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Pancreatic Neoplasms: HELP
Articles by Yu-Tang Gao
Based on 20 articles published since 2010
(Why 20 articles?)
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Between 2010 and 2020, Y. T. Gao wrote the following 20 articles about Pancreatic Neoplasms.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Article A prospective evaluation of serum kynurenine metabolites and risk of pancreatic cancer. 2018

Huang, Joyce Y / Butler, Lesley M / Midttun, Øivind / Ulvik, Arve / Wang, Renwei / Jin, Aizhen / Gao, Yu-Tang / Ueland, Per M / Koh, Woon-Puay / Yuan, Jian-Min. ·Division of Cancer Control and Population Science, UPMC Hillman Cancer Center, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States of America. · Department of Epidemiology, Graduate School of Public Health, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States of America. · Bevital A/S, Bergen, Norway. · Department of Clinical Science, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway. · National Registry of Diseases Office, Health Promotion Board, Singapore, Republic of Singapore. · Department of Epidemiology, Shanghai Cancer Institute/Shanghai Jiaotong University, Shanghai, China. · Laboratory of Clinical Biochemistry, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway. · Duke-NUS Graduate Medical School Singapore, Singapore, Republic of Singapore. · Saw Swee Hock School of Public Health, National University of Singapore, Singapore, Republic of Singapore. ·PLoS One · Pubmed #29734388.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Serum pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP), the active form of vitamin B6, is associated with reduced risk of pancreatic cancer. Data on functional measures of vitamin B6 status and risk of pancreatic cancer is lacking. METHODS: A nested case-control study involving 187 incident cases of pancreatic cancer and 362 individually matched controls were conducted within two prospective cohorts to evaluate the associations between kynurenine metabolites in pre-diagnostic serum samples and risk of pancreatic cancer. RESULTS: Higher serum concentrations of 3-hydroxyanthranilic acid (HAA) and the HAA:3-hydroxykynurenine (HK) ratio (a measure for in vivo functional status of PLP) were significantly associated with reduced risk of pancreatic cancer. Compared with the lowest tertile, odds ratios (95% confidence intervals) of pancreatic cancer for the highest tertile was 0.62 (0.39, 1.01) for HAA, and 0.59 (0.35-0.98) for the HAA:HK ratio, after adjustment for potential confounders and serum PLP (both Ps for trend<0.05). The kynurenine:tryptophan ratio or neopterin was not significantly associated with pancreatic cancer risk. CONCLUSIONS: The inverse association between HAA or the HAA:HK ratio and risk of pancreatic cancer supports the notion that functional status of PLP may be a more important measure than circulating PLP alone for the development of pancreatic cancer.

2 Article Prospective metabolomics study identifies potential novel blood metabolites associated with pancreatic cancer risk. 2018

Shu, Xiang / Zheng, Wei / Yu, Danxia / Li, Hong-Lan / Lan, Qing / Yang, Gong / Cai, Hui / Ma, Xiao / Rothman, Nathaniel / Gao, Yu-Tang / Jia, Wei / Xiang, Yong-Bing / Shu, Xiao-Ou. ·Division of Epidemiology, Department of Medicine, Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN. · State Key Laboratory of Oncogene and Related Genes & Department of Epidemiology, Shanghai Cancer Institute, Renji Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, China. · Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, Occupational and Environmental Epidemiology Branch, National Cancer Institute, Rockville, MD. · Cancer Epidemiology Program, University of Hawaii Cancer Center, Honolulu, HI. · Center for Translational Medicine, and Shanghai Key Laboratory of Diabetes Mellitus, Shanghai Jiao Tong University Affiliated Sixth People's Hospital, Shanghai, 200233, China. ·Int J Cancer · Pubmed #29717485.

ABSTRACT: Using a metabolomics approach, we systematically searched for circulating metabolite biomarkers for pancreatic cancer risk in a case-control study nested within two prospective Shanghai cohorts. Included in our study were 226 incident pancreatic cancer cases and their individually-matched controls. Untargeted mass spectrometry platforms were used to measure metabolites in blood samples collected prior to cancer diagnosis. Conditional logistic regression was performed to assess the associations of metabolites with pancreatic cancer risk. We identified 10 metabolites associated with pancreatic cancer, after accounting for multiple comparisons (the Benjamini-Hochberg false discovery rate <0.05). The majority of the identified metabolites were glycerophospholipids (ORs per SD increase: 0.44-2.32; p values: 7.2 × 10

3 Article Physical Activity and Pancreatic Cancer Risk among Urban Chinese: Results from Two Prospective Cohort Studies. 2018

Wu, Lang / Zheng, Wei / Xiang, Yong-Bing / Gao, Yu-Tang / Li, Hong-Lan / Cai, Hui / Shu, Xiao-Ou. ·Division of Epidemiology, Department of Medicine, Vanderbilt Epidemiology Center, Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee. · State Key Laboratory of Oncogene and Related Genes & Department of Epidemiology, Shanghai Cancer Institute, Renji Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, China. · Division of Epidemiology, Department of Medicine, Vanderbilt Epidemiology Center, Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee. xiao-ou.shu@vanderbilt.edu. ·Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev · Pubmed #29475964.

ABSTRACT:

4 Article Prospective study of urinary prostaglandin E2 metabolite and pancreatic cancer risk. 2017

Cui, Yong / Shu, Xiao-Ou / Li, Hong-Lan / Yang, Gong / Wen, Wanqing / Gao, Yu-Tang / Cai, Qiuyin / Rothman, Nathaniel / Yin, Hui-Yong / Lan, Qing / Xiang, Yong-Bing / Zheng, Wei. ·Division of Epidemiology, Department of Medicine, Vanderbilt Epidemiology Center, Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, 2525 West End Avenue, 8th Floor, Nashville, TN. · Department of Epidemiology, Shanghai Cancer Institute, Renji Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, China. · Division of Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD. · Institute for Nutritional Sciences, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai, China. ·Int J Cancer · Pubmed #28815606.

ABSTRACT: The cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) pathway is upregulated in many pancreatic cancer cells, and it is believed that carcinogenetic effects of COX-2 upregulation are largely through prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) overproduction. We tested this hypothesis by evaluating the association between urinary PGE2 metabolites (PGE-M), a biomarker of in vivo PGE2 overproduction, and pancreatic cancer risk. We conducted a case-control study with 722 subjects (239 cases and 483 controls) nested within two prospective cohort studies, the Shanghai Women's Health Study (SWHS) and Shanghai Men's Health Study (SMHS). Pre-diagnosis urine samples were measured for PGE-M using a liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometric method. Conditional logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95%CI), with adjustment for potential confounders. Compared to those with the lowest urine level of PGE-M (the first quartile), individuals with higher urine levels of PGE-M had an increased risk of developing pancreatic cancer, with adjusted ORs (95%CI) of 1.63 (0.98-2.73), 1.55 (0.90-2.69) and 1.94 (1.07-3.51), for the second to the fourth quartile groups, respectively (p for trend = 0.054). This dose-response positive association was more evident among those who had BMI <25 kg/m

5 Article Aspirin Use and Reduced Risk of Pancreatic Cancer. 2017

Risch, Harvey A / Lu, Lingeng / Streicher, Samantha A / Wang, Jing / Zhang, Wei / Ni, Quanxing / Kidd, Mark S / Yu, Herbert / Gao, Yu-Tang. ·Department of Chronic Disease Epidemiology, Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, Connecticut. harvey.risch@yale.edu. · Department of Chronic Disease Epidemiology, Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, Connecticut. · Department of Epidemiology, Shanghai Cancer Institute, Renji Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, China. · Department of Pancreatic and Hepatobiliary Surgery, Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center, Shanghai, China. · Wren Laboratories LLC, Branford, Connecticut. · Epidemiology Program, University of Hawaii Cancer Center, Honolulu, Hawaii. ·Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev · Pubmed #27999143.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Few options besides the avoidance of smoking and obesity are available to prevent pancreatic cancer. The association between aspirin use and risk of pancreatic cancer has been inconsistent across studies. METHODS: We performed a population-based study of 761 case and 794 control subjects frequency matched on sex and age during 2006 to 2011 in Shanghai, China. Participants were asked about episodes of regular use of aspirin, tablets per day or week, and ages that the use started and stopped. Data were analyzed by unconditional logistic regression, with adjustments for age, sex, education, body mass index, years of cigarette smoking, cigarettes smoked per day, Helicobacter pylori CagA seropositivity, ABO blood group, and history of diabetes mellitus. Meta-regression was carried out to summarize the literature. RESULTS: Ever-regular use of aspirin was associated with lowered risk of pancreatic cancer: OR = 0.54; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.40-0.73; P = 10 CONCLUSIONS: Regular use of aspirin thus appears to reduce risk of pancreatic cancer by almost half. IMPACT: People who take aspirin for prevention of other diseases likely also reduce their risk of pancreatic cancer. Aside from benefits for both cardiovascular disease and certain cancers, long-term aspirin use entails some risks of bleeding complications, which necessitates risk-benefit analysis for individual decisions about use. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 26(1); 68-74. ©2016 AACR.

6 Article Serum B 2016

Huang, Joyce Y / Butler, Lesley M / Midttun, Øivind / Koh, Woon-Puay / Ueland, Per M / Wang, Renwei / Jin, Aizhen / Gao, Yu-Tang / Yuan, Jian-Min. ·Division of Cancer Control and Population Science, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, UPMC Cancer Pavilion, 5150 Centre Avenue - Suite 4C, Pittsburgh, PA, 15232, USA. · Department of Epidemiology, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, USA. · Division of Cancer Control and Population Science, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, UPMC Cancer Pavilion, 5150 Centre Avenue - Suite 4C, Pittsburgh, PA, 15232, USA. butlerl3@upmc.edu. · Department of Epidemiology, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, USA. butlerl3@upmc.edu. · Bevital A/S, Bergen, Norway. · Duke-NUS Medical School, National University of Singapore, Singapore, Singapore. · Saw Swee Hock School of Public Health, National University of Singapore, Singapore, Singapore. · Department of Clinical Science, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway. · Laboratory of Clinical Biochemistry, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway. · National Registry of Diseases Office, Health Promotion Board, Singapore, Singapore. · Shanghai Jiaotong University, Shanghai, China. ·Cancer Causes Control · Pubmed #27830400.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Vitamin B METHODS: To determine whether levels of serum B RESULTS: The median (5th-95th percentiles) concentrations of serum PLP among control subjects of the Shanghai and Singapore cohorts were 25.7 (10.0-91.7) nmol/L and 58.1 (20.8-563.0) nmol/L, respectively. In pooled analyses, high serum PLP was associated with a reduced risk of pancreatic cancer (P for trend = 0.048); the adjusted odds ratio for the highest category of PLP (>52.4 nmol/L) was 0.46 (95% CI 0.23, 0.92) compared to vitamin B CONCLUSIONS: Higher concentrations of PLP may protect against the development of pancreatic cancer. The protective effect may be more apparent in populations with low concentrations of circulating vitamin B

7 Article Menstrual and Reproductive Factors, Hormone Use, and Risk of Pancreatic Cancer: Analysis From the International Pancreatic Cancer Case-Control Consortium (PanC4). 2016

Lujan-Barroso, Leila / Zhang, Wei / Olson, Sara H / Gao, Yu-Tang / Yu, Herbert / Baghurst, Peter A / Bracci, Paige M / Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas / Foretová, Lenka / Gallinger, Steven / Holcatova, Ivana / Janout, Vladimír / Ji, Bu-Tian / Kurtz, Robert C / La Vecchia, Carlo / Lagiou, Pagona / Li, Donghui / Miller, Anthony B / Serraino, Diego / Zatonski, Witold / Risch, Harvey A / Duell, Eric J. ·From the *Unit of Nutrition and Cancer, Cancer Epidemiology Research Program, Catalan Institute of Oncology (ICO), Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute (IDIBELL), Barcelona, Spain; †Department of Epidemiology, Shanghai Cancer Institute and Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, China; ‡Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY; §Epidemiology Program, University of Hawaii Cancer Center, Honolulu, HI; ∥Public Health, Women's and Children's Hospital, Adelaide, SA, Australia; ¶University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA; #National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven; **Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands; ††Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, UK; ‡‡Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia; §§Department of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, Masaryk Memorial Cancer Institute, Institute and MF MU, Brno, Czech Republic; ∥∥University Health Network, Department of Surgery, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada; ¶¶Institute of Hygiene and Epidemiology, 1st Faculty of Medicine, Charles University in Prague, Prague; ##Department of Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Palacky University, Olomouc, Czech Republic; ***National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD; †††Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY; ‡‡‡Department of Clinical Sciences and Community Health, Università degli Studi di Milano, Milan, Italy; §§§Department of Hygiene, Epidemiology and Medical Statistics, School of Medicine, University of Athens, Greece; ∥∥∥Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA; ¶¶¶M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, University of Texas, Houston, TX; ###Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada; ****Unit of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, CRO Aviano, National Cancer Institute, IRCCS, Aviano, Italy; ††††Cancer Center and Institute of Oncology, Warsaw, Poland; and ‡‡‡‡Department of Chronic Disease Epidemiology, Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, CT. ·Pancreas · Pubmed #27088489.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: We aimed to evaluate the relation between menstrual and reproductive factors, exogenous hormones, and risk of pancreatic cancer (PC). METHODS: Eleven case-control studies within the International Pancreatic Cancer Case-control Consortium took part in the present study, including in total 2838 case and 4748 control women. Pooled estimates of odds ratios (ORs) and their 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using a 2-step logistic regression model and adjusting for relevant covariates. RESULTS: An inverse OR was observed in women who reported having had hysterectomy (ORyesvs.no, 0.78; 95% CI, 0.67-0.91), remaining significant in postmenopausal women and never-smoking women, adjusted for potential PC confounders. A mutually adjusted model with the joint effect for hormone replacement therapy (HRT) and hysterectomy showed significant inverse associations with PC in women who reported having had hysterectomy with HRT use (OR, 0.64; 95% CI, 0.48-0.84). CONCLUSIONS: Our large pooled analysis suggests that women who have had a hysterectomy may have reduced risk of PC. However, we cannot rule out that the reduced risk could be due to factors or indications for having had a hysterectomy. Further investigation of risk according to HRT use and reason for hysterectomy may be necessary.

8 Article Urinary prostaglandin E2 metabolite and pancreatic cancer risk: case-control study in urban Shanghai. 2015

Zhao, Jing / Wang, Jing / Du, Jinfeng / Xu, Hongli / Zhang, Wei / Ni, Quan-Xing / Yu, Herbert / Risch, Harvey A / Gao, Yu-Tang / Gao, Ying. ·Key Laboratory of Nutrition and Metabolism, Institute for Nutritional Sciences, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai, China. · Department of Epidemiology, Shanghai Cancer Institute, Renji Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiaotong University, Shanghai, China. · Department of Pancreatic and Hepatobiliary Surgery, Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center, Shanghai, China. · Epidemiology Program, University of Hawaii Cancer Center, Honolulu, HI, United States of America. · Department of Chronic Disease Epidemiology, Yale School of Public Health and Yale Cancer Center, New Haven, CT, United States of America. ·PLoS One · Pubmed #25679523.

ABSTRACT: Pancreatic cancer has been increasing in importance in Shanghai over the last four decades. The etiology of the disease is still unclear. Evidence suggests that the COX-2 pathway, an important component of inflammation, may be involved in the disease. We aimed to evaluate the association between urinary prostaglandin E2 metabolite (PGE-M) level and risk of pancreatic cancer. From a recent population-based case-control study in Shanghai, 200 pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma cases and 200 gender- and age- frequency matched controls were selected for the present analysis. Urinary PGE-M was measured with a liquid chromatography/mass spectrometric assay. Adjusted unconditional logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). A positive association was observed between PGE-M leve and pancreatic cancer risk: OR = 1.63 (95% CI 1.01-2.63) for the third tertile compared to the first. Though the interactions were not statistically significant, the associations tended to be stronger among subjects with diabetes history (OR = 3.32; 95% CI 1.20-9.19) and higher meat intake (OR = 2.12; 95% CI 1.10-4.06). The result suggests that higher urinary PGE-M level may be associated with increased risk of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma.

9 Article Plasma metabolite biomarkers for the detection of pancreatic cancer. 2015

Xie, Guoxiang / Lu, Lingeng / Qiu, Yunping / Ni, Quanxing / Zhang, Wei / Gao, Yu-Tang / Risch, Harvey A / Yu, Herbert / Jia, Wei. ·Center for Translational Medicine, Shanghai Key Laboratory of Diabetes Mellitus, Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Shanghai Jiao Tong University Affiliated Sixth People's Hospital , Shanghai 200233, China. ·J Proteome Res · Pubmed #25429707.

ABSTRACT: Patients with pancreatic cancer (PC) are usually diagnosed at late stages, when the disease is nearly incurable. Sensitive and specific markers are critical for supporting diagnostic and therapeutic strategies. The aim of this study was to use a metabonomics approach to identify potential plasma biomarkers that can be further developed for early detection of PC. In this study, plasma metabolites of newly diagnosed PC patients (n = 100) and age- and gender-matched controls (n = 100) from Connecticut (CT), USA, and the same number of cases and controls from Shanghai (SH), China, were profiled using combined gas and liquid chromatography mass spectrometry. The metabolites consistently expressed in both CT and SH samples were used to identify potential markers, and the diagnostic performance of the candidate markers was tested in two sample sets. A diagnostic model was constructed using a panel of five metabolites including glutamate, choline, 1,5-anhydro-d-glucitol, betaine, and methylguanidine, which robustly distinguished PC patients in CT from controls with high sensitivity (97.7%) and specificity (83.1%) (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve [AUC] = 0.943, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.908-0.977). This panel of metabolites was then tested with the SH data set, yielding satisfactory accuracy (AUC = 0.835; 95% CI = 0.777-0.893), with a sensitivity of 77.4% and specificity of 75.8%. This model achieved a sensitivity of 84.8% in the PC patients at stages 0, 1, and 2 in CT and 77.4% in the PC patients at stages 1 and 2 in SH. Plasma metabolic signatures show promise as biomarkers for early detection of PC.

10 Article [A case-control study on the association between urinary levels of isothiocyanates and the risk of pancreatic cancer]. 2014

Wang, Jing / Han, Lihua / Zhang, Wei / Wang, Jing / Ni, Quanxing / Shen, Mingchang / Gao, Yutang. ·Department of Epidemiology, Shanghai Cancer Institute, Renji Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200032, China. · Email: ytgao@vip.sina.com. ·Zhonghua Yu Fang Yi Xue Za Zhi · Pubmed #24844828.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To investigate the association between urinary levels of isothiocyanates (ITCs) and the risk of pancreatic cancer in urban Shanghai. METHODS: A case-control study has been conducted in urban Shanghai. The cases (from December 2006 to December 2008) were identified through an newly established "instant case reporting" system. The high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method was applied to determine the urinary levels of isothiocyanates in 390 cases and 414 controls. A food-frequency questionnaire was administered to estimate cruciferous vegetables consumption and dietary ITC exposure.Non-conditional logistic regression model was used to analyze the relationship between dietary and urinary levels of isothiocyanates and the risk of pancreatic cancer. RESULTS: The cruciferous vegetables intake and ITC consumption, urinary ITC levels (median (P25, P75)) were 95.0 (66.9, 135.8) g/d, 11.0 (7.1, 16.0) µmol/d, 0.95 (0.12, 2.92) µmol/g Cr respectively in cases, all lower than those in controls, separately 107.4 (80.1, 154.1) g/d, 12.3 (8.0, 18.0) µmol/d, 1.78 (0.53, 5.28) µmol/g Cr. The differences were statistically significant (t = 3.75, 3.03, 4.40, all P values <0.01). Urinary levels of ITCs in controls were correlated with cruciferous vegetables consumption and dietary ITC exposure (r = 0.189, 0.201, all P values <0.01). There was inverse association between urinary ITCs and the risk of pancreatic cancer after adjusting for possible confounding factors such as age, sex, history of diabetes and pancreatitis. Compared with the first tertile (<0.825 µmol/g Cr), the odds ratio (95%CI) for the second (0.825-3.342 µmol/g Cr) and third tertiles ( ≥ 3.343 µmol/g Cr) were 0.69 (0.49-0.97) and 0.47(0.33-0.68), respectively, Ptrend<0.01.High levels of cruciferous vegetables or ITC consumption were associated with a reduced risk of pancreatic cancer (all P trend <0.05). CONCLUSION: indicated that high levels of dietary ITC exposure might reduce the risk of pancreatic cancer.

