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Pancreatic Neoplasms: HELP
Articles by Milena Di Leo
Based on 10 articles published since 2010
(Why 10 articles?)
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Between 2010 and 2020, M. Di Leo wrote the following 10 articles about Pancreatic Neoplasms.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Article Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumours: The Role of Endoscopic Ultrasound Biopsy in Diagnosis and Grading Based on the WHO 2017 Classification. 2019

Di Leo, Milena / Poliani, Laura / Rahal, Daoud / Auriemma, Francesco / Anderloni, Andrea / Ridolfi, Cristina / Spaggiari, Paola / Capretti, Giovanni / Di Tommaso, Luca / Preatoni, Paoletta / Zerbi, Alessandro / Carnaghi, Carlo / Lania, Andrea / Malesci, Alberto / Repici, Alessandro / Carrara, Silvia. ·Humanitas Clinical and Research Center, IRCCS, Digestive Endoscopy Unit, Division of Gastroenterology, Milan, Italy, milena.di_leo@hunimed.eu. · Humanitas University, Department of Biomedical Sciences, Milan, Italy, milena.di_leo@hunimed.eu. · Humanitas Clinical and Research Center, IRCCS, Digestive Endoscopy Unit, Division of Gastroenterology, Milan, Italy. · Department of Pathology, Humanitas Clinical and Research Center, IRCCS, Milan, Italy. · Humanitas Clinical and Research Center, IRCCS, Pancreatic Surgery Unit, Milan, Italy. · Humanitas University, Department of Biomedical Sciences, Milan, Italy. · Humanitas Clinical and Research Center, IRCCS, Division of Gastroenterology, Milan, Italy. · Humanitas Clinical and Research Center, IRCCS, Division of Oncology, Milan, Italy. · Humanitas Clinical and Research Center, IRCCS, Division of Endocrinology, Milan, Italy. ·Dig Dis · Pubmed #30897588.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: One of the controversial issues in the diagnosis of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumours (pNETs) is the accurate prediction of their clinical behaviour. OBJECTIVES: The aim of the study was to evaluate the role of endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) biopsy in the diagnosis and grading of pNETs in a certified ENETS Center. METHODS: A prospectively maintained database of EUS biopsy procedures was retrospectively reviewed to identify all consecutive patients referred to a certified ENETS Center with a suspicion of pNET between June 2014 and April 2017. The cytological and/or histological specimens were stained and the Ki-67 labeling index was evaluated. In patients undergoing surgery, the grade obtained with EUS-guided biopsy was compared with the final histological grade. The grade was evaluated according to the 2017 WHO classifications and grading. RESULTS: The study population included 59 patients. EUS biopsy material reached an adequacy of 98.3% and was adequate for Ki-67 evaluation in 84.7% of cases. Twenty-nine patients (49.2%) underwent surgery. Of these, 25 patients had Ki-67 evaluated on EUS biopsy: the agreement between EUS biopsy grading and surgical specimen grading was 84%. CONCLUSION: EUS biopsy is an accurate method for the diagnosis and grading of pNETs based on the WHO 2017 Ki-67 labelling scheme.

2 Article Germline BRCA2 K3326X and CHEK2 I157T mutations increase risk for sporadic pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. 2019

Obazee, O / Archibugi, L / Andriulli, A / Soucek, P / Małecka-Panas, E / Ivanauskas, A / Johnson, T / Gazouli, M / Pausch, T / Lawlor, R T / Cavestro, G M / Milanetto, A C / Di Leo, M / Pasquali, C / Hegyi, P / Szentesi, A / Radu, C E / Gheorghe, C / Theodoropoulos, G E / Bergmann, F / Brenner, H / Vodickova, L / Katzke, V / Campa, D / Strobel, O / Kaiser, J / Pezzilli, R / Federici, F / Mohelnikova-Duchonova, B / Boggi, U / Lemstrova, R / Johansen, J S / Bojesen, S E / Chen, I / Jensen, B V / Capurso, G / Pazienza, V / Dervenis, C / Sperti, C / Mambrini, A / Hackert, T / Kaaks, R / Basso, D / Talar-Wojnarowska, R / Maiello, E / Izbicki, J R / Cuk, K / Saum, K U / Cantore, M / Kupcinskas, J / Palmieri, O / Delle Fave, G / Landi, S / Salvia, R / Fogar, P / Vashist, Y K / Scarpa, A / Vodicka, P / Tjaden, C / Iskierka-Jazdzewska, E / Canzian, F. ·Genomic Epidemiology Group, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Digestive and Liver Disease Unit, Pancreatic Disorders Clinic, S. Andrea Hospital, University of Sapienza, Rome, Italy. · Pancreatico/Biliary Endoscopy and Endosonography Division, Pancreas Translational and Clinical Research Center, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy. · Division of Gastroenterology and Research Laboratory, Department of Oncology, IRCCS Scientific Institute and Regional General Hospital "Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza", San Giovanni Rotondo, Italy. · Laboratory of Pharmacogenomics, Biomedical Centre, Faculty of Medicine in Plzen, Charles University in Prague, Plzen, Czech Republic. · Department of Digestive Tract Diseases, Medical University of Lodz, Lodz, Poland. · Department of Gastroenterology, Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, Kaunas, Lithuania. · Division of Cancer Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Department of Basic Medical Sciences, Laboratory of Biology, Medical School National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece. · Klinik für Allgemein-, Viszeral- und Transplantationschirurgie, Heidelberg, Germany. · ARC-Net, Applied Research on Cancer Centre, University of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Gastroenterology and Gastrointestinal Endoscopy Unit, Vita-Salute San Raffaele University, IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy. · Department of Surgery, Oncology and Gastroenterology -DiSCOG, University of Padova, Padova, Italy. · Institute for Translational Medicine and 1st Department of Medicine, University of Pécs, Pécs, Hungary. · Fundeni Clinical Institute, Bucharest, Romania. · First Propaedeutic Surgical Department, "Hippocratio" General Hospital Athens Medical School, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece. · Pathologisches Institut der Universität Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany. · Division of Clinical Epidemiology and Aging Research, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Division of Preventive Oncology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ) and National Center for Tumor Diseases (NCT), Heidelberg, Germany. · German Cancer Consortium (DKTK), German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Institute of Biology and Medical Genetics, 1st Medical Faculty, Charles University, Prague and Biomedical Center, Faculty of Medicine in Pilsen, Charles University, Prague, Czech Republic. · Dipartimento di Biologia, Università di Pisa, Pisa, Italy. · Pancreas Unit, Department of Digestive System, Sant'Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, Bologna, Italy. · Department of Massa Carrara Oncological, Azienda USL Toscana Nord Ovest, Carrara, Italy. · Department of Oncology, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, Palacky University Olomouc and University Hospital Olomouc, Olomouc, Czech Republic. · Division of General and Transplant Surgery, Pisa University Hospital, Pisa, Italy. · Department of Oncology, Herlev and Gentofte Hospital, Copenhagen University Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark. · Department of Clinical Biochemistry, Herlev and Gentofte Hospital, Copenhagen University Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark. · Department of Surgery, Konstantopouleion General Hospital of Athens, Athens, Greece. · Department of Laboratory Medicine, University-Hospital of Padova, Padova, Italy. · Department of General, Visceral and Thoracic Surgery, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany. · Department of Surgery, Pancreas Institute, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Section for Visceral Surgery, Department of Surgery, Kantonsspital Aarau AG, Aarau, Switzerland. · Institute of Experimental Medicine, Czech Academy of Science, Prague and Institute of Biology and Medical Genetics, 1st Medical Faculty, Charles University, Prague, Czech Republic. · Department of Hematology, Medical University of Lodz, Lodz, Poland. ·Int J Cancer · Pubmed #30672594.

ABSTRACT: Rare truncating BRCA2 K3326X (rs11571833) and pathogenic CHEK2 I157T (rs17879961) variants have previously been implicated in familial pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), but not in sporadic cases. The effect of both mutations in important DNA repair genes on sporadic PDAC risk may shed light on the genetic architecture of this disease. Both mutations were genotyped in germline DNA from 2,935 sporadic PDAC cases and 5,626 control subjects within the PANcreatic Disease ReseArch (PANDoRA) consortium. Risk estimates were evaluated using multivariate unconditional logistic regression with adjustment for possible confounders such as sex, age and country of origin. Statistical analyses were two-sided with p values <0.05 considered significant. K3326X and I157T were associated with increased risk of developing sporadic PDAC (odds ratio (OR

3 Article Single-stage EUS-guided choledochoduodenostomy using a lumen-apposing metal stent for malignant distal biliary obstruction. 2019

Anderloni, Andrea / Fugazza, Alessandro / Troncone, Edoardo / Auriemma, Francesco / Carrara, Silvia / Semeraro, Rossella / Maselli, Roberta / Di Leo, Milena / D'Amico, Ferdinando / Sethi, Amrita / Repici, Alessandro. ·Digestive Endoscopy Unit, Division of Gastroenterology, Humanitas Research Hospital, Rozzano, Milan, Italy. · Pancreaticobiliary Endoscopy Services, Division of Digestive and Liver Disease, Columbia University Medical Center-New York Presbyterian Hospital, New York, New York, USA. · Digestive Endoscopy Unit, Division of Gastroenterology, Humanitas Research Hospital, Rozzano, Milan, Italy; Humanitas University, Rozzano, Milan, Italy. ·Gastrointest Endosc · Pubmed #30189198.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND AND AIMS: EUS-guided choledochoduodenostomy (EUS-CD) using a lumen-apposing metal stent (LAMS) has recently been reported as an alternative treatment approach for patients with malignant obstructive jaundice and failed ERCP. We analyzed the safety and technical and clinical efficacy of EUS-CD using LAMSs in patients with malignant obstructive jaundice. METHODS: This was a retrospective study of consecutive patients with inoperable malignant distal bile duct obstruction who underwent EUS-CD using an electrocautery-enhanced (EC)-LAMS over a 3-year period (2015-2018). The main outcome measures were technical and clinical success (defined as a decline in serum bilirubin level by 50% at 2-week follow-up). Secondary outcomes were occurrence of adverse events, procedure time, and stent patency. RESULTS: Forty-six patients (47.8% women; median age, 73.1 ± 12.6 years) underwent direct EUS-CD using the biliary EC-LAMS. The procedure was technically successful in 43 patients (93.5%). The rate of clinical success was 97.7%. Adverse events occurred in 5 (11.6%) patients and included the following: 1 fatal bleeding 17 days after stent placement, 3 episodes of stent occlusion (food impaction), and 1 spontaneous migration (all 4 requiring reintervention). The mean follow-up was 114.37 days (95% confidence interval, 73.2-155.4). CONCLUSIONS: EUS-CD using the EC-LAMS is effective. The rate of adverse events including one fatal event is not negligible and should be carefully considered before using the stent in this clinical setting. Prospective studies are required to validate our preliminary findings to fully assess the long-term efficacy and safety of the stent.

4 Article Endoscopic ultrasound-through-the-needle biopsy in pancreatic cystic lesions: A multicenter study. 2018

Barresi, Luca / Crinò, Stefano F / Fabbri, Carlo / Attili, Fabia / Poley, Jan W / Carrara, Silvia / Tarantino, Ilaria / Bernardoni, Laura / Giovanelli, Silvia / Di Leo, Milena / Manfrin, Erminia / Tacelli, Matteo / Bruno, Marco J / Traina, Mario / Larghi, Alberto. ·Endoscopy Service, Department of Diagnostic and Therapeutic Services, IRCCS-ISMETT (Mediterranean Institute for Transplantation and Highly Specialized Therapies), Palermo, Italy. · Department of Medicine, Gastroