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Pancreatic Neoplasms: HELP
Articles by Luigi Funicelli
Based on 3 articles published since 2008
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Between 2008 and 2019, Luigi Funicelli wrote the following 3 articles about Pancreatic Neoplasms.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Guideline None 2018

Grimaldi, Franco / Fazio, Nicola / Attanasio, Roberto / Frasoldati, Andrea / Papini, Enrico / Cremonini, Nadia / Davi, Maria V / Funicelli, Luigi / Massironi, Sara / Spada, Francesca / Toscano, Vincenzo / Versari, Annibale / Zini, Michele / Falconi, Massimo / Oberg, Kjell. ·Endocrinology and Metabolic Disease Unit, Azienda Sanitaria Universitaria Integrata di Udine, Udine, Italy. · Division of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology and Neuroendocrine Tumor, European Institute of Oncology, Milan, Italy. · Endocrinology Service, Galeazzi Institute IRCCS, Milan, Italy. · Endocrinology Unit, Azienda Ospedaliera S. Maria Nuova IRCCS, Reggio Emilia, Italy. · Department of Endocrinology and Metabolic Diseases, Regina Apostolorum Hospital, Albano Laziale (Rome), Italy. · Endocrinology Clinics, Clinica Villalba, Bologna, Italy. · Section of Endocrinology, Medicina Generale e Malattie Aterotrombotiche e Degenerative, Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria Integrata, Verona, Italy. · Division of Radiology, European Institute of Oncology, Milan, Italy. · Gastroenterology and Endoscopy Unit, Fondazione IRCCS Ca' Granda, Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Milan, Italy. · Endocrinology, Department of Clinical and Molecular Medicine, Sant'Andrea Hospital, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy. · Nuclear Medicine Unit, Azienda Ospedaliera S. Maria Nuova IRCCS, Reggio Emilia, Italy. · Division of Pancreatic Surgery, Pancreas Translational and Clinical Research Center, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Vita e Salute University, Milan, Italy. · Department of Endocrine Oncology, University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden. ·Endocr Metab Immune Disord Drug Targets · Pubmed #29237387.

ABSTRACT: Well-established criteria for evaluating the response to treatment and the appropriate followup of individual patients are critical in clinical oncology. The current evidence-based data on these issues in terms of the management of gastroenteropancreatic (GEP) neuroendocrine neoplasms (NEN) are unfortunately limited. This document by the Italian Association of Clinical Endocrinologists (AME) on the criteria for the follow-up of GEP-NEN patients is aimed at providing comprehensive recommendations for everyday clinical practice based on both the best available evidence and the combined opinion of an interdisciplinary panel of experts. The initial risk stratification of patients with NENs should be performed according to the grading, staging and functional status of the neoplasm and the presence of an inherited syndrome. The evaluation of response to the initial treatment, and to the subsequent therapies for disease progression or recurrence, should be based on a cost-effective, risk-effective and timely use of the appropriate diagnostic resources. A multidisciplinary evaluation of the response to the treatment is strongly recommended and, at every step in the follow-up, it is mandatory to assess the disease state and the patient performance status, comorbidities, and recent clinical evolution. Local expertise, available technical resources and the patient preferences should always be evaluated while planning the individual clinical management of GEP-NENs.

2 Review Predictive Markers of Response to Everolimus and Sunitinib in Neuroendocrine Tumors. 2017

Martins, Diana / Spada, Francesca / Lambrescu, Ioana / Rubino, Manila / Cella, Chiara / Gibelli, Bianca / Grana, Chiara / Ribero, Dario / Bertani, Emilio / Ravizza, Davide / Bonomo, Guido / Funicelli, Luigi / Pisa, Eleonora / Zerini, Dario / Fazio, Nicola / Anonymous5180910. ·Unit of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology and Neuroendocrine Tumors, European Institute of Oncology, IEO, 20141 via Ripamonti, 435, Milan, Italy. · Division of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, European Institute of Oncology, IEO, Milan, Italy. · Division of Nuclear Medicine, European Institute of Oncology, IEO, Milan, Italy. · Division of Hepatobiliopancreatic Surgery, European Institute of Oncology, IEO, Milan, Italy. · Division of Endoscopy, European Institute of Oncology, IEO, Milan, Italy. · Division of Interventional Radiology, European Institute of Oncology, IEO, Milan, Italy. · Division of Radiology, European Institute of Oncology, IEO, Milan, Italy. · Division of Pathology, European Institute of Oncology, IEO, Milan, Italy. · Division of Radiotherapy, European Institute of Oncology, IEO, Milan, Italy. · Unit of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology and Neuroendocrine Tumors, European Institute of Oncology, IEO, 20141 via Ripamonti, 435, Milan, Italy. nicola.fazio@ieo.it. ·Target Oncol · Pubmed #28634872.

ABSTRACT: Neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) represent a large and heterogeneous group of malignancies with various biological and clinical characteristics, depending on the site of origin and the grade of tumor proliferation. In NETs, as in other cancer types, molecularly targeted therapies have radically changed the therapeutic landscape. Recently two targeted agents, the mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitor everolimus and the tyrosine kinase inhibitor sunitinib, have both demonstrated significantly prolonged progression free survival in patients with advanced pancreatic NETs. Despite these important therapeutic developments, there are still significant limitations to the use of these agents due to the lack of accurate biomarkers for predicting tumor response and efficacy of therapy. In this review, we provide an overview of the current clinical data for the evaluation of predictive factors of response to/efficacy of everolimus and sunitinib in advanced pancreatic NETs. Surrogate indicators discussed include circulating and tissue markers, as well as non-invasive imaging techniques.

3 Article Resection of the Primary Tumor Followed by Peptide Receptor Radionuclide Therapy as Upfront Strategy for the Treatment of G1-G2 Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors with Unresectable Liver Metastases. 2016

Bertani, Emilio / Fazio, Nicola / Radice, Davide / Zardini, Claudio / Grana, Chiara / Bodei, Lisa / Funicelli, Luigi / Ferrari, Carlo / Spada, Francesca / Partelli, Stefano / Falconi, Massimo. ·Division of Hepatobilio-pancreatic Surgery, European Institute of Oncology, Milan, Italy. emilio.bertani@ieo.it. · GI and Neuroendocrine Tumors Unit, European Institute of Oncology, Milan, Italy. · Division of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, European Institute of Oncology, Milan, Italy. · Surgical Department, Sacro Cuore Hospital, Negrar, Italy. · Division of Nuclear Medicine, European Institute of Oncology, Milan, Italy. · Molecular Imaging and Therapy Service, Department of Radiology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, USA. · Division of Radiology, European Institute of Oncology, Milan, Italy. · Division of Digestive Surgery, European Institute of Oncology, Milan, Italy. · Division of Pancreatic Surgery, Ospedale San Raffaele IRCCS, Università Vita e Salute, Milan, Italy. ·Ann Surg Oncol · Pubmed #27613553.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: A low burden of disease represents an independent favorable prognostic factor of response to peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) in patients affected by gastro-entero-pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. However, it is not clear whether this is due to a lower diffusion of the disease or thanks to debulking surgery. METHODS: From 1996 to 2013 those patients diagnosed with G1-G2 pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor (PNET) and synchronous liver metastases who were not deemed eligible for liver radical surgery but were eligible to receive upfront PRRT were prospectively included in the study. Two groups of comparison were identified: those submitted for primary tumor resection before PRRT and those who were not. The outcome was evaluated as: objective response to PRRT (OR), progression-free survival (PFS), and overall survival (OS). RESULTS: Of the 94 subjects, 31 were previously submitted for primary tumor resection. After propensity score adjustments, patients who underwent surgery before PRRT showed higher stabilization or objective responses after PRRT (p = .006), and this translated into a better median PFS (70 vs. 30 months; p = .002) and OS (112 vs. 65 months; p = .011), for operated versus nonoperated patients, respectively. At multivariate analysis, operated patients showed a statistically significantly improved PFS: HR, 5.11 (95 % CI 1.43-18.3); p = .012, whereas Ki-67 in continuous fashion was correlated significantly with OS: 1.13 (95 % CI 1-1.27); p = .048. CONCLUSIONS: Primary tumor resection prior to PRRT can be safely proposed in G1-G2 PNETs with diffuse liver metastases because it seems to enhance response to PRRT and to improve significantly PFS.