11 Article Cancer statistics: current diagnosis and treatment of pancreatic cancer in Shanghai, China. 2014

Long, Jiang / Luo, Guo-pei / Xiao, Zhi-wen / Liu, Zu-qiang / Guo, Meng / Liu, Liang / Liu, Chen / Xu, Jin / Gao, Yu-tang / Zheng, Ying / Wu, Chunxiao / Ni, Quan-xing / Li, Min / Yu, Xianjun. ·Department of Pancreatic and Hepatobiliary Surgery, Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center, Shanghai 200032, PR China; Department of Oncology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032, PR China; Pancreatic Cancer Institute, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032, PR China. · Department of Epidemiology, Shanghai Cancer Institute, Shanghai 200032, PR China. · Department of Oncology, Shanghai Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Shanghai 200336, PR China. · Department of Pancreatic and Hepatobiliary Surgery, Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center, Shanghai 200032, PR China; Department of Oncology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032, PR China; Pancreatic Cancer Institute, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032, PR China; The Vivian L. Smith Department of Neurosurgery, The University of Texas Medical School at Houston, Houston, TX 77030, USA. Electronic address: min.li@uth.tmc.edu. · Department of Pancreatic and Hepatobiliary Surgery, Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center, Shanghai 200032, PR China; Department of Oncology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032, PR China; Pancreatic Cancer Institute, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032, PR China. Electronic address: yuxianjun88@hotmail.com. ·Cancer Lett · Pubmed #24462819.

ABSTRACT: A multi-center population-based study in Shanghai, China was performed to explore the implications for the management of pancreatic cancer by comparing diagnosis and survival rates. Novel imaging modalities including MRI (13.9%), PET/CT (1.8%), and EUS (5.6%) were not widely used in our population. Only 39.7% of cases were histologically verified (surgery with histologic diagnosis 31.0%, cytological diagnosis 8.7%, surgery without histologic diagnosis 12.1%, and clinical diagnosis 48.2%). Overall, 30.0% of patients underwent curative-intent operation, and only 9.8% of patients received comprehensive treatment. The prognosis of pancreatic cancer patients was significantly better for patients who were treated in high-volume centers than in low-volume centers. We propose that more effort should be put on novel diagnostic modalities, histological confirmation, and comprehensive treatment in China. Multidisciplinary teams specialized in pancreatic cancer therapy in high-volume centers are urgently needed.

12 Article Helicobacter pylori seropositivities and risk of pancreatic carcinoma. 2014

Risch, Harvey A / Lu, Lingeng / Kidd, Mark S / Wang, Jing / Zhang, Wei / Ni, Quanxing / Gao, Yu-Tang / Yu, Herbert. ·Authors' Affiliations: Department of Chronic Disease Epidemiology, Yale School of Public Health; Department of Surgery, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut; Department of Epidemiology, Shanghai Cancer Institute, Jiao Tong University; Department of Pancreas and Hepatobiliary Surgery, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai, China; and Epidemiology Program, University of Hawaii Cancer Center, Honolulu, Hawaii. ·Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev · Pubmed #24234587.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Pathophysiologic actions of Helicobacter pylori colonization on gastric acidity have been hypothesized to modulate the effect of pancreatic carcinogens, through CagA-negative organism strain type, hyperchlorhydria and increased risk of pancreatic cancer, or CagA-positive strain, hypochlorhydria and decreased risk of pancreatic cancer. We aimed to determine H. pylori strain-specific associations with pancreatic cancer in a population in which colonization by CagA-positive strains is common. METHODS: We carried out a large population-based case-control study of pancreatic carcinoma in Shanghai, China. Venipuncture specimens were obtained from a representative sample of 761 case patients and 794 randomly selected control subjects matched by category of age and gender. Antibody seropositivity for H. pylori and its virulence protein CagA were determined by commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent IgG assays. RESULTS: Compared with individuals seronegative for both H. pylori and CagA, decreased pancreas-cancer risk was seen for CagA seropositivity [adjusted OR, 0.68; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.54-0.84], whereas some increased risk was suggested for CagA-negative H. pylori seropositivity (OR, 1.28; 95% CI, 0.76-2.13). No risk interactions were observed between CagA seropositivity and gender, cigarette smoking, or age-21 body mass index. CONCLUSIONS: Similar to what has been seen in animal models, our results provide suggestive evidence in humans for the involvement of gastric acidity, through its bidirectional modification according to colonization by H. pylori CagA strain type, in the risk of pancreatic carcinoma. IMPACT: H. pylori colonization may have diverse effects on cancer risk, depending on the organism strain type as well as on the particular cancer site.

13 Article Re-evaluation of ABO gene polymorphisms detected in a genome-wide association study and risk of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma in a Chinese population. 2014

Xu, Hong-Li / Cheng, Jia-Rong / Zhang, Wei / Wang, Jing / Yu, Herbert / Ni, Quan-Xing / Risch, Harvey A / Gao, Yu-Tang. ·Department of Epidemiology, Shanghai Cancer Institute, Renji Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200032, P. R. China. ytgao@vip.sina.com. ·Chin J Cancer · Pubmed #23816557.

ABSTRACT: Pancreatic cancer is a fatal malignancy with an increasing incidence in Shanghai, China. A genome-wide association study (GWAS) and other work have shown that ABO alleles are associated with pancreatic cancer risk. We conducted a population-based case-control study involving 256 patients with pathologically confirmed pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) and 548 healthy controls in Shanghai, China, to assess the relationships between GWAS-identified ABO alleles and risk of PDAC. Carriers of the C allele of rs505922 had an increased cancer risk [adjusted odds ratio (OR) = 1.42, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.02-1.98] compared to TT carriers. The T alleles of rs495828 and rs657152 were also significantly associated with an elevated cancer risk (adjusted OR = 1.58, 95% CI: 1.17-2.14; adjusted OR = 1.51, 95% CI: 1.09-2.10). The rs630014 variant was not associated with risk. We did not find any significant gene-environment interaction with cancer risk using a multifactor dimensionality reduction (MDR) method. Haplotype analysis also showed that the haplotype CTTC was associated with an increased risk of PDAC (adjusted OR = 1.46, 95% CI: 1.12-1.91) compared with haplotype TGGT. GWAS-identified ABO variants are thus also associated with risk of PDAC in the Chinese population.

14 Article Ulcer, gastric surgery and pancreatic cancer risk: an analysis from the International Pancreatic Cancer Case-Control Consortium (PanC4). 2013

Bosetti, C / Lucenteforte, E / Bracci, P M / Negri, E / Neale, R E / Risch, H A / Olson, S H / Gallinger, S / Miller, A B / Bueno-de-Mesquita, H B / Talamini, R / Polesel, J / Ghadirian, P / Baghurst, P A / Zatonski, W / Fontham, E / Holly, E A / Gao, Y T / Yu, H / Kurtz, R C / Cotterchio, M / Maisonneuve, P / Zeegers, M P / Duell, E J / Boffetta, P / La Vecchia, C. ·Department of Epidemiology, IRCCS, Istituto di Ricerche Farmacologiche 'Mario Negri', Milan. ·Ann Oncol · Pubmed #23970016.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Peptic ulcer and its treatments have been associated to pancreatic cancer risk, although the evidence is inconsistent. METHODS: We pooled 10 case-control studies within the Pancreatic Cancer Case-control Consortium (PanC4), including 4717 pancreatic cancer cases and 9374 controls, and estimated summary odds ratios (OR) using multivariable logistic regression models. RESULTS: The OR for pancreatic cancer was 1.10 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.98-1.23] for history of ulcer (OR = 1.08 for gastric and 0.97 for duodenal ulcer). The association was stronger for a diagnosis within 2 years before cancer diagnosis (OR = 2.43 for peptic, 1.75 for gastric, and 1.98 for duodenal ulcer). The OR was 1.53 (95% CI 1.15-2.03) for history of gastrectomy; however, the excess risk was limited to a gastrectomy within 2 years before cancer diagnosis (OR = 6.18, 95% CI 1.82-20.96), while no significant increased risk was observed for longer time since gastrectomy. No associations were observed for pharmacological treatments for ulcer, such as antacids, H2-receptor antagonists, or proton-pump inhibitors. CONCLUSIONS: This uniquely large collaborative study does not support the hypothesis that peptic ulcer and its treatment materially affect pancreatic cancer risk. The increased risk for short-term history of ulcer and gastrectomy suggests that any such association is due to increased cancer surveillance.

15 Article Dietary energy density is positively associated with risk of pancreatic cancer in urban Shanghai Chinese. 2013

Wang, Jing / Zhang, Wei / Sun, Lu / Yu, Herbert / Ni, Quan-Xing / Risch, Harvey A / Gao, Yu-Tang. ·Department of Epidemiology, Shanghai Cancer Institute, Renji Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, China. ·J Nutr · Pubmed #23902959.

ABSTRACT: Regular consumption of energy-dense foods predisposes to obesity and type 2 diabetes, both of which are suggested risk factors for pancreatic cancer. The aim of this study was to investigate whether energy density of foods is an independent risk factor for pancreatic cancer. In this population-based case-control study in urban Shanghai, 908 patients with pancreatic cancer and 1067 normal controls, aged 35-79 y, were recruited. The energy density for overall diet was calculated from food-frequency questionnaire data. Energy density (adjusted for age, sex, and total energy intake) was significantly higher in cases (6.08 ± 0.04 kJ/g) than in controls (5.91 ± 0.04 kJ/g) (P = 0.003). Energy density was positively associated with pancreatic cancer risk (OR: 1.16 per unit increase; 95% CI: 1.07, 1.27; P < 0.001). In adjusted analysis, the risk of pancreatic cancer was 72% greater (OR: 1.72; 95% CI: 1.25, 2.35; P = 0.001) in the highest quintile of energy density compared with the lowest quintile. In this case-control study, dietary energy density is positively associated with risk of pancreatic cancer. This association should be further investigated in prospective studies.

