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Pancreatic Neoplasms: HELP
Articles by Jean-Marc Dumonceau
Based on 8 articles published since 2008
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Between 2008 and 2019, Jean-Marc Dumonceau wrote the following 8 articles about Pancreatic Neoplasms.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Guideline Technical aspects of endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided sampling in gastroenterology: European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) Technical Guideline - March 2017. 2017

Polkowski, Marcin / Jenssen, Christian / Kaye, Philip / Carrara, Silvia / Deprez, Pierre / Gines, Angels / Fernández-Esparrach, Gloria / Eisendrath, Pierre / Aithal, Guruprasad P / Arcidiacono, Paolo / Barthet, Marc / Bastos, Pedro / Fornelli, Adele / Napoleon, Bertrand / Iglesias-Garcia, Julio / Seicean, Andrada / Larghi, Alberto / Hassan, Cesare / van Hooft, Jeanin E / Dumonceau, Jean-Marc. ·Department of Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Oncology, Medical Centre for Postgraduate Education, Warsaw, Poland. · Department of Gastroenterological Oncology, The M. Skłodowska-Curie Memorial Cancer Centre, Warsaw, Poland. · Department of Internal Medicine, Krankenhaus Märkisch Oderland Strausberg/Wriezen, Academic Teaching Hospital of the Medical University of Brandenburg, Germany. · Nottingham Digestive Diseases Centre, NIHR Nottingham Biomedical Research Centre, Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust and University of Nottingham, UK. · Digestive Endoscopy Unit, Division of Gastroenterology, Humanitas Research Hospital, Rozzano, Italy. · Cliniques Universitaires St-Luc, Université Catholique de Louvain, Brussels, Belgium. · Endoscopy Unit, Department of Gastroenterology, ICMDM, IDIBAPS, CIBEREHD, Hospital Clínic, Barcelona, Spain. · Department of Gastroenterology, Hepatopancreatology, and Digestive Oncology, Université Libre de Bruxelles, Hôpital Erasme & Hôpital Saint-Pierre, Brussels, Belgium. · Pancreato-Biliary Endoscopy and Endosonography Division, San Raffaele University, Milan, Italy. · Service de Gastroentérologie, Hôpital NORD AP-HM, Aix-Marseille-Université, Marseille, France. · Gastroenterology Department Instituto Português de Oncologia do Porto, Porto, Portugal. · Anatomic Pathology Unit, AUSL of Bologna, Maggiore Hospital, Bologna, Italy. · Department of Gastroenterology, Ramsay Générale de Santé, Private Hospital Jean Mermoz, Lyon, France. · Gastroenterology Department, University Hospital of Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela, Spain. · Regional Institute of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Iuliu Hatieganu University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Cluj-Napoca, Romania. · Digestive Endoscopy Unit, Catholic University, Rome, Italy. · Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Gedyt Endoscopy Center, Buenos Aires, Argentina. ·Endoscopy · Pubmed #28898917.

ABSTRACT: For routine EUS-guided sampling of solid masses and lymph nodes (LNs) ESGE recommends 25G or 22G needles (high quality evidence, strong recommendation); fine needle aspiration (FNA) and fine needle biopsy (FNB) needles are equally recommended (high quality evidence, strong recommendation).When the primary aim of sampling is to obtain a core tissue specimen, ESGE suggests using 19G FNA or FNB needles or 22G FNB needles (low quality evidence, weak recommendation).ESGE recommends using 10-mL syringe suction for EUS-guided sampling of solid masses and LNs with 25G or 22G FNA needles (high quality evidence, strong recommendation) and other types of needles (low quality evidence, weak recommendation). ESGE suggests neutralizing residual negative pressure in the needle before withdrawing the needle from the target lesion (moderate quality evidence, weak recommendation).ESGE does not recommend for or against using the needle stylet for EUS-guided sampling of solid masses and LNs with FNA needles (high quality evidence, strong recommendation) and suggests using the needle stylet for EUS-guided sampling with FNB needles (low quality evidence, weak recommendation).ESGE suggests fanning the needle throughout the lesion when sampling solid masses and LNs (moderate quality evidence, weak recommendation).ESGE equally recommends EUS-guided sampling with or without on-site cytologic evaluation (moderate quality evidence, strong recommendation). When on-site cytologic evaluation is unavailable, ESGE suggests performance of three to four needle passes with an FNA needle or two to three passes with an FNB needle (low quality evidence, weak recommendation).For diagnostic sampling of pancreatic cystic lesions without a solid component, ESGE suggests emptying the cyst with a single pass of a 22G or 19G needle (low quality evidence, weak recommendation). For pancreatic cystic lesions with a solid component, ESGE suggests sampling of the solid component using the same technique as in the case of other solid lesions (low quality evidence, weak recommendation).ESGE does not recommend antibiotic prophylaxis for EUS-guided sampling of solid masses or LNs (low quality evidence, strong recommendation), and suggests antibiotic prophylaxis with fluoroquinolones or beta-lactam antibiotics for EUS-guided sampling of cystic lesions (low quality evidence, weak recommendation). ESGE suggests that evaluation of tissue obtained by EUS-guided sampling should include histologic preparations (e. g., cell blocks and/or formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded tissue fragments) and should not be limited to smear cytology (low quality evidence, weak recommendation).

2 Editorial Distal pancreatectomy: another indication for prophylactic pancreatic stenting? 2010

Dumonceau, Jean-Marc. · ·Gastrointest Endosc · Pubmed #20801287.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

3 Article Extracellular Vesicles in Bile as Markers of Malignant Biliary Stenoses. 2017

Severino, Valeria / Dumonceau, Jean-Marc / Delhaye, Myriam / Moll, Solange / Annessi-Ramseyer, Isabelle / Robin, Xavier / Frossard, Jean-Louis / Farina, Annarita. ·Department of Internal Medicine Specialties, University of Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland; Department of Human Protein Science, University of Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland. · Gedyt Endoscopy Center, Buenos Aires, Argentina. · Department of Gastroenterology, Hepatopancreatology and GI Oncology, Erasme University Hospital, Brussels, Belgium. · Department of Pathology, University Hospitals of Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland. · Department of Human Protein Science, University of Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland. · Biotech Research and Innovation Center, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark. · Department of Internal Medicine Specialties, University of Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland; Service of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University Hospitals of Geneva, Switzerland. · Department of Internal Medicine Specialties, University of Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland; Department of Human Protein Science, University of Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland. Electronic address: Annarita.Farina@unige.ch. ·Gastroenterology · Pubmed #28479376.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND & AIMS: Algorithms for diagnosis of malignant common bile duct (CBD) stenoses are complex and lack accuracy. Malignant tumors secrete large numbers of extracellular vesicles (EVs) into surrounding fluids; EVs might therefore serve as biomarkers for diagnosis. We investigated whether concentrations of EVs in bile could discriminate malignant from nonmalignant CBD stenoses. METHODS: We collected bile and blood samples from 50 patients undergoing therapeutic endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography at university hospitals in Europe for CBD stenosis of malignant (pancreatic cancer, n = 20 or cholangiocarcinoma, n = 5) or nonmalignant (chronic pancreatitis [CP], n = 15) origin. Ten patients with CBD obstruction due to biliary stones were included as controls. EV concentrations in samples were determined by nanoparticle tracking analyses. The discovery cohort comprised the first 10 patients with a diagnosis of pancreatic cancer, based on tissue analysis, and 10 consecutive controls. Using samples from these subjects, we identified a threshold concentration of bile EVs that could best discriminate between patients with pancreatic cancer from controls. We verified the diagnostic performance of bile EV concentration by analyzing samples from the 30 consecutive patients with a diagnosis of malignant (pancreatic cancer or cholangiocarcinoma, n = 15) or nonmalignant (CP, n = 15) CBD stenosis. Samples were compared using the Mann-Whitney test and nonparametric Spearman correlation analysis. Receiver operating characteristic area under the curve was used to determine diagnostic accuracy. RESULTS: In both cohorts, the median concentration of EVs was significantly higher in bile samples from patients with malignant CBD stenoses than controls or nonmalignant CBD stenoses (2.41 × 10 CONCLUSIONS: Concentration of EVs in bile samples discriminates between patients with malignant vs nonmalignant CBD stenosis with 100% accuracy. Further studies are needed to confirm these findings. Clinical Trial registration no: ISRCTN66835592.

4 Article An integrated approach for comparative proteomic analysis of human bile reveals overexpressed cancer-associated proteins in malignant biliary stenosis. 2014

Lukic, Natalija / Visentin, Rémy / Delhaye, Myriam / Frossard, Jean-Louis / Lescuyer, Pierre / Dumonceau, Jean-Marc / Farina, Annarita. ·Biomedical Proteomics Research Group, Department of Human Protein Sciences, Geneva University, Geneva CH-1211, Switzerland. · Department of Gastroenterology, Erasme Hospital, Free University of Brussels, Brussels BE-1070, Belgium. · Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Geneva University Hospitals, Geneva CH-1211, Switzerland. · Biomedical Proteomics Research Group, Department of Human Protein Sciences, Geneva University, Geneva CH-1211, Switzerland; Clinical Proteomics Laboratory, Department of Genetic and Laboratory Medicine, Geneva University Hospitals, Geneva CH-1211, Switzerland. · Biomedical Proteomics Research Group, Department of Human Protein Sciences, Geneva University, Geneva CH-1211, Switzerland. Electronic address: Annarita.Farina@unige.ch. ·Biochim Biophys Acta · Pubmed #23872482.

ABSTRACT: Proteomics is a key tool in the identification of new bile biomarkers for differentiating malignant and nonmalignant biliary stenoses. Unfortunately, the complexity of bile and the presence of molecules interfering with protein analysis represent an obstacle for quantitative proteomic studies in bile samples. The simultaneous need to introduce purification steps and minimize the use of pre-fractionation methods inevitably leads to protein loss and limited quantifications. This dramatically reduces the chance of identifying new potential biomarkers. In the present study, we included differential centrifugation as a preliminary step in a quantitative proteomic workflow involving iTRAQ labeling, peptide fractionation by OFFGEL electrophoresis and LC-MS/MS, to compare protein expression in bile samples collected from patients with malignant or nonmalignant biliary stenoses. A total of 1267 proteins were identified, including a set of 322 newly described bile proteins, mainly belonging to high-density cellular fractions. The subsequent comparative analysis led to a 5-fold increase in the number of quantified proteins over previously published studies and highlighted 104 proteins overexpressed in malignant samples. Finally, immunoblot verifications performed on a cohort of 8 malignant (pancreatic adenocarcinoma, n=4; cholangiocarcinoma, n=4) and 5 nonmalignant samples (chronic pancreatitis, n=3; biliary stones, n=2) confirmed the results of proteomic analysis for three proteins: olfactomedin-4, syntenin-2 and Ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Biomarkers: A Proteomic Challenge.

5 Article Bile carcinoembryonic cell adhesion molecule 6 (CEAM6) as a biomarker of malignant biliary stenoses. 2014

Farina, Annarita / Dumonceau, Jean-Marc / Antinori, Paola / Annessi-Ramseyer, Isabelle / Frossard, Jean-Louis / Hochstrasser, Denis F / Delhaye, Myriam / Lescuyer, Pierre. ·Biomedical Proteomics Research Group, Department of Human Protein Sciences, Geneva University, Geneva CH-1211, Switzerland. Electronic address: Annarita.Farina@unige.ch. · Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Geneva University Hospitals, Geneva CH-1211, Switzerland. · Biomedical Proteomics Research Group, Department of Human Protein Sciences, Geneva University, Geneva CH-1211, Switzerland. · Biomedical Proteomics Research Group, Department of Human Protein Sciences, Geneva University, Geneva CH-1211, Switzerland; Clinical Proteomics Laboratory, Department of Genetic and Laboratory Medicine, Geneva University Hospitals, Geneva CH-1211, Switzerland. · Department of Gastroenterology, Erasme Hospital, Free University of Brussels, Brussels BE-1070, Belgium. ·Biochim Biophys Acta · Pubmed #23806607.

ABSTRACT: Differentiating malignant from nonmalignant biliary stenoses is challenging. This could be facilitated by the measurement of cancer biomarkers in bile. We aimed at (i) identifying new cancer biomarkers by comparative proteomic analysis of bile collected from patients with a malignant or benign biliary stenosis (exploratory phase) and (ii) verifying the accuracy of the newly identified potential biomarkers for discriminating malignant versus nonmalignant biliary stenoses in a larger group of patients (confirmation phase). Overall, 66 proteins were found overexpressed (ratio>1.5) in at least one cancer condition using proteomic analysis and 7 proteins were increased in all malignant/nonmalignant disease comparisons. Preliminary screening by immunoblot highlighted carcinoembryonic cell adhesion molecule 6 (CEAM6), a cell surface protein overexpressed in many human cancers, as an interesting candidate biomarker. ELISA subsequently confirmed CEAM6 as a potential bile biomarker for distinguishing malignant from benign biliary stenoses with a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) area under the curve (AUC) of 0.92 (specificity 83%, sensitivity 93%, positive predictive value 93%, and negative predictive value 83%). No significant difference in serum CEAM6 level was found between malignant and nonmalignant samples. Combining bile CEAM6 and serum CA19-9 in a panel further improved diagnostic accuracy for malignant stenoses (AUC 0.96, specificity 83%, sensitivity 97%, positive predictive value 93%, and negative predictive value 91%). CEAM6 measurement in bile could be clinically useful to discriminate between malignant and nonmalignant causes of biliary stenosis. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Biomarkers: A Proteomic Challenge.

6 Article Role of proteomics to differentiate between benign and potentially malignant pancreatic cysts. 2011

Cuoghi, Aurora / Farina, Annarita / Z'graggen, Kaspar / Dumonceau, Jean-Marc / Tomasi, Aldo / Hochstrasser, Denis F / Genevay, Muriel / Lescuyer, Pierre / Frossard, Jean-Louis. ·Biomedical Proteomics Research Group, Department of Bioinformatics and Structural Biology, Faculty of Medicine, Geneva University, Geneva, Switzerland. ·J Proteome Res · Pubmed #21425880.

ABSTRACT: Pancreatic cystic neoplasms represent 10-15% of primary cystic masses of the pancreas. While pancreatic cysts are detected with an increasing frequency due to the use of advanced imaging modalities in clinical practice, the diagnosis of pancreatic cystic neoplasms remains unsatisfactory because available diagnostic techniques proved not sensitive enough so far. This study was designed to characterize the proteomic pattern of pancreatic cyst fluids obtained from various cystic lesions. Cyst fluids were collected by direct puncture during open surgery to avoid any possible contamination from other tissues. CEA, CA-19-9, and amylase concentrations were measured using specific immunoassays. After immunodepletion and fractionation by SDS-PAGE, proteins were digested and analyzed by LC-MS/MS. Specific histological lesions were found to be associated with distinct protein patterns. Interestingly, some of these proteins have been proposed as biomarkers of pancreatic cancer. Immunoblots allowed for verifying the differential expression in specific cyst fluids of two selected proteins, olfactomedin-4 and mucin-18. Finally, immunohistochemistry was performed to correlate these data with the expression pattern of olfactomedin-4 and mucin-18 in pancreatic cyst tissues. Results from this study indicate that proteomic analysis of cyst fluid could provide reliable candidates for developing new biomarkers for the preoperative management of malignant and premalignant pancreatic cysts.

7 Article Proteomic analysis of human bile from malignant biliary stenosis induced by pancreatic cancer. 2009

Farina, Annarita / Dumonceau, Jean-Marc / Frossard, Jean-Louis / Hadengue, Antoine / Hochstrasser, Denis F / Lescuyer, Pierre. ·Biomedical Proteomics Research Group, Department of Bioinformatics and Structural Biology, Faculty of Medicine, Geneva University, Geneva CH-1211, Switzerland. Annarita.Farina@medecine.unige.ch ·J Proteome Res · Pubmed #19055478.

ABSTRACT: Stenosis of the common bile duct may be either due to benign (chronic pancreatitis) or malignant (cholangiocarcinoma, pancreatic adenocarcinoma) conditions. The benign nature of the stricture should be first confirmed in order to ensure appropriate therapy. Therefore, the identification of markers allowing discrimination between malignant and benign biliary stenosis would be very valuable in clinical practice. To this intent, we performed a proteomic analysis of bile samples from patients having a biliary stenosis caused by pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Bile samples were collected during endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography and purified using different methods. The extracted proteins were then analyzed by SDS-PAGE and LC-MS/MS. A total of 127 proteins were identified, 34 of which have not been previously detected in proteomic studies of bile. Among them, several proteins have been described as potential biomarkers of pancreatic cancer. We extended our investigation by studying the expression of some of these pancreatic cancer markers in bile samples collected from patients with various etiologies of biliary stenosis including pancreatic cancer, cholangiocarcinoma, chronic pancreatitis, as well as gallstone-induced stenosis. Our data showed a conspicuous overexpression of CEACAM6 and MUC1 (CA19-9) in pancreatic cancer and cholangiocarcinoma samples, according to the hypothesis that bile fluid collects cancer-associated protein leaking from the tumor microenvironment. These results underline the interest of using bile as a source of biomarkers for the diagnosis of malignant biliary stenosis.

8 Minor Fluorescence in situ hybridization as a tool to characterize genetic alterations in pancreatic adenocarcinoma. 2010

Genevay, Muriel / Dumonceau, Jean-Marc / Pepey, Béatrice / Pache, Jean-Claude / Rubbia-Brandt, Laura / McKee, Thomas Alexander. · ·Pancreas · Pubmed #20418759.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --