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Pancreatic Neoplasms: HELP
Articles by Cristina Rosa Ferrone
Based on 98 articles published since 2010
(Why 98 articles?)
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Between 2010 and 2020, C. Ferrone wrote the following 98 articles about Pancreatic Neoplasms.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2 · 3 · 4
1 Guideline Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma, Version 2.2017, NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology. 2017

Tempero, Margaret A / Malafa, Mokenge P / Al-Hawary, Mahmoud / Asbun, Horacio / Bain, Andrew / Behrman, Stephen W / Benson, Al B / Binder, Ellen / Cardin, Dana B / Cha, Charles / Chiorean, E Gabriela / Chung, Vincent / Czito, Brian / Dillhoff, Mary / Dotan, Efrat / Ferrone, Cristina R / Hardacre, Jeffrey / Hawkins, William G / Herman, Joseph / Ko, Andrew H / Komanduri, Srinadh / Koong, Albert / LoConte, Noelle / Lowy, Andrew M / Moravek, Cassadie / Nakakura, Eric K / O'Reilly, Eileen M / Obando, Jorge / Reddy, Sushanth / Scaife, Courtney / Thayer, Sarah / Weekes, Colin D / Wolff, Robert A / Wolpin, Brian M / Burns, Jennifer / Darlow, Susan. · ·J Natl Compr Canc Netw · Pubmed #28784865.

ABSTRACT: Ductal adenocarcinoma and its variants account for most pancreatic malignancies. High-quality multiphase imaging can help to preoperatively distinguish between patients eligible for resection with curative intent and those with unresectable disease. Systemic therapy is used in the neoadjuvant or adjuvant pancreatic cancer setting, as well as in the management of locally advanced unresectable and metastatic disease. Clinical trials are critical for making progress in treatment of pancreatic cancer. The NCCN Guidelines for Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma focus on diagnosis and treatment with systemic therapy, radiation therapy, and surgical resection.

2 Editorial FOLFIRINOX: desert, oasis, or mirage? 2015

Ferrone, Cristina R. ·Massachusetts General Hospital, Surgery, Boston, MA, USA, cFERRONE@mgh.harvard.edu. ·Ann Surg Oncol · Pubmed #25490873.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

3 Editorial Lymphadenectomy for pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors: is that the relevant debate? 2014

Ferrone, Cristina R. ·From the Division of General Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA. ·Ann Surg · Pubmed #24398923.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

4 Review Status of 5-Year Survivors of the Whipple Procedure for Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma. 2019

Mehtsun, Winta T / Hashimoto, Daniel A / Ferrone, Cristina R. ·Department of Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, 15 Parkman Street, WAC 460, Boston, MA 02114, USA. · Department of Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, 15 Parkman Street, WAC 460, Boston, MA 02114, USA. Electronic address: cferrone@mgh.harvard.edu. ·Adv Surg · Pubmed #31327451.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

5 Review Treatment of Locally Advanced Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma. 2016

Loehrer, Andrew P / Kinnier, Christine V / Ferrone, Cristina R. ·Department of Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, USA. · Department of Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, USA. Electronic address: cferrone@partners.org. ·Adv Surg · Pubmed #27520867.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

6 Review Treatment of Locally Advanced Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma. 2016

Loehrer, Andrew P / Ferrone, Cristina R. ·Department of Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Mass., USA. ·Dig Surg · Pubmed #27216011.

ABSTRACT: Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is increasingly common and a leading cause of cancer-related mortality. Surgery remains the only possibility for cure. Upwards of 40% of patients present with locally advanced PDAC (LA-PDAC), where management strategies continue to evolve. In this review, we highlight current trends in neoadjuvant chemotherapy, surgical resection, and other multimodality approaches for patients with LA-PDAC. Despite promising early results, additional work is needed to more accurately and appropriately tailor treatment for patients with LA-PDAC.

7 Review Spectrum and Classification of Cystic Neoplasms of the Pancreas. 2016

Greer, Jonathan B / Ferrone, Cristina R. ·General Surgery, Department of Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, 55 Fruit Street, GRB-425, Boston, MA 02114, USA. · Department of Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, 15 Parkman Street, Boston, MA 02114, USA. Electronic address: cferrone@mgh.harvard.edu. ·Surg Oncol Clin N Am · Pubmed #27013368.

ABSTRACT: As patients are living longer and axial imaging is more widespread, increasing numbers of cystic neoplasms of the pancreas are found. Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms and mucinous cystic neoplasms are the most common. The revised Sendai guidelines provide a safe algorithm for expectant management of certain cystic neoplasms; however, studies are ongoing to identify further subgroups that can be treated nonoperatively. For those patients with high-risk clinical features or symptoms, surgical resection can be performed safely at high-volume pancreatic centers. Accurate diagnosis is critical for accurate decision making.

8 Review Intraductal Papillary Mucinous Neoplasm of the Pancreas: Current State of the Art and Ongoing Controversies. 2016

Fong, Zhi Ven / Ferrone, Cristina R / Lillemoe, Keith D / Fernández-Del Castillo, Carlos. ·Department of Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA. ·Ann Surg · Pubmed #26727096.

ABSTRACT: With the widespread use and advances in radiographic imaging, Intraductal Papillary Mucinous Neoplasms (IPMNs) of the pancreas are identified with increasing frequency. Although many studies have addressed its biology and treatment, true understanding of its natural history continues to elude us. Its malignant potential places careproviders in a clinical dilemma of balancing the morbidity of pancreatectomy against the risk of malignant transformation while under continuous surveillance. Recently, there have been conflicting data published in the literature, generating more uncertainty in the field. In this article, we critically analyze the contrasting consensus guidelines from the International Association of Pancreatology and the American Gastroenterology Association, and address lingering questions and controversies. We also synthesize newly published data in the context of current standard of care, and provide a comprehensive review and recommendations for the clinical diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up strategy in the management of patients with Intraductal Papillary Mucinous Neoplasms.