16 Article ABO blood group and risk of pancreatic cancer: a study in Shanghai and meta-analysis. 2013

Risch, Harvey A / Lu, Lingeng / Wang, Jing / Zhang, Wei / Ni, Quanxing / Gao, Yu-Tang / Yu, Herbert. ·Department of Chronic Disease Epidemiology, Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, Connecticut, USA. harvey.risch@yale.edu ·Am J Epidemiol · Pubmed #23652164.

ABSTRACT: Studies over 5 decades have examined ABO blood groups and risk of pancreatic cancer in Western, Asian, and other populations, though no systematic review has been published. We studied data from 908 pancreatic cancer cases and 1,067 population controls collected during December 2006-January 2011 in urban Shanghai, China, and reviewed the literature for all studies of this association. Random-effects meta-analysis provided summary odds ratio estimates according to blood group and by populations endemic versus nonendemic for cytotoxin-associated gene A (CagA)-positive Helicobacter pylori. In our Shanghai study, versus group O, only ABO group A was associated with risk (odds ratio (OR) = 1.60, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.27, 2.03). In 24 pooled studies, group A showed increased risk in both CagA-nonendemic and -endemic populations (ORpooled = 1.40, 95% CI: 1.32, 1.49). In nonendemic populations, groups B and AB were also associated with higher risk (OR = 1.38, 95% CI: 1.16, 1.64; and OR = 1.52, 95% CI: 1.24, 1.85, respectively). However, in CagA-endemic populations, groups B and AB were not associated with risk (OR = 1.05, 95% CI: 0.92, 1.19; and OR = 1.13, 95% CI: 0.92, 1.38, respectively). These population differences were significant. One explanation for contrasts in associations of blood groups B and AB between CagA-endemic and -nonendemic populations could involve gastric epithelial expression of A versus B antigens on colonization behaviors of CagA-positive and CagA-negative H. pylori strains.

17 Article Association of body mass index and risk of death from pancreas cancer in Asians: findings from the Asia Cohort Consortium. 2013

Lin, Yingsong / Fu, Rong / Grant, Eric / Chen, Yu / Lee, Jung Eun / Gupta, Prakash C / Ramadas, Kunnambath / Inoue, Manami / Tsugane, Shoichiro / Gao, Yu-Tang / Tamakoshi, Akiko / Shu, Xiao-Ou / Ozasa, Kotaro / Tsuji, Ichiro / Kakizaki, Masako / Tanaka, Hideo / Chen, Chien-Jen / Yoo, Keun-Young / Ahn, Yoon-Ok / Ahsan, Habibul / Pednekar, Mangesh S / Sauvaget, Catherine / Sasazuki, Shizuka / Yang, Gong / Xiang, Yong-Bing / Ohishi, Waka / Watanabe, Takashi / Nishino, Yoshikazu / Matsuo, Keitaro / You, San-Lin / Park, Sue K / Kim, Dong-Hyun / Parvez, Faruque / Rolland, Betsy / McLerran, Dale / Sinha, Rashmi / Boffetta, Paolo / Zheng, Wei / Thornquist, Mark / Feng, Ziding / Kang, Daehee / Potter, John D. ·Department of Public Health, Aichi Medical University School of Medicine, Nagakute, Aichi, Japan. linys@aichi-med-u.ac.jp ·Eur J Cancer Prev · Pubmed #23044748.

ABSTRACT: We aimed to examine the association between BMI and the risk of death from pancreas cancer in a pooled analysis of data from the Asia Cohort Consortium. The data for this pooled analysis included 883 529 men and women from 16 cohort studies in Asian countries. Cox proportional-hazards models were used to estimate the hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals for pancreas cancer mortality in relation to BMI. Seven predefined BMI categories (<18.5, 18.5-19.9, 20.0-22.4, 22.5-24.9, 25.0-27.4, 27.5-29.9, ≥ 30) were used in the analysis, with BMI of 22.5-24.9 serving as the reference group. The multivariable analyses were adjusted for known risk factors, including age, smoking, and a history of diabetes. We found no statistically significant overall association between each BMI category and the risk of death from pancreas cancer in all Asians, and obesity was unrelated to the risk of mortality in both East Asians and South Asians. Age, smoking, and a history of diabetes did not modify the association between BMI and the risk of death from pancreas cancer. In planned subgroup analyses among East Asians, an increased risk of death from pancreas cancer among those with a BMI less than 18.5 was observed for individuals with a history of diabetes; hazard ratio=2.01 (95% confidence interval: 1.01-4.00) (P for interaction=0.07). The data do not support an association between BMI and the risk of death from pancreas cancer in these Asian populations.

18 Article Green tea drinking and risk of pancreatic cancer: a large-scale, population-based case-control study in urban Shanghai. 2012

Wang, Jing / Zhang, Wei / Sun, Lu / Yu, Herbert / Ni, Quan-Xing / Risch, Harvey A / Gao, Yu-Tang. ·Department of Epidemiology, Shanghai Cancer Institute, Renji Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200032, China. ·Cancer Epidemiol · Pubmed #22944495.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Little is known about the etiology of pancreatic cancer. Epidemiological studies on tea consumption and pancreatic cancer risk have been inconclusive. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the association between green tea drinking and the risk of pancreatic cancer in urban Shanghai, China. METHODS: In this population-based case-control study conducted in urban Shanghai, 908 cases of pancreatic cancer and 1067 healthy controls were recruited. Information on tea drinking, including type of tea, amount of tea consumption, temperature of tea, and the duration of regular tea drinking, were collected via interview questionnaire. RESULTS: We examined the association of multiple tea drinking habits with the risk of pancreatic cancer. In women, regular green tea drinking was associated with 32% reduction of pancreatic cancer risk (OR 0.68, 95% CI 0.48-0.96), compared to those who did not drink tea regularly. Increased consumption and longer duration of tea drinking were both associated with reduced pancreatic cancer risk in women. Among regular tea drinkers, lower temperature of tea was associated with reduced risk of pancreatic cancer in both men and women, independent of amount or duration of tea drinking. CONCLUSIONS: Habits of green tea drinking, including regular drinking, amount of consumption, persistence of the habit, and tea temperature, may lower pancreatic cancer risk.

19 Article Cigarette smoking and pancreatic cancer: an analysis from the International Pancreatic Cancer Case-Control Consortium (Panc4). 2012

Bosetti, C / Lucenteforte, E / Silverman, D T / Petersen, G / Bracci, P M / Ji, B T / Negri, E / Li, D / Risch, H A / Olson, S H / Gallinger, S / Miller, A B / Bueno-de-Mesquita, H B / Talamini, R / Polesel, J / Ghadirian, P / Baghurst, P A / Zatonski, W / Fontham, E / Bamlet, W R / Holly, E A / Bertuccio, P / Gao, Y T / Hassan, M / Yu, H / Kurtz, R C / Cotterchio, M / Su, J / Maisonneuve, P / Duell, E J / Boffetta, P / La Vecchia, C. ·Department of Epidemiology, Istituto di Ricerche Farmacologiche Mario Negri, Milan, Italy. cristina.bosetti@marionegri.it ·Ann Oncol · Pubmed #22104574.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: To evaluate the dose-response relationship between cigarette smoking and pancreatic cancer and to examine the effects of temporal variables. METHODS: We analyzed data from 12 case-control studies within the International Pancreatic Cancer Case-Control Consortium (PanC4), including 6507 pancreatic cases and 12 890 controls. We estimated summary odds ratios (ORs) by pooling study-specific ORs using random-effects models. RESULTS: Compared with never smokers, the OR was 1.2 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.0-1.3) for former smokers and 2.2 (95% CI 1.7-2.8) for current cigarette smokers, with a significant increasing trend in risk with increasing number of cigarettes among current smokers (OR=3.4 for ≥35 cigarettes per day, P for trend<0.0001). Risk increased in relation to duration of cigarette smoking up to 40 years of smoking (OR=2.4). No trend in risk was observed for age at starting cigarette smoking, whereas risk decreased with increasing time since cigarette cessation, the OR being 0.98 after 20 years. CONCLUSIONS: This uniquely large pooled analysis confirms that current cigarette smoking is associated with a twofold increased risk of pancreatic cancer and that the risk increases with the number of cigarettes smoked and duration of smoking. Risk of pancreatic cancer reaches the level of never smokers ∼20 years after quitting.

20 Article Alcohol consumption and pancreatic cancer: a pooled analysis in the International Pancreatic Cancer Case-Control Consortium (PanC4). 2012

Lucenteforte, E / La Vecchia, C / Silverman, D / Petersen, G M / Bracci, P M / Ji, B T / Bosetti, C / Li, D / Gallinger, S / Miller, A B / Bueno-de-Mesquita, H B / Talamini, R / Polesel, J / Ghadirian, P / Baghurst, P A / Zatonski, W / Fontham, E / Bamlet, W R / Holly, E A / Gao, Y T / Negri, E / Hassan, M / Cotterchio, M / Su, J / Maisonneuve, P / Boffetta, P / Duell, E J. ·Department of Epidemiology, Istituto di Ricerche Farmacologiche Mario Negri Milan, Milan, Italy. ·Ann Oncol · Pubmed #21536662.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Heavy alcohol drinking has been related to pancreatic cancer, but the issue is still unsolved. METHODS: To evaluate the role of alcohol consumption in relation to pancreatic cancer, we conducted a pooled analysis of 10 case-control studies (5585 cases and 11,827 controls) participating in the International Pancreatic Cancer Case-Control Consortium. We computed pooled odds ratios (ORs) by estimating study-specific ORs adjusted for selected covariates and pooling them using random effects models. RESULTS: Compared with abstainers and occasional drinkers (< 1 drink per day), we observed no association for light-to-moderate alcohol consumption (≤ 4 drinks per day) and pancreatic cancer risk; however, associations were above unity for higher consumption levels (OR = 1.6, 95% confidence interval 1.2-2.2 for subjects drinking ≥ 9 drinks per day). Results did not change substantially when we evaluated associations by tobacco smoking status, or when we excluded participants who reported a history of pancreatitis, or participants whose data were based upon proxy responses. Further, no notable differences in pooled risk estimates emerged across strata of sex, age, race, study type, and study area. CONCLUSION: This collaborative-pooled analysis provides additional evidence for a positive association between heavy alcohol consumption and the risk of pancreatic cancer.