Pick Topic
Review Topic
List Experts
Examine Expert
Save Expert
  Site Guide ··   
Pancreatic Neoplasms: HELP
Articles by Fraser R. Duthie
Based on 9 articles published since 2010
(Why 9 articles?)
||||

Between 2010 and 2020, F. Duthie wrote the following 9 articles about Pancreatic Neoplasms.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Article Feasibility and clinical utility of endoscopic ultrasound guided biopsy of pancreatic cancer for next-generation molecular profiling. 2019

Dreyer, Stephan B / Jamieson, Nigel B / Evers, Lisa / Duthie, Fraser / Cooke, Susie / Marshall, John / Beraldi, Dario / Knight, Stephen / Upstill-Goddard, Rosanna / Dickson, Euan J / Carter, C Ross / McKay, Colin J / Biankin, Andrew V / Chang, David K. ·Wolfson Wohl Cancer Research Centre, Institute of Cancer Sciences, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, UK; West of Scotland Pancreatic Unit, Glasgow Royal Infirmary, Glasgow, UK. · West of Scotland Pancreatic Unit, Glasgow Royal Infirmary, Glasgow, UK. · Wolfson Wohl Cancer Research Centre, Institute of Cancer Sciences, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, UK. · Department of Clinical Surgery, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK. · Wolfson Wohl Cancer Research Centre, Institute of Cancer Sciences, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, UK; West of Scotland Pancreatic Unit, Glasgow Royal Infirmary, Glasgow, UK. david.chang@glasgow.ac.uk. ·Chin Clin Oncol · Pubmed #31070037.

ABSTRACT: Next-generation sequencing is enabling molecularly guided therapy for many cancer types, yet failure rates remain relatively high in pancreatic cancer (PC). The aim of this study is to investigate the feasibility of genomic profiling using endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) biopsy samples to facilitate personalised therapy for PC. Ninty-five patients underwent additional research biopsies at the time of diagnostic EUS. Diagnostic formalin-fixed (FFPE) and fresh frozen EUS samples underwent DNA extraction, quantification and targeted gene sequencing. Whole genome (WGS) and RNA sequencing was performed as proof of concept. Only 2 patients (2%) with a diagnosis of PC had insufficient material for targeted sequencing in both FFPE and frozen specimens. Targeted panel sequencing (n=54) revealed mutations in PC genes (KRAS, GNAS, TP53, CDKN2A, SMAD4) in patients with histological evidence of PC, including potentially actionable mutations (BRCA1, BRCA2, ATM, BRAF). WGS (n=5) of EUS samples revealed mutational signatures that are potential biomarkers of therapeutic responsiveness. RNA sequencing (n=35) segregated patients into clinically relevant molecular subtypes based on transcriptome. Integrated multi-omic analysis of PC using standard EUS guided biopsies offers clinical utility to guide personalized therapy and study the molecular pathology in all patients with PC.

2 Article The role of induction chemotherapy + chemoradiotherapy in localised pancreatic cancer: initial experience in Scotland. 2017

Grose, Derek / McIntosh, David / Jamieson, Nigel / Carter, Ross / Dickson, Euan / Chang, David / Marashi, Husam / Wilson, Christina / Alfayez, Mohammed / Kerr, Ashleigh / O'Donoghue, Roisin / Haskins, Lea / Duthie, Fraser / McKay, Colin J / Graham, Janet. ·Beatson West of Scotland Cancer Centre, Glasgow, UK. ·J Gastrointest Oncol · Pubmed #28890819.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Despite being relatively rare pancreatic cancer is one of the highest causes of death. Even within the potentially resectable group outcomes are poor. We present our initial experiences utilising a neoadjuvant approach to localised pancreatic cancer, evaluating survival, response rates and tolerability. METHODS: This was a retrospective analysis of a prospectively maintained database. Patients from 2012 to 2015 referred to a busy regional Hepato-Pancreatic Biliary (HPB) MDT were included. Patients were classified according to respectability criteria (utilising NCCN guidelines) and a treatment plan agreed. Systemic therapy with either FOLFIRINOX or Gem/Cap was delivered followed by chemoradiotherapy if disease remained localised. Toxicity, response, pathological outcomes and survival were all recorded. RESULTS: A total of 85 patients were included in the study: 45 had initially resectable disease; 19 required a response for resection and 21 had locally advanced inoperable disease; 34 patients underwent resection. The median survival for the potentially resectable group was 22.2 months while for those undergoing resection it was 37 months. CONCLUSIONS: We have demonstrated that a neoadjuvant approach is deliverable and tolerable. In addition we have demonstrated impressive survival results in patients undergoing resection with no detriment in outcome for those not proceeding to surgery.

