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Pancreatic Neoplasms: HELP
Articles by Giuseppe Kito Fusai
Based on 18 articles published since 2010
(Why 18 articles?)
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Between 2010 and 2020, Giuseppe Fusai wrote the following 18 articles about Pancreatic Neoplasms.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Review Treatment challenges in and outside a specialist network setting: Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumours. 2019

Lykoudis, Panagis M / Partelli, Stefano / Muffatti, Francesca / Caplin, Martyn / Falconi, Massimo / Fusai, Giuseppe K / Anonymous4960926. ·Department of Hepato-Pancreato-Biliary Surgery & Liver Transplantation, Royal Free Hospital, London, UK. Electronic address: p.lykoudis@ucl.ac.uk. · Pancreatic Surgery Unit, Pancreas Translational & Research Institute, Scientific Institute San Raffaele Hospital & University "Vita e Salute", Milan, Italy. · Department of Gastroenterology and G.I. & Tumour Neuroendocrinology, Royal Free Hospital, London, UK. · Department of Hepato-Pancreato-Biliary Surgery & Liver Transplantation, Royal Free Hospital, London, UK. ·Eur J Surg Oncol · Pubmed #29126671.

ABSTRACT: Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Neoplasms comprise a group of rare tumours with special biology, an often indolent behaviour and particular diagnostic and therapeutic requirements. The specialized biochemical tests and radiological investigations, the complexity of surgical options and the variety of medical treatments that require individual tailoring, mandate a multidisciplinary approach that can be optimally achieved through an organized network. The present study describes currents concepts in the management of these tumours as well as an insight into the challenges of delivering the pathway in and outside a Network.

2 Review Systematic review and meta-analysis on laparoscopic pancreatic resections for neuroendocrine neoplasms (PNENs). 2017

Tamburrino, Domenico / Partelli, Stefano / Renzi, Claudio / Crippa, Stefano / Muffatti, Francesca / Perali, Carolina / Parisi, Amilcare / Randolph, Justus / Fusai, Giuseppe Kito / Cirocchi, Roberto / Falconi, Massimo. ·a HPB and Liver Transplant Surgery , Royal Free Hospital, NHS Foundation Trust , London , UK. · b Pancreatic surgery Unit, Pancreas Translational & Clinical Research Center - IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute , 'Vita e Salute' University , Milan , Italy. · c Department of General and Oncologic Surgery , University of Perugia, St. Mary's Hospital , Terni , Italy. · d Department of Digestive Surgery , University of Perugia, St. Mary's Hospital , Terni , Italy. · e Tift College of Education , Mercer University , Atlanta , GA , USA. ·Expert Rev Gastroenterol Hepatol · Pubmed #27781493.

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: The safety of laparoscopic resections (LPS) of pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms (PNENs) has been well established in the literature. Areas covered: Studies conducted between January 2003 and December 2015 that reported on LPS and open surgery (OPS) were reviewed. The primary outcomes were the rate of post-operative complications and the length of hospital stay (LoS) after laparoscopic and open surgical resection. The rate of recurrence was the secondary outcome. Eleven studies were included with a total of 907 pancreatic resections for PNENs, of whom, 298 (32.8%) underwent LPS and 609 (67.2%) underwent open surgery. LPS resulted in a significantly shorter LoS (p < 0.0001) and lower blood loss (p < 0.0001). The meta-analysis did not show any significant difference in the pancreatic fistula rate, recurrence rate or post-operative mortality between the two groups. Expert commentary: LPS is a safe approach even for PNENs and it is associated with a shorter LoS.

3 Review Pancreaticojejunostomy Versus Pancreaticogastrostomy After Pancreaticoduodenectomy: An Up-to-date Meta-Analysis. 2016

Guerrini, Gian Piero / Soliani, Paolo / D'Amico, Giuseppe / Di Benedetto, Fabrizio / Negri, Marco / Piccoli, Micaela / Ruffo, Giacomo / Orti-Rodriguez, Rafael Jose / Pissanou, Theodora / Fusai, Giuseppe. ·a Ravenna Hospital, AUSL Romagna , HBP and General Surgery Unit , Ravenna , Italy. · b Papa Giovanni XXIII Hospital and Milan University , Department of Surgery and Transplantation , Bergamo , Italy. · c Policlinico Hospital, HPB and Liver Transplant Unit , University of Modena and Reggio Emilia , Modena , Italy. · d Civile S. Agostino Estense Hospital , AUSL Modena, Robotic and General Surgery Unit , Modena , Italy. · e "Sacro Cuore-Don Calabria" Hospital , General Surgery Unit , Negrar (Verona) , Italy. · f Royal Free Hospital, HPB & Liver Transplant Unit , University College Medical School of London , London , England. ·J Invest Surg · Pubmed #26682701.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The reconstruction of the pancreas after pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD) is a crucial factor in preventing postoperative complications as pancreatic anastomosis failure is associated with a high morbidity rate and contributes to prolonged hospitalization and mortality. Several techniques have been described for the reconstruction of pancreatic digestive continuity in the attempt to minimize the risk of a pancreatic fistula. The aim of this study was to compare the results of pancreaticogastrostomy and pancreaticojejunostomy after PD. METHODS: A systematic review and meta-analysis were conducted of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) published up to January 2015 comparing patients with pancreaticogastrostomy (PG group) versus pancreaticojejunostomy (PJ group). Two reviewers independently assessed the eligibility and quality of the studies. The meta-analysis was conducted using either the fixed-effect or the random-effect model. RESULTS: Eight RCTs describing 1,211 patients were identified for inclusion in the study. The meta-analysis shows that the PG group had a significantly lower incidence rate of postoperative pancreatic fistulas [OR 0.64 (95% confidence interval 0.46-0.86), p = .003], intra-abdominal abscesses [OR 0.53 (95% CI, 0.33-0.85), p = .009] and length of hospital stay [MD -1.62; (95% CI 2.63-0.61), p = .002] than the PJ group, while biliary fistula, mortality, morbidity, rate of delayed gastric emptying, reoperation, and bleeding did not differ between the two groups. CONCLUSION: This meta-analysis suggests that the most effective treatment for reconstruction of pancreatic continuity after pancreatoduodenectomy is pancreaticogastrostomy. However, the advantage of the latter could potentially be demonstrated through further RCTs, including only patients at high risk of developing pancreatic fistulas.

4 Review Obesity and pancreatic cancer. 2014

Preziosi, Giuseppe / Oben, Jude A / Fusai, Giuseppe. ·Hepato-Pancreatico-Biliary Surgery and Liver Transplant Unit, Royal Free Hospital, London, United Kingdom. Electronic address: g.preziosi@ucl.ac.uk. · Centre for Liver and Digestive Health, University College London, Royal Free Hospital, London, United Kingdom. · Hepato-Pancreatico-Biliary Surgery and Liver Transplant Unit, Royal Free Hospital, London, United Kingdom. ·Surg Oncol · Pubmed #24746917.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Pancreatic cancer is an invariably fatal malignancy. Cigarette smoking and diabetes are established risk factors, but over the last two decades studies have shown that excess adiposity is an additional independent risk factor with 30-50% of cases thought to be attributed to nutritional factors. The aim of this narrative review is to analyze all the epidemiological evidence on the topic and possible pathophysiology. METHODS: We searched PubMed, Embase, Cochrane Library and Medline, and all available evidence was included. We firstly analyze meta- and pooled analysis. Then we discuss individual studies to identify sources of discrepancies between studies and attempt to delineate pathophysiology. RESULTS: It is estimated that obese individuals have a relative risk (RR) ranging between 1.19 and 1.47, when compared with those of normal weight, regardless of diabetes or smoking status. No significant differences were found between gender. CONCLUSION: There is a measurable increased risk of developing pancreatic cancer in obese individuals, and excess adiposity is related to the condition with a "dose-response" curve. Hyperinsulinemia and possibly hyperestrogenism secondary to a metabolic syndrome, and independently from diabetes status, appear to be the key elements of the pathogenesis in pancreatic cancer secondary to excess body fat. Increased efforts should therefore be made in tackling the epidemic levels of obesity in the Western world countries.

5 Review Systematic review of novel ablative methods in locally advanced pancreatic cancer. 2014

Keane, Margaret G / Bramis, Konstantinos / Pereira, Stephen P / Fusai, Giuseppe K. ·Margaret G Keane, Stephen P Pereira, Institute for Liver and Digestive Health, University College London, Royal Free Campus, London NW3 2PF, United Kingdom. ·World J Gastroenterol · Pubmed #24605026.

ABSTRACT: Unresectable locally advanced pancreatic cancer with or without metastatic disease is associated with a very poor prognosis. Current standard therapy is limited to chemotherapy or chemoradiotherapy. Few regimens have been shown to have a substantial survival advantage and novel treatment strategies are urgently needed. Thermal and laser based ablative techniques are widely used in many solid organ malignancies. Initial studies in the pancreas were associated with significant morbidity and mortality, which limited widespread adoption. Modifications to the various applications, in particular combining the techniques with high quality imaging such as computed tomography and intraoperative or endoscopic ultrasound has enabled real time treatment monitoring and significant improvements in safety. We conducted a systematic review of the literature up to October 2013. Initial studies suggest that ablative therapies may confer an additional survival benefit over best supportive care but randomised studies are required to validate these findings.