9 Review Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms: does a family history of pancreatic cancer matter? 2012

Nehra, Deepika / Oyarvide, Vicente Morales / Mino-Kenudson, Mari / Thayer, Sarah P / Ferrone, Cristina R / Wargo, Jennifer A / Muzikansky, Alona / Finkelstein, Dianne / Warshaw, Andrew L / Castillo, Carlos Fernández-del. ·Department of Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston MA, USA. ·Pancreatology · Pubmed #22898638.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study is to compare surgically resected intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMNs) in patients with and without a family history of pancreatic cancer to gain insight into differences that may suggest the need for differential management. METHODS: A retrospective review of patients who underwent resection of an IPMN at the Massachusetts General Hospital (1990-2011) was conducted. Three hundred and twenty-four patients of whom 45 (13.9%) had a family history of pancreatic cancer were identified. Patients with (PFH) and without (NFH) a family history of pancreatic cancer were compared. RESULTS: There were no differences in demographic characteristics between groups. Extra-pancreatic malignancies diagnosed prior to the IPMN were more common in those with a PFH (35.6% vs 20.1%, p = 0.03). There were no differences in IPMN characteristics between groups including no difference in the presence of invasive disease (p = 0.55). Concurrent pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas were more common in those with a PFH (11.1% vs 2.9%, p = 0.02). The survival in the PFH group was marginally lower than the NFH group, a difference found to be attributable to the higher prevalence of extra-pancreatic malignancies. CONCLUSION: Characteristics of surgically resected IPMNs are not different between patients with and without a family history of pancreatic cancer. Most importantly, the incidence of invasive disease is not different, suggesting that these lesions may not be more aggressive when they occur in the presence of a family history of pancreatic cancer.

10 Clinical Trial Total Neoadjuvant Therapy With FOLFIRINOX Followed by Individualized Chemoradiotherapy for Borderline Resectable Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma: A Phase 2 Clinical Trial. 2018

Murphy, Janet E / Wo, Jennifer Y / Ryan, David P / Jiang, Wenqing / Yeap, Beow Y / Drapek, Lorraine C / Blaszkowsky, Lawrence S / Kwak, Eunice L / Allen, Jill N / Clark, Jeffrey W / Faris, Jason E / Zhu, Andrew X / Goyal, Lipika / Lillemoe, Keith D / DeLaney, Thomas F / Fernández-Del Castillo, Carlos / Ferrone, Cristina R / Hong, Theodore S. ·Division of Hematology/Oncology, Department of Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston. · Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston. · Department of Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston. ·JAMA Oncol · Pubmed #29800971.

ABSTRACT: Importance: Patients with borderline-resectable pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma have historically poor outcomes with surgery followed by adjuvant chemotherapy. Evaluation of a total neoadjuvant approach with highly active therapy is warranted. Objective: To evaluate the margin-negative (R0) resection rate in borderline-resectable pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma after neoadjuvant FOLFIRINOX (fluorouracil, irinotecan, and oxaliplatin) therapy and individualized chemoradiotherapy. Design, Setting, and Participants: A single-arm, phase 2 clinical trial was conducted at a large academic hospital with expertise in pancreatic surgery from August 3, 2012, through August 31, 2016, among 48 patients with newly diagnosed, previously untreated, localized pancreatic cancer determined to be borderline resectable by multidisciplinary review, who had Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status 0 or 1 and adequate hematologic, renal, and hepatic function. Median follow-up for the analysis was 18.0 months among the 30 patients still alive at study completion. Interventions: Patients received FOLFIRINOX for 8 cycles. Upon restaging, patients with resolution of vascular involvement received short-course chemoradiotherapy (5 Gy × 5 with protons) with capecitabine. Patients with persistent vascular involvement received long-course chemoradiotherapy with fluorouracil or capecitabine. Main Outcomes and Measures: The primary outcome was R0 resection rate; secondary outcomes were median progression-free survival (PFS) and median overall survival (OS). Results: Of the 48 eligible patients, 27 were men and 21 were women, with a median age of 62 years (range, 46-74 years). Of the 43 patients who planned to receive 8 preoperative cycles of chemotherapy, 34 (79%) were able to complete all cycles. Twenty-seven patients (56%) had short-course chemoradiotherapy, while 17 patients (35%) had long-course chemoradiotherapy. R0 resection was achieved in 31 of the 48 eligible patients (65%; 95% CI, 49%-78%). Among the 32 patients who underwent resection, the R0 resection rate was 97% (n = 31). Median PFS among all eligible patients was 14.7 months (95% CI, 10.5 to not reached), with 2-year PFS of 43%; median OS was 37.7 months (95% CI, 19.4 to not reached), with 2-year OS of 56%. Among patients who underwent resection, median PFS was 48.6 months (95% CI, 14.4 to not reached) and median OS has not been reached, with a 2-year PFS of 55% and a 2-year OS of 72%. Conclusions and Relevance: Preoperative FOLFIRINOX followed by individualized chemoradiotherapy in borderline resectable pancreatic cancer results in high rates of R0 resection and prolonged median PFS and median OS, supporting ongoing phase 3 trials. Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01591733.

11 Clinical Trial A phase 1/2 and biomarker study of preoperative short course chemoradiation with proton beam therapy and capecitabine followed by early surgery for resectable pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. 2014

Hong, Theodore S / Ryan, David P / Borger, Darrell R / Blaszkowsky, Lawrence S / Yeap, Beow Y / Ancukiewicz, Marek / Deshpande, Vikram / Shinagare, Shweta / Wo, Jennifer Y / Boucher, Yves / Wadlow, Raymond C / Kwak, Eunice L / Allen, Jill N / Clark, Jeffrey W / Zhu, Andrew X / Ferrone, Cristina R / Mamon, Harvey J / Adams, Judith / Winrich, Barbara / Grillo, Tarin / Jain, Rakesh K / DeLaney, Thomas F / Fernandez-del Castillo, Carlos / Duda, Dan G. ·Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. Electronic address: tshong1@partners.org. · Department of Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. · Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. · Department of Pathology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. · Department of Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. · Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women's Hospital/Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts. ·Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys · Pubmed #24867540.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: To evaluate the safety, efficacy and biomarkers of short-course proton beam radiation and capecitabine, followed by pancreaticoduodenectomy in a phase 1/2 study in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) patients. METHODS AND MATERIALS: Patients with radiographically resectable, biopsy-proven PDAC were treated with neoadjuvant short-course (2-week) proton-based radiation with capecitabine, followed by surgery and adjuvant gemcitabine. The primary objective was to demonstrate a rate of toxicity grade ≥ 3 of <20%. Exploratory biomarker studies were performed using surgical specimen tissues and peripheral blood. RESULTS: The phase 2 dose was established at 5 daily doses of 5 GyE. Fifty patients were enrolled, of whom 35 patients were treated in the phase 2 portion. There were no grade 4 or 5 toxicities, and only 2 of 35 patients (4.1%) experienced a grade 3 toxicity event (chest wall pain grade 1, colitis grade 1). Of 48 patients eligible for analysis, 37 underwent pancreaticoduodenectomy. Thirty of 37 (81%) had positive nodes. Locoregional failure occurred in 6 of 37 resected patients (16.2%), and distant recurrence occurred in 35 of 48 patients (72.9%). With median follow-up of 38 months, the median progression-free survival for the entire group was 10 months, and overall survival was 17 months. Biomarker studies showed significant associations between worse survival outcomes and the KRAS point mutation change from glycine to aspartic acid at position 12, stromal CXCR7 expression, and circulating biomarkers CEA, CA19-9, and HGF (all, P<.05). CONCLUSIONS: This study met the primary endpoint by showing a rate of 4.1% grade 3 toxicity for neoadjuvant short-course proton-based chemoradiation. Treatment was associated with favorable local control. In exploratory analyses, KRAS(G12D) status and high CXCR7 expression and circulating CEA, CA19-9, and HGF levels were associated with poor survival.

12 Clinical Trial Phase I study of neoadjuvant accelerated short course radiation therapy with photons and capecitabine for resectable pancreatic cancer. 2014

Wo, Jennifer Y / Mamon, Harvey J / Ferrone, Cristina R / Ryan, David P / Blaszkowsky, Lawrence S / Kwak, Eunice L / Tseng, Yolanda D / Napolitano, Brian N / Ancukiewicz, Marek / Swanson, Richard S / Lillemoe, Keith D / Fernandez-del Castillo, Carlos / Hong, Theodore S. ·Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, United States. Electronic address: jwo@partners.org. · Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, United States. · Department of General Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, United States. · Department of Medical Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, United States. · Harvard Radiation Oncology Program, Boston, United States. · Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, United States. · Department of General Surgery, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, United States. ·Radiother Oncol · Pubmed #24231241.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: In this phase I study, we sought to determine the feasibility and tolerability of neoadjuvant short course radiotherapy (SC-CRT) delivered with photon RT with concurrent capecitabine for resectable pancreatic adenocarcinoma. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Ten patients with localized, resectable pancreatic adenocarcinoma were enrolled from December 2009 to August 2011. In dose level I, patients received 3 Gy × 10. In dose level 2, patients received 5 Gy × 5 (every other day). In dose level 3, patients received 5 Gy × 5 (consecutive days). Capecitabine was given during weeks 1 and 2. Surgery was performed 1-3 weeks after completion of chemotherapy. RESULTS: With an intended accrual of 12 patients, the study was closed early due to unexpected intraoperative complications. Compared to the companion phase I proton study, patients treated with photons had increased intraoperative RT fibrosis reported by surgeons (27% vs. 63%). Among those undergoing a Whipple resection, increased RT fibrosis translated to an increased mean OR time of 69 min. Dosimetric comparison revealed significantly increased low dose exposure to organs at risk for patients treated with photon RT. CONCLUSIONS: This phase I experience evaluating the tolerability of neoadjuvant SC-CRT with photon RT closed early due to unexpected intraoperative complications.

13 Article Diabetes mellitus is associated with unfavorable pathologic features, increased postoperative mortality, and worse long-term survival in resected pancreatic cancer. 2019

Hank, Thomas / Sandini, Marta / Qadan, Motaz / Weniger, Maximilian / Ciprani, Debora / Li, Annie / Ferrone, Cristina R / Warshaw, Andrew L / Lillemoe, Keith D / Fernández-Del Castillo, Carlos. ·Department of Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA. · Department of Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA. Electronic address: CFernandez@mgh.harvard.edu. ·Pancreatology · Pubmed #31706821.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The risk of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is increased in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM), particularly in those with new-onset DM. However, the impact of DM on outcomes following pancreatic surgery is not fully understood. We sought to explore the effects of DM on post-resection outcomes in patients undergoing either upfront resection or following neoadjuvant treatment (NAT). METHODS: Resections for PDAC between 2007 and 2016 were identified from a prospectively-maintained database. Data on demographics, pathology, and perioperative outcomes were compared between patients with or without DM. Survival analysis was performed using Kaplan-Meier curves and adjusted for confounders by a Cox-proportional hazards model. RESULTS: 662 patients were identified, of whom 277 (41.8%) had DM. Diabetics were more likely to be male, had higher BMI, and higher ASA-scores. At pathology, DM was associated with larger tumors (30 vs. 26 mm; p = 0.041), higher rates of lymph-node involvement (69% vs. 59%; p = 0.031) and perineural invasion (88% vs. 82%; p = 0.026). Despite having similar rates of complications, diabetics experienced higher 30-day mortality (3.2% vs. 0.8%; p = 0.019). Median overall survival was worse in diabetic patients (18 vs. 34 months; p < 0.001); this effect was more pronounced in patients with NAT (18 vs. 54 months; p < 0.001). At multivariate analysis, DM was confirmed as an independent predictor of post-resection survival. CONCLUSION: DM is a common comorbidity in PDAC and is associated with unfavorable pathology, as well as worse postoperative and oncologic outcomes. The blunted effect on survival is more pronounced in patients who undergo resection following NAT.

14 Article Enhancer signatures stratify and predict outcomes of non-functional pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. 2019

Cejas, Paloma / Drier, Yotam / Dreijerink, Koen M A / Brosens, Lodewijk A A / Deshpande, Vikram / Epstein, Charles B / Conemans, Elfi B / Morsink, Folkert H M / Graham, Mindy K / Valk, Gerlof D / Vriens, Menno R / Castillo, Carlos Fernandez-Del / Ferrone, Cristina R / Adar, Tomer / Bowden, Michaela / Whitton, Holly J / Da Silva, Annacarolina / Font-Tello, Alba / Long, Henry W / Gaskell, Elizabeth / Shoresh, Noam / Heaphy, Christopher M / Sicinska, Ewa / Kulke, Matthew H / Chung, Daniel C / Bernstein, Bradley E / Shivdasani, Ramesh A. ·Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA, USA. · Center for Functional Cancer Epigenetics, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA, USA. · Translational Oncology Laboratory, Hospital La Paz Institute for Health Research, Madrid, Spain. · Broad Institute of Harvard and MIT, Cambridge, MA, USA. yotam.drier@mail.huji.ac.il. · Department of Pathology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA. yotam.drier@mail.huji.ac.il. · Lautenberg Center for Immunology and Cancer Research, Hebrew University, Faculty of Medicine, Jerusalem, Israel. yotam.drier@mail.huji.ac.il. · Department of Endocrine Oncology, UMC Utrecht Cancer Center, Utrecht, the Netherlands. · Department of Internal Medicine, Amsterdam UMC, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. · Department of Pathology, UMC Utrecht Cancer Center, Utrecht, the Netherlands. · Department of Pathology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA. · Broad Institute of Harvard and MIT, Cambridge, MA, USA. · Department of Pathology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA. · Department of Surgical Oncology, UMC Utrecht Cancer Center, Utrecht, the Netherlands. · Department of Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA. · Department of Gastroenterology Division, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA. · Department of Oncologic Pathology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA, USA. · Departments of Medicine, Brigham & Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA. · Broad Institute of Harvard and MIT, Cambridge, MA, USA. bernstein.bradley@mgh.harvard.edu. · Department of Pathology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA. bernstein.bradley@mgh.harvard.edu. · Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA, USA. ramesh_shivdasani@dfci.harvard.edu. · Center for Functional Cancer Epigenetics, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA, USA. ramesh_shivdasani@dfci.harvard.edu. · Departments of Medicine, Brigham & Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA. ramesh_shivdasani@dfci.harvard.edu. ·Nat Med · Pubmed #31263286.

ABSTRACT: Most pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PNETs) do not produce excess hormones and are therefore considered 'non-functional'

15 Article Cross Validation of the Monoclonal Antibody Das-1 in Identification of High-Risk Mucinous Pancreatic Cystic Lesions. 2019

Das, Koushik K / Geng, Xin / Brown, Jeffrey W / Morales-Oyarvide, Vicente / Huynh, Tiffany / Pergolini, Ilaria / Pitman, Martha B / Ferrone, Cristina / Al Efishat, Mohammad / Haviland, Dana / Thompson, Elizabeth / Wolfgang, Christopher / Lennon, Anne Marie / Allen, Peter / Lillemoe, Keith D / Fields, Ryan C / Hawkins, William G / Liu, Jingxia / Castillo, Carlos Fernandez-Del / Das, Kiron M / Mino-Kenudson, Mari. ·Division of Gastroenterology, Washington University, St Louis, Missouri. Electronic address: k.das@wustl.edu. · Division of Gastroenterology, Rutgers-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, New Brunswick, New Jersey. · Division of Gastroenterology, Washington University, St Louis, Missouri. · Department of Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts. · Deparment of Pathology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts. · Department of Surgery, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York. · Department of Pathology, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland. · Department of Surgery Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland. · Division of Gastroenterology, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland. · Department of Surgery, Washington University, St Louis, Missouri. · Deparment of Pathology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts. Electronic address: mminokenudson@partners.org. ·Gastroenterology · Pubmed #31175863.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND & AIMS: Although pancreatic cystic lesions (PCLs) are frequently and incidentally detected, it is a challenge to determine their risk of malignancy. In immunohistochemical and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) analyses of tissue and cyst fluid from pancreatic intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms, the monoclonal antibody Das-1 identifies those at risk for malignancy with high levels of specificity and sensitivity. We aimed to validate the ability of Das-1 to identify high-risk PCLs in comparison to clinical guidelines and clinical features, using samples from a multicenter cohort. METHODS: We obtained cyst fluid samples of 169 PCLs (90 intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms, 43 mucinous cystic neoplasms, and 36 non-mucinous cysts) from patients undergoing surgery at 4 tertiary referral centers (January 2010 through June 2017). Histology findings from surgical samples, analyzed independently and centrally re-reviewed in a blinded manner, were used as the reference standard. High-risk PCLs were those with invasive carcinomas, high-grade dysplasia, or intestinal-type intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms with intermediate-grade dysplasia. An ELISA with Das-1 was performed in parallel using banked cyst fluid samples. We evaluated the biomarker's performance, generated area under the curve values, and conducted multivariate logistic regression using clinical and pathology features. RESULTS: The ELISA for Das-1 identified high-risk PCLs with 88% sensitivity, 99% specificity, and 95% accuracy, at a cutoff optical density value of 0.104. In 10-fold cross-validation analysis with 100 replications, Das-1 identified high-risk PCLs with 88% sensitivity and 98% specificity. The Sendai, Fukuoka, and American Gastroenterological Association guideline criteria identified high-risk PCLs with 46%, 52%, and 74% accuracy (P for comparison to Das-1 ELISA <.001). When we controlled for Das-1 in multivariate regression, main pancreatic duct dilation >5 mm (odds ratio, 14.98; 95% confidence interval, 2.63-108; P < .0012), main pancreatic duct dilation ≥1 cm (odds ratio, 47.9; 95% confidence interval, 6.39-490; P < .0001), and jaundice (odds ratio, 6.16; 95% confidence interval, 1.08-36.7; P = .0397) were significantly associated with high-risk PCLs. CONCLUSIONS: We validated the ability of an ELISA with the monoclonal antibody Das-1 to detect PCLs at risk for malignancy with high levels of sensitivity and specificity. This biomarker might be used in conjunction with clinical guidelines to identify patients at risk for malignancy.

16 Article Stromal Microenvironment Shapes the Intratumoral Architecture of Pancreatic Cancer. 2019

Ligorio, Matteo / Sil, Srinjoy / Malagon-Lopez, Jose / Nieman, Linda T / Misale, Sandra / Di Pilato, Mauro / Ebright, Richard Y / Karabacak, Murat N / Kulkarni, Anupriya S / Liu, Ann / Vincent Jordan, Nicole / Franses, Joseph W / Philipp, Julia / Kreuzer, Johannes / Desai, Niyati / Arora, Kshitij S / Rajurkar, Mihir / Horwitz, Elad / Neyaz, Azfar / Tai, Eric / Magnus, Neelima K C / Vo, Kevin D / Yashaswini, Chittampalli N / Marangoni, Francesco / Boukhali, Myriam / Fatherree, Jackson P / Damon, Leah J / Xega, Kristina / Desai, Rushil / Choz, Melissa / Bersani, Francesca / Langenbucher, Adam / Thapar, Vishal / Morris, Robert / Wellner, Ulrich F / Schilling, Oliver / Lawrence, Michael S / Liss, Andrew S / Rivera, Miguel N / Deshpande, Vikram / Benes, Cyril H / Maheswaran, Shyamala / Haber, Daniel A / Fernandez-Del-Castillo, Carlos / Ferrone, Cristina R / Haas, Wilhelm / Aryee, Martin J / Ting, David T. ·Cancer Center, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA 02114, USA; Department of Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA 02114, USA. · Cancer Center, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA 02114, USA. · Cancer Center, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA 02114, USA; Department of Pathology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA 02114, USA. · Division of Rheumatology, Allergy, and Immunology, Center for Immunology and Inflammatory Diseases, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA 02114, USA. · Cancer Center, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA 02114, USA; Center for Engineering in Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA 02114, USA; Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114, USA. · Cancer Center, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA 02114, USA; Department of Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA 02114, USA; Department of Pathology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA 02114, USA. · Clinic of Surgery, UKSH Campus Lübeck, Germany. · Institute of Pathology, University Medical Center Freiburg, Germany. · Department of Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA 02114, USA. · Cancer Center, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA 02114, USA; Division of Rheumatology, Allergy, and Immunology, Center for Immunology and Inflammatory Diseases, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA 02114, USA; Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Chevy Chase, MD 20815, USA. · Cancer Center, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA 02114, USA; Department of Pathology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA 02114, USA; Department of Biostatistics, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA 02115, USA. Electronic address: aryee.martin@mgh.harvard.edu. · Cancer Center, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA 02114, USA; Department of Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA 02114, USA. Electronic address: dting1@mgh.harvard.edu. ·Cell · Pubmed #31155233.

ABSTRACT: Single-cell technologies have described heterogeneity across tissues, but the spatial distribution and forces that drive single-cell phenotypes have not been well defined. Combining single-cell RNA and protein analytics in studying the role of stromal cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) in modulating heterogeneity in pancreatic cancer (pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma [PDAC]) model systems, we have identified significant single-cell population shifts toward invasive epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and proliferative (PRO) phenotypes linked with mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) signaling. Using high-content digital imaging of RNA in situ hybridization in 195 PDAC tumors, we quantified these EMT and PRO subpopulations in 319,626 individual cancer cells that can be classified within the context of distinct tumor gland "units." Tumor gland typing provided an additional layer of intratumoral heterogeneity that was associated with differences in stromal abundance and clinical outcomes. This demonstrates the impact of the stroma in shaping tumor architecture by altering inherent patterns of tumor glands in human PDAC.

17 Article Antitumor Responses in the Absence of Toxicity in Solid Tumors by Targeting B7-H3 via Chimeric Antigen Receptor T Cells. 2019

Du, Hongwei / Hirabayashi, Koichi / Ahn, Sarah / Kren, Nancy Porterfield / Montgomery, Stephanie Ann / Wang, Xinhui / Tiruthani, Karthik / Mirlekar, Bhalchandra / Michaud, Daniel / Greene, Kevin / Herrera, Silvia Gabriela / Xu, Yang / Sun, Chuang / Chen, Yuhui / Ma, Xingcong / Ferrone, Cristina Rosa / Pylayeva-Gupta, Yuliya / Yeh, Jen Jen / Liu, Rihe / Savoldo, Barbara / Ferrone, Soldano / Dotti, Gianpietro. ·Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA. · Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA; Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA. · Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA; Department of Genetics, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA. · Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA; Department of Pathology & Laboratory Medicine, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA. · Department of Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114, USA. · Division of Chemical Biology and Medicinal Chemistry, Eshelman School of Pharmacy, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA. · Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA; Department of Cell Biology and Physiology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA. · Department of Pathology & Laboratory Medicine, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA. · Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA; Department of Surgery, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA; Department of Pharmacology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA. · Division of Chemical Biology and Medicinal Chemistry, Eshelman School of Pharmacy, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA; Carolina Center for Genome Sciences, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA. · Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA; Department of Pediatrics, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA. · Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA; Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA. Electronic address: gdotti@med.unc.edu. ·Cancer Cell · Pubmed #30753824.

ABSTRACT: The high expression across multiple tumor types and restricted expression in normal tissues make B7-H3 an attractive target for immunotherapy. We generated chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells targeting B7-H3 (B7-H3.CAR-Ts) and found that B7-H3.CAR-Ts controlled the growth of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, ovarian cancer and neuroblastoma in vitro and in orthotopic and metastatic xenograft mouse models, which included patient-derived xenograft. We also found that 4-1BB co-stimulation promotes lower PD-1 expression in B7-H3.CAR-Ts, and superior antitumor activity when targeting tumor cells that constitutively expressed PD-L1. We took advantage of the cross-reactivity of the B7-H3.CAR with murine B7-H3, and found that B7-H3.CAR-Ts significantly controlled tumor growth in a syngeneic tumor model without evident toxicity. These findings support the clinical development of B7-H3.CAR-Ts.

