Pick Topic
Review Topic
List Experts
Examine Expert
Save Expert
  Site Guide ··   
Pancreatic Neoplasms: HELP
Articles by Eugenio Gaudio
Based on 2 articles published since 2010
(Why 2 articles?)
||||

Between 2010 and 2020, Eugenio Gaudio wrote the following 2 articles about Pancreatic Neoplasms.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Review Common features between neoplastic and preneoplastic lesions of the biliary tract and the pancreas. 2019

Zaccari, Piera / Cardinale, Vincenzo / Severi, Carola / Pedica, Federica / Carpino, Guido / Gaudio, Eugenio / Doglioni, Claudio / Petrone, Maria Chiara / Alvaro, Domenico / Arcidiacono, Paolo Giorgio / Capurso, Gabriele. ·Department of Internal Medicine and Medical Specialties, Gastroenterology Unit, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome 00161, Italy. · Department of Medico-Surgical Sciences and Biotechnologies, Sapienza University of Rome, 00161 Rome, Italy. · Pathology Department, Pancreas Translational and Clinical Research Center, San Raffaele Scientific Institute IRCCS, Milan 20132, Italy. · Department of Movement, Human and Health Sciences, Division of Health Sciences, University of Rome "Foro Italico", Rome 00161, Italy. · Department of Anatomical, Histological, Forensic Medicine and Orthopedics Sciences, Division of Human Anatomy, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome 00161, Italy. · PancreatoBiliary Endoscopy and EUS Division, Pancreas Translational and Clinical Research Center, San Raffaele Scientific Institute IRCCS, Milan 20132, Italy. · Department of Translational and Precision Medicine, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome 00161, Italy. · PancreatoBiliary Endoscopy and EUS Division, Pancreas Translational and Clinical Research Center, San Raffaele Scientific Institute IRCCS, Milan 20132, Italy, arcidiacono.paologiorgio@hsr.it. ·World J Gastroenterol · Pubmed #31496617.

ABSTRACT: the bile duct system and pancreas show many similarities due to their anatomical proximity and common embryological origin. Consequently, preneoplastic and neoplastic lesions of the bile duct and pancreas share analogies in terms of molecular, histological and pathophysiological features. Intraepithelial neoplasms are reported in biliary tract, as biliary intraepithelial neoplasm (BilIN), and in pancreas, as pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasm (PanIN). Both can evolve to invasive carcinomas, respectively cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) and pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). Intraductal papillary neoplasms arise in biliary tract and pancreas. Intraductal papillary neoplasm of the biliary tract (IPNB) share common histologic and phenotypic features such as pancreatobiliary, gastric, intestinal and oncocytic types, and biological behavior with the pancreatic counterpart, the intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm of the pancreas (IPMN). All these neoplastic lesions exhibit similar immunohistochemical phenotypes, suggesting a common carcinogenic process. Indeed, CCA and PDAC display similar clinic-pathological features as growth pattern, poor response to conventional chemotherapy and radiotherapy and, as a consequence, an unfavorable prognosis. The objective of this review is to discuss similarities and differences between the neoplastic lesions of the pancreas and biliary tract with potential implications on a common origin from similar stem/progenitor cells.

2 Article Therapeutic actions of melatonin on gastrointestinal cancer development and progression. 2013

Glenister, Rachael / McDaniel, Kelly / Francis, Heather / Venter, Julie / Jensen, Kendal / Dusio, Giuseppina / Gaudio, Eugenio / Glaser, Shannon / Meng, Fanyin / Alpini, Gianfranco. · ·Transl Gastrointest Cancer · Pubmed #24312749.

ABSTRACT: Melatonin exerts a multitude of physiological functions including the regulation of the sleep cycle and circadian rhythm. Although the synthesis of melatonin in the pineal gland is regulated by changes in the light/dark cycle, the release of melatonin in the gastrointestinal tract is related to food consumption. Melatonin regulates antioxidative processes and it improves T-helper cell response by stimulating the production of specific cytokines. Melatonin is directly involved in preventing tumor initiation, promotion, and progression in a variety of cancers of the gastrointestinal tract including colorectal cancer, cholangiocarcinoma, hepatocarcinoma, and pancreatic carcinoma. This paper is a review of the literature regarding melatonin in the gastrointestinal tract and as a potential therapy for gastrointestinal cancers.