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Pancreatic Neoplasms: HELP
Articles by Douglas A. Fraker
Based on 2 articles published since 2009
(Why 2 articles?)
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Between 2009 and 2019, Douglas A. Fraker wrote the following 2 articles about Pancreatic Neoplasms.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Article A precision oncology approach to the pharmacological targeting of mechanistic dependencies in neuroendocrine tumors. 2018

Alvarez, Mariano J / Subramaniam, Prem S / Tang, Laura H / Grunn, Adina / Aburi, Mahalaxmi / Rieckhof, Gabrielle / Komissarova, Elena V / Hagan, Elizabeth A / Bodei, Lisa / Clemons, Paul A / Dela Cruz, Filemon S / Dhall, Deepti / Diolaiti, Daniel / Fraker, Douglas A / Ghavami, Afshin / Kaemmerer, Daniel / Karan, Charles / Kidd, Mark / Kim, Kyoung M / Kim, Hee C / Kunju, Lakshmi P / Langel, Ülo / Li, Zhong / Lee, Jeeyun / Li, Hai / LiVolsi, Virginia / Pfragner, Roswitha / Rainey, Allison R / Realubit, Ronald B / Remotti, Helen / Regberg, Jakob / Roses, Robert / Rustgi, Anil / Sepulveda, Antonia R / Serra, Stefano / Shi, Chanjuan / Yuan, Xiaopu / Barberis, Massimo / Bergamaschi, Roberto / Chinnaiyan, Arul M / Detre, Tony / Ezzat, Shereen / Frilling, Andrea / Hommann, Merten / Jaeger, Dirk / Kim, Michelle K / Knudsen, Beatrice S / Kung, Andrew L / Leahy, Emer / Metz, David C / Milsom, Jeffrey W / Park, Young S / Reidy-Lagunes, Diane / Schreiber, Stuart / Washington, Kay / Wiedenmann, Bertram / Modlin, Irvin / Califano, Andrea. ·Department of Systems Biology, Columbia University, New York, NY, USA. · DarwinHealth Inc, New York, NY, USA. · Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY, USA. · Institute for Systems Genetics, New York University Langone Medical Center, New York, NY, USA. · Department of Urology, Columbia University, New York, NY, USA. · Division of Pathology, European Institute of Oncology, Milan, Italy. · Broad Institute of Harvard and MIT, Cambridge, MA, USA. · Department of Pediatrics, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY, USA. · Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA, USA. · Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USA. · PsychoGenics Inc., Tarrytown, NY, USA. · Department of General and Visceral Surgery, Zentralklinik, Bad Berka, Germany. · Sulzberger Columbia Genome Center, Columbia University, New York, NY, USA. · Wren Laboratories, Branford, CT, USA. · Division of Hematology Oncology, Department of Medicine, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. · Michigan Center for Translational Pathology, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI, USA. · Department of Pathology, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI, USA. · Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI, USA. · Department of Neurochemistry, the Arrhenius Laboratories for Nat. Sci., Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden. · Laboratory of Molecular Biotechnology, Institute of Technology, University of Tartu, Tartu, Estonia. · Falconwood Foundation, New York, NY, USA. · Institute of Pathophysiology and Immunology, Medical University of Graz, Graz, Austria. · Department of Pathology, Columbia University, New York, NY, USA. · Department of Pathology, University Health Network, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada. · Department of Pathology, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN, USA. · Division of Colon and Rectal Surgery, State University of New York, Stony Brook, NY, USA. · Howard Hughes Medical Institute, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI, USA. · Department of Urology, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI, USA. · Imperial College London, London, UK. · Medical Oncology, National Center for Tumor Diseases Heidelberg, University Medical Center Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany. · Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY, USA. · Department of Surgery, New York-Presbyterian Hospital, Weill Cornell Medicine, New York, NY, USA. · Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA, USA. · Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Gastroenterology, Charite, Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany. · Emeritus Professor Gastrointestinal Surgery, School of Medicine, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut, USA. imodlin@irvinmodlin.com. · Department of Systems Biology, Columbia University, New York, NY, USA. califano@cumc.columbia.edu. · Department of Biomedical Informatics, Columbia University, New York, NY, USA. califano@cumc.columbia.edu. · Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biophysics, Columbia University, New York, NY, USA. califano@cumc.columbia.edu. · J.P. Sulzberger Columbia Genome Center, Columbia University, New York, NY, USA. califano@cumc.columbia.edu. · Herbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center, Columbia University, New York, NY, USA. califano@cumc.columbia.edu. ·Nat Genet · Pubmed #29915428.

ABSTRACT: We introduce and validate a new precision oncology framework for the systematic prioritization of drugs targeting mechanistic tumor dependencies in individual patients. Compounds are prioritized on the basis of their ability to invert the concerted activity of master regulator proteins that mechanistically regulate tumor cell state, as assessed from systematic drug perturbation assays. We validated the approach on a cohort of 212 gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (GEP-NETs), a rare malignancy originating in the pancreas and gastrointestinal tract. The analysis identified several master regulator proteins, including key regulators of neuroendocrine lineage progenitor state and immunoevasion, whose role as critical tumor dependencies was experimentally confirmed. Transcriptome analysis of GEP-NET-derived cells, perturbed with a library of 107 compounds, identified the HDAC class I inhibitor entinostat as a potent inhibitor of master regulator activity for 42% of metastatic GEP-NET patients, abrogating tumor growth in vivo. This approach may thus complement current efforts in precision oncology.

2 Article PTCH 1 staining of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor (PNET) samples from patients with and without multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN-1) syndrome reveals a potential therapeutic target. 2015

Gurung, Buddha / Hua, Xianxin / Runske, Melissa / Bennett, Bonita / LiVolsi, Virginia / Roses, Robert / Fraker, Douglas A / Metz, David C. ·a Abramson Family Cancer Research Center; Department of Cancer Biology ; University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine ; Philadelphia , PA USA. ·Cancer Biol Ther · Pubmed #25482929.

ABSTRACT: Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PNETs) are rare, indolent tumors that may occur sporadically or develop in association with well-recognized hereditary syndromes, particularly multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN-1). We previously demonstrated that the hedgehog (HH) signaling pathway was aberrantly up-regulated in a mouse model that phenocopies the human MEN-1 syndrome, Men1l/l;RipCre, and that inhibition of this pathway suppresses MEN-1 tumor cell proliferation. We hypothesized that the HH signaling pathway is similarly upregulated in human PNETs. We performed immunohistochemical (IHC) staining for PTCH1 in human fresh and archival PNET specimens to examine whether human sporadic and MEN-1-associated PNETs revealed similar abnormalities as in our mouse model and correlated the results with clinical and demographic factors of the study cohort. PTCH1 staining was positive in 12 of 22 PNET patients (55%). Four of 5 MEN-1 patients stained for PTCH1 (p = 0.32 as compared with sporadic disease patients). Nine of 16 patients with metastatic disease stained for PTCH1 as compared with zero of 3 with localized disease only (p = 0.21). No demographic or clinical features appeared to be predictive of PTCH 1 positivity and PTCH 1 positivity per se was not predictive of clinical outcome. PTCH1, a marker of HH pathway up regulation, is detectable in both primary and metastatic tumors in more than 50% of PNET patients. Although no clinical or demographic factors predict PTCH1 positivity and PTCH1 positivity does not predict clinical outcome, the frequency of expression alone indicates that perturbation of this pathway with agents such as Vismodegib, an inhibitor of Smoothened (SMO), should be examined in future clinical trials.