18 Article Neoadjuvant FOLFIRINOX for Patients with Borderline Resectable or Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer: Results of a Decision Analysis. 2019

Choi, Jin G / Nipp, Ryan D / Tramontano, Angela / Ali, Ayman / Zhan, Tiannan / Pandharipande, Pari / Dowling, Emily C / Ferrone, Cristina R / Hong, Theodore S / Schrag, Deborah / Fernandez-Del Castillo, Carlos / Ryan, David P / Kong, Chung Yin / Hur, Chin. ·Gastrointestinal Unit, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Institute for Technology Assessment, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Health Innovations Research and Evaluations Unit, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY, USA. · Department of Medical Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, USA rnipp@mgh.harvard.edu. · Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Department of Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Department of Medical Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Herbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY, USA. ·Oncologist · Pubmed #30559125.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of using neoadjuvant FOLFIRINOX (nFOLFIRINOX) for patients with borderline resectable or locally advanced pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (BR/LA PDAC) are unknown. Our objective was to determine whether nFOLFIRINOX is more effective or cost-effective for patients with BR/LA PDAC compared with upfront resection surgery and adjuvant gemcitabine plus capecitabine (GEM/CAPE) or gemcitabine monotherapy (GEM). MATERIALS AND METHODS: We performed a decision-analysis to assess the value of nFOLFIRINOX versus GEM/CAPE or GEM using a mathematical simulation model. Model transition probabilities were estimated using published and institutional clinical data. Model outcomes included overall and disease-free survival, quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs), cost in U.S. dollars, and cost-effectiveness expressed as an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio. Deterministic and probabilistic sensitivity analyses explored the uncertainty of model assumptions. RESULTS: Model results found median overall survival (34.5/28.0/22.0 months) and disease-free survival (15.0/14.0/13.0 months) were better for nFOLFIRINOX compared with GEM/CAPE and GEM. nFOLFIRINOX was the optimal strategy on an efficiency frontier, resulting in an additional 0.35 life-years, or 0.30 QALYs, at a cost of $46,200/QALY gained compared with GEM/CAPE. Sensitivity analysis found that cancer recurrence and complete resection rates most affected model results, but were otherwise robust. Probabilistic sensitivity analyses found that nFOLFIRINOX was cost-effective 92.4% of the time at a willingness-to-pay threshold of $100,000/QALY. CONCLUSION: Our modeling analysis suggests that nFOLFIRINOX is preferable to upfront surgery for patients with BR/LA PDAC from both an effectiveness and cost-effectiveness standpoint. Additional clinical data that further define the long-term effectiveness of nFOLFIRINOX are needed to confirm our results. IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE: Increasingly, neoadjuvant FOLFIRINOX has been used for borderline resectable and locally advanced pancreatic cancer with the goal of rendering them resectable and decreasing risk of recurrence. Despite many efforts to show the benefits of neoadjuvant over adjuvant therapies, clinical evidence to guide this decision is largely lacking. Decision-analytic modeling can provide a methodologic platform that integrates the best available data to quantitatively explore clinical decisions by simulating a hypothetical clinical trial. This modeling analysis suggests that neoadjuvant FOLFIRINOX is preferable to upfront surgery and adjuvant therapies by various outcome metrics including quality-adjusted life years, overall survival, and incremental cost-effectiveness ratio.

19 Article Major Complications Independently Increase Long-Term Mortality After Pancreatoduodenectomy for Cancer. 2019

Sandini, M / Ruscic, K J / Ferrone, C R / Qadan, M / Eikermann, M / Warshaw, A L / Lillemoe, K D / Castillo, Carlos Fernández-Del. ·Department of Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, 15 Parkman ST, Boston, MA, 02114-02115, USA. · Department of Anesthesia, Critical Care, and Pain Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA. · Department of Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, 15 Parkman ST, Boston, MA, 02114-02115, USA. cfernandez@mgh.harvard.edu. ·J Gastrointest Surg · Pubmed #30225794.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Postoperative major morbidity has been associated with worse survival gastrointestinal tumors. This association remains controversial in pancreatic cancer (PC). We analyzed whether major complications after surgical resection affect long-term survival. METHODS: Records of all PC patients resected from 2007 to 2015 were reviewed. Major morbidity was defined as any grade-3 or higher 30-day complications, per the Clavien-Dindo Classification. Patients who died within 90 days after surgery were excluded from survival analysis. RESULTS: Of 616 patients, 81.7% underwent pancreatoduodenectomy (PD) and 18.3% distal pancreatectomy (DP). Major complications occurred in 19.1% after PD and 15.9% after DP. In patients who survived > 90 days, the likelihood of receiving adjuvant treatment was 43.9% if major complications had occurred, vs. 68.5% if not (p < 0.001), and those who received it started the treatment median 10 days later compared with uncomplicated patients (median 60 days (50-72) vs. 50 days (41-61), p = 0.001). By univariate analysis, in addition to the conventional pathology-related prognostic determinants and the receipt of adjuvant treatment, major complications worsened long-term survival after PD (median OS 26 months vs. 15, p = 0.008). A difference was also seen after DP, but it did not reach statistical significance, likely related to the small sample size (median OS 33 months vs. 18, p = 0.189). At multivariate analysis for PD, major postoperative complications remained independently associated with worse survival [HR 1.37, 95%CI (1.01-1.86)]. CONCLUSIONS: Major surgical complications after pancreaticoduodenectomy are associated with worse long-term survival in pancreatic cancer. This effect is independent of the receipt of adjuvant treatment.

20 Article ASO Author Reflections: Staging Laparoscopy Improves Overall Survival of Patients with Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma Found to Have Occult Metastatic Disease. 2018

Sell, Naomi M / Ferrone, Cristina R. ·Department of Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, USA. · Department of Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, USA. cferrone@mgh.harvard.edu. ·Ann Surg Oncol · Pubmed #30430323.

ABSTRACT:

21 Article Association Between Very Small Tumor Size and Decreased Overall Survival in Node-Positive Pancreatic Cancer. 2018

Muralidhar, Vinayak / Nipp, Ryan D / Mamon, Harvey J / Punglia, Rinaa S / Hong, Theodore S / Ferrone, Cristina / Fernandez-Del Castillo, Carlos / Parikh, Aparna / Nguyen, Paul L / Wo, Jennifer Y. ·Harvard Radiation Oncology Program, Boston, MA, USA. · Department of Medical Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, USA. · Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA, USA. · Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, USA. · Department of Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, USA. · Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, USA. jwo@mgh.harvard.edu. ·Ann Surg Oncol · Pubmed #30298331.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: In pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PDAC), increasing tumor size usually correlates with a worse prognosis. However, patients with a very small primary tumor who experience lymph node involvement may have a different disease biology. This study sought to determine the interaction between tumor size and lymph node involvement in terms of overall survival (OS). METHODS: The study identified 17,073 patients with a diagnosis of M0 resected PDAC between 1983 and 2013 using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database. The patients were stratified by lymph node involvement (N0 vs N+) and T stage (T1a-T1b vs T1c vs T2 vs T3 vs T4). The Kaplan-Meier method was used to estimate OS, and Cox regression analysis was used to compare survival between subgroups after adjustment for patient-specific factors. RESULTS: Lymph node involvement and T stage significantly interacted (p < 0.001). Among the patients with node-negative disease, 5-year OS decreased monotonically with increasing T stage (59.1%, 30.6%, 22.9%, 16.6%, and 8.0%, respectively; p < 0.001). In contrast, among the patients with node-positive disease, those with T1a-T1b tumors (< 10 mm) had worse 5-year OS than those with T1c tumors (7.4% vs 17.6%; adjusted hazard ratio, 0.70; 95% confidence interval, 0.50-0.97; p = 0.034) and similar survival compared with those who had T2, T3, or T4 tumors (9.7%, 8.2%, and 4.8%, respectively; p > 0.2 in all cases). CONCLUSIONS: Among patients with lymph node-positive PDAC, very small primary tumors are associated with decreased OS. This finding raises the possibility that small tumors capable of lymph node metastasis might represent more biologically aggressive cancers.

22 Article Intraoperative Dexamethasone Decreases Infectious Complications After Pancreaticoduodenectomy and is Associated with Long-Term Survival in Pancreatic Cancer. 2018

Sandini, Marta / Ruscic, Katarina J / Ferrone, Cristina R / Warshaw, Andrew L / Qadan, Motaz / Eikermann, Matthias / Lillemoe, Keith D / Fernández-Del Castillo, Carlos. ·Department of Surgery, Harvard Medical School, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, USA. · Department of Anesthesia, Critical Care, and Pain Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, USA. · Department of Surgery, Harvard Medical School, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, USA. CFERNANDEZ@mgh.harvard.edu. ·Ann Surg Oncol · Pubmed #30298316.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Dexamethasone is administered intraoperatively to prevent anesthesia-related nausea and vomiting and to reduce postoperative opioid administration. However, the adverse effects of corticosteroids on anastomotic healing and wound infection as well as oncologic outcomes remain unclear. We analyzed the effect of intraoperative dexamethasone administration on surgical outcomes after pancreaticoduodenectomy and on long-term survival in pancreatic cancer patients. METHODS: A total of 679 pancreaticoduodenectomies from a prospectively maintained database were analyzed. Surgical outcomes were compared between patients who received intraoperative dexamethasone and those who did not. Kaplan-Meier curves and Cox-regression survival analysis were performed in patients with pancreatic cancer. A propensity analysis was done to reduce the inherent bias of retrospective design. RESULTS: Patients who received dexamethasone (117, 17.2%) were younger and more likely to be female than those who did not (p = 0.001). Overall and 30-day major morbidity were similar among all resected patients, although there were fewer infectious complications in the dexamethasone group (18.8% vs. 28.5%, p = 0.032). In pancreatic cancer patients, dexamethasone was associated with significantly improved median overall survival (46 vs. 22 months, p = 0.017). This effect occurred independently of stage, pathologic characteristics, or adjuvant therapy, with adjusted hazard ratios, derived from pre-propensity and post-propensity analysis, of 0.67 (0.47-0.97) and 0.57 (0.37-0.87), respectively. CONCLUSIONS: A single intraoperative dose of dexamethasone did not increase morbidity after pancreaticoduodenectomy and, in fact, was associated with a decrease in infectious complications. The treatment was independently associated with improved overall survival in patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma, an effect that cannot be explained and needs further validation in a prospective setting.

23 Article Are Staging Computed Tomography (CT) Scans of the Chest Necessary in Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma? 2018

Mehtsun, Winta T / Chipidza, Fallon E / Fernández-Del Castillo, Carlos / Hemingway, Katherine / Fong, Zhi Ven / Chang, David C / Pandharipande, Pari / Clark, Jeffrey W / Allen, Jill / Hong, Theodore S / Wo, Jennifer Y / Warshaw, Andrew L / Lillemoe, Keith D / Ferrone, Cristina R. ·Department of Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, USA. · Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, USA. · Charles E. Schmidt College of Medicine, Florida Atlantic University, Boca Raton, FL, USA. · Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, USA. · Department of Medical Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, USA. · Department of Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, USA. cferrone@partners.org. ·Ann Surg Oncol · Pubmed #30276641.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: There is no consensus on the use of chest imaging in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) patients. Among PDAC patients, we examined the use of chest computed tomography (CT) over time and determined whether the use of chest CT led to a survival difference or change in management via identification of indeterminate lung nodules (ILNs). METHODS: Retrospective clinical data was collected for patients diagnosed with PDAC from 1998 to 2014. We examined the proportion of patients undergoing staging chest CT scan and those who had ILN, defined as ≥ 1 well-defined, noncalcified lung nodule(s) ≤ 1 cm in diameter. We determined time to overall survival (OS) using multivariate Cox regression. We also assessed changes in management of PDAC patients who later developed lung metastasis only. RESULTS: Of the 2710 patients diagnosed with PDAC, 632 (23%) had greater than one chest CT. Of those patients, 451 (71%) patients had ILNs, whereas 181 (29%) had no ILNs. There was no difference in median overall survival in patients without ILNs (16.4 [13.6, 19.0] months) versus those with ILN (14.8 [13.6, 15.8] months, P = 0.18). Examining patients who developed isolated lung metastases (3.3%), we found that staging chest CTs did not lead to changes in management of the primary abdominal tumor. CONCLUSIONS: Survival did not differ for PDAC patients with ILNs identified on staging chest CTs compared with those without ILNs. Furthermore, ILN identification did not lead to changes in management of the primary abdominal tumor, questioning the utility of staging chest CTs for PDAC patients.

