Pick Topic
Review Topic
List Experts
Examine Expert
Save Expert
  Site Guide ··   
Pancreatic Neoplasms: HELP
Articles by Susan M. Gapstur
Based on 8 articles published since 2010
(Why 8 articles?)
||||

Between 2010 and 2020, S. M. Gapstur wrote the following 8 articles about Pancreatic Neoplasms.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Review Central adiposity, obesity during early adulthood, and pancreatic cancer mortality in a pooled analysis of cohort studies. 2015

Genkinger, J M / Kitahara, C M / Bernstein, L / Berrington de Gonzalez, A / Brotzman, M / Elena, J W / Giles, G G / Hartge, P / Singh, P N / Stolzenberg-Solomon, R Z / Weiderpass, E / Adami, H-O / Anderson, K E / Beane-Freeman, L E / Buring, J E / Fraser, G E / Fuchs, C S / Gapstur, S M / Gaziano, J M / Helzlsouer, K J / Lacey, J V / Linet, M S / Liu, J J / Park, Y / Peters, U / Purdue, M P / Robien, K / Schairer, C / Sesso, H D / Visvanathan, K / White, E / Wolk, A / Wolpin, B M / Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, A / Jacobs, E J. ·Department of Epidemiology, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University, New York Herbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center, Columbia University Medical Center, New York jg3081@columbia.edu. · Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, NIH, DHHS, Bethesda. · Division of Cancer Etiology, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte. · Westat, Rockville. · Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences, National Cancer Institute, NIH, DHHS, Bethesda, USA. · Cancer Epidemiology Centre, Cancer Council of Victoria, and Centre for Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Melbourne School of Population and Global Health, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia. · Department of Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Population Medicine and The Center for Health Research, Loma Linda University School of Medicine, Loma Linda, USA. · Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Tromsø, The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø Department of Research, Cancer Registry of Norway, Oslo, Norway Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden Genetic Epidemiology Group, Folkhälsan Research Center, Helsinki, Finland. · Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston. · Division of Epidemiology and Community Health, School of Public Health, and Masonic Cancer Center, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis. · Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston Division of Preventive Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston. · Channing Laboratory, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston. · Epidemiology Research Program, American Cancer Society, Atlanta. · Division of Aging, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston Massachusetts Veterans Epidemiology Research and Information Center, Geriatric Research Education and Clinical Center, VA Boston Healthcare System, Boston. · The Prevention & Research Center, Mercy Medical Center, Baltimore Department of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore. · Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, NIH, DHHS, Bethesda Division of Public Health Sciences, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis. · Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle Department of Epidemiology, University of Washington, Seattle. · Department of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences, Milken Institute School of Public Health, George Washington University, Washington. · Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston Division of Preventive Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston Division of Aging, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston. · Department of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore Department of Medical Oncology, Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center, John Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, USA. · Division of Nutritional Epidemiology, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. · Department of Population Health and Perlmutter Cancer Center, New York University, New York, USA. ·Ann Oncol · Pubmed #26347100.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Body mass index (BMI), a measure of obesity typically assessed in middle age or later, is known to be positively associated with pancreatic cancer. However, little evidence exists regarding the influence of central adiposity, a high BMI during early adulthood, and weight gain after early adulthood on pancreatic cancer risk. DESIGN: We conducted a pooled analysis of individual-level data from 20 prospective cohort studies in the National Cancer Institute BMI and Mortality Cohort Consortium to examine the association of pancreatic cancer mortality with measures of central adiposity (e.g. waist circumference; n = 647 478; 1947 pancreatic cancer deaths), BMI during early adulthood (ages 18-21 years) and BMI change between early adulthood and cohort enrollment, mostly in middle age or later (n = 1 096 492; 3223 pancreatic cancer deaths). Multivariable hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using Cox proportional hazards regression models. RESULTS: Higher waist-to-hip ratio (HR = 1.09, 95% CI 1.02-1.17 per 0.1 increment) and waist circumference (HR = 1.07, 95% CI 1.00-1.14 per 10 cm) were associated with increased risk of pancreatic cancer mortality, even when adjusted for BMI at baseline. BMI during early adulthood was associated with increased pancreatic cancer mortality (HR = 1.18, 95% CI 1.11-1.25 per 5 kg/m(2)), with increased risk observed in both overweight and obese individuals (compared with BMI of 21.0 to <23 kg/m(2), HR = 1.36, 95% CI 1.20-1.55 for BMI 25.0 < 27.5 kg/m(2), HR = 1.48, 95% CI 1.20-1.84 for BMI 27.5 to <30 kg/m(2), HR = 1.43, 95% CI 1.11-1.85 for BMI ≥30 kg/m(2)). BMI gain after early adulthood, adjusted for early adult BMI, was less strongly associated with pancreatic cancer mortality (HR = 1.05, 95% CI 1.01-1.10 per 5 kg/m(2)). CONCLUSIONS: Our results support an association between pancreatic cancer mortality and central obesity, independent of BMI, and also suggest that being overweight or obese during early adulthood may be important in influencing pancreatic cancer mortality risk later in life.

2 Review Dairy products and pancreatic cancer risk: a pooled analysis of 14 cohort studies. 2014

Genkinger, J M / Wang, M / Li, R / Albanes, D / Anderson, K E / Bernstein, L / van den Brandt, P A / English, D R / Freudenheim, J L / Fuchs, C S / Gapstur, S M / Giles, G G / Goldbohm, R A / Håkansson, N / Horn-Ross, P L / Koushik, A / Marshall, J R / McCullough, M L / Miller, A B / Robien, K / Rohan, T E / Schairer, C / Silverman, D T / Stolzenberg-Solomon, R Z / Virtamo, J / Willett, W C / Wolk, A / Ziegler, R G / Smith-Warner, S A. ·Department of Epidemiology, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University, New York jg3081@columbia.edu. · Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston Department of Biostatistics, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston. · Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston. · Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, NIH, DHHS, Bethesda. · Division of Epidemiology and Community Health, School of Public Health, Masonic Cancer Center, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis. · Division of Cancer Etiology, Department of Population Science, Beckman Research Institute and City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, USA. · Department of Epidemiology, School for Oncology and Developmental Biology (GROW), Maastricht University, Maastricht, The Netherlands. · Cancer Epidemiology Centre, Cancer Council of Victoria, Centre for Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Melbourne School of Population and Global Health, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia. · Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, University at Buffalo, State University of New York, Buffalo. · Division of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston. · Epidemiology Research Program, American Cancer Society, Atlanta, USA. · Department of Prevention and Health, TNO Quality of Life, Leiden, The Netherlands. · Division of Nutritional Epidemiology, National Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden. · Cancer Prevention Institute of California, Fremont, USA. · Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, University of Montreal, Montreal. · Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health and Health Services, George Washington University, Washington, DC. · Department of Epidemiology and Population Health, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, USA. · Department of Chronic Disease Prevention, National Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland. · Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston Department of Nutrition, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, USA. · Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston Department of Nutrition, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, USA. ·Ann Oncol · Pubmed #24631943.

ABSTRACT: Pancreatic cancer has few early symptoms, is usually diagnosed at late stages, and has a high case-fatality rate. Identifying modifiable risk factors is crucial to reducing pancreatic cancer morbidity and mortality. Prior studies have suggested that specific foods and nutrients, such as dairy products and constituents, may play a role in pancreatic carcinogenesis. In this pooled analysis of the primary data from 14 prospective cohort studies, 2212 incident pancreatic cancer cases were identified during follow-up among 862 680 individuals. Adjusting for smoking habits, personal history of diabetes, alcohol intake, body mass index (BMI), and energy intake, multivariable study-specific hazard ratios (MVHR) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using the Cox proportional hazards models and then pooled using a random effects model. There was no association between total milk intake and pancreatic cancer risk (MVHR = 0.98, 95% CI = 0.82-1.18 comparing ≥500 with 1-69.9 g/day). Similarly, intakes of low-fat milk, whole milk, cheese, cottage cheese, yogurt, and ice-cream were not associated with pancreatic cancer risk. No statistically significant association was observed between dietary (MVHR = 0.96, 95% CI = 0.77-1.19) and total calcium (MVHR = 0.89, 95% CI = 0.71-1.12) intake and pancreatic cancer risk overall when comparing intakes ≥1300 with <500 mg/day. In addition, null associations were observed for dietary and total vitamin D intake and pancreatic cancer risk. Findings were consistent within sex, smoking status, and BMI strata or when the case definition was limited to pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Overall, these findings do not support the hypothesis that consumption of dairy foods, calcium, or vitamin D during adulthood is associated with pancreatic cancer risk.