6 Review Resection versus other treatments for locally advanced pancreatic cancer. 2014

Gurusamy, Kurinchi Selvan / Kumar, Senthil / Davidson, Brian R / Fusai, Giuseppe. ·Department of Surgery, Royal Free Campus, UCL Medical School, Royal Free Hospital, Rowland Hill Street, London, UK, NW3 2PF. ·Cochrane Database Syst Rev · Pubmed #24578248.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Pancreatic cancer is an aggressive cancer. Resection of the cancer is the only treatment with the potential to achieve long-term survival. However, a third of patients with pancreatic cancer have locally advanced cancer involving adjacent structures such as blood vessels which are not usually removed because of fear of increased complications after surgery. Such patients often receive palliative treatment. Resection of the pancreas along with the involved vessels is an alternative to palliative treatment for patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer. OBJECTIVES: To compare the benefits and harms of surgical resection versus palliative treatment in patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer. SEARCH METHODS: We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library 2013, Issue 12), MEDLINE, EMBASE, Science Citation Index Expanded, and trial registers until February 2014. SELECTION CRITERIA: We included randomised controlled trials comparing pancreatic resection versus palliative treatments for patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer (irrespective of language or publication status). DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Two authors independently assessed trials for inclusion and independently extracted the data. We analysed the data with both the fixed-effect and random-effects models using Review Manager (RevMan). We calculated the hazard ratio (HR), risk ratio (RR) or mean difference (MD) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) based on an intention-to-treat analysis. MAIN RESULTS: We identified two trials comparing pancreatic resection versus other treatments for patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer. Ninety eight patients were randomised to pancreatic resection (n = 47) or palliative treatment (n = 51) in the two trials included in this review. Both trials were at high risk of bias. Both trials included patients who had locally advanced pancreatic cancer which involved the serosa anteriorly or retroperitoneum posteriorly or involved the blood vessels. Such pancreatic cancers would be considered generally unresectable. One trial included patients with pancreatic cancer in different locations of the pancreas including the head, neck and body (n = 42). The patients allocated to the pancreatic resection group underwent partial pancreatic resection (pancreatoduodenectomy with lymph node clearance or distal pancreatic resection with lymph node clearance) in this trial; the control group received palliative treatment with chemoradiotherapy. In the other trial, only patients with cancer in the head or neck of the pancreas were included (n = 56). The patients allocated to the pancreatic resection group underwent en bloc total pancreatectomy with splenectomy and vascular reconstruction in this trial; the control group underwent palliative bypass surgery with chemoimmunotherapy. The pancreatic resection group had lower mortality than the palliative treatment group (HR 0.38; 95% CI 0.25 to 0.58, very low quality evidence). Both trials followed the survivors up to at least five years. There were no survivors at two years in the palliative treatment group in either trial. Approximately 40% of the patients who underwent pancreatic resection were alive in the pancreatic resection group at the end of three years. This difference in survival was statistically significant (RR 22.68; 95% CI 3.15 to 163.22). The difference persisted at five years of follow-up (RR 8.65; 95% CI 1.12 to 66.89). Neither trial reported severe adverse events but it is likely that a significant proportion of patients suffered from severe adverse events in both groups. The overall peri-operative mortality in the resection group in the two trials was 2.5%. None of the trials reported quality of life. The estimated difference in the length of total hospital stay (which included all admissions of the patient related to the treatment) between the two groups was imprecise (MD -23.00 days; 95% CI -59.05 to 13.05, very low quality evidence). The total treatment costs were significantly lower in the pancreatic resection group than the palliative treatment group (MD -10.70 thousand USD; 95% CI -14.11 to -7.29, very low quality evidence). AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS: There is very low quality evidence that pancreatic resection increases survival and decreases costs compared to palliative treatments for selected patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer and venous involvement. When sufficient expertise is available, pancreatic resection could be considered for selected patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer who are willing to accept the potentially increased morbidity associated with the procedure. Further randomised controlled trials are necessary to increase confidence in the estimate of effect and to assess the quality of life of patients and the cost-effectiveness of pancreatic resection versus palliative treatment for locally advanced pancreatic cancer.

7 Review Development of a composite endpoint for randomized controlled trials in pancreaticoduodenectomy. 2014

Coolsen, Marielle M E / Clermonts, Stefan H E M / van Dam, Ronald M / Winkens, Bjorn / Malagó, Massimo / Fusai, Giuseppe K / Dejong, Cornelis H C / Olde Damink, Steven W M. ·Department of Surgery, Maastricht University Medical Centre, PO Box 5800, 6202 AZ, Maastricht, The Netherlands, marielle.coolsen@maastrichtuniversity.nl. ·World J Surg · Pubmed #24366279.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Few randomized controlled trials (RCTs) have been performed in patients undergoing pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD). An important factor contributing to this is the large number of patients needed to adequately power RCTs for relevant clinical single endpoints. A PD-specific composite endpoint (CEP) could solve this problem. The aim of the present study was to develop a PD-specific CEP, consisting of complications related to PD, allowing reduction in sample sizes and improving the ability to compare outcomes. METHODS: PD-specific CEP components were selected after a systematic review of the literature and consensus between 25 international pancreatic surgeons. Ultimately, prospective cohorts of patients who underwent PD in two high-volume HPB centers (London, UK, and Maastricht, NL) were used to assess the event rate and effect of implementing a PD-specific CEP. RESULTS: From a total of 18 single-component endpoints, intra-abdominal abscess, sepsis, post-PD hemorrhage, bile leakage, gastrojejunostomy leakage, leakage of the pancreatic anastomosis, delayed gastric emptying, and operative mortality within 90 days were selected to be included the PD-specific CEP. All eight components had consensus definitions and a Dindo-Clavien classification of 3 or more. The incidence of the PD-specific CEP was 24.7 % in the Maastricht cohort and 23.3 % in the London cohort. These incidence rates led to a twofold reduction in the theoretical calculated sample size for an adequately powered RCT on PD using this CEP as a primary endpoint. CONCLUSIONS: The proposed PD-specific CEP enables clinical investigators to adequately power RCTs on PD and increases the feasibility, comparability, and utility in meta-analysis.

8 Review Somatostatin analogues for pancreatic surgery. 2010

Gurusamy, Kurinchi Selvan / Koti, Rahul / Fusai, Giuseppe / Davidson, Brian R. ·University Department of Surgery, Royal Free Hospital and University College School of Medicine, 9th Floor, Royal Free Hospital, Pond Street, London, UK, NW3 2QG. ·Cochrane Database Syst Rev · Pubmed #20166101.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Pancreatic resections are associated with high morbidity (30% to 60%) and mortality (5%). Synthetic analogues of somatostatin are advocated by some surgeons to reduce complications following pancreatic surgery, however their use is controversial. OBJECTIVES: To determine whether prophylactic somatostatin analogues should be used routinely in pancreatic surgery. SEARCH STRATEGY: We searched the Cochrane Upper Gastrointestinal and Pancreatic Diseases Group Trials Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library 2009, issue 4), MEDLINE, EMBASE and Science Citation Index Expanded to November 2009. SELECTION CRITERIA: We included randomised controlled trials comparing prophylactic somatostatin or one of its analogues versus no drug or placebo during pancreatic surgery (irrespective of language or publication status). DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Two authors independently assessed trials for inclusion and independently extracted data. We analysed data with both the fixed-effect and the random-effects models using Review Manager (RevMan). We calculated the risk ratio (RR), mean difference (MD) or standardised mean difference (SMD) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) based on an intention-to-treat or available case analysis. When it was not possible to perform either of the above, we performed per protocol analysis. MAIN RESULTS: We identified 17 trials (of high risk of bias) involving 2143 patients. The overall number of patients with postoperative complications was lower in the somatostatin analogue group (RR 0.71; 95% CI 0.62 to 0.82) but there was no difference in the perioperative mortality, re-operation rate or hospital stay between the groups. The incidence of pancreatic fistula was lower in the somatostatin analogue group (RR 0.64; 95% CI 0.53 to 0.78). The proportion of these fistulas that were clinically significant was not mentioned in most trials. On inclusion of trials that clearly distinguished clinically significant fistulas, there was no difference between the two groups (RR 0.69; 95% CI 0.34 to 1.41). Subgroup analysis revealed a shorter hospital stay in the somatostatin analogue group than the controls for patients with malignant aetiology (MD -7.57; 95% CI -11.29 to -3.84). AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS: Somatostatin analogues reduce perioperative complications but do not reduce perioperative mortality. In those undergoing pancreatic surgery for malignancy, they shorten hospital stay. Further adequately powered trials with low risk of bias are necessary. Based on the current available evidence, somatostatin and its analogues are recommended for routine use in patients undergoing pancreatic resection for malignancy. There is currently no evidence to support their routine use in pancreatic surgeries performed for other indications.

9 Article Risk and Predictors of Postoperative Morbidity and Mortality After Pancreaticoduodenectomy for Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Neoplasms: A Comparative Study With Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma. 2019

Partelli, Stefano / Tamburrino, Domenico / Cherif, Rim / Muffatti, Francesca / Moggia, Elisabetta / Gaujoux, Sébastien / Sauvanet, Alain / Falconi, Massimo / Fusai, Giuseppe. ·Department of HPB and Liver Transplant Surgery, Royal Free Hospital, NHS Foundation Trust, London, United Kingdom. · Chirurgie Hépato-Bilio-Pancréatique, Beaujon Hospital, Paris. ·Pancreas · Pubmed #30946244.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: Pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD) is associated with a high risk of postoperative complications and mortality. The aim of this study was to compare postoperative morbidity after PD in patients undergoing resections for pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms (PanNENs) with patients undergoing the same resection for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). METHODS: Data of 566 patients from 3 European tertiary referral centers between 1998 and 2014 were considered. RESULTS: Overall, 566 patients (179 with PanNENs, 387 with PDAC) who underwent PD were analyzed. Patients with PanNENs were significantly younger (56 vs 64 years, P < 0.0001). The consistency of the pancreas was soft in 147 patients (82%) with PanNENs and in 162 patients (42%) with PDAC (P < 0.0001). Patients in the PanNENs group had a significantly higher rate of pancreatic fistula (P < 0.0001), bile leak (P = 0.004), abdominal collection (P = 0.017), and development of sepsis (P = 0.042). No differences in terms of overall postoperative complications, median length of stay, and in-hospital mortality were found. On multivariate analysis sex (male), PanNENs indication, blood transfusion, and a soft pancreatic texture were independent predictors of pancreatic fistula after PD. CONCLUSIONS: Pancreaticoduodenectomy for PanNENs is associated with higher rate of surgical-specific postoperative complications than those for PDAC.

10 Article Competitive Testing of the WHO 2010 versus the WHO 2017 Grading of Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Neoplasms: Data from a Large International Cohort Study. 2018

Rindi, Guido / Klersy, Catherine / Albarello, Luca / Baudin, Eric / Bianchi, Antonio / Buchler, Markus W / Caplin, Martyn / Couvelard, Anne / Cros, Jérôme / de Herder, Wouter W / Delle Fave, Gianfranco / Doglioni, Claudio / Federspiel, Birgitte / Fischer, Lars / Fusai, Giuseppe / Gavazzi, Francesca / Hansen, Carsten P / Inzani, Frediano / Jann, Henning / Komminoth, Paul / Knigge, Ulrich P / Landoni, Luca / La Rosa, Stefano / Lawlor, Rita T / Luong, Tu V / Marinoni, Ilaria / Panzuto, F / Pape, Ulrich-Frank / Partelli, Stefano / Perren, Aurel / Rinzivillo, Maria / Rubini, Corrado / Ruszniewski, Philippe / Scarpa, Aldo / Schmitt, Anja / Schinzari, Giovanni / Scoazec, Jean-Yves / Sessa, Fausto / Solcia, Enrico / Spaggiari, Paola / Toumpanakis, Christos / Vanoli, Alessandro / Wiedenmann, Bertram / Zamboni, Giuseppe / Zandee, Wouter T / Zerbi, Alessandro / Falconi, Massimo. ·Institute of Pathology, Fondazione Policlinico Universitario A. Gemelli IRCCS, Roma-Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Roma ENETS Center of Excellence, Rome, Italyguido.rindi@unicatt.it. · Service of Biometry and Clinical Epidemiology, Research Department, and IRCCS Fondazione Policlinico San Matteo, Pavia, Italy. · Pathology Unit, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy. · Department of Oncology, Cancer Campus, Villejuif, France. · Department of Endocrinology, Fondazione Policlinico Universitario A. Gemelli IRCCS, Roma-Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Roma ENETS Center of Excellence, Rome, Italy. · Department of Surgery, University Hospital Heidelberg, Neu Heidelberg, Germany. · Neuroendocrine Tumour Unit, Centre for Gastroenterology, London, United Kingdom. · Department of Pathology, Hopital Beaujon, Paris ENETS Center of Excellence, Clichy, France. · Section Endocrinology, Department of Internal Medicine, Erasmus University Medical Center and and Erasmus MC Cancer Institute Rotterdam, Rotterdam ENETS Center of Excellence, Rotterdam, The Netherlands. · Digestive and Liver Disease Unit, Sant'Andrea University Hospital, Roma ENETS Center of Excellence, Rome, Italy. · Department of Pathology, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen University Hospital, Copenhagen ENETS Center of Excellence, Copenhagen, Denmark. · Department of Surgery, University College, Royal Free Hospital, London ENETS Center of Excellence, London, United Kingdom. · Pancreatic Surgery, Humanitas Clinical and Research Center, Humanitas Milan ENETS Center of Excellence, Milan, Italy. · Department of Surgery, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen University Hospital, Copenhagen ENETS Center of Excellence, Copenhagen, Denmark. · Institute of Pathology, Fondazione Policlinico Universitario A. Gemelli IRCCS, Roma-Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Roma ENETS Center of Excellence, Rome, Italy. · Department of Hepatology and Gastroenterology, Charité, Campus Virchow Klinikum and Charite Mitte, University Medicine Berlin, Berlin ENETS Center of Excellence, Berlin, Germany. · Institute of Pathology, Stadtspital Triemli, Zurich, Switzerland. · Department of Surgery and Oncology, General and Pancreatic Surgery, The Pancreas Institute, Verona ENETS Center of Excellence, Verona, Italy. · Department of Pathology, Ospedale di Circolo, Università dell'Insubria, Varese, Italy. · Section of Pathology and ARC-Net Research Centre, Department of Diagnostics and Public Health, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona ENETS Center of Excellence, Verona, Italy. · Department of Pathology, University College, Royal Free Hospital, London ENETS Center of Excellence, London, United Kingdom. · Institute of Pathology, University of Bern, Bern, Switzerland. · Pancreatic Surgery Unit, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy. · Department of Pathology, Marche Polytechnic University, Ancona, Italy. · Department of Gastroenterology and Pancreatology, Hopital Beaujon, Paris ENETS Center of Excellence, Clichy, France. · Department of Medical Oncology, Fondazione Policlinico Universitario A. Gemelli IRCCS, Roma-Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Roma ENETS Center of Excellence, Rome, Italy. · Department of Medical Biology and Pathology, Cancer Campus, Villejuif, France. · Department of Molecular Medicine, University of Pavia, Pavia, Italy. · Pathology Department, Humanitas Clinical and Research Center, Humanitas Milan ENETS Center of Excellence, Milan, Italy. · Department of Pathology, Sacro Cuore-Don Calabria Hospital, Negrar, Italy. ·Neuroendocrinology · Pubmed #30300897.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The World Health Organization (WHO) and the American Joint Cancer Committee (AJCC) modified the grading of pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms from a three-tier (WHO-AJCC 2010) to a four-tier system by introducing the novel category of NET G3 (WHO-AJCC 2017). OBJECTIVES: This study aims at validating the WHO-AJCC 2017 and identifying the most effective grading system. METHOD: A total of 2,102 patients were enrolled; entry criteria were: (i) patient underwent surgery; (ii) at least 2 years of follow-up; (iii) observation time up to 2015. Data from 34 variables were collected; grading was assessed and compared for efficacy by statistical means including Kaplan-Meier method, Cox regression analysis, Harrell's C statistics, and Royston's explained variation in univariable and multivariable analyses. RESULTS: In descriptive analysis, the two grading systems demonstrated statistically significant differences for the major category sex but not for age groups. In Cox regression analysis, both grading systems showed statistically significant differences between grades for OS and EFS; however, no statistically significant difference was observed between the two G3 classes of WHO-AJCC 2017. In multivariable analysis for the two models fitted to compare efficacy, the two grading systems performed equally well with substantially similar optimal discrimination and well-explained variation for both OS and EFS. The WHO-AJCC 2017 grading system retained statistically significant difference between the two G3 classes for OS but not for EFS. CONCLUSIONS: The WHO-AJCC 2017 grading system is at least equally performing as the WHO-AJCC 2010 but allows the successful identification of the most aggressive PanNET subgroup. Grading is confirmed as probably the most powerful tool for predicting patient survival.

11 Article Outcomes After Distal Pancreatectomy with Celiac Axis Resection for Pancreatic Cancer: A Pan-European Retrospective Cohort Study. 2018

Klompmaker, Sjors / van Hilst, Jony / Gerritsen, Sarah L / Adham, Mustapha / Teresa Albiol Quer, M / Bassi, Claudio / Berrevoet, Frederik / Boggi, Ugo / Busch, Olivier R / Cesaretti, Manuela / Dalla Valle, Raffaele / Darnis, Benjamin / De Pastena, Matteo / Del Chiaro, Marco / Grützmann, Robert / Diener, Markus K / Dumitrascu, Traian / Friess, Helmut / Ivanecz, Arpad / Karayiannakis, Anastasios / Fusai, Giuseppe K / Labori, Knut J / Lombardo, Carlo / López-Ben, Santiago / Mabrut, Jean-Yves / Niesen, Willem / Pardo, Fernando / Perinel, Julie / Popescu, Irinel / Roeyen, Geert / Sauvanet, Alain / Prasad, Raj / Sturesson, Christian / Lesurtel, Mickael / Kleeff, Jorg / Salvia, Roberto / Besselink, Marc G / Anonymous5490939. ·Department of Surgery, Cancer Center Amsterdam, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. · Department of Digestive Surgery, E. Herriot Hospital, HCL, UCBL1, Lyon, France. · Department of Surgery, Hospital Universitari de Girona Dr. Josep Trueta, Girona, Spain. · Department of Surgery, University of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Department of General and HPB Surgery, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent, Belgium. · Division of General and Transplant Surgery, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. · Department of HPB Surgery, Hôpital Beaujon, Clichy Cedex, France. · Hepato-Pancreato-Biliary Unit, Parma University Hospital, Parma, Italy. · Department of Surgery and Liver Transplantation, Croix-Rousse University Hospital, Hospices Civils de Lyon, University of Lyon I, Lyon, France. · Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden. · Department of Surgery, University Hospital Erlangen, Erlangen, Germany. · Department of General, Visceral and Transplantation Surgery, Heidelberg University, Heidelberg, Germany. · Center of General Surgery and Liver Transplant, Fundeni Clinical Institute, Bucharest, Romania. · Department of Surgery, Klinikum rechts der Isar, School of Medicine, Technical University of Munich, Munich, Germany. · Department of Abdominal and General Surgery, University Medical Centre Maribor, Maribor, Slovenia. · Second Department of Surgery, Democritus University of Thrace, Alexandroupolis, Greece. · HPB Surgery and Liver Transplantation Unit, Royal Free Hospital, London, UK. · Department of Hepato-Pancreato-Biliary Surgery, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway. · Department of HPB and Transplant Surgery, Clínica Universidad de Navarra, Pamplona, Spain. · Department of Hepatobiliary, Endocrine and Transplantation Surgery, Antwerp University Hospital, Antwerp, Belgium. · Department of HPB and Transplant Services, National Health Service, Leeds, UK. · Department of Surgery, Skåne University Hospital, Lund, Sweden. · Department of Visceral, Vascular and Endocrine Surgery, Martin-Luther-University Halle-Wittenberg, Halle, Germany. · Department of Surgery, Cancer Center Amsterdam, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. m.g.besselink@amc.nl. ·Ann Surg Oncol · Pubmed #29532342.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Western multicenter studies on distal pancreatectomy with celiac axis resection (DP-CAR), also known as the Appleby procedure, for locally advanced pancreatic cancer are lacking. We aimed to study overall survival, morbidity, mortality and the impact of preoperative hepatic artery embolization (PHAE). METHODS: Retrospective cohort study within the European-African Hepato-Pancreato-Biliary-Association, on DP-CAR between 1-1-2000 and 6-1-2016. Primary endpoint was overall survival. Secondary endpoints were radicality (R0-resection), 90-day mortality, major morbidity, and pancreatic fistulae (grade B/C). RESULTS: We included 68 patients from 20 hospitals in 12 countries. Postoperatively, 53% of patients had R0-resection, 25% major morbidity, 21% an ISGPS grade B/C pancreatic fistula, and 16% mortality. In total, 82% received (neo-)adjuvant chemotherapy and median overall survival in 62 patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma patients was 18 months (CI 10-37). We observed no impact of PHAE on ischemic complications. CONCLUSIONS: DP-CAR combined with chemotherapy for locally advanced pancreatic cancer is associated with acceptable overall survival. The 90-day mortality is too high and should be reduced. Future studies should investigate to what extent increasing surgical volume or better patient selection can improve outcomes.