3 Article Whole-genome landscape of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumours. 2017

Scarpa, Aldo / Chang, David K / Nones, Katia / Corbo, Vincenzo / Patch, Ann-Marie / Bailey, Peter / Lawlor, Rita T / Johns, Amber L / Miller, David K / Mafficini, Andrea / Rusev, Borislav / Scardoni, Maria / Antonello, Davide / Barbi, Stefano / Sikora, Katarzyna O / Cingarlini, Sara / Vicentini, Caterina / McKay, Skye / Quinn, Michael C J / Bruxner, Timothy J C / Christ, Angelika N / Harliwong, Ivon / Idrisoglu, Senel / McLean, Suzanne / Nourse, Craig / Nourbakhsh, Ehsan / Wilson, Peter J / Anderson, Matthew J / Fink, J Lynn / Newell, Felicity / Waddell, Nick / Holmes, Oliver / Kazakoff, Stephen H / Leonard, Conrad / Wood, Scott / Xu, Qinying / Nagaraj, Shivashankar Hiriyur / Amato, Eliana / Dalai, Irene / Bersani, Samantha / Cataldo, Ivana / Dei Tos, Angelo P / Capelli, Paola / Davì, Maria Vittoria / Landoni, Luca / Malpaga, Anna / Miotto, Marco / Whitehall, Vicki L J / Leggett, Barbara A / Harris, Janelle L / Harris, Jonathan / Jones, Marc D / Humphris, Jeremy / Chantrill, Lorraine A / Chin, Venessa / Nagrial, Adnan M / Pajic, Marina / Scarlett, Christopher J / Pinho, Andreia / Rooman, Ilse / Toon, Christopher / Wu, Jianmin / Pinese, Mark / Cowley, Mark / Barbour, Andrew / Mawson, Amanda / Humphrey, Emily S / Colvin, Emily K / Chou, Angela / Lovell, Jessica A / Jamieson, Nigel B / Duthie, Fraser / Gingras, Marie-Claude / Fisher, William E / Dagg, Rebecca A / Lau, Loretta M S / Lee, Michael / Pickett, Hilda A / Reddel, Roger R / Samra, Jaswinder S / Kench, James G / Merrett, Neil D / Epari, Krishna / Nguyen, Nam Q / Zeps, Nikolajs / Falconi, Massimo / Simbolo, Michele / Butturini, Giovanni / Van Buren, George / Partelli, Stefano / Fassan, Matteo / Anonymous6880896 / Khanna, Kum Kum / Gill, Anthony J / Wheeler, David A / Gibbs, Richard A / Musgrove, Elizabeth A / Bassi, Claudio / Tortora, Giampaolo / Pederzoli, Paolo / Pearson, John V / Waddell, Nicola / Biankin, Andrew V / Grimmond, Sean M. ·ARC-Net Centre for Applied Research on Cancer, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona 37134, Italy. · Department of Pathology and Diagnostics, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona 37134, Italy. · Wolfson Wohl Cancer Research Centre, Institute of Cancer Sciences, University of Glasgow, Garscube Estate, Switchback Road, Bearsden, Glasgow G61 1QH, UK. · West of Scotland Pancreatic Unit, Glasgow Royal Infirmary, Glasgow G31 2ER, UK. · The Kinghorn Cancer Centre, Cancer Division, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, University of New South Wales, 384 Victoria St, Darlinghurst, Sydney, New South Wales 2010, Australia. · Department of Surgery, Bankstown Hospital, Eldridge Road, Bankstown, Sydney, New South Wales 2200, Australia. · South Western Sydney Clinical School, Faculty of Medicine, University of New South Wales, Liverpool, New South Wales 2170, Australia. · QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Herston Road, Brisbane 4006, Australia. · Queensland Centre for Medical Genomics, Institute for Molecular Bioscience, The University of Queensland, St Lucia, Brisbane, Queensland 4072, Australia. · Department of Surgery, Pancreas Institute, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona 37134, Italy. · Medical Oncology, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Department of Pathology, General Hospital of Treviso, Department of Medicine, University of Padua, Italy. · Department of Medicine, Section of Endocrinology, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona, Italy. · The University of Queensland, School of Medicine, Brisbane 4006, Australia. · Pathology Queensland, Brisbane 4006, Australia. · Royal Brisbane and Women's Hospital, Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Brisbane 4006, Australia. · Institute of Health Biomedical Innovation, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Australia. · School of Environmental &Life Sciences, University of Newcastle, Ourimbah, New South Wales 2258, Australia. · Key Laboratory of Carcinogenesis and Translational Research (Ministry of Education/Beijing), Centre for Cancer Bioinformatics, Peking University Cancer Hospital &Institute, Beijing 100142, China. · Department of Surgery, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Ipswich Rd, Woollongabba, Queensland 4102, Australia. · Department of Anatomical Pathology. St Vincent's Hospital, Sydney, New South Wales 2010, Australia. · Academic Unit of Surgery, School of Medicine, College of Medical, Veterinary and Life Sciences, University of Glasgow, Glasgow Royal Infirmary, Glasgow G4 OSF, UK. · Department of Pathology, Queen Elizabeth University Hospital, Greater Glasgow &Clyde NHS, Glasgow G51 4TF, UK. · Department of Molecular and Human Genetics, Human Genome Sequencing Center, Baylor College of Medicine, One Baylor Plaza, MS226, Houston, Texas 77030-3411, USA. · Michael E. DeBakey Department of Surgery and The Elkins Pancreas Center, Baylor College of Medicine, One Baylor Plaza, Houston, Texas 77030-3411, USA. · Children's Hospital at Westmead, Westmead, New South Wales 2145, Australia. · Children's Medical Research Institute, The University of Sydney, Westmead, New South Wales 2145, Australia. · Department of Surgery, Royal North Shore Hospital, St Leonards, Sydney, New South Wales 2065, Australia. · University of Sydney. Sydney, New South Wales 2006, Australia. · Tissue Pathology and Diagnostic Oncology, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Camperdown, New South Wales 2050, Australia. · School of Medicine, Western Sydney University, Penrith, New South Wales 2175, Australia. · Department of Surgery, Fremantle Hospital, Alma Street, Fremantle, Western Australia 6160, Australia. · Department of Gastroenterology, Royal Adelaide Hospital, North Terrace, Adelaide, South Australia 5000, Australia. · School of Surgery M507, University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Highway, Nedlands, Western Australia 6009, Australia. · St John of God Pathology, 12 Salvado Rd, Subiaco, Western Australia 6008, Australia. · Bendat Family Comprehensive Cancer Centre, St John of God Subiaco Hospital, Subiaco, Western Australia 6008, Australia. · University of Melbourne Centre for Cancer Research, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, 3010, Victoria, Australia. ·Nature · Pubmed #28199314.

ABSTRACT: The diagnosis of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumours (PanNETs) is increasing owing to more sensitive detection methods, and this increase is creating challenges for clinical management. We performed whole-genome sequencing of 102 primary PanNETs and defined the genomic events that characterize their pathogenesis. Here we describe the mutational signatures they harbour, including a deficiency in G:C > T:A base excision repair due to inactivation of MUTYH, which encodes a DNA glycosylase. Clinically sporadic PanNETs contain a larger-than-expected proportion of germline mutations, including previously unreported mutations in the DNA repair genes MUTYH, CHEK2 and BRCA2. Together with mutations in MEN1 and VHL, these mutations occur in 17% of patients. Somatic mutations, including point mutations and gene fusions, were commonly found in genes involved in four main pathways: chromatin remodelling, DNA damage repair, activation of mTOR signalling (including previously undescribed EWSR1 gene fusions), and telomere maintenance. In addition, our gene expression analyses identified a subgroup of tumours associated with hypoxia and HIF signalling.

4 Article Hypermutation In Pancreatic Cancer. 2017

Humphris, Jeremy L / Patch, Ann-Marie / Nones, Katia / Bailey, Peter J / Johns, Amber L / McKay, Skye / Chang, David K / Miller, David K / Pajic, Marina / Kassahn, Karin S / Quinn, Michael C J / Bruxner, Timothy J C / Christ, Angelika N / Harliwong, Ivon / Idrisoglu, Senel / Manning, Suzanne / Nourse, Craig / Nourbakhsh, Ehsan / Stone, Andrew / Wilson, Peter J / Anderson, Matthew / Fink, J Lynn / Holmes, Oliver / Kazakoff, Stephen / Leonard, Conrad / Newell, Felicity / Waddell, Nick / Wood, Scott / Mead, Ronald S / Xu, Qinying / Wu, Jianmin / Pinese, Mark / Cowley, Mark J / Jones, Marc D / Nagrial, Adnan M / Chin, Venessa T / Chantrill, Lorraine A / Mawson, Amanda / Chou, Angela / Scarlett, Christopher J / Pinho, Andreia V / Rooman, Ilse / Giry-Laterriere, Marc / Samra, Jaswinder S / Kench, James G / Merrett, Neil D / Toon, Christopher W / Epari, Krishna / Nguyen, Nam Q / Barbour, Andrew / Zeps, Nikolajs / Jamieson, Nigel B / McKay, Colin J / Carter, C Ross / Dickson, Euan J / Graham, Janet S / Duthie, Fraser / Oien, Karin / Hair, Jane / Morton, Jennifer P / Sansom, Owen J / Grützmann, Robert / Hruban, Ralph H / Maitra, Anirban / Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine A / Schulick, Richard D / Wolfgang, Christopher L / Morgan, Richard A / Lawlor, Rita T / Rusev, Borislav / Corbo, Vincenzo / Salvia, Roberto / Cataldo, Ivana / Tortora, Giampaolo / Tempero, Margaret A / Anonymous5070887 / Hofmann, Oliver / Eshleman, James R / Pilarsky, Christian / Scarpa, Aldo / Musgrove, Elizabeth A / Gill, Anthony J / Pearson, John V / Grimmond, Sean M / Waddell, Nicola / Biankin, Andrew V. ·The Kinghorn Cancer Centre, Darlinghurst, and the Cancer Research Program, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, Darlinghurst, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. · QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia; Queensland Centre for Medical Genomics, Institute for Molecular Bioscience, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. · Queensland Centre for Medical Genomics, Institute for Molecular Bioscience, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia; Wolfson Wohl Cancer Research Centre, Institute of Cancer Sciences, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, Scotland, United Kingdom. · Wolfson Wohl Cancer Research Centre, Institute of Cancer Sciences, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, Scotland, United Kingdom; Department of Surgery, Bankstown Hospital, Bankstown, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia; South Western Sydney Clinical School, Faculty of Medicine, University of New South Wales Australia, Liverpool, New South Wales, Australia; West of Scotland Pancreatic Unit, Glasgow Royal Infirmary, Glasgow, United Kingdom. · The Kinghorn Cancer Centre, Darlinghurst, and the Cancer Research Program, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, Darlinghurst, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia; Queensland Centre for Medical Genomics, Institute for Molecular Bioscience, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. · The Kinghorn Cancer Centre, Darlinghurst, and the Cancer Research Program, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, Darlinghurst, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia; St Vincent's Clinical School, Faculty of Medicine, University of New South Wales Australia, Darlinghurst, New South Wales, Australia. · Queensland Centre for Medical Genomics, Institute for Molecular Bioscience, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia; Genetic and Molecular Pathology, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia; School of Biological Sciences, The University of Adelaide, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia. · Queensland Centre for Medical Genomics, Institute for Molecular Bioscience, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. · Queensland Centre for Medical Genomics, Institute for Molecular Bioscience, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia; St Vincent's Clinical School, Faculty of Medicine, University of New South Wales Australia, Darlinghurst, New South Wales, Australia. · The Kinghorn Cancer Centre, Darlinghurst, and the Cancer Research Program, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, Darlinghurst, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia; South Eastern Area Laboratory Services Pathology, Prince of Wales Hospital, Randwick, New South Wales, Australia; Sonic Genetics, Douglass Hanly Moir Pathology, New South Wales, Australia. · The Kinghorn Cancer Centre, Darlinghurst, and the Cancer Research Program, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, Darlinghurst, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia; Wolfson Wohl Cancer Research Centre, Institute of Cancer Sciences, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, Scotland, United Kingdom. · The Kinghorn Cancer Centre, Darlinghurst, and the Cancer Research Program, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, Darlinghurst, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia; Macarthur Cancer Therapy Centre, Campbelltown Hospital, New South Wales, Australia. · The Kinghorn Cancer Centre, Darlinghurst, and the Cancer Research Program, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, Darlinghurst, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia; Department of Anatomical Pathology, SydPath, St Vincent's Hospital, New South Wales, Australia. · The Kinghorn Cancer Centre, Darlinghurst, and the Cancer Research Program, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, Darlinghurst, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia; School of Environmental and Life Sciences, University of Newcastle, Ourimbah, New South Wales, Australia. · Department of Surgery, Royal North Shore Hospital, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia; University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. · The Kinghorn Cancer Centre, Darlinghurst, and the Cancer Research Program, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, Darlinghurst, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia; University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia; Tissue Pathology and Diagnostic Oncology, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Camperdown, New South Wales, Australia. · Department of Surgery, Bankstown Hospital, Bankstown, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia; School of Medicine, Western Sydney University, Penrith, New South Wales, Australia. · Department of Surgery, Fiona Stanley Hospital, Murdoch, Washington. · Department of Gastroenterology, Royal Adelaide Hospital, North Terrace, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia. · Department of Surgery, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Woollongabba, Queensland, Australia. · School of Surgery, University of Western Australia, Australia and St John of God Pathology, Subiaco, Washington. · Wolfson Wohl Cancer Research Centre, Institute of Cancer Sciences, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, Scotland, United Kingdom; West of Scotland Pancreatic Unit, Glasgow Royal Infirmary, Glasgow, United Kingdom; Academic Unit of Surgery, School of Medicine, College of Medical, Veterinary and Life Sciences, University of Glasgow, Glasgow Royal Infirmary, Glasgow, United Kingdom. · West of Scotland Pancreatic Unit, Glasgow Royal Infirmary, Glasgow, United Kingdom. · Wolfson Wohl Cancer Research Centre, Institute of Cancer Sciences, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, Scotland, United Kingdom; Department of Medical Oncology, Beatson West of Scotland Cancer Centre, Glasgow, United Kingdom. · Department of Pathology, Southern General Hospital, Greater Glasgow & Clyde National Health Service, Glasgow, United Kingdom. · Greater Glasgow and Clyde Bio-repository, Pathology Department, Queen Elizabeth University Hospital, Glasgow, United Kingdom. · Cancer Research UK Beatson Institute, Glasgow, United Kingdom; Institute for Cancer Science, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, United Kingdom. · Universitätsklinikum Erlangen, Erlangen, Germany. · Department of Pathology, The Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland. · Department of Surgery, The Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland. · ARC-NET Center for Applied Research on Cancer, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona, Italy; Department of Pathology and Diagnostics, University of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Department of Medicine, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Division of Hematology and Oncology, University of California, San Francisco, California. · Australian Pancreatic Cancer Genome Initiative. · Wolfson Wohl Cancer Research Centre, Institute of Cancer Sciences, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, Scotland, United Kingdom. · Universitätsklinikum Erlangen, Department of Surgery, University of Erlangen-Nueremberg, Germany. · The Kinghorn Cancer Centre, Darlinghurst, and the Cancer Research Program, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, Darlinghurst, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia; Wolfson Wohl Cancer Research Centre, Institute of Cancer Sciences, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, Scotland, United Kingdom; St Vincent's Clinical School, Faculty of Medicine, University of New South Wales Australia, Darlinghurst, New South Wales, Australia. · The Kinghorn Cancer Centre, Darlinghurst, and the Cancer Research Program, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, Darlinghurst, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia; University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia; Department of Anatomical Pathology, Royal North Shore Hospital, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. · Queensland Centre for Medical Genomics, Institute for Molecular Bioscience, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia; University of Melbourne Centre for Cancer Research, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. · QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia; Queensland Centre for Medical Genomics, Institute for Molecular Bioscience, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. Electronic address: nic.waddell@qimrberghofer.edu.au. · Wolfson Wohl Cancer Research Centre, Institute of Cancer Sciences, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, Scotland, United Kingdom; Department of Surgery, Bankstown Hospital, Bankstown, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia; South Western Sydney Clinical School, Faculty of Medicine, University of New South Wales Australia, Liverpool, New South Wales, Australia; West of Scotland Pancreatic Unit, Glasgow Royal Infirmary, Glasgow, United Kingdom. Electronic address: andrew.biankin@glasgow.ac.uk. ·Gastroenterology · Pubmed #27856273.

ABSTRACT: Pancreatic cancer is molecularly diverse, with few effective therapies. Increased mutation burden and defective DNA repair are associated with response to immune checkpoint inhibitors in several other cancer types. We interrogated 385 pancreatic cancer genomes to define hypermutation and its causes. Mutational signatures inferring defects in DNA repair were enriched in those with the highest mutation burdens. Mismatch repair deficiency was identified in 1% of tumors harboring different mechanisms of somatic inactivation of MLH1 and MSH2. Defining mutation load in individual pancreatic cancers and the optimal assay for patient selection may inform clinical trial design for immunotherapy in pancreatic cancer.

5 Article Investigating Various Thresholds as Immunohistochemistry Cutoffs for Observer Agreement. 2017

Ali, Asif / Bell, Sarah / Bilsland, Alan / Slavin, Jill / Lynch, Victoria / Elgoweini, Maha / Derakhshan, Mohammad H / Jamieson, Nigel B / Chang, David / Brown, Victoria / Denley, Simon / Orange, Clare / McKay, Colin / Carter, Ross / Oien, Karin A / Duthie, Fraser R. ·*Institute of Cancer Sciences, College of Medical, Veterinary and Life Sciences, University of Glasgow §Institute of Cardiovascular and Medical Sciences, University of Glasgow, Western Infirmary ¶Academic Unit of Surgery, School of Medicine, College of Medical, Veterinary and Life Sciences, University of Glasgow, Glasgow Royal Infirmary ‡Department of Pathology, Laboratory Medicine Building, Queen Elizabeth University Hospital, Greater Glasgow & Clyde NHS ∥West of Scotland Pancreatic Unit and Glasgow Royal Infirmary, Alexandra Parade, Glasgow #Pathology Laboratory, Forth Valley Royal Hospital, Larbert, UK †Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, Khyber Medical University, Peshawar, Pakistan. ·Appl Immunohistochem Mol Morphol · Pubmed #27093449.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Clinical translation of immunohistochemistry (IHC) biomarkers requires reliable and reproducible cutoffs or thresholds for interpretation of immunostaining. Most IHC biomarker research focuses on the clinical relevance (diagnostic, prognostic, or predictive utility) of cutoffs, with less emphasis on observer agreement using these cutoffs. From the literature, we identified 3 commonly used cutoffs of 10% positive epithelial cells, 20% positive epithelial cells, and moderate to strong staining intensity (+2/+3 hereafter) to use for investigating observer agreement. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A series of 36 images of microarray cores stained for 4 different IHC biomarkers, with variable staining intensity and percentage of positive cells, was used for investigating interobserver and intraobserver agreement. Seven pathologists scored the immunostaining in each image using the 3 cutoffs for positive and negative staining. Kappa (κ) statistic was used to assess the strength of agreement for each cutoff. RESULTS: The interobserver agreement between all 7 pathologists using the 3 cutoffs was reasonably good, with mean κ scores of 0.64, 0.59, and 0.62, respectively, for 10%, 20%, and +2/+3 cutoffs. A good agreement was observed for experienced pathologists using the 10% cutoff, and their agreement was statistically higher than for junior pathologists (P=0.02). In addition, the mean intraobserver agreement for all 7 pathologists using the 3 cutoffs was reasonably good, with mean κ scores of 0.71, 0.60, and 0.73, respectively, for 10%, 20%, and +2/+3 cutoffs. For all 3 cutoffs, a positive correlation was observed with perceived ease of interpretation (P<0.003). Finally, cytoplasmic-only staining achieved higher agreement using all 3 cutoffs than mixed staining patterns. CONCLUSIONS: All 3 cutoffs investigated achieve reasonable strength of agreement, modestly decreasing interobserver and intraobserver variability in IHC interpretation. These cutoffs have previously been used in cancer pathology, and this study provides evidence that these cutoffs can be reproducible between practicing pathologists.

6 Article Genomic analyses identify molecular subtypes of pancreatic cancer. 2016

Bailey, Peter / Chang, David K / Nones, Katia / Johns, Amber L / Patch, Ann-Marie / Gingras, Marie-Claude / Miller, David K / Christ, Angelika N / Bruxner, Tim J C / Quinn, Michael C / Nourse, Craig / Murtaugh, L Charles / Harliwong, Ivon / Idrisoglu, Senel / Manning, Suzanne / Nourbakhsh, Ehsan / Wani, Shivangi / Fink, Lynn / Holmes, Oliver / Chin, Venessa / Anderson, Matthew J / Kazakoff, Stephen / Leonard, Conrad / Newell, Felicity / Waddell, Nick / Wood, Scott / Xu, Qinying / Wilson, Peter J / Cloonan, Nicole / Kassahn, Karin S / Taylor, Darrin / Quek, Kelly / Robertson, Alan / Pantano, Lorena / Mincarelli, Laura / Sanchez, Luis N / Evers, Lisa / Wu, Jianmin / Pinese, Mark / Cowley, Mark J / Jones, Marc D / Colvin, Emily K / Nagrial, Adnan M / Humphrey, Emily S / Chantrill, Lorraine A / Mawson, Amanda / Humphris, Jeremy / Chou, Angela / Pajic, Marina / Scarlett, Christopher J / Pinho, Andreia V / Giry-Laterriere, Marc / Rooman, Ilse / Samra, Jaswinder S / Kench, James G / Lovell, Jessica A / Merrett, Neil D / Toon, Christopher W / Epari, Krishna / Nguyen, Nam Q / Barbour, Andrew / Zeps, Nikolajs / Moran-Jones, Kim / Jamieson, Nigel B / Graham, Janet S / Duthie, Fraser / Oien, Karin / Hair, Jane / Grützmann, Robert / Maitra, Anirban / Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine A / Wolfgang, Christopher L / Morgan, Richard A / Lawlor, Rita T / Corbo, Vincenzo / Bassi, Claudio / Rusev, Borislav / Capelli, Paola / Salvia, Roberto / Tortora, Giampaolo / Mukhopadhyay, Debabrata / Petersen, Gloria M / Anonymous2640859 / Munzy, Donna M / Fisher, William E / Karim, Saadia A / Eshleman, James R / Hruban, Ralph H / Pilarsky, Christian / Morton, Jennifer P / Sansom, Owen J / Scarpa, Aldo / Musgrove, Elizabeth A / Bailey, Ulla-Maja Hagbo / Hofmann, Oliver / Sutherland, Robert L / Wheeler, David A / Gill, Anthony J / Gibbs, Richard A / Pearson, John V / Waddell, Nicola / Biankin, Andrew V / Grimmond, Sean M. ·Queensland Centre for Medical Genomics, Institute for Molecular Bioscience, The University of Queensland, St Lucia, Brisbane, Queensland 4072, Australia. · Wolfson Wohl Cancer Research Centre, Institute of Cancer Sciences, University of Glasgow, Garscube Estate, Switchback Road, Bearsden, Glasgow G61 1BD, UK. · The Kinghorn Cancer Centre, 370 Victoria St, Darlinghurst, and the Cancer Research Program, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, 384 Victoria St, Darlinghurst, Sydney, New South Wales 2010, Australia. · Department of Surgery, Bankstown Hospital, Eldridge Road, Bankstown, Sydney, New South Wales 2200, Australia. · South Western Sydney Clinical School, Faculty of Medicine, University of New South Wales, Liverpool, New South Wales 2170, Australia. · QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Herston, Queensland 4006, Australia. · Department of Molecular and Human Genetics, Human Genome Sequencing Center, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas 77030, USA. · Michael DeBakey Department of Surgery, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas 77030, USA. · Dan L. Duncan Cancer Center, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas 77030, USA. · Department of Human Genetics, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112, USA. · Genetic and Molecular Pathology, SA Pathology, Adelaide, South Australia 5000, Australia. · School of Biological Sciences, The University of Adelaide, Adelaide, South Australia 5000, Australia. · Harvard Chan Bioinformatics Core, Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA. · Macarthur Cancer Therapy Centre, Campbelltown Hospital, New South Wales 2560, Australia. · Department of Pathology. SydPath, St Vincent's Hospital, Sydney, NSW 2010, Australia. · St Vincent's Clinical School, Faculty of Medicine, University of New South Wales, New South Wales 2052, Australia. · School of Environmental &Life Sciences, University of Newcastle, Ourimbah, New South Wales 2258, Australia. · Department of Surgery, Royal North Shore Hospital, St Leonards, Sydney, New South Wales 2065, Australia. · University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales 2006, Australia. · Tissue Pathology and Diagnostic Oncology, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Camperdown New South Wales 2050, Australia. · School of Medicine, University of Western Sydney, Penrith, New South Wales 2175, Australia. · Fiona Stanley Hospital, Robin Warren Drive, Murdoch, Western Australia 6150, Australia. · Department of Gastroenterology, Royal Adelaide Hospital, North Terrace, Adelaide, South Australia 5000, Australia. · Department of Surgery, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Ipswich Rd, Woollongabba, Queensland 4102, Australia. · School of Surgery M507, University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Hwy, Nedlands 6009, Australia and St John of God Pathology, 12 Salvado Rd, Subiaco, Western Australia 6008, Australia. · Academic Unit of Surgery, School of Medicine, College of Medical, Veterinary and Life Sciences, University of Glasgow, Glasgow Royal Infirmary, Glasgow G4 OSF, UK. · West of Scotland Pancreatic Unit, Glasgow Royal Infirmary, Glasgow G31 2ER, UK. · Department of Medical Oncology, Beatson West of Scotland Cancer Centre, 1053 Great Western Road, Glasgow G12 0YN, UK. · Department of Pathology, Southern General Hospital, Greater Glasgow &Clyde NHS, Glasgow G51 4TF, UK. · GGC Bio-repository, Pathology Department, Southern General Hospital, 1345 Govan Road, Glasgow G51 4TY, UK. · Department of Surgery, TU Dresden, Fetscherstr. 74, 01307 Dresden, Germany. · Departments of Pathology and Translational Molecular Pathology, UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston Texas 77030, USA. · The David M. Rubenstein Pancreatic Cancer Research Center and Department of Pathology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York 10065, USA. · Department of Pathology, The Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21231, USA. · Department of Surgery, The Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21231, USA. · ARC-Net Applied Research on Cancer Centre, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona 37134, Italy. · Department of Pathology and Diagnostics, University of Verona, Verona 37134, Italy. · Department of Surgery, Pancreas Institute, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona 37134, Italy. · Department of Medical Oncology, Comprehensive Cancer Centre, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona 37134, Italy. · Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota 55905, USA. · Elkins Pancreas Center, Baylor College of Medicine, One Baylor Plaza, MS226, Houston, Texas 77030-3411, USA. · Cancer Research UK Beatson Institute, Glasgow G61 1BD, UK. · Institute for Cancer Science, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ, UK. · University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria 3010, Australia. ·Nature · Pubmed #26909576.

ABSTRACT: Integrated genomic analysis of 456 pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas identified 32 recurrently mutated genes that aggregate into 10 pathways: KRAS, TGF-β, WNT, NOTCH, ROBO/SLIT signalling, G1/S transition, SWI-SNF, chromatin modification, DNA repair and RNA processing. Expression analysis defined 4 subtypes: (1) squamous; (2) pancreatic progenitor; (3) immunogenic; and (4) aberrantly differentiated endocrine exocrine (ADEX) that correlate with histopathological characteristics. Squamous tumours are enriched for TP53 and KDM6A mutations, upregulation of the TP63∆N transcriptional network, hypermethylation of pancreatic endodermal cell-fate determining genes and have a poor prognosis. Pancreatic progenitor tumours preferentially express genes involved in early pancreatic development (FOXA2/3, PDX1 and MNX1). ADEX tumours displayed upregulation of genes that regulate networks involved in KRAS activation, exocrine (NR5A2 and RBPJL), and endocrine differentiation (NEUROD1 and NKX2-2). Immunogenic tumours contained upregulated immune networks including pathways involved in acquired immune suppression. These data infer differences in the molecular evolution of pancreatic cancer subtypes and identify opportunities for therapeutic development.

7 Article Ampullary Cancers Harbor ELF3 Tumor Suppressor Gene Mutations and Exhibit Frequent WNT Dysregulation. 2016

Gingras, Marie-Claude / Covington, Kyle R / Chang, David K / Donehower, Lawrence A / Gill, Anthony J / Ittmann, Michael M / Creighton, Chad J / Johns, Amber L / Shinbrot, Eve / Dewal, Ninad / Fisher, William E / Anonymous400856 / Pilarsky, Christian / Grützmann, Robert / Overman, Michael J / Jamieson, Nigel B / Van Buren, George / Drummond, Jennifer / Walker, Kimberly / Hampton, Oliver A / Xi, Liu / Muzny, Donna M / Doddapaneni, Harsha / Lee, Sandra L / Bellair, Michelle / Hu, Jianhong / Han, Yi / Dinh, Huyen H / Dahdouli, Mike / Samra, Jaswinder S / Bailey, Peter / Waddell, Nicola / Pearson, John V / Harliwong, Ivon / Wang, Huamin / Aust, Daniela / Oien, Karin A / Hruban, Ralph H / Hodges, Sally E / McElhany, Amy / Saengboonmee, Charupong / Duthie, Fraser R / Grimmond, Sean M / Biankin, Andrew V / Wheeler, David A / Gibbs, Richard A. ·Department of Molecular and Human Genetics, Human Genome Sequencing Center, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX 77030, USA; Michael DeBakey Department of Surgery, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX 77030, USA; Dan L. Duncan Cancer Center, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX 77030, USA. Electronic address: mgingras@bcm.edu. · Department of Molecular and Human Genetics, Human Genome Sequencing Center, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX 77030, USA. · Wolfson Wohl Cancer Research Centre, Institute for Cancer Sciences, University of Glasgow, Garscube Estate, Bearsden, Glasgow G61 1BD, UK; West of Scotland Pancreatic Unit, Glasgow Royal Infirmary, Glasgow G31 2ER, UK; The Kinghorn Cancer Centre and the Cancer Research Program Garvan Institute of Medical Research, Darlinghurst, Sydney, NSW 2010, Australia; South Western Sydney Clinical School, Faculty of Medicine, University of New South Wales, Liverpool, NSW 2170, Australia. · Department of Molecular and Human Genetics, Human Genome Sequencing Center, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX 77030, USA; Department of Molecular Virology and Microbiology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX 77030, USA. · The Kinghorn Cancer Centre and the Cancer Research Program Garvan Institute of Medical Research, Darlinghurst, Sydney, NSW 2010, Australia; Department of Anatomical Pathology, Royal North Shore Hospital, St Leonards, Sydney, NSW 2065, Australia; Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia. · Dan L. Duncan Cancer Center, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX 77030, USA; Department of Pathology and Immunology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX 77030, USA; Michael E. DeBakey Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Houston, TX 77030, USA. · Department of Molecular and Human Genetics, Human Genome Sequencing Center, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX 77030, USA; Dan L. Duncan Cancer Center, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX 77030, USA. · The Kinghorn Cancer Centre and the Cancer Research Program Garvan Institute of Medical Research, Darlinghurst, Sydney, NSW 2010, Australia. · Michael DeBakey Department of Surgery, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX 77030, USA; Dan L. Duncan Cancer Center, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX 77030, USA; The Elkins Pancreas Center at Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX 77030, USA. · Department of Surgery, TU Dresden, 01307 Dresden, Germany. · Department of Surgery, Universitätsklinikum Erlangen, 91054 Erlangen, Germany. · Department of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX 77030, USA. · Wolfson Wohl Cancer Research Centre, Institute for Cancer Sciences, University of Glasgow, Garscube Estate, Bearsden, Glasgow G61 1BD, UK; West of Scotland Pancreatic Unit, Glasgow Royal Infirmary, Glasgow G31 2ER, UK; Academic Unit of Surgery, Institute of Cancer Sciences, Glasgow Royal Infirmary, Level 2, New Lister Building, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G31 2ER, UK. · Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia; Department of Surgery, Royal North Shore Hospital, St Leonards, Sydney, NSW 2065, Australia. · Wolfson Wohl Cancer Research Centre, Institute for Cancer Sciences, University of Glasgow, Garscube Estate, Bearsden, Glasgow G61 1BD, UK. · Queensland Centre for Medical Genomics, Institute for Molecular Bioscience, The University of Queensland, St Lucia, Brisbane, QLD 4072, Australia; QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Herston, Brisbane, QLD 4006, Australia. · Queensland Centre for Medical Genomics, Institute for Molecular Bioscience, The University of Queensland, St Lucia, Brisbane, QLD 4072, Australia. · Department of Pathology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX 77030, USA. · Department of Pathology, TU Dresden, 01307 Dresden, Germany. · Wolfson Wohl Cancer Research Centre, Institute for Cancer Sciences, University of Glasgow, Garscube Estate, Bearsden, Glasgow G61 1BD, UK; Department of Pathology, Southern General Hospital, Greater Glasgow and Clyde NHS, Glasgow G51 4TF, UK. · Department of Pathology, The Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21231, USA. · Michael DeBakey Department of Surgery, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX 77030, USA; The Elkins Pancreas Center at Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX 77030, USA. · Department of Molecular and Human Genetics, Human Genome Sequencing Center, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX 77030, USA; Department of Biochemistry and Liver Fluke and Cholangiocarcinoma Research Center, Faculty of Medicine, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen 40002, Thailand. · Wolfson Wohl Cancer Research Centre, Institute for Cancer Sciences, University of Glasgow, Garscube Estate, Bearsden, Glasgow G61 1BD, UK; Queensland Centre for Medical Genomics, Institute for Molecular Bioscience, The University of Queensland, St Lucia, Brisbane, QLD 4072, Australia. · Department of Molecular and Human Genetics, Human Genome Sequencing Center, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX 77030, USA; Dan L. Duncan Cancer Center, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX 77030, USA. Electronic address: wheeler@bcm.edu. ·Cell Rep · Pubmed #26804919.

ABSTRACT: The ampulla of Vater is a complex cellular environment from which adenocarcinomas arise to form a group of histopathologically heterogenous tumors. To evaluate the molecular features of these tumors, 98 ampullary adenocarcinomas were evaluated and compared to 44 distal bile duct and 18 duodenal adenocarcinomas. Genomic analyses revealed mutations in the WNT signaling pathway among half of the patients and in all three adenocarcinomas irrespective of their origin and histological morphology. These tumors were characterized by a high frequency of inactivating mutations of ELF3, a high rate of microsatellite instability, and common focal deletions and amplifications, suggesting common attributes in the molecular pathogenesis are at play in these tumors. The high frequency of WNT pathway activating mutation, coupled with small-molecule inhibitors of β-catenin in clinical trials, suggests future treatment decisions for these patients may be guided by genomic analysis.

8 Article Prospective cohort study comparing transient EUS guided elastography to EUS-FNA for the diagnosis of solid pancreatic mass lesions. 2016

Mayerle, J / Beyer, G / Simon, P / Dickson, E J / Carter, R C / Duthie, F / Lerch, M M / McKay, C J. ·Department of Medicine A, University Medicine Greifswald, Ernst-Moritz-Arndt-University Greifswald, Germany. Electronic address: mayerle@uni-greifswald.de. · Department of Medicine A, University Medicine Greifswald, Ernst-Moritz-Arndt-University Greifswald, Germany. · Lister Department of Surgery, Glasgow Royal Infirmary, Glasgow, United Kingdom. · Department of Pathology, Southern General Hospital, Glasgow, United Kingdom. ·Pancreatology · Pubmed #26602088.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Semiquantitative EUS-elastography has been introduced to distinguish between malignant and benign pancreatic lesions. This study investigated whether semiquantitative EUS-guided transient real time elastography increases the diagnostic accuracy for solid pancreatic lesions compared to EUS-FNA. PATIENTS AND METHODS: This single centre prospective cohort study included all patients with solitary pancreatic lesions on EUS during one year. Patients underwent EUS-FNA and semiquantitative EUS-elastography during the same session. EUS and elastography results were compared with final diagnosis which was made on the basis of tissue samples and long-term outcome. RESULTS: 91 patients were recruited of which 68 had pancreatic malignancy, 17 showed benign disease and 6 had cystic lesions and were excluded from further analysis. Strain ratios from malignant lesions were significantly higher (24.00; 8.01-43.94 95% CI vs 44.00; 32.42-55.00 95% CI) and ROC analysis indicated optimal cut-off of 24.82 with resulting sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of 77%, 65% and 73% respectively. B-mode EUS and EUS-FNA had an accuracy for the correct diagnosis of malignant lesions of 87% and 85%. When lowering the cut-off strain ratio for elastography to 10 the sensitivity rose to 96% with specificity of 43% and accuracy of 84%, resulting in the least accurate EUS-based method. This was confirmed by pairwise comparison. CONCLUSION: Semiquantitative EUS-elastography does not add substantial value to the EUS-based assessment of solid pancreatic lesions when compared to B-mode imaging.

9 Article Expression of KOC, S100P, mesothelin and MUC1 in pancreatico-biliary adenocarcinomas: development and utility of a potential diagnostic immunohistochemistry panel. 2014

Ali, Asif / Brown, Victoria / Denley, Simon / Jamieson, Nigel B / Morton, Jennifer P / Nixon, Colin / Graham, Janet S / Sansom, Owen J / Carter, C Ross / McKay, Colin J / Duthie, Fraser R / Oien, Karin A. ·Wolfson Wohl Cancer Research Centre, Institute of Cancer Sciences, College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences, University of Glasgow, Garscube Estate, Switchback Road, Bearsden G61 1QH, UK. · Pathology Laboratory, Forth Valley Royal Hospital, Stirling Road, Larbert FK5 4WR, UK. · West of Scotland Pancreatic Unit and Glasgow Royal Infirmary, Alexandra Parade, Glasgow G31 2ER, UK. · Beatson Institute for Cancer Research, Glasgow G61 1BD, UK. · Medical Oncology, Beatson West of Scotland Cancer Centre, Glasgow G12 0YN, UK. · Department of Pathology, Southern General Hospital, Greater Glasgow & Clyde NHS, Glasgow G51 4TF, UK. · Wolfson Wohl Cancer Research Centre, Institute of Cancer Sciences, College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences, University of Glasgow, Garscube Estate, Switchback Road, Bearsden G61 1QH, UK ; Department of Pathology, Southern General Hospital, Greater Glasgow & Clyde NHS, Glasgow G51 4TF, UK. ·BMC Clin Pathol · Pubmed #25071419.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Pancreatico-biliary adenocarcinomas (PBA) have a poor prognosis. Diagnosis is usually achieved by imaging and/or endoscopy with confirmatory cytology. Cytological interpretation can be difficult especially in the setting of chronic pancreatitis/cholangitis. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) biomarkers could act as an adjunct to cytology to improve the diagnosis. Thus, we performed a meta-analysis and selected KOC, S100P, mesothelin and MUC1 for further validation in PBA resection specimens. METHODS: Tissue microarrays containing tumour and normal cores in a ratio of 3:2, from 99 surgically resected PBA patients, were used for IHC. IHC was performed on an automated platform using antibodies against KOC, S100P, mesothelin and MUC1. Tissue cores were scored for staining intensity and proportion of tissue stained using a Histoscore method (range, 0-300). Sensitivity and specificity for individual biomarkers, as well as biomarker panels, were determined with different cut-offs for positivity and compared by summary receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve. RESULTS: The expression of all four biomarkers was high in PBA versus normal ducts, with a mean Histoscore of 150 vs. 0.4 for KOC, 165 vs. 0.3 for S100P, 115 vs. 0.5 for mesothelin and 200 vs. 14 for MUC1 (p < .0001 for all comparisons). Five cut-offs were carefully chosen for sensitivity/specificity analysis. Four of these cut-offs, namely 5%, 10% or 20% positive cells and Histoscore 20 were identified using ROC curve analysis and the fifth cut-off was moderate-strong staining intensity. Using 20% positive cells as a cut-off achieved higher sensitivity/specificity values: KOC 84%/100%; S100P 83%/100%; mesothelin 88%/92%; and MUC1 89%/63%. Analysis of a panel of KOC, S100P and mesothelin achieved 100% sensitivity and 99% specificity if at least 2 biomarkers were positive for 10% cut-off; and 100% sensitivity and specificity for 20% cut-off. CONCLUSION: A biomarker panel of KOC, S100P and mesothelin with at least 2 biomarkers positive was found to be an optimum panel with both 10% and 20% cut-offs in resection specimens from patients with PBA.