24 Article Orthotopic and heterotopic murine models of pancreatic cancer and their different responses to FOLFIRINOX chemotherapy. 2018

Erstad, Derek J / Sojoodi, Mozhdeh / Taylor, Martin S / Ghoshal, Sarani / Razavi, Allen A / Graham-O'Regan, Katherine A / Bardeesy, Nabeel / Ferrone, Cristina R / Lanuti, Michael / Caravan, Peter / Tanabe, Kenneth K / Fuchs, Bryan C. ·Department of Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114, United States derstad@partners.org bfuchs@mgh.harvard.edu. · Department of Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114, United States. · Department of Pathology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114, United States. · Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Charlestown, MA 02129, United States. · Institute for Innovation in Imaging, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA 02114, United States. ·Dis Model Mech · Pubmed #29903803.

ABSTRACT: Syngeneic, immunocompetent allograft tumor models recapitulate important aspects of the tumor microenvironment and have short tumor latency with predictable growth kinetics, making them useful for trialing novel therapeutics. Here, we describe surgical techniques for orthotopic and heterotopic pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) tumor implantation and characterize phenotypes based on implantation site.Mice (

25 Article Association Between Changes in Body Composition and Neoadjuvant Treatment for Pancreatic Cancer. 2018

Sandini, Marta / Patino, Manuel / Ferrone, Cristina R / Alvarez-Pérez, Carlos A / Honselmann, Kim C / Paiella, Salvatore / Catania, Matteo / Riva, Luca / Tedesco, Giorgia / Casolino, Raffaella / Auriemma, Alessandra / Salandini, Maria C / Carrara, Giulia / Cristel, Giulia / Damascelli, Anna / Ippolito, Davide / D'Onofrio, Mirko / Lillemoe, Keith D / Bassi, Claudio / Braga, Marco / Gianotti, Luca / Sahani, Dushyant / Fernández-Del Castillo, Carlos. ·Department of Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. · Department of Surgery, School of Medicine and Surgery, San Gerardo Hospital, University of Milano-Bicocca, Monza, Italy. · Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. · Department of Surgery, The Pancreas Institute, Policlinico GB Rossi, University of Verona Hospital Trust, Verona, Italy. · Department of Radiology, The Pancreas Institute, Policlinico GB Rossi, University of Verona Hospital Trust, Verona, Italy. · Department of Radiology, School of Medicine and Surgery, San Gerardo Hospital, University of Milano-Bicocca, Monza, Italy. · Department of Oncology, The Pancreas Institute, Policlinico GB Rossi, University of Verona Hospital Trust, Verona, Italy. · Department of Surgery, Vita-Salute San Raffaele University, Milan, Italy. · Department of Radiology, Vita-Salute San Raffaele University, Milan, Italy. ·JAMA Surg · Pubmed #29801062.

ABSTRACT: Importance: Sarcopenia and sarcopenic obesity have been associated with poor outcomes in unresectable pancreatic cancer (PC). Neoadjuvant treatment (NT) is used increasingly to improve resectability; however, its effects on fat and muscle body composition have not been characterized. Objectives: To evaluate whether NT affects muscle mass and adipose tissue in patients with borderline resectable PC (BRPC) and locally advanced PC (LAPC) and determine whether there were potential differences between patients who ultimately underwent resection and those who did not. Design, Setting, and Participants: In this retrospective cohort study conducted at 4 academic medical centers, 193 patients with BRPC and LAPC undergoing surgical exploration after NT who had available computed tomographic scans (both at diagnosis and preoperatively) and confirmed pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma were evaluated. The study was conducted from January 2013 to December 2015. Data analysis was performed from September 2016 to May 2017. Measurement of body compartments was evaluated with volume assessment software before and after NT. A radiologist blinded to the patient outcome assessed the areas of skeletal muscle, total adipose tissue, and visceral adipose tissue through a standardized protocol. Exposures: Receipt of NT. Main Outcomes and Measures: Achievement of pancreatic resection at surgical exploration after the receipt of NT. Results: Of the 193 patients with complete radiologic imaging available after NT, 96 (49.7%) were women; mean (SD) age at diagnosis was 64 (11) years. Most patients received combined therapy with fluorouracil, irinotecan, oxaliplatin, leucovorin, and folic acid (124 [64.2%]) and 86 (44.6%) received chemoradiotherapy as well. The median interval between pre-NT and post-NT imaging was 6 months (interquartile range [IQR], 4-7 months). All body compartments significantly changed. The adipose compound decreased (median total adipose tissue area from 284.0 cm2; IQR, 171.0-414.0 to 250.0 cm2; IQR, 139.0-363.0; P < .001; median visceral adipose tissue area from 115.2 cm2; IQR, 59.9-191.0 to 97.7 cm2; IQR, 48.0-149.0 cm2; P < .001), whereas the lean mass slightly improved (median skeletal muscle from 122.1 cm2; IQR, 99.3-142.0 to 123 cm2; IQR 104.8-152.5 cm2; P = .001). Surgical resection was achievable in 136 (70.5%) patients. Patients who underwent resection had experienced a 5.9% skeletal muscle area increase during NT treatment, whereas those who did not undergo resection had a 1.7% decrease (P < .001). Conclusions and Relevance: Patients with PC experience a significant loss of adipose tissue during neoadjuvant chemotherapy, but no muscle wasting. An increase in muscle tissue during NT is associated with resectability.

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