22 underwent surgical resection. The majority were male (n = 24) with a median age of 55 years (range, 21-74). During the evaluation, all patients underwent a CT, with endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) guided fine needle aspiration (FNA) biopsy (n = 22) and/or MRI/MRCP (n = 11) performed in a smaller number of patients. A combination of exophytic tumor growth on imaging and the presence of specific cytomorphologic features on the EUS-FNA cytology biopsy led to the correct diagnosis of LEC and prevention of unnecessary surgery in 7 patients. DISCUSSION: Differentiating LECs from premalignant pancreatic cystic neoplasms remains difficult. Findings of an exophytic growth pattern of the lesion on abdominal imaging and the presence of specific cytomorphologic features in the EUS-FNA biopsy could help clinicians diagnose LEC preoperatively.

2 Article Recurrence after neoadjuvant therapy and resection of borderline resectable and locally advanced pancreatic cancer. 2019

Groot, Vincent P / Blair, Alex B / Gemenetzis, Georgios / Ding, Ding / Burkhart, Richard A / Yu, Jun / Borel Rinkes, Inne H M / Molenaar, I Quintus / Cameron, John L / Weiss, Matthew J / Wolfgang, Christopher L / He, Jin. ·Department of Surgery, The Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA; Department of Surgery, UMC Utrecht Cancer Center, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, the Netherlands. · Department of Surgery, The Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA. · Department of Surgery, UMC Utrecht Cancer Center, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, the Netherlands. · Department of Surgery, The Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA. Electronic address: jhe11@jhmi.edu. ·Eur J Surg Oncol · Pubmed #31023560.

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: The incidence, timing, and implications of recurrence in patients who underwent neoadjuvant treatment and surgical resection of borderline resectable (BRPC) or locally advanced (LAPC) pancreatic cancer are not well established. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Patients with BRPC/LAPC who underwent post-neoadjuvant resection between 2007 and 2015 were included. Associations between clinicopathologic characteristics and specific recurrence locations, recurrence-free survival (RFS), and overall survival from resection (OS) were assessed using Cox regression analyses. RESULTS: For 231 included patients, median survival from diagnosis and resection were 28.0 and 19.8 months, respectively. After a median RFS of 7.9 months, 189 (81.8%) patients had recurred. Multiple-site (n = 87, 46.0%) and liver-only recurrence (n = 28, 14.8%) generally occurred earlier and resulted in significantly worse OS when compared to local-only (n = 52, 27.5%) or lung-only recurrence (n = 18, 9.5%). Microscopic perineural invasion, yN1-yN2 status and elevated pre-surgery CA 19-9 >100 U/mL were associated with both local-only and multiple-site/liver-only recurrence. R1-margin was associated with local-only recurrence (HR 2.03). yN1-yN2 status and microscopic perineural invasion were independent predictors for both poor RFS and OS, while yT3-yT4 tumor stage (HR 1.39) and poor tumor differentiation (HR 1.60) were only predictive of poor OS. Adjuvant therapy was independently associated with both prolonged RFS (HR 0.73; median 7.0 vs. 10.9 months) and OS (HR 0.69; median 15.4 vs. 22.7 months). CONCLUSION: Despite neoadjuvant therapy leading to resection and relatively favorable pathologic tumor characteristics in BRPC/LAPC patients, more than 80% of patients experienced disease recurrence, 72.5% of which occurred at distant sites.

3 Article Incidence and risk factors for abdominal occult metastatic disease in patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma. 2018

Gemenetzis, Georgios / Groot, Vincent P / Blair, Alex B / Ding, Ding / Thakker, Sameer S / Fishman, Elliot K / Cameron, John L / Makary, Martin A / Weiss, Matthew J / Wolfgang, Christopher L / He, Jin. ·Department of Surgery, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland. · Department of Radiology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland. ·J Surg Oncol · Pubmed #30380143.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The incidence of occult metastatic disease (OMD) in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) and associated risk factors are largely unknown. METHODS: We identified all patients with PDAC, who had an aborted oncologic operation due to OMD within a 10-year period. The cases were matched to a cohort of resected PDAC patients on a 1:3 ratio, based on age and sex, for comparison of preoperative clinical characteristics and potential risk factors for OMD. RESULTS: In the studied period, 117 patients with OMD were identified in 1423 pancreatectomies performed for PDAC (8%). Liver metastases were the most common finding (79%) followed by peritoneal implants (16%). When compared with non-OMD cases, patients with OMD presented more often with abdominal pain (P < 0.001), and higher preoperative carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA 19-9) values ( P = 0.007). Additionally, indeterminate liver lesions on preoperative computed tomography (CT) were identified in 40% of OMD versus 17% of non-OMD patients ( P < 0.001). Multivariable analysis distinguished four independent predictors for OMD: indeterminate lesions on preoperative CT, tumor size > 30 mm, abdominal pain, and preoperative CA 19-9 > 192 U/mL. CONCLUSIONS: Occurrence of OMD in PDAC accounts for 8% of cases. Preoperative CA 19-9 > 192 U/mL, primary tumor size > 30 mm, and identification of indeterminate lesions in preoperative CT may indicate the need for diagnostic laparoscopy.

4 Article Circulating Tumor Cells Dynamics in Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma Correlate With Disease Status: Results of the Prospective CLUSTER Study. 2018

Gemenetzis, Georgios / Groot, Vincent P / Yu, Jun / Ding, Ding / Teinor, Jonathan A / Javed, Ammar A / Wood, Laura D / Burkhart, Richard A / Cameron, John L / Makary, Martin A / Weiss, Matthew J / He, Jin / Wolfgang, Christopher L. ·Department of Surgery, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD. · The Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD. · Department of Surgery, UMC Utrecht Cancer Center, Utrecht, The Netherlands. · Department of Pathology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD. ·Ann Surg · Pubmed #30080739.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: Previous retrospective studies demonstrated that circulating tumor cells (CTCs) subtypes correlate with overall survival in patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). Herein, we report results of a prospective observational study on CTCs dynamics to assess their clinical significance. METHODS: The CLUSTER study is a prospective longitudinal study on PDAC CTCs dynamics (NCT02974764). Multiple peripheral blood samples were collected from 200 consecutively enrolled patients with presumed PDAC diagnosis. CTCs were isolated and characterized by immunofluorescence. RESULTS: Two major CTCs subtypes were identified in PDAC patients: epithelial CTCs (eCTCs) and epithelial/mesenchymal CTCs (mCTCs). Patients who received neoadjuvant chemotherapy had significantly lower total CTCs (tCTCs, P = 0.007), eCTCs (P = 0.007), and mCTCs (P = 0.034), compared with untreated patients eligible for upfront resection. Surgical resection of the primary tumor resulted in significant reduction, but not disappearance, of CTCs burden across all cell subtypes (P < 0.001). In multivariable logistic regression analysis, preoperative numbers of all CTCs subpopulations were the only predictors of early recurrence within 12 months from surgery in both chemo-naive and post-neoadjuvant patients (odds ratio 5.9 to 11.0). Alterations in CTCs were also observed longitudinally, before disease recurrence. A risk assessment score based on the difference of tCTCs increase accurately identified disease recurrence within the next 2 months, with an accuracy of 75% and 84% for chemo-naive and post-neoadjuvant patients, respectively. CONCLUSION: We report novel findings regarding CTCs from a large prospective cohort of PDAC patients. CTCs dynamics reflect progression of disease and response to treatment, providing important information on clinical outcomes, not available by current tumor markers and imaging.

5 Article Implications of the Pattern of Disease Recurrence on Survival Following Pancreatectomy for Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma. 2018

Groot, Vincent P / Gemenetzis, Georgios / Blair, Alex B / Ding, Ding / Javed, Ammar A / Burkhart, Richard A / Yu, Jun / Borel Rinkes, Inne H / Molenaar, I Quintus / Cameron, John L / Fishman, Elliot K / Hruban, Ralph H / Weiss, Matthew J / Wolfgang, Christopher L / He, Jin. ·Department of Surgery, The Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, 21287, USA. · Department of Surgery, UMC Utrecht Cancer Center, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands. · Department of Radiology, The Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA. · Department of Pathology, The Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA. · Department of Surgery, The Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, 21287, USA. jhe11@jhmi.edu. ·Ann Surg Oncol · Pubmed #29948425.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: After radical resection of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), approximately 80% of patients will develop disease recurrence. It remains unclear to what extent the location of recurrence carries prognostic significance. Additionally, stratifying the pattern of recurrence may lead to a deeper understanding of the heterogeneous biological behavior of PDAC. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to characterize the relationship of recurrence patterns with survival in patients with resected PDAC. METHODS: This single-center cohort study included patients undergoing pancreatectomy at the Johns Hopkins Hospital between 2000 and 2013. Exclusion criteria were neoadjuvant therapy and incomplete follow-up. Sites of first recurrence were stratified into five groups and survival outcomes were estimated using Kaplan-Meier curves. The association of specific recurrence locations with overall survival (OS) was analyzed using Cox proportional-hazards models with and without landmark analysis. RESULTS: Accurate follow-up data were available for 877 patients, 662 (75.5%) of whom had documented recurrence at last follow-up. Patients with multiple-site (n = 227, 4.7 months) or liver-only recurrence (n = 166, 7.2 months) had significantly worse median survival after recurrence when compared with lung- (n = 93) or local-only (n = 158) recurrence (15.4 and 9.7 months, respectively). On multivariable analysis, the unique recurrence patterns had variable predictive values for OS. Landmark analyses, with landmarks set at 12, 18, and 24 months, confirmed these findings. CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrates that specific patterns of PDAC recurrence result in different survival outcomes. Furthermore, distinct first recurrence locations have unique independent predictive values for OS, which could help with prognostic stratification and decisions regarding treatment after the diagnosis of recurrence.

6 Article IPMNs with co-occurring invasive cancers: neighbours but not always relatives. 2018

Felsenstein, Matthäus / Noë, Michaël / Masica, David L / Hosoda, Waki / Chianchiano, Peter / Fischer, Catherine G / Lionheart, Gemma / Brosens, Lodewijk A A / Pea, Antonio / Yu, Jun / Gemenetzis, Georgios / Groot, Vincent P / Makary, Martin A / He, Jin / Weiss, Matthew J / Cameron, John L / Wolfgang, Christopher L / Hruban, Ralph H / Roberts, Nicholas J / Karchin, Rachel / Goggins, Michael G / Wood, Laura D. ·Department of Pathology, Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. · Department of Surgery, Charité-Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany. · Institute for Computational Medicine, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. · Department of Biomedical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. · Department of Pathology, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands. · Department of Surgery, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Department of Surgery, Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. · Department of Surgery, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands. · Department of Oncology, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. ·Gut · Pubmed #29500184.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMNs) are precursor lesions that can give rise to invasive pancreatic carcinoma. Although approximately 8% of patients with resected pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma have a co-occurring IPMN, the precise genetic relationship between these two lesions has not been systematically investigated. DESIGN: We analysed all available patients with co-occurring IPMN and invasive intrapancreatic carcinoma over a 10-year period at a single institution. For each patient, we separately isolated DNA from the carcinoma, adjacent IPMN and distant IPMN and performed targeted next generation sequencing of a panel of pancreatic cancer driver genes. We then used the identified mutations to infer the relatedness of the IPMN and co-occurring invasive carcinoma in each patient. RESULTS: We analysed co-occurring IPMN and invasive carcinoma from 61 patients with IPMN/ductal adenocarcinoma as well as 13 patients with IPMN/colloid carcinoma and 7 patients with IPMN/carcinoma of the ampullary region. Of the patients with co-occurring IPMN and ductal adenocarcinoma, 51% were likely related. Surprisingly, 18% of co-occurring IPMN and ductal adenocarcinomas were likely independent, suggesting that the carcinoma arose from an independent precursor. By contrast, all colloid carcinomas were likely related to their associated IPMNs. In addition, these analyses showed striking genetic heterogeneity in IPMNs, even with respect to well-characterised driver genes. CONCLUSION: This study demonstrates a higher prevalence of likely independent co-occurring IPMN and ductal adenocarcinoma than previously appreciated. These findings have important implications for molecular risk stratification of patients with IPMN.

7 Article Postoperative complications after resection of borderline resectable and locally advanced pancreatic cancer: The impact of neoadjuvant chemotherapy with conventional radiation or stereotactic body radiation therapy. 2018

Blair, Alex B / Rosati, Lauren M / Rezaee, Neda / Gemenetzis, Georgios / Zheng, Lei / Hruban, Ralph H / Cameron, John L / Weiss, Matthew J / Wolfgang, Christopher L / Herman, Joseph M / He, Jin. ·Department of Surgery, Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, MD, USA; The Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, MD, USA; The Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, MD, USA. · The Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, MD, USA; The Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, MD, USA; Department of Radiation Oncology, Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, MD, USA. · The Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, MD, USA; The Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, MD, USA; Department of Oncology, Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, MD, USA. · The Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, MD, USA; The Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, MD, USA; Department of Pathology, Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, MD, USA. · Department of Radiation Oncology, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, USA. · Department of Surgery, Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, MD, USA; The Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, MD, USA; The Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, MD, USA. Electronic address: jhe11@jhmi.edu. ·Surgery · Pubmed #29395234.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The impact of neoadjuvant stereotactic body radiation therapy on postoperative complications for patients with borderline resectable or locally advanced pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma remains unclear. Limited studies have compared neoadjuvant stereotactic body radiation therapy versus conventional chemoradiation therapy. A retrospective study was performed to determine if perioperative complications were different among patients with borderline resectable or locally advanced pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma receiving neoadjuvant stereotactic body radiation therapy or chemoradiation therapy. METHODS: Patients with borderline resectable or locally advanced pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma who underwent neoadjuvant chemotherapy with stereotactic body radiation therapy or chemoradiation therapy followed by pancreatectomy at the Johns Hopkins Hospital between 2008 and 2015 were included. Predictive factors for severe complications (Clavien grade ≥ III) were assessed by univariate and multivariate analyses. RESULTS: A total of 168 patients with borderline resectable or locally advanced pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma underwent neoadjuvant chemotherapy and RT followed by pancreatectomy. Sixty-one (36%) patients underwent stereotactic body radiation therapy and 107 (64%) patients received chemoradiation therapy. Compared with the chemoradiation therapy cohort, the neoadjuvant stereotactic body radiation therapy cohort was more likely to have locally advanced pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (62% vs 43% P = .017) and require a vascular resection (54% vs 37%, P = .027). Multiagent chemotherapy was used more commonly in the stereotactic body radiation therapy cohort (97% vs 75%, P < .001). Postoperative complications (Clavien grade ≥ III 23% vs 28%, P = .471) were similar between stereotactic body radiation therapy and chemoradiation therapy cohort. No significant difference in postoperative bleeding or infection was noted in either group. CONCLUSION: Compared with chemoradiation therapy, neoadjuvant stereotactic body radiation therapy appears to offer equivalent rates of perioperative complications in patients with borderline resectable or locally advanced pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma despite a greater percentage of locally advanced disease and more complex operative treatment.

8 Article Is a Pathological Complete Response Following Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation Associated With Prolonged Survival in Patients With Pancreatic Cancer? 2018

He, Jin / Blair, Alex B / Groot, Vincent P / Javed, Ammar A / Burkhart, Richard A / Gemenetzis, Georgios / Hruban, Ralph H / Waters, Kevin M / Poling, Justin / Zheng, Lei / Laheru, Daniel / Herman, Joseph M / Makary, Martin A / Weiss, Matthew J / Cameron, John L / Wolfgang, Christopher L. ·Department of Surgery, The Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD. · Department of Pathology, The Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD. · Department of Medical Oncology, The Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD. · Department of Radiation Oncology, The Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD. ·Ann Surg · Pubmed #29334562.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: To describe the survival outcome of patients with borderline resectable or locally advanced pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (BR/LA-PDAC) who have a pathologic complete response (pCR) following neoadjuvant chemoradiation. BACKGROUND: Patients with BR/LA-PDAC are often treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiation in an attempt to downstage the tumor. Uncommonly, a pCR may result. METHODS: A retrospective review of a prospectively maintained database was performed at a single institution. pCR was defined as no viable tumor identified in the pancreas or lymph nodes by pathology. A near complete response (nCR) was defined as a primary tumor less than 1 cm, without nodal metastasis. Overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) were reported. RESULTS: One hundred eighty-six patients with BR/LA-PDAC underwent neoadjuvant chemoradiation and subsequent pancreatectomy. Nineteen patients (10%) had a pCR, 29 (16%) had an nCR, and the remaining 138 (74%) had a limited response. Median DFS was 26 months in patients with pCR, which was superior to nCR (12 months, P = 0.019) and limited response (12 months, P < 0.001). The median OS of nCR (27 months, P = 0.003) or limited response (26 months, P = 0.001) was less than that of pCR (more than 60 months). In multivariable analyses pCR was an independent prognostic factor for DFS (HR = 0.45; 0.22-0.93, P = 0.030) and OS (HR=0.41; 0.17-0.97, P = 0.044). Neoadjuvant FOLFIRINOX (HR=0.47; 0.26-0.87, P = 0.015) and negative lymph node status (HR=0.57; 0.36-0.90, P = 0.018) were also associated with improved survival. CONCLUSIONS: Patients with BR/LA-PDAC who had a pCR after neoadjuvant chemoradiation had a significantly prolonged survival compared with those who had nCR or a limited response.

9 Article BRCA1/BRCA2 Germline Mutation Carriers and Sporadic Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma. 2018

Blair, Alex B / Groot, Vincent P / Gemenetzis, Georgios / Wei, Jishu / Cameron, John L / Weiss, Matthew J / Goggins, Michael / Wolfgang, Christopher L / Yu, Jun / He, Jin. ·Department of Surgery, The Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, MD. · Department of Surgery, The Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, MD; Department of Oncology, The Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, MD. · Department of Oncology, The Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, MD; Department of Pathology, The Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, MD; Department of Medicine, The Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, MD. · Department of Surgery, The Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, MD; Department of Oncology, The Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, MD; Department of Pathology, The Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, MD. · Department of Surgery, The Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, MD; Department of Oncology, The Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, MD. Electronic address: jhe11@jhmi.edu. ·J Am Coll Surg · Pubmed #29309945.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The outcomes of sporadic pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) patients with germline mutations of BRCA1/BRCA2 remains unclear. The prognostic significance of BRCA1/BRCA2 mutations on survival is not well established. STUDY DESIGN: We performed targeted next-generation sequencing (NGS) to identify BRCA1/BRCA2 germline mutations in resected sporadic PDAC cases from 2000 to 2015. Germline BRCA mutation carriers were matched by age and tumor location to those with BRCA1/BRCA2 wild-type genes from our institutional database. Demographics, clinicopathologic features, overall survival (OS), and disease-free survival (DFS) were abstracted from medical records and compared between the 2 cohorts. RESULTS: Twenty-two patients with sporadic cancer and BRCA1 (n = 4) or BRCA2 (n = 18) germline mutations and 105 wild-type patients were identified for this case-control study. The BRCA1/BRCA2 mutations were associated with inferior median OS (20.2 vs 27.8 months, p = 0.034) and DFS (8.4 vs 16.7 months, p < 0.001) when compared with the matched wild-type controls. On multivariable analyses, a BRCA1/BRCA2 mutation (hazard ratio [HR] 2.10, p < 0.001), positive margin status (HR 1.72, p = 0.021), and lack of adjuvant therapy (HR 2.38, p < 0.001), were all independently associated with worse survival. Within the BRCA1/BRCA2 mutated group, having had platinum-based adjuvant chemotherapy (n = 10) was associated with better survival than alternative chemotherapy (n = 8) or no adjuvant therapy (n = 4) (31.0 vs 17.8 vs 9.3 months, respectively, p < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: Carriers of BRCA1/BRCA2 mutation with sporadic PDAC had a worse survival after pancreatectomy than their BRCA wild-type counterparts. However, platinum-based chemotherapy regimens were associated with markedly improved survival in patients with BRCA1/BRCA2 mutations, with survival differences no longer appreciated with wild-type patients.

10 Article Long-Term Outcomes of 98 Surgically Resected Metastatic Tumors in the Pancreas. 2017

Lee, Shin-Rong / Gemenetzis, Georgios / Cooper, Michol / Javed, Ammar A / Cameron, John L / Wolfgang, Christopher L / Eckhauser, Frederick E / He, Jin / Weiss, Matthew J. ·Department of Surgery, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA. · Department of Surgery, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA. · Department of Surgery, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA. mweiss5@jhmi.edu. ·Ann Surg Oncol · Pubmed #27770346.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: The goal of this study was to assess the outcomes and characteristics of patients who underwent pancreatectomy for metastatic disease to the pancreas. METHODS: Patients who underwent surgical resection of metastatic disease to the pancreas from 1988 to 2016 were identified using a prospectively maintained database. Data on clinicopathological features and outcomes of these patients were analyzed. Cox proportional hazard models were employed to identify patient-specific risk factors that influence survival. RESULTS: Ninety-seven patients underwent 98 pancreatic metastasectomies from July 1988 through March 2016 for metastatic disease from 13 different primary cancers. Pancreaticoduodenectomy, distal pancreatectomy, and total pancreatectomy were performed in 49 (50 %), 37 (38 %), and 12 (12 %) patients, respectively. Postoperative complications occurred in 55 (56 %) patients, while 3 (3 %) perioperative deaths occurred. Median follow-up was 2.0 years, with a median survival of 3.2 years. Multivariate analysis revealed that older patients [hazard ratio (HR) 1.04/year; p = 0.006], non-renal cell carcinomas (HR 5.07; p < 0.001), vascular invasion (HR 3.53; p < 0.001), and positive resection margins (HR 2.62; p = 0.008) were independently associated with an increased risk of mortality. CONCLUSIONS: Pancreatic metastasectomy is safe and feasible in well-selected patients and is associated with acceptable long-term survival.

11 Article Neutrophil-to-lymphocyte Ratio is a Predictive Marker for Invasive Malignancy in Intraductal Papillary Mucinous Neoplasms of the Pancreas. 2017

Gemenetzis, Georgios / Bagante, Fabio / Griffin, James F / Rezaee, Neda / Javed, Ammar A / Manos, Lindsey L / Lennon, Anne M / Wood, Laura D / Hruban, Ralph H / Zheng, Lei / Zaheer, Atif / Fishman, Elliot K / Ahuja, Nita / Cameron, John L / Weiss, Matthew J / He, Jin / Wolfgang, Christopher L. ·*Department of Surgery, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, MD †Department of Gastroenterology, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, MD ‡Department of Pathology, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, MD §Department of Oncology, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, MD ¶Department of Radiology, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, MD. ·Ann Surg · Pubmed #27631774.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the correlation between neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR) and platelet-to-lymphocyte ratio (PLR) values, and the presence of invasive carcinoma in patients with intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN). BACKGROUND: NLR and (PLR) are inflammatory markers that have been associated with overall survival in patients with invasive malignancies, including pancreatic cancer. METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed 272 patients who underwent surgical resection for histologically confirmed IPMN from January 1997 to July 2015. NLR and PLR were calculated and coevaluated with additional demographic, clinical, and imaging data for possible correlation with IPMN-associated carcinoma in the form of a predictive nomogram. RESULTS: NLR and PLR were significantly elevated in patients with IPMN-associated invasive carcinoma (P < 0.001). In the multivariate analysis, NLR value higher than 4 (P < 0.001), IPMN cyst of size more than 3 cm (P < 0.001), presence of enhanced solid component (P = 0.014), main pancreatic duct dilatation of more than 5 mm (P < 0.001), and jaundice (P < 0.001) were statistically significant variables. The developed statistical model has a c-index of 0.895. Implementation of the statistically significant variables in a predictive nomogram provided a reliable point system for estimating the presence of IPMN-associated invasive carcinoma. CONCLUSIONS: NLR is an independent predictive marker for the presence of IPMN-associated invasive carcinoma. Further prospective studies are needed to assess the predictive ability of NLR and how it can be applied in the clinical setting.

12 Minor Reply to: Oncogenesis in Patients With Pancreatic Intraductal Papillary Mucinous Neoplasms: Taking the Thread From the Beginning. 2018

Gemenetzis, Georgios / Wolfgang, Christopher L. ·Department of Surgery, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, MD. ·Ann Surg · Pubmed #28145979.

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