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Pancreatic Neoplasms: HELP
Articles by Ying Dong
Based on 7 articles published since 2008
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Between 2008 and 2019, Yi Dong wrote the following 7 articles about Pancreatic Neoplasms.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Review Serous pancreatic neoplasia, data and review. 2017

Dietrich, Christoph F / Dong, Yi / Jenssen, Christian / Ciaravino, Valentina / Hocke, Michael / Wang, Wen-Ping / Burmester, Eike / Moeller, Kathleen / Atkinson, Nathan Ss / Capelli, Paola / D'Onofrio, Mirko. ·Christoph F Dietrich, Medizinische Klinik 2, Caritas-Krankenhaus Bad Mergentheim, 97980 Bad Mergentheim, Germany. ·World J Gastroenterol · Pubmed #28852316.

ABSTRACT: AIM: To describe the imaging features of serous neoplasms of the pancreas using ultrasound, endoscopic ultrasound, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. METHODS: This multicenter international collaboration enhances a literature review to date, reporting features of 287 histologically confirmed cases of serous pancreatic cystic neoplasms (SPNs). RESULTS: Female predominance is seen with most SPNs presenting asymptomatically in the 5 CONCLUSION: The described ultrasound features can aid differentiation of SPN from other neoplastic lesions under most circumstances.

2 Article Endoscopic ultrasound elastography of small solid pancreatic lesions: a multicenter study. 2018

Ignee, Andre / Jenssen, Christian / Arcidiacono, Paolo G / Hocke, Michael / Möller, Kathleen / Saftoiu, Adrian / Will, Uwe / Fusaroli, Pietro / Iglesias-Garcia, Julio / Ponnudurai, Ryan / Petrone, Maria C / Braden, Barbara / Burmester, Eike / Dong, Yi / Atkinson, Nathan S / Dietrich, Christoph F. ·Medical Department 2, Caritas-Krankenhaus, Bad Mergentheim, Germany. · Department of Internal Medicine, Krankenhaus Märkisch Oderland, Strausberg/Wriezen, Germany. · Pancreato-Biliary Endoscopy and Endosonography Division, Vita Salute San Raffaele University, Milan, Italy. · Department of Internal Medicine 2, Helios Hospital Meiningen GmbH, Meiningen, Germany. · Medical Department I/Gastroenterology, SANA Hospital Lichtenberg, Berlin, Germany. · Department of Gastroenterology, Research Center of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Craiova, Romania. · SRH Wald Klinikum Gera, Germany. · Gastroenterology Unit, Department of Medical and Surgical Sciences University of Bologna, Hospital of Imola, Italy. · Gastroenterology and Hepatology Department, University Hospital, Santiago de Compostela, Spain. · Division of Gastroenterology, Prince Court Medical Centre, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. · Translational Gastroenterology Unit, Oxford University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Oxford, UK. · Medical Department I, Sana Hospital Lübeck, Germany. · Department of Ultrasound, Zhongshan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai, China. · Ultrasound Department of the First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou, Zhengzhou University, China. ·Endoscopy · Pubmed #29689572.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The prevalence of malignancy in patients with small solid pancreatic lesions is low; however, early diagnosis is crucial for successful treatment of these cases. Therefore, a method to reliably distinguish between benign and malignant small solid pancreatic lesions would be highly desirable. We investigated the role of endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) elastography in this setting. METHODS: Patients with solid pancreatic lesions ≤ 15 mm in size and a definite diagnosis were included. Lesion stiffness relative to the surrounding pancreatic parenchyma, as qualitatively assessed and documented at the time of EUS elastography, was retrospectively compared with the final diagnosis obtained by fine-needle aspiration/biopsy or surgical resection. RESULTS: 218 patients were analyzed. The average size of the lesions was 11 ± 3 mm; 23 % were ductal adenocarcinoma, 52 % neuroendocrine tumors, 8 % metastases, and 17 % other entities; 66 % of the lesions were benign. On elastography, 50 % of lesions were stiffer than the surrounding pancreatic parenchyma (stiff lesions) and 50 % were less stiff or of similar stiffness (soft lesions). High stiffness of the lesion had a sensitivity of 84 % (95 % confidence interval 73 % - 91 %), specificity of 67 % (58 % - 74 %), positive predictive value (PPV) of 56 % (50 % - 62 %), and negative predictive value (NPV) of 89 % (83 % - 93 %) for the diagnosis of malignancy. For the diagnosis of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, the sensitivity, specificity, PPV, and NPV were 96 % (87 % - 100 %), 64 % (56 % - 71 %), 45 % (40 % - 50 %), and 98 % (93 % - 100 %), respectively. CONCLUSIONS: In patients with small solid pancreatic lesions, EUS elastography can rule out malignancy with a high level of certainty if the lesion appears soft. A stiff lesion can be either benign or malignant.

3 Article Leveraging an NQO1 Bioactivatable Drug for Tumor-Selective Use of Poly(ADP-ribose) Polymerase Inhibitors. 2016

Huang, Xiumei / Motea, Edward A / Moore, Zachary R / Yao, Jun / Dong, Ying / Chakrabarti, Gaurab / Kilgore, Jessica A / Silvers, Molly A / Patidar, Praveen L / Cholka, Agnieszka / Fattah, Farjana / Cha, Yoonjeong / Anderson, Glenda G / Kusko, Rebecca / Peyton, Michael / Yan, Jingsheng / Xie, Xian-Jin / Sarode, Venetia / Williams, Noelle S / Minna, John D / Beg, Muhammad / Gerber, David E / Bey, Erik A / Boothman, David A. ·Departments of Pharmacology and Radiation Oncology, Simmons Comprehensive Cancer Center (SCCC), UT Southwestern Medical Center (UTSW), Dallas, TX 75390, USA. · Department of Biochemistry, SCCC, UTSW, Dallas, TX 75390, USA. · Immuneering Corporation, One Broadway 14th Floor, Cambridge, MA 02142, USA. · 5Degrees Bio., Inc., 111 North Market Street #300, San Jose, CA 95113, USA. · Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Hematology-Oncology, UTSW, Dallas, TX 75390, USA. · Department of Biostatistics, UTSW, Dallas, TX 75390, USA. · Department of Pathology, UTSW, Dallas, TX 75390, USA. · Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, West Virginia University Cancer Institute, Morgantown, WV 26506, USA. Electronic address: erik.bey@hsc.wvu.edu. · Departments of Pharmacology and Radiation Oncology, Simmons Comprehensive Cancer Center (SCCC), UT Southwestern Medical Center (UTSW), Dallas, TX 75390, USA. Electronic address: david.boothman@utsouthwestern.edu. ·Cancer Cell · Pubmed #27960087.

ABSTRACT: Therapeutic drugs that block DNA repair, including poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors, fail due to lack of tumor-selectivity. When PARP inhibitors and β-lapachone are combined, synergistic antitumor activity results from sustained NAD(P)H levels that refuel NQO1-dependent futile redox drug recycling. Significant oxygen-consumption-rate/reactive oxygen species cause dramatic DNA lesion increases that are not repaired due to PARP inhibition. In NQO1

4 Article Differential diagnosis of small solid pancreatic lesions. 2016

Dietrich, Christoph Frank / Sahai, Anand Vasante / D'Onofrio, Mirko / Will, Uwe / Arcidiacono, Paolo Giorgio / Petrone, Maria Chiara / Hocke, Michael / Braden, Barbara / Burmester, Eike / Möller, Kathleen / Săftoiu, Adrian / Ignee, Andre / Cui, Xin-Wu / Iordache, Sevastita / Potthoff, Andrej / Iglesias-Garcia, Julio / Fusaroli, Pietro / Dong, Yi / Jenssen, Christian. ·Sino-German Research Center of Ultrasound in Medicine, The First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University, China; Medical Department, Caritas-Krankenhaus, Bad Mergentheim, Germany. · Division of Gastroenterology, CHUM, Hopital Saint Luc, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. · Department of Radiology, G.B. Rossi University Hospital, University of Verona, Verona, Italy. · SRH Wald Klinikum Gera, Germany. · PancreatoBiliary Endoscopy and Endosonography Division, Pancreas Translational & Clinical Research Center, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Vita Salute San Raffaele University, Milan, Italy. · Medical Department, Helios Klinikum Meiningen, Meiningen, Germany. · Translational Gastroenterology Unit, Oxford University Hospitals, Oxford, United Kingdom. · Medical Department I, Sana Hospital Lübeck, Lübeck, Germany. · Medical Department I/Gastroenterology; SANA Hospital Lichtenberg, Berlin, Germany. · Department of Gastroenterology, Research Center of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University of Medicine and Pharmacy Craiova, Romania; Endoscopy Department, Gastrointestinal Unit, Copenhagen University Hospital Herlev, Herlev, Denmark. · Medical Department, Caritas-Krankenhaus, Bad Mergentheim, Germany. · Department of Gastroenterology, Research Center of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University of Medicine and Pharmacy Craiova, Romania. · Gastroenterology, Hepatology und Endocrinology, Hannover Medical School, Hannover, Germany. · Gastroenterology and Hepatology Department, Foundation for Research in Digestive Diseases, University Hospital of Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela, Spain. · Gastroenterology Unit, Department of Medical and Surgical Sciences, University of Bologna and Hospital of Imola, Imola, Italy. · Medical Department, Caritas-Krankenhaus, Bad Mergentheim, Germany; Department of Ultrasound, Zhongshan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai, China. · Medical Department, Krankenhaus Maerkisch-Oderland, Strausberg, Germany. ·Gastrointest Endosc · Pubmed #27155592.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is typically diagnosed at a late stage. Little is known about the incidental finding of early-stage PDAC. The aim of the current study was to determine the etiology of small solid pancreatic lesions (≤15 mm) to optimize clinical management. METHODS: Inclusion criterion for the retrospective study analysis was the incidental finding of primarily undetermined small solid pancreatic lesions ≤15 mm in 394 asymptomatic patients. Final diagnoses were based on histology or cytology obtained by imaging-guided biopsy (and at least 12-month follow-up) and/or surgery. Contrast-enhanced US or contrast-enhanced EUS was performed in 219 patients. RESULTS: The final diagnoses of 394 patients were as follows: 146 PDACs, 156 neuroendocrine tumors, 28 metastases into the pancreas from other primary sites, and 64 various other etiologies. Contrast-enhanced US allowed differential diagnosis of PDAC and non-PDAC in 189 of 219 patients (86%). CONCLUSIONS: Approximately 40% of patients with small solid pancreatic lesions had very early stage PDAC. Approximately 60% of small solid pancreatic lesions ≤15 mm are not PDAC and, therefore, do not require radical surgery. Without preoperative diagnosis, an unacceptably large proportion of patients would be exposed to radical surgery with significant morbidity and mortality.

5 Article Differentiation of pancreatobiliary-type from intestinal-type periampullary carcinomas using 3.0T MRI. 2016

Bi, Lei / Dong, Yin / Jing, Changqing / Wu, Qingzhong / Xiu, Jianjun / Cai, Shifeng / Huang, Zhaoqin / Zhang, Jie / Han, Xue / Liu, Qingwei / Lv, Shouchen. ·Department of Radiology, Shandong Provincial Hospital Affiliated to Shandong University, Shandong University, Jinan, P.R. China. · Department of Surgery, Shandong Provincial Hospital Affiliated to Shandong University, Shandong University, Jinan, P.R. China. · Department of Science and Education, Shandong Provincial Hospital Affiliated to Shandong University, Shandong University, Jinan, P.R. China. ·J Magn Reson Imaging · Pubmed #26395453.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: To differentiate pancreatobiliary-type from intestinal-type periampullary carcinomas using combined magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP), contrast-enhanced MRI, and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI). MATERIALS AND METHODS: MRI (3.0T) results of 41 patients with pathologically confirmed periampullary carcinoma were retrospectively assessed. Two radiologists, blinded to histologic type of each tumor, evaluated image findings independently. MRCP image features, enhancement pattern, and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values were analyzed. Independent-sample t-test, chi-square, or Fisher's exact test were used to determine differential image findings between the pancreatobiliary-type and the intestinal-type group. Cohen's κ statistic or interclass correlation coefficient (ICC) were used to evaluate interobserver agreement between two observers. Univariate and multiple logistic regression analysis were performed to identify MRI features with predictive values. RESULTS: On the basis of hematoxylin-eosin staining, 27 patients were classified as having pancreatobiliary-type carcinomas, and 14 patients the intestinal type. The pancreatobiliary-type carcinomas more commonly showed progressive enhancement than the intestinal type (P = 0.003). The minimum ADC (ADCmin ) value of the pancreatobiliary-type group ([0.95 ± 0.21] × 10(-3) mm(2) /s) was significantly lower than the intestinal-type group ([1.10 ± 0.25] × 10(-3) mm(2) /s) (P = 0.047). For interobserver agreement, the κ values and ICCs for all parameters exceeded 0.8, indicating almost perfect agreement. At multiple logistic regression analysis, the enhancement pattern was the only significant independent predictor (P = 0.011, odds ratio [OR] = 0.105). When the enhancement pattern and ADCmin were used in combination, we could identify 70.4% of pancreatobiliary-type and 78.6% of intestinal-type carcinomas. CONCLUSION: Progressive enhancement and low ADCmin values suggest a pancreatobiliary-type periampullary carcinoma.

6 Article Silibinin causes apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in some human pancreatic cancer cells. 2011

Ge, Yakun / Zhang, Yuanxin / Chen, Yunpeng / Li, Quanshun / Chen, Jun / Dong, Ying / Shi, Wei. ·Key Laboratory for Molecular Enzymology & Engineering of the Ministry of Education, School of Life Science, Jilin University, Changchun 130023, China · E-Mails: yakunge@126.com (Y.G.) · zhangyuanxin@126.com (Y.Z.) · qsli06@mails.jlu.edu.cn (Q.L.). ·Int J Mol Sci · Pubmed #21954330.

ABSTRACT: Silibinin, an effective anti-cancer and chemopreventive agent in various epithelial cancer models, has been reported to inhibit cancer cell growth through mitogenic signaling pathways. However, whether it can inhibit human pancreatic carcinoma growth and what are the underlying mechanisms is still not well elucidated. Here, we evaluated the inhibitory proliferation effects of Silibinin in pancreatic carcinoma growth and examined whether Silibinin modulates cell cycle and apoptosis. Our results indicate that Silibinin effectively inhibited the pancreatic carcinoma AsPC-1, BxPC-3 and Panc-1 cells' proliferation and caused apoptosis. Silibinin induced a decrease in S phase and cell cycle arrest in G1 phase in AsPC-1 cells, but had no obvious changes in BxPC-3 and Panc-1 cell cycle. Furthermore, these results suggest that Silibinin might be a candidate chemopreventive agent for pancreatic carcinoma therapy.

7 Article Modulating endogenous NQO1 levels identifies key regulatory mechanisms of action of β-lapachone for pancreatic cancer therapy. 2011

Li, Long Shan / Bey, Erik A / Dong, Ying / Meng, Jieru / Patra, Biswanath / Yan, Jingsheng / Xie, Xian-Jin / Brekken, Rolf A / Barnett, Carlton C / Bornmann, William G / Gao, Jinming / Boothman, David A. ·Department of Pharmacology, Simmons Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas, Texas 75390, USA. ·Clin Cancer Res · Pubmed #21224367.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer-related deaths, in which the 5-year survival rate is less than 5%. Current standard of care therapies offer little selectivity and high toxicity. Novel, tumor-selective approaches are desperately needed. Although prior work suggested that β-lapachone (β-lap) could be used for the treatment of pancreatic cancers, the lack of knowledge of the compound's mechanism of action prevented optimal use of this agent. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: We examined the role of NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase-1 (NQO1) in β-lap-mediated antitumor activity, using a series of MIA PaCa-2 pancreatic cancer clones varying in NQO1 levels by stable shRNA knockdown. The antitumor efficacy of β-lap was determined using an optimal hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextran (HPβ-CD) vehicle formulation in metastatic pancreatic cancer models. RESULTS: β-Lap-mediated cell death required ∼90 enzymatic units of NQO1. Essential downstream mediators of lethality were as follows: (i) reactive oxygen species (ROS); (ii) single-strand DNA breaks induced by ROS; (iii) poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase-1 (PARP1) hyperactivation; (iv) dramatic NAD(+)/ATP depletion; and (v) programmed necrosis. We showed that 1 regimen of β-lap therapy (5 treatments every other day) efficaciously regressed and reduced human pancreatic tumor burden and dramatically extended the survival of athymic mice, using metastatic pancreatic cancer models. CONCLUSIONS: Because NQO1 enzyme activities are easily measured and commonly overexpressed (i.e., >70%) in pancreatic cancers 5- to 10-fold above normal tissue, strategies using β-lap to efficaciously treat pancreatic cancers are indicated. On the basis of optimal drug formulation and efficacious antitumor efficacy, such a therapy should be extremely safe and not accompanied with normal tissue toxicity or hemolytic anemia.