3 Article The Association Between Body Mass Index and Pancreatic Cancer: Variation by Age at Body Mass Index Assessment. 2020

Jacobs, Eric J / Newton, Christina C / Patel, Alpa V / Stevens, Victoria L / Islami, Farhad / Flanders, W Dana / Gapstur, Susan M. ·Behavioral and Epidemiology Research Group, American Cancer Society, Atlanta, Georgia. · Surveillance and Health Service Research, American Cancer Society, Atlanta, Georgia. · Department of Epidemiology, Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia. ·Am J Epidemiol · Pubmed #31602476.

ABSTRACT: Higher body mass index (BMI; weight (kg)/height (m)2) is associated with increased risk of pancreatic cancer in epidemiologic studies. However, BMI has usually been assessed at older ages, potentially underestimating the full impact of excess weight. We examined the association between BMI and pancreatic cancer mortality among 963,317 adults who were aged 30-89 years at their enrollment in Cancer Prevention Study II in 1982. During follow-up through 2014, a total of 8,354 participants died of pancreatic cancer. Hazard ratios per 5 BMI units, calculated using proportional hazards regression, declined steadily with age at BMI assessment, from 1.25 (95% confidence interval: 1.18, 1.33) in persons aged 30-49 years at enrollment to 1.13 (95% confidence interval: 1.02, 1.26) in those aged 70-89 years at enrollment (P for trend = 0.005). On the basis of a hazard ratio of 1.25 per 5 BMI units at age 45 years, we estimated that 28% of US pancreatic cancer deaths among persons born in 1970-1974 will be attributable to BMI ≥25.0-nearly twice the equivalent proportion of those born in the 1930s, a birth cohort with much lower BMI in middle age. These results suggest that BMI before age 50 years is more strongly associated with pancreatic cancer risk than BMI at older ages, and they underscore the importance of avoiding excess weight gain before middle age for preventing this highly fatal cancer.

4 Article The Association of Body Mass Index with Pancreatic Cancer: Variation by Age at Body Mass Index Assessment. 2019

Jacobs, Eric J / Newton, Christina C / Patel, Alpa V / Stevens, Victoria L / Islami, Farhad / Flanders, W Dana / Gapstur, Susan M. ·Behavioral and Epidemiology Research Group, American Cancer Society, Atlanta, GA. · Surveillance and Health Services Research, American Cancer Society, Atlanta, GA. · Rolins School of Public Health. Emory Univesity, Atlanta, GA. ·Am J Epidemiol · Pubmed #31647510.

ABSTRACT: Higher body mass index (BMI) is associated with increased risk of pancreatic cancer in epidemiologic studies but BMI has usually been assessed at older ages, potentially underestimating the full impact of excess weight. We examined the association between BMI and pancreatic cancer mortality among 963,317 adults aged 30-89 years at enrollment into Cancer Prevention Study-II in 1982. During follow-up through 2014, 8,354 participants died of pancreatic cancer. Hazard ratios (HRs) per 5 BMI-units, calculated using proportional hazards regression, declined steadily with age at BMI assessment, from 1.25 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.18, 1.33) in those aged 30-49 at enrollment to 1.13 (95% CI 1.02, 1.26) in those aged 70-89 (p-trend=0.005). Based on a HR of 1.25 per 5 BMI-units at age 45, we estimate 28% of US pancreatic cancer deaths in those born from 1970-74 will be attributable to BMI>25, nearly twice the equivalent proportion in those born in the 1930s, a birth cohort with much lower BMI in middle age. These results suggest BMI before age 50 is more strongly associated with pancreatic cancer risk than BMI at older ages and underscore the importance of avoiding excess weight gain before middle age for preventing this highly fatal cancer.

5 Article Meat consumption and pancreatic cancer risk among men and women in the Cancer Prevention Study-II Nutrition Cohort. 2018

McCullough, Marjorie L / Jacobs, Eric J / Shah, Roma / Campbell, Peter T / Wang, Ying / Hartman, Terryl J / Gapstur, Susan M. ·Epidemiology Research Program, American Cancer Society, 250 Williams St. NE, Atlanta, GA, 30303-1002, USA. marji.mccullough@cancer.org. · Epidemiology Research Program, American Cancer Society, 250 Williams St. NE, Atlanta, GA, 30303-1002, USA. · Department of Epidemiology, Rollins School of Public Health, Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, GA, USA. ·Cancer Causes Control · Pubmed #29185090.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: Prospective cohort studies suggest that red and processed meat consumption is associated with increased risk of pancreatic cancer among men, but not women. However, evidence is limited, and less evidence exists for other types of meat. METHODS: Cox proportional hazards regression was used to estimate multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios (HR) for the association of meat consumption, by type, with pancreatic cancer risk among 138,266 men and women in the Cancer Prevention Study-II Nutrition Cohort. Diet was assessed at baseline in 1992, and 10 years earlier, at enrollment into the parent CPS-II mortality cohort. 1,156 pancreatic cancers were verified through 2013. RESULTS: Red meat, processed meat, and fish intake at baseline were not associated with pancreatic cancer risk. However, for long-term red and processed meat consumption (highest quartiles in 1982 and 1992, vs. lowest quartiles), risk appeared different in men [hazard ratio (HR) 1.32, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.90, 1.95] and women (HR 0.72, 95% CI 0.47, 1.10, p heterogeneity by sex = 0.05). Poultry consumption in 1992 was associated with increased pancreatic cancer risk (HR 1.27, 95% CI 1.04, 1.55, p trend = 0.01, top vs. bottom quintile). CONCLUSIONS: The associations of meat consumption with pancreatic cancer risk remain unclear and further research, particularly of long-term intake, is warranted.

6 Article Human oral microbiome and prospective risk for pancreatic cancer: a population-based nested case-control study. 2018

Fan, Xiaozhou / Alekseyenko, Alexander V / Wu, Jing / Peters, Brandilyn A / Jacobs, Eric J / Gapstur, Susan M / Purdue, Mark P / Abnet, Christian C / Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael / Miller, George / Ravel, Jacques / Hayes, Richard B / Ahn, Jiyoung. ·Department of Population Health, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York, USA. · Departments of Public Health Sciences and Oral Health Sciences, Biomedical Informatics Center, Program for Human Microbiome Research, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina, USA. · Epidemiology Research Program, American Cancer Society, Atlanta, Georgia, USA. · Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA. · Department of Surgery, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York, USA. · Department of Cell Biology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York, USA. · NYU Perlmutter Cancer Center, New York, New York, USA. · Institute for Genome Sciences, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. ·Gut · Pubmed #27742762.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: A history of periodontal disease and the presence of circulating antibodies to selected oral pathogens have been associated with increased risk of pancreatic cancer; however, direct relationships of oral microbes with pancreatic cancer have not been evaluated in prospective studies. We examine the relationship of oral microbiota with subsequent risk of pancreatic cancer in a large nested case-control study. DESIGN: We selected 361 incident adenocarcinoma of pancreas and 371 matched controls from two prospective cohort studies, the American Cancer Society Cancer Prevention Study II and the National Cancer Institute Prostate, Lung, Colorectal and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial. From pre-diagnostic oral wash samples, we characterised the composition of the oral microbiota using bacterial 16S ribosomal RNA (16S rRNA) gene sequencing. The associations between oral microbiota and risk of pancreatic cancer, controlling for the random effect of cohorts and other covariates, were examined using traditional and L1-penalised least absolute shrinkage and selection operator logistic regression. RESULTS: Carriage of oral pathogens, CONCLUSIONS: This study provides supportive evidence that oral microbiota may play a role in the aetiology of pancreatic cancer.

7 Article Association of alcohol intake with pancreatic cancer mortality in never smokers. 2011

Gapstur, Susan M / Jacobs, Eric J / Deka, Anusila / McCullough, Marjorie L / Patel, Alpa V / Thun, Michael J. ·Epidemiology Research Program, American Cancer Society, 250 Williams St NW, Atlanta, GA 30303-1002, USA. susan.gapstur@cancer.org ·Arch Intern Med · Pubmed #21403041.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: An international panel of experts characterized the evidence linking alcoholic beverage consumption to pancreatic cancer as limited. Primary concerns include inconsistent results from underpowered studies, residual confounding by smoking, and the question of whether the association varies by type of alcoholic beverage. METHODS: The association of alcohol intake with pancreatic cancer mortality was examined using data from the Cancer Prevention Study II, a prospective study of US adults 30 years and older. Alcohol consumption was self-reported on a 4-page questionnaire in 1982. Based on follow-up through December 31, 2006, there were 6847 pancreatic cancer deaths among 1,030,467 participants. Multivariable-adjusted relative risks (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were computed using Cox proportional hazards regression analysis controlling for age, sex, race/ethnicity, education, marital status, body mass index, family history of pancreatic cancer, and personal history of gallstones, diabetes mellitus, or smoking. RESULTS: The RRs (95% CIs) of pancreatic cancer mortality associated with current intake of less than 1, 1, 2, 3, and 4 or more drinks per day compared with nondrinkers were 1.06 (0.99-1.13), 0.99 (0.90-1.08), 1.06 (0.97-1.17), 1.25 (1.11-1.42), and 1.17 (1.06-1.29), respectively (P< .001 for trend). Consumption of 3 or more drinks per day was associated with pancreatic cancer mortality in never smokers (RR, 1.36; 95% CI, 1.13-1.62) and in ever smokers (RR, 1.16; 95% CI, 1.06-1.27). This association was observed for consumption of liquor (RR, 1.32; 95% CI, 1.10-1.57) but not beer (RR, 1.08; 95% CI, 0.90-1.30) or wine (RR, 1.09; 95% CI, 0.79-1.49). CONCLUSION: These results strengthen the evidence that alcohol consumption, specifically liquor consumption of 3 or more drinks per day, increases pancreatic cancer mortality independent of smoking.

8 Article Jewish ethnicity and pancreatic cancer mortality in a large U.S. cohort. 2011

Eldridge, Ronald C / Gapstur, Susan M / Newton, Christina C / Goodman, Michael / Patel, Alpa V / Jacobs, Eric J. ·Department of Epidemiology, Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University, 1518 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30322, USA. reldrid@emory.edu ·Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev · Pubmed #21278327.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: An association between Jewish ethnicity and pancreatic cancer risk was suggested by analyses comparing pancreatic cancer mortality rates between Jews and non-Jews in New York in the 1950s. These analyses lacked information on potential confounding factors and the association between Jewish ethnicity and pancreatic cancer has not been examined in any contemporary U.S. population or in any cohort study. METHODS: We examined the association between Jewish ethnicity and pancreatic cancer mortality among approximately 1 million participants in the Cancer Prevention Study II cohort. Participants completed a questionnaire at enrollment in 1982 which included information on religion, smoking, obesity, and diabetes. During follow-up through 2006, there were 6,727 pancreatic cancer deaths, including 480 among Jewish participants. Proportional hazards modeling was used to calculate multivariable rate ratios (RR). RESULTS: After adjusting for age, sex, smoking, body mass index, and diabetes, pancreatic cancer mortality was higher among Jewish participants than among non-Jewish whites (RR = 1.43; 95% CI, 1.30-1.57). In analyses by birthplace, RRs were 1.59 (95% CI, 1.31-1.93) for North American-born Jews with North American-born parents, 1.43 (95% CI, 1.27-1.61) for North American-born Jews with 1 or more parents born outside North America, and 1.03 (0.73, 1.44) for Jews born outside North America (P(heterogeneity) = 0.07). CONCLUSIONS: These results support a higher risk of developing pancreatic cancer among U.S. Jews that is not explained by established risk factors. IMPACT: Future studies may clarify the role of specific environmental or genetic factors responsible for higher risk among U.S. Jews.