12 Article Demonstration of Calreticulin Expression in Hamster Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma with the Use of Fluorescent Gold Quantum Dots. 2016

Giorgakis, Emmanouil / Ramesh, Bala / Kamali-Dashtarzheneh, Ashkan / Fusai, Giuseppe Kito / Imber, Charles / Tsironis, Dimitrios / Loizidou, Marilena. ·Division of Surgery and Interventional Science, Royal Free Campus, University College London, London, UK Institute of Liver Studies, King's College Hospital, London, UK emmanouil.giorgakis@nhs.net. · Division of Surgery and Interventional Science, Royal Free Campus, University College London, London, UK. ·Anticancer Res · Pubmed #26976972.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: There is dire need for discovery of novel pancreatic cancer biomarkers and of agents with the potential for simultaneous diagnostic and therapeutic capacity. This study demonstrates calreticulin expression on hamster pancreatic adenocarcinoma via bio-conjugated gold quantum dots (AuQDs). MATERIALS AND METHODS: Hamster pancreatic adenocarcinoma cells were cultured, fixed and incubated with fluorescent AuQDs, bio-conjugated to anti-calreticulin antibodies. Anti-calreticulin and AuQDs were produced in-house. AuQDs were manufactured to emit in the near-infrared. Cells were further characterized under confocal fluorescence. RESULTS: AuQDs were confirmed to emit in the near-infrared. AuQD bio-conjugation to calreticulin was confirmed via dot-blotting. Upon laser excitation and post-incubation with bio-conjugated AuQDs, pancreatic cancer cell lines emitted fluorescence in near-infrared. CONCLUSION: Hamster pancreatic cancer cells express calreticulin, which may be labelled with AuQDs. This study demonstrates the application of nanoparticle-based theranostics in pancreatic cancer. Such biomarker-targeting nanosystems are anticipated to play a significant role in the management of pancreatic cancer.

13 Article Active Surveillance versus Surgery of Nonfunctioning Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Neoplasms ≤2 cm in MEN1 Patients. 2016

Partelli, Stefano / Tamburrino, Domenico / Lopez, Caroline / Albers, Max / Milanetto, Anna Caterina / Pasquali, Claudio / Manzoni, Marco / Toumpanakis, Christos / Fusai, Giuseppe / Bartsch, Detlef / Falconi, Massimo. ·Pancreatic Surgery Unit, Department of Internal Medicine, IRCCS San Raffaele Hospital, Vita-Salute San Raffaele University, Milan, Italy. ·Neuroendocrinology · Pubmed #26731608.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of conservative treatment for nonfunctioning pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms (NF-PNEN) ≤2 cm in multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1)-affected patients compared with surgical treatment. METHODS: The databases of 4 tertiary referral institutions (San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan; Philipps-Universität Marburg, Marburg; University of Padua, Padua; Royal Free Hospital, London) were analyzed. A comparison of conservative management and surgery at initial diagnosis of NF-PNEN ≤2 cm between 1997 and 2013 was performed. RESULTS: Overall, 27 patients (45%) underwent up-front surgery and 33 patients (55%) were followed up after the initial diagnosis. A higher proportion of patients in the surgery group were female (70 vs. 33%, p = 0.004). Patients were mainly operated on in the period 1997-2007 as compared with the period 2008-2013 (n = 17; 63 vs. 37%; p = 0.040). The rate of multifocal tumors was higher in the surgery group (n = 24; 89%) than in the 'no surgery' group (n = 22; 67%; p = 0.043). After a median follow-up of 126 months, 1 patient deceased due to postoperative complications within 30 days after surgery. The 5-, 10-, and 15-year progression-free survival (PFS) rates were 63, 39, and 10%, respectively. The median PFS was similar in the two groups. Overall, 13 patients (32.5%) were operated on after initial surgical or conservative treatment. The majority of the surgically treated patients had stage 1 (77.5%), T1 (77.5%), and G1 (85%) tumors. CONCLUSIONS: NF-PNEN ≤2 cm in MEN1 patients are indolent neoplasms posing a low oncological risk. Surgical treatment of these tumors at initial diagnosis is rarely justified in favor of conservative treatment.

14 Article Long-Term Outcomes of Surgical Management of Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors with Synchronous Liver Metastases. 2015

Partelli, Stefano / Inama, Marco / Rinke, Anja / Begum, Nehara / Valente, Roberto / Fendrich, Volker / Tamburrino, Domenico / Keck, Tobias / Caplin, Martyn E / Bartsch, Detlef / Thirlwell, Christina / Fusai, Giuseppe / Falconi, Massimo. ·Pancreatic Surgery Unit, University Hospital of Ancona, Ancona, Italy. ·Neuroendocrinology · Pubmed #26043944.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The value of surgical resection in the management of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PNET) with liver metastases (LM) is still debated. The aim of this study was to evaluate the outcomes of surgery of PNET with LM. METHODS: Patients with PNET with synchronous LM between 2000 and 2011 from 4 high-volume institutions were included. The patients were divided into 3 groups: curative resection, palliative resection, and no resection. RESULTS: Overall, 166 patients were included. Eighteen patients (11%) underwent curative resection, 73 patients (43%) underwent palliative resection, and 75 patients (46%) underwent conservative treatment. The median overall survival (OS) from the time of diagnosis was 73 months. Patients who underwent curative resection had a significantly better median OS from the initial diagnosis compared with those who underwent palliative resection and those who were conservatively treated (97 vs. 89 vs. 36 months, p = 0.0001). The median OS from the time of diagnosis in those patients who underwent radical or palliative resection was 97 months, with a 5-year survival rate of 76%. On multivariate analysis, factors associated with OS from the time of diagnosis were the presence of bilobar metastases, tumor grading, and curative resection in a first model. On a second model, curative or palliative surgery was an independent predictor of OS. Among 91 patients who underwent surgery, the presence of pancreatic neuroendocrine carcinoma G3 was the only factor independently associated with a poorer survival after surgery (median OS: 35 vs. 97 months, p < 0.0001). CONCLUSIONS: Patients with LM from PNET benefit from surgical resection, although surgery should be reserved to well- or moderately differentiated forms.

15 Article Portal vein resection in borderline resectable pancreatic cancer: a United Kingdom multicenter study. 2014

Ravikumar, Reena / Sabin, Caroline / Abu Hilal, Mohammad / Bramhall, Simon / White, Steven / Wigmore, Stephen / Imber, Charles J / Fusai, Giuseppe / Anonymous4230783. ·Department of HPB and Liver Transplant Surgery, Royal Free Hospital, London, UK. Electronic address: reena.ravikumar@nhs.net. · Research Department of Infection and Population Health, UCL, Royal Free Campus, UK. · Department of HPB Surgery, Southampton General Hospital, Southampton, UK. · Liver Unit, University Hospital Birmingham, Birmingham, UK. · Department of HPB and Transplantation, Freeman Hospital, Newcastle, UK. · Department of HPB and Liver Transplant Surgery, Royal Infirmary of Edinburgh, UK. · Department of HPB and Liver Transplant Surgery, Royal Free Hospital, London, UK. ·J Am Coll Surg · Pubmed #24484730.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Until recently, in the United Kingdom, borderline resectable pancreatic cancer with invasion into the portomesenteric veins often resulted in surgical bypass because of the presumed high risk for complications and the uncertainty of a survival benefit associated with a vascular resection. Portomesenteric vein resection has therefore remained controversial. We present the second largest published cohort of patients undergoing portal vein resection for borderline resectable (T3) adenocarcinoma of the head of the pancreas. STUDY DESIGN: This is a UK multicenter retrospective cohort study comparing pancreaticoduodenectomy with vein resection (PDVR), standard pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD), and surgical bypass (SB). Nine high-volume UK centers contributed. All consecutive patients with T3 (stage IIA to III) adenocarcinoma of the head of the pancreas undergoing surgery between December 1998 and June 2011 were included. The primary outcomes measures are overall survival and in-hospital mortality. Secondary outcomes measure is operative morbidity. RESULTS: One thousand five hundred and eighty-eight patients underwent surgery for borderline resectable pancreatic cancer; 840 PD, 230 PDVR, and 518 SB. Of 230 PDVR patients, 129 had primary closure (56%), 65 had end to end anastomosis (28%), and 36 had interposition grafts (16%). Both resection groups had greater complication rates than the bypass group, but with no difference between PD and PDVR. In-hospital mortality was similar across all 3 surgical groups. Median survival was 18 months for PD, 18.2 months for PDVR, and 8 months for SB (p = 0.0001). CONCLUSIONS: This study, the second largest to date on borderline resectable pancreatic cancer, demonstrates no significant difference in perioperative mortality in the 3 groups and a similar overall survival between PD and PDVR; significantly better compared with SB.

16 Article Is there a role for arterial reconstruction in surgery for pancreatic cancer? 2013

Ravikumar, Reena / Holroyd, David / Fusai, Giuseppe. ·Reena Ravikumar, David Holroyd, Giuseppe Fusai, Department of Hepatopancreato-biliary and Liver Transplant Surgery, Royal Free London Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, London NW3 2QG, United Kingdom. ·World J Gastrointest Surg · Pubmed #23556057.

ABSTRACT: Surgery remains the only potentially curative treatment for patients with pancreatic cancer. Locally advanced pancreatic cancer with vascular involvement remains a surgical challenge because high perioperative risk and the uncertainty of a survival benefit. Whilst portal vein resection has started to gather momentum because the perioperative morbidity and long term survival is comparable to standard pancreatectomy, there isn't yet a consensus on arterial resections. There have been various reports and case series of arterial resections in pancreatic cancer, with mixed survival results. Mollberg et al have appraised the heterogeneous published literature available on arterial resection in pancreatic cancer in an attempt to compare this to standard pancreatectomy. In this article, we discuss the results of this systematic review and meta-analysis, and the limitations associated with analysing results from heterogenous data. We have outlined the important features in surgery for pancreatic cancer and specifically to arterial resections, and compared arterial resections to the published literature on venous resections.

17 Minor Should we consider pancreaticogastrostomy the best method of reconstruction after pancreaticoduodenectomy? 2016

Guerrini, Gian Piero / Fusai, Giuseppe. ·Ravenna Hospital, AUSL Romagna, HBP and General Surgery Unit, Randi 5, 48121 Ravenna, Italy. Electronic address: guerrinigp@yahoo.it. · Royal Free Hospital, HPB & Liver Transplant Unit, University College Medical School of London, Pond Street, London NW32Q, UK. ·Eur J Surg Oncol · Pubmed #26738787.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

18 Minor Preoperative Gemcitabine-based Chemoradiation Therapy for Resectable and Borderline Resectable Pancreatic Cancer. 2015

Ravikumar, Reena / Fusai, Giuseppe. ·Department of HPB and Liver Transplant Surgery Royal Free London Hospital London, UK. ·Ann Surg · Pubmed #24854654.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --