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Pancreatic Neoplasms: HELP
Articles by Euan J. Dickson
Based on 13 articles published since 2010
(Why 13 articles?)
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Between 2010 and 2020, E. J. Dickson wrote the following 13 articles about Pancreatic Neoplasms.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Article Feasibility and clinical utility of endoscopic ultrasound guided biopsy of pancreatic cancer for next-generation molecular profiling. 2019

Dreyer, Stephan B / Jamieson, Nigel B / Evers, Lisa / Duthie, Fraser / Cooke, Susie / Marshall, John / Beraldi, Dario / Knight, Stephen / Upstill-Goddard, Rosanna / Dickson, Euan J / Carter, C Ross / McKay, Colin J / Biankin, Andrew V / Chang, David K. ·Wolfson Wohl Cancer Research Centre, Institute of Cancer Sciences, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, UK; West of Scotland Pancreatic Unit, Glasgow Royal Infirmary, Glasgow, UK. · West of Scotland Pancreatic Unit, Glasgow Royal Infirmary, Glasgow, UK. · Wolfson Wohl Cancer Research Centre, Institute of Cancer Sciences, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, UK. · Department of Clinical Surgery, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK. · Wolfson Wohl Cancer Research Centre, Institute of Cancer Sciences, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, UK; West of Scotland Pancreatic Unit, Glasgow Royal Infirmary, Glasgow, UK. david.chang@glasgow.ac.uk. ·Chin Clin Oncol · Pubmed #31070037.

ABSTRACT: Next-generation sequencing is enabling molecularly guided therapy for many cancer types, yet failure rates remain relatively high in pancreatic cancer (PC). The aim of this study is to investigate the feasibility of genomic profiling using endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) biopsy samples to facilitate personalised therapy for PC. Ninty-five patients underwent additional research biopsies at the time of diagnostic EUS. Diagnostic formalin-fixed (FFPE) and fresh frozen EUS samples underwent DNA extraction, quantification and targeted gene sequencing. Whole genome (WGS) and RNA sequencing was performed as proof of concept. Only 2 patients (2%) with a diagnosis of PC had insufficient material for targeted sequencing in both FFPE and frozen specimens. Targeted panel sequencing (n=54) revealed mutations in PC genes (KRAS, GNAS, TP53, CDKN2A, SMAD4) in patients with histological evidence of PC, including potentially actionable mutations (BRCA1, BRCA2, ATM, BRAF). WGS (n=5) of EUS samples revealed mutational signatures that are potential biomarkers of therapeutic responsiveness. RNA sequencing (n=35) segregated patients into clinically relevant molecular subtypes based on transcriptome. Integrated multi-omic analysis of PC using standard EUS guided biopsies offers clinical utility to guide personalized therapy and study the molecular pathology in all patients with PC.

2 Article The role of induction chemotherapy + chemoradiotherapy in localised pancreatic cancer: initial experience in Scotland. 2017

Grose, Derek / McIntosh, David / Jamieson, Nigel / Carter, Ross / Dickson, Euan / Chang, David / Marashi, Husam / Wilson, Christina / Alfayez, Mohammed / Kerr, Ashleigh / O'Donoghue, Roisin / Haskins, Lea / Duthie, Fraser / McKay, Colin J / Graham, Janet. ·Beatson West of Scotland Cancer Centre, Glasgow, UK. ·J Gastrointest Oncol · Pubmed #28890819.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Despite being relatively rare pancreatic cancer is one of the highest causes of death. Even within the potentially resectable group outcomes are poor. We present our initial experiences utilising a neoadjuvant approach to localised pancreatic cancer, evaluating survival, response rates and tolerability. METHODS: This was a retrospective analysis of a prospectively maintained database. Patients from 2012 to 2015 referred to a busy regional Hepato-Pancreatic Biliary (HPB) MDT were included. Patients were classified according to respectability criteria (utilising NCCN guidelines) and a treatment plan agreed. Systemic therapy with either FOLFIRINOX or Gem/Cap was delivered followed by chemoradiotherapy if disease remained localised. Toxicity, response, pathological outcomes and survival were all recorded. RESULTS: A total of 85 patients were included in the study: 45 had initially resectable disease; 19 required a response for resection and 21 had locally advanced inoperable disease; 34 patients underwent resection. The median survival for the potentially resectable group was 22.2 months while for those undergoing resection it was 37 months. CONCLUSIONS: We have demonstrated that a neoadjuvant approach is deliverable and tolerable. In addition we have demonstrated impressive survival results in patients undergoing resection with no detriment in outcome for those not proceeding to surgery.

3 Article Hypermutation In Pancreatic Cancer. 2017

Humphris, Jeremy L / Patch, Ann-Marie / Nones, Katia / Bailey, Peter J / Johns, Amber L / McKay, Skye / Chang, David K / Miller, David K / Pajic, Marina / Kassahn, Karin S / Quinn, Michael C J / Bruxner, Timothy J C / Christ, Angelika N / Harliwong, Ivon / Idrisoglu, Senel / Manning, Suzanne / Nourse, Craig / Nourbakhsh, Ehsan / Stone, Andrew / Wilson, Peter J / Anderson, Matthew / Fink, J Lynn / Holmes, Oliver / Kazakoff, Stephen / Leonard, Conrad / Newell, Felicity / Waddell, Nick / Wood, Scott / Mead, Ronald S / Xu, Qinying / Wu, Jianmin / Pinese, Mark / Cowley, Mark J / Jones, Marc D / Nagrial, Adnan M / Chin, Venessa T / Chantrill, Lorraine A / Mawson, Amanda / Chou, Angela / Scarlett, Christopher J / Pinho, Andreia V / Rooman, Ilse / Giry-Laterriere, Marc / Samra, Jaswinder S / Kench, James G / Merrett, Neil D / Toon, Christopher W / Epari, Krishna / Nguyen, Nam Q / Barbour, Andrew / Zeps, Nikolajs / Jamieson, Nigel B / McKay, Colin J / Carter, C Ross / Dickson, Euan J / Graham, Janet S / Duthie, Fraser / Oien, Karin / Hair, Jane / Morton, Jennifer P / Sansom, Owen J / Grützmann, Robert / Hruban, Ralph H / Maitra, Anirban / Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine A / Schulick, Richard D / Wolfgang, Christopher L / Morgan, Richard A / Lawlor, Rita T / Rusev, Borislav / Corbo, Vincenzo / Salvia, Roberto / Cataldo, Ivana / Tortora, Giampaolo / Tempero, Margaret A / Anonymous5070887 / Hofmann, Oliver / Eshleman, James R / Pilarsky, Christian / Scarpa, Aldo / Musgrove, Elizabeth A / Gill, Anthony J / Pearson, John V / Grimmond, Sean M / Waddell, Nicola / Biankin, Andrew V. ·The Kinghorn Cancer Centre, Darlinghurst, and the Cancer Research Program, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, Darlinghurst, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. · QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia; Queensland Centre for Medical Genomics, Institute for Molecular Bioscience, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. · Queensland Centre for Medical Genomics, Institute for Molecular Bioscience, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia; Wolfson Wohl Cancer Research Centre, Institute of Cancer Sciences, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, Scotland, United Kingdom. · Wolfson Wohl Cancer Research Centre, Institute of Cancer Sciences, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, Scotland, United Kingdom; Department of Surgery, Bankstown Hospital, Bankstown, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia; South Western Sydney Clinical School, Faculty of Medicine, University of New South Wales Australia, Liverpool, New South Wales, Australia; West of Scotland Pancreatic Unit, Glasgow Royal Infirmary, Glasgow, United Kingdom. · The Kinghorn Cancer Centre, Darlinghurst, and the Cancer Research Program, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, Darlinghurst, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia; Queensland Centre for Medical Genomics, Institute for Molecular Bioscience, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. · The Kinghorn Cancer Centre, Darlinghurst, and the Cancer Research Program, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, Darlinghurst, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia; St Vincent's Clinical School, Faculty of Medicine, University of New South Wales Australia, Darlinghurst, New South Wales, Australia. · Queensland Centre for Medical Genomics, Institute for Molecular Bioscience, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia; Genetic and Molecular Pathology, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia; School of Biological Sciences, The University of Adelaide, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia. · Queensland Centre for Medical Genomics, Institute for Molecular Bioscience, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. · Queensland Centre for Medical Genomics, Institute for Molecular Bioscience, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia; St Vincent's Clinical School, Faculty of Medicine, University of New South Wales Australia, Darlinghurst, New South Wales, Australia. · The Kinghorn Cancer Centre, Darlinghurst, and the Cancer Research Program, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, Darlinghurst, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia; South Eastern Area Laboratory Services Pathology, Prince of Wales Hospital, Randwick, New South Wales, Australia; Sonic Genetics, Douglass Hanly Moir Pathology, New South Wales, Australia. · The Kinghorn Cancer Centre, Darlinghurst, and the Cancer Research Program, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, Darlinghurst, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia; Wolfson Wohl Cancer Research Centre, Institute of Cancer Sciences, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, Scotland, United Kingdom. · The Kinghorn Cancer Centre, Darlinghurst, and the Cancer Research Program, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, Darlinghurst, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia; Macarthur Cancer Therapy Centre, Campbelltown Hospital, New South Wales, Australia. · The Kinghorn Cancer Centre, Darlinghurst, and the Cancer Research Program, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, Darlinghurst, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia; Department of Anatomical Pathology, SydPath, St Vincent's Hospital, New South Wales, Australia. · The Kinghorn Cancer Centre, Darlinghurst, and the Cancer Research Program, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, Darlinghurst, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia; School of Environmental and Life Sciences, University of Newcastle, Ourimbah, New South Wales, Australia. · Department of Surgery, Royal North Shore Hospital, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia; University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. · The Kinghorn Cancer Centre, Darlinghurst, and the Cancer Research Program, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, Darlinghurst, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia; University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia; Tissue Pathology and Diagnostic Oncology, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Camperdown, New South Wales, Australia. · Department of Surgery, Bankstown Hospital, Bankstown, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia; School of Medicine, Western Sydney University, Penrith, New South Wales, Australia. · Department of Surgery, Fiona Stanley Hospital, Murdoch, Washington. · Department of Gastroenterology, Royal Adelaide Hospital, North Terrace, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia. · Department of Surgery, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Woollongabba, Queensland, Australia. · School of Surgery, University of Western Australia, Australia and St John of God Pathology, Subiaco, Washington. · Wolfson Wohl Cancer Research Centre, Institute of Cancer Sciences, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, Scotland, United Kingdom; West of Scotland Pancreatic Unit, Glasgow Royal Infirmary, Glasgow, United Kingdom; Academic Unit of Surgery, School of Medicine, College of Medical, Veterinary and Life Sciences, University of Glasgow, Glasgow Royal Infirmary, Glasgow, United Kingdom. · West of Scotland Pancreatic Unit, Glasgow Royal Infirmary, Glasgow, United Kingdom. · Wolfson Wohl Cancer Research Centre, Institute of Cancer Sciences, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, Scotland, United Kingdom; Department of Medical Oncology, Beatson West of Scotland Cancer Centre, Glasgow, United Kingdom. · Department of Pathology, Southern General Hospital, Greater Glasgow & Clyde National Health Service, Glasgow, United Kingdom. · Greater Glasgow and Clyde Bio-repository, Pathology Department, Queen Elizabeth University Hospital, Glasgow, United Kingdom. · Cancer Research UK Beatson Institute, Glasgow, United Kingdom; Institute for Cancer Science, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, United Kingdom. · Universitätsklinikum Erlangen, Erlangen, Germany. · Department of Pathology, The Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland. · Department of Surgery, The Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland. · ARC-NET Center for Applied Research on Cancer, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona, Italy; Department of Pathology and Diagnostics, University of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Department of Medicine, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Division of Hematology and Oncology, University of California, San Francisco, California. · Australian Pancreatic Cancer Genome Initiative. · Wolfson Wohl Cancer Research Centre, Institute of Cancer Sciences, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, Scotland, United Kingdom. · Universitätsklinikum Erlangen, Department of Surgery, University of Erlangen-Nueremberg, Germany. · The Kinghorn Cancer Centre, Darlinghurst, and the Cancer Research Program, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, Darlinghurst, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia; Wolfson Wohl Cancer Research Centre, Institute of Cancer Sciences, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, Scotland, United Kingdom; St Vincent's Clinical School, Faculty of Medicine, University of New South Wales Australia, Darlinghurst, New South Wales, Australia. · The Kinghorn Cancer Centre, Darlinghurst, and the Cancer Research Program, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, Darlinghurst, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia; University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia; Department of Anatomical Pathology, Royal North Shore Hospital, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. · Queensland Centre for Medical Genomics, Institute for Molecular Bioscience, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia; University of Melbourne Centre for Cancer Research, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. · QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia; Queensland Centre for Medical Genomics, Institute for Molecular Bioscience, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. Electronic address: nic.waddell@qimrberghofer.edu.au. · Wolfson Wohl Cancer Research Centre, Institute of Cancer Sciences, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, Scotland, United Kingdom; Department of Surgery, Bankstown Hospital, Bankstown, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia; South Western Sydney Clinical School, Faculty of Medicine, University of New South Wales Australia, Liverpool, New South Wales, Australia; West of Scotland Pancreatic Unit, Glasgow Royal Infirmary, Glasgow, United Kingdom. Electronic address: andrew.biankin@glasgow.ac.uk. ·Gastroenterology · Pubmed #27856273.

ABSTRACT: Pancreatic cancer is molecularly diverse, with few effective therapies. Increased mutation burden and defective DNA repair are associated with response to immune checkpoint inhibitors in several other cancer types. We interrogated 385 pancreatic cancer genomes to define hypermutation and its causes. Mutational signatures inferring defects in DNA repair were enriched in those with the highest mutation burdens. Mismatch repair deficiency was identified in 1% of tumors harboring different mechanisms of somatic inactivation of MLH1 and MSH2. Defining mutation load in individual pancreatic cancers and the optimal assay for patient selection may inform clinical trial design for immunotherapy in pancreatic cancer.

4 Article Prospective cohort study comparing transient EUS guided elastography to EUS-FNA for the diagnosis of solid pancreatic mass lesions. 2016

Mayerle, J / Beyer, G / Simon, P / Dickson, E J / Carter, R C / Duthie, F / Lerch, M M / McKay, C J. ·Department of Medicine A, University Medicine Greifswald, Ernst-Moritz-Arndt-University Greifswald, Germany. Electronic address: mayerle@uni-greifswald.de. · Department of Medicine A, University Medicine Greifswald, Ernst-Moritz-Arndt-University Greifswald, Germany. · Lister Department of Surgery, Glasgow Royal Infirmary, Glasgow, United Kingdom. · Department of Pathology, Southern General Hospital, Glasgow, United Kingdom. ·Pancreatology · Pubmed #26602088.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Semiquantitative EUS-elastography has been introduced to distinguish between malignant and benign pancreatic lesions. This study investigated whether semiquantitative EUS-guided transient real time elastography increases the diagnostic accuracy for solid pancreatic lesions compared to EUS-FNA. PATIENTS AND METHODS: This single centre prospective cohort study included all patients with solitary pancreatic lesions on EUS during one year. Patients underwent EUS-FNA and semiquantitative EUS-elastography during the same session. EUS and elastography results were compared with final diagnosis which was made on the basis of tissue samples and long-term outcome. RESULTS: 91 patients were recruited of which 68 had pancreatic malignancy, 17 showed benign disease and 6 had cystic lesions and were excluded from further analysis. Strain ratios from malignant lesions were significantly higher (24.00; 8.01-43.94 95% CI vs 44.00; 32.42-55.00 95% CI) and ROC analysis indicated optimal cut-off of 24.82 with resulting sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of 77%, 65% and 73% respectively. B-mode EUS and EUS-FNA had an accuracy for the correct diagnosis of malignant lesions of 87% and 85%. When lowering the cut-off strain ratio for elastography to 10 the sensitivity rose to 96% with specificity of 43% and accuracy of 84%, resulting in the least accurate EUS-based method. This was confirmed by pairwise comparison. CONCLUSION: Semiquantitative EUS-elastography does not add substantial value to the EUS-based assessment of solid pancreatic lesions when compared to B-mode imaging.

5 Article SIRT3 & SIRT7: Potential Novel Biomarkers for Determining Outcome in Pancreatic Cancer Patients. 2015

McGlynn, Liane M / McCluney, Simon / Jamieson, Nigel B / Thomson, Jackie / MacDonald, Alasdair I / Oien, Karin / Dickson, Euan J / Carter, C Ross / McKay, Colin J / Shiels, Paul G. ·Institute of Cancer Sciences, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, United Kingdom. · West of Scotland Pancreatic Unit, Glasgow Royal Infirmary, Glasgow, United Kingdom; Academic Department of Surgery, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, United Kingdom. · Institute of Cancer Sciences, Pathology, Wolfson Building, Beatson Labs, Glasgow, United Kingdom. · West of Scotland Pancreatic Unit, Glasgow Royal Infirmary, Glasgow, United Kingdom. ·PLoS One · Pubmed #26121130.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: The sirtuin gene family has been linked with tumourigenesis, in both a tumour promoter and suppressor capacity. Information regarding the function of sirtuins in pancreatic cancer is sparse and equivocal. We undertook a novel study investigating SIRT1-7 protein expression in a cohort of pancreatic tumours. The aim of this study was to establish a protein expression profile for SIRT1-7 in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas (PDAC) and to determine if there were associations between SIRT1-7 expression, clinico-pathological parameters and patient outcome. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Immunohistochemical analysis of SIRT1-7 protein levels was undertaken in a tissue micro-array comprising 77 resected PDACs. Statistical analyses determined if SIRT1-7 protein expression was associated with clinical parameters or outcome. RESULTS: Two sirtuin family members demonstrated significant associations with clinico-pathological parameters and patient outcome. Low level SIRT3 expression in the tumour cytoplasm correlated with more aggressive tumours, and a shorter time to relapse and death, in the absence of chemotherapeutic intervention. Low levels of nuclear SIRT7 expression were also associated with an aggressive tumour phenotype and poorer outcome, as measured by disease-free and disease-specific survival time, 12 months post-diagnosis. CONCLUSIONS: Our data suggests that SIRT3 and SIRT7 possess tumour suppressor properties in the context of pancreatic cancer. SIRT3 may also represent a novel predictive biomarker to determine which patients may or may not respond to chemotherapy. This study opens up an interesting avenue of investigation to potentially identify predictive biomarkers and novel therapeutic targets for pancreatic cancer, a disease that has seen no significant improvement in survival over the past 40 years.

6 Article Pre-operative cardiopulmonary exercise testing predicts adverse post-operative events and non-progression to adjuvant therapy after major pancreatic surgery. 2013

Chandrabalan, Vishnu V / McMillan, Donald C / Carter, Roger / Kinsella, John / McKay, Colin J / Carter, C Ross / Dickson, Euan J. ·Academic Department of Surgery, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, UK. · Department of Respiratory Medicine, Glasgow Royal Infirmary, Glasgow, UK. · Section of Anaesthesia, Glasgow Royal Infirmary, Glasgow, UK. · West of Scotland Pancreatic Unit, Glasgow Royal Infirmary, Glasgow, UK. ·HPB (Oxford) · Pubmed #23458160.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Surgery followed by chemotherapy is the primary modality of cure for patients with resectable pancreatic cancer but is associated with significant morbidity. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the role of cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET) in predicting post-operative adverse events and fitness for chemotherapy after major pancreatic surgery. METHODS: Patients who underwent a pancreaticoduodenectomy or total pancreatectomy for pancreatic head lesions and had undergone pre-operative CPET were included in this retrospective study. Data on patient demographics, comorbidity and results of pre-operative evaluation were collected. Post-operative adverse events, hospital stay and receipt of adjuvant therapy were outcome measures. RESULTS: One hundred patients were included. Patients with an anaerobic threshold less than 10 ml/kg/min had a significantly greater incidence of a post-operative pancreatic fistula [International Study Group for Pancreatic Surgery (ISGPS) Grades A-C, 35.4% versus 16%, P = 0.028] and major intra-abdominal abscesses [Clavien-Dindo (CD) Grades III-V, 22.4% versus 7.8%, P = 0.042] and were less likely to receive adjuvant therapy [hazard ratio (HR) 6.30, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.25-31.75, P = 0.026]. A low anaerobic threshold was also associated with a prolonged hospital stay (median 20 versus 14 days, P = 0.005) but not with other adverse events. DISCUSSION: CPET predicts a post-operative pancreatic fistula, major intra-abdominal abscesses as well as length of hospital stay after major pancreatic surgery. Patients with a low anaerobic threshold are less likely to receive adjuvant therapy.

7 Article The prognostic influence of resection margin clearance following pancreaticoduodenectomy for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. 2013

Jamieson, Nigel B / Chan, Nigel I J / Foulis, Alan K / Dickson, Euan J / McKay, Colin J / Carter, C Ross. ·West of Scotland Pancreatic Unit, Glasgow Royal Infirmary, Alexandra Parade, Glasgow, G31 2ER, UK. nigel.jamieson@glasgow.ac.uk ·J Gastrointest Surg · Pubmed #23297028.

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: The poor overall survival associated with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) despite complete resection suggests that occult metastatic disease is present in most at the time of surgery. Resection margin involvement (R1) following resection is an established poor prognostic factor. However, the definition of an R1 resection varies and the impact of margin clearance on outcome has not been examined in detail. METHODS: In a cohort of 217 consecutive patients who underwent pancreaticoduodenectomy for PDAC with curative intent at a single institution between 1996 and 2011, the prognostic significance of the proximity of margin clearance was investigated. Microscopic margin clearance was stratified by 0.5 mm increments from tumor present at the margin to >2.0 mm. Groups were dichotomized into clear and involved groups according to the different R1 definitions. Multivariate survival analysis was used to establish independent prognostic factors. RESULTS: For the 38 patients (17.5 %) where the tumor was >1.5 mm from the closest involved margin, there was a significantly prolonged overall median survival (63.1 months; 95 % confidence interval, 32.5-93.8) compared to R1 resections (16.9 months; 95 % confidence interval, 14.5-19.4; P < 0.0001, log-rank test). This cutoff represented the optimum distance for predicting long-term survival. As margin clearance increased, R1 status became a more powerful independent predictor of outcome; however, margin clearance did not relate to site of tumor recurrence. CONCLUSION: These data demonstrate that margin clearance by at least 1.5 mm identifies a subgroup of patients which may potentially achieve long-term survival. This study further confirms the need to achieve standardization across pancreatic specimen reporting. Stratification of patients into future clinical trials based upon the degree of margin clearance may identify those patients likely to benefit from adjuvant therapy.

8 Article The relationship between tumor inflammatory cell infiltrate and outcome in patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. 2012

Jamieson, Nigel B / Mohamed, Mohamed / Oien, Karin A / Foulis, Alan K / Dickson, Euan J / Imrie, Clem W / Carter, C Ross / McKay, Colin J / McMillan, Donald C. ·West of Scotland Pancreatic Unit, Glasgow Royal Infirmary, Glasgow, United Kingdom. nigeljamieson@yahoo.com ·Ann Surg Oncol · Pubmed #22555345.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The tumor-associated inflammatory cell infiltrate is recognized to have prognostic value in various common solid tumors. However, the prognostic value of the tumor inflammatory cell infiltrate has not been established in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) nor has its relationship with the systemic inflammatory response. METHODS: Retrospective study was made of 173 patients who underwent surgery between 1997 and 2009. Routine pathology specimens were scored according to density of the tumor inflammatory cell infiltrate, and biochemical data were collected preoperatively. RESULTS: Low-grade tumor inflammatory cell infiltrate was associated with earlier tumor recurrence (P < 0.001) and particularly in the liver (P = 0.027). It was also associated with T3 tumors (P < 0.05), lymph node involvement (P < 0.05), and resection margin involvement (P < 0.05). On univariate survival analysis, age <65 years (P < 0.05), mGPS (P < 0.001), increased tumor stage (P < 0.01), nodal involvement (P < 0.01), size (P < 0.05), grade (P < 0.05), perineural invasion (P < 0.05), venous invasion (P < 0.01), resection margin involvement (P ≤ 0.001), vascular reconstruction (P < 0.05), and no adjuvant chemotherapy (P < 0.05) were associated with poor survival. In contrast, high-grade tumor inflammatory cell infiltrate was associated with better survival (P < 0.001). On multivariate survival analysis, mGPS [hazard ratio (HR): 1.77, 95% confidence interval (95% CI): 1.19-2.62, P = 0.005], tumor stage (HR: 2.21, 95% CI: 1.16-4.23, P = 0.016), resection margin involvement (HR: 2.19, 95% CI: 1.41-3.44, P = 0.001), venous invasion (HR: 1.79, 95% CI: 1.22-2.63, P = 0.003), tumor inflammatory cell infiltrate (HR: 0.37, 95% CI: 0.25-0.55, P = 0.0001), and adjuvant chemotherapy (P = 0.04) were independently prognostic. CONCLUSIONS: The results of the study show, for the first time, that the presence of a high-grade tumor inflammatory cell infiltrate is an independent predictor of prolonged overall survival following resection for PDAC. Furthermore, measures of the local and the systemic inflammatory response were inversely associated.

9 Article MicroRNA molecular profiles associated with diagnosis, clinicopathologic criteria, and overall survival in patients with resectable pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. 2012

Jamieson, Nigel B / Morran, Douglas C / Morton, Jennifer P / Ali, Asif / Dickson, Euan J / Carter, C Ross / Sansom, Owen J / Evans, T R Jeffry / McKay, Colin J / Oien, Karin A. ·West of Scotland Pancreatic Unit, Glasgow Royal Infirmary, Alexandra Parade, Glasgow, G31 2ER, United Kingdom. nigeljamieson@yahoo.com ·Clin Cancer Res · Pubmed #22114136.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: MicroRNAs (miRNA) have potential as diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers and as therapeutic targets in cancer. We sought to establish the relationship between miRNA expression and clinicopathologic parameters, including prognosis, in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: Global miRNA microarray expression profiling of prospectively collected fresh-frozen PDAC tissue was done on an initial test cohort of 48 patients, who had undergone pancreaticoduodenectomy between 2003 and 2008 at a single institution. We evaluated association with tumor stage, lymph node status, and site of recurrence, in addition to overall survival, using Cox regression multivariate analysis. Validation of selected potentially prognostic miRNAs was done in a separate cohort of 24 patients. RESULTS: miRNA profiling identified expression signatures associated with PDAC, lymph node involvement, high tumor grade, and 20 miRNAs were associated with overall survival. In the initial cohort of 48 PDAC patients, high expression of miR-21 (HR = 3.22, 95% CI: 1.21-8.58) and reduced expression of miR-34a (HR = 0.15, 95% CI: 0.06-0.37) and miR-30d (HR = 0.30, 95% CI: 0.12-0.79) were associated with poor overall survival following resection independent of clinical covariates. In a further validation set of 24 patients, miR-21 and miR-34a expression again significantly correlated with overall survival (P = 0.031 and P = 0.001). CONCLUSION: Expression patterns of miRNAs are significantly altered in PDAC. Aberrant expression of a number of miRNAs was independently associated with reduced survival, including overexpression of miR-21 and underexpression of miR-34a. SUMMARY: miRNA expression profiles for resected PDAC were examined to identify potentially prognostic miRNAs. miRNA microarray analysis identified statistically unique profiles, which could discriminate PDAC from paired nonmalignant pancreatic tissues as well as molecular signatures that differ according to pathologic features. miRNA expression profiles correlated with overall survival of PDAC following resection, indicating that miRNAs provide prognostic utility.

10 Article A prospective comparison of the prognostic value of tumor- and patient-related factors in patients undergoing potentially curative surgery for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. 2011

Jamieson, Nigel B / Denley, Simon M / Logue, Jennifer / MacKenzie, Douglas J / Foulis, Alan K / Dickson, Euan J / Imrie, Clem W / Carter, Ross / McKay, Colin J / McMillan, Donald C. ·Department of Surgery, Glasgow University, Glasgow, Scotland, UK. nigeljamieson@yahoo.com ·Ann Surg Oncol · Pubmed #21267785.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Outcome prediction after resection with curative intent for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma remains a challenge. There is increasing evidence that the presence of an ongoing systemic inflammatory response is associated with poor outcome in patients undergoing resection for a variety of common solid tumors. Our aim was to prospectively evaluate the prognostic value of tumor- and patient-related factors including the systemic inflammatory response in patients undergoing potentially curative surgery for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma of the head of pancreas. METHODS: The prognostic impact of tumor factors such as stage and host factors, including the systemic inflammatory response (modified Glasgow Prognostic Score [mGPS]), were evaluated in a prospective study of 135 patients who underwent elective pancreaticoduodenectomy for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma from January 2002 to April 2009. RESULTS: In addition to the established tumor-related pathological factors (in particular margin involvement; hazard ratio [HR] 2.82, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.65-4.84, P < 0.001), an elevated mGPS (HR 2.26, 95% CI 1.43-3.57, P < 0.001) was independently associated with lower overall survival after pancreaticoduodenectomy. Additionally, in an adjuvant therapy subgroup of 74 patients, both margin involvement and an elevated mGPS remained independently associated with reduced overall survival. CONCLUSIONS: We have prospectively validated the influence of tumor-related and patient-related factors. Margin involvement and the preoperative mGPS were the most important determinants of overall survival in patients undergoing potentially curative pancreaticoduodenectomy. Furthermore, both had independent prognostic value in those patients receiving adjuvant chemotherapy. In the future, this may be considered a stratification factor for entry onto therapeutic trials.

11 Article Peripancreatic fat invasion is an independent predictor of poor outcome following pancreaticoduodenectomy for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. 2011

Jamieson, Nigel Balfour / Foulis, Alan K / Oien, Karin A / Dickson, Euan J / Imrie, Clem W / Carter, Ross / McKay, Colin J. ·West of Scotland Pancreatic Unit, Glasgow Royal Infirmary, Alexandra Parade, Glasgow G31 2ER, UK. nigeljamieson@yahoo.com ·J Gastrointest Surg · Pubmed #21116727.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Following pancreaticoduodenectomy for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), identification of peripancreatic fat tumor invasion promotes a tumor to stage T3. We sought to understand better the impact of histological peripancreatic fat invasion on prognosis and site of recurrence in a cohort of patients with PDAC. METHODS: We analyzed the patient demographics, outcome, and recurrence data that had been prospectively collected in 189 consecutive PDAC undergoing potentially curative pancreaticoduodenectomy between 1996 and 2009. Pathological features were reassessed for all patients. Survival outcome was compared using Kaplan-Meier/Cox proportional hazards analysis. The primary site of recurrence was defined as either locoregional or distant metastases. RESULTS: The median survival of this PDAC cohort was 18.9 months (95% confidence interval (CI) 15.7-22.2). Histological peripancreatic fat invasion was evident in 51 (27%) patients and was associated with lymph node metastases (p = 0.004) and larger tumor size (p = 0.015). The presence of peripancreatic fat invasion was associated with reduced overall survival following resection (12.4 months [95% CI 9.9-15.0]) when compared to those patients with no evidence of fat invasion (22.6 months [95% CI 18.5-26.7]; p < 0.0001). By multivariate survival analysis, independent predictors of overall survival included tumor grade (p = 0.002), lymph node involvement (p = 0.025), resection margin status (p = 0.003), venous invasion (p = 0.045), and peripancreatic fat invasion (p = 0.007). Invasion into the pancreatic fat was significantly associated with the primary site of recurrence being locoregional failure (p = 0.002). CONCLUSIONS: Peripancreatic fat invasion was identified as being an independent predictor of poor outcome following pancreaticoduodenectomy for PDAC. Additionally, the presence of peripancreatic fat invasion was associated with locoregional disease as the primary site of recurrence. This may have implications for the staging of PDAC and potentially require incorporation into future staging systems to improve outcome stratification.

12 Article Positive mobilization margins alone do not influence survival following pancreatico-duodenectomy for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. 2010

Jamieson, Nigel B / Foulis, Alan K / Oien, Karin A / Going, James J / Glen, Paul / Dickson, Euan J / Imrie, Clem W / McKay, Colin J / Carter, Ross. ·West of Scotland Pancreatic Unit, Department of Pancreatico-Biliary Surgery, Glasgow Royal Infirmary, Alexandra Parade, Glasgow, United Kingdom. nigeljamieson@yahoo.com ·Ann Surg · Pubmed #20485150.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To determine the prognostic influence of residual tumor at or within 1 mm of the mobilization margins (R1Mobilization) compared with transection margins (R1Transection) following pancreaticoduodenectomy for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). BACKGROUND: The prognostic strength of R1 status increases with frequency of margin positivity and is enhanced by protocol driven pathology reporting. Currently, margins are treated uniformly with tumor at or close to any margin considered of equal prognostic significance. The resection involves a mobilization phase freeing the posterior margin and anterior surface then a transection phase requiring lympho-vascular division forming the medial resection and pancreatic transection margin. The comparative assessment of the relative importance of tumor involvement of these different margins has not previously been investigated. METHODS: Retrospective analysis of 148 consecutive resections for PDAC from 1996-2007 was performed. The individual (pancreatic transection, medial, posterior, and anterior surface) margins were separately identified and analyzed by a senior pathologist. An R1 resection was defined as microscopic evidence of tumor < or = 1 mm from a resection margin. R1Mobilization tumor extension included both R1Anterior and R1Posterior cases; while R1Transection included pancreatic neck/body transection, R1Medial and adjacent transection margins. RESULTS: R1 status was confirmed in 109 patients (74%). The medial (46%) and posterior (44%) margins were most commonly involved. R1 status was found to an independent predictor of poor outcome (P < 0.001). R1Mobilization involvement only (n = 48) was associated with a significantly longer median survival of 18.9 months (95% CI, 13.7-24.8) versus 11.1 months (95% CI, 7.1-15.0) for those with R1Transection tumor involvement (n = 61) (P < 0.001). There was no significant difference in the survival of the R1Mobilization compared with R0 group (P = 0.52). CONCLUSIONS: Following pancreaticoduodenectomy for PDAC, involvement of the transection margins in contrast to mobilization margins defines a group whose outcome is significantly worse. This may impact upon the allocation of adjuvant therapy within the setting of randomized controlled trials.

13 Minor RE: nab-Paclitaxel Plus Gemcitabine for Metastatic Pancreatic Cancer: Long-Term Survival From a Phase III Trial. 2015

Palani Velu, Lavanniya K / Steele, Colin W / Dickson, Euan J / Carter, C Ross / McKay, Colin J / Horgan, Paul G / McMillan, Donald C / Jamieson, Nigel B. ·Academic Unit of Surgery, School of Medicine, College of Medical, Veterinary and Life Sciences, University of Glasgow, Glasgow Royal Infirmary, Glasgow, Scotland (LKPV, PGH, DCM, NBJ) · West of Scotland Pancreatic Unit, Glasgow Royal Infirmary, Glasgow, Scotland (LKPV, CWS, EJD, CRC, CJM, PGH, DCM, NBJ). ·J Natl Cancer Inst · Pubmed #26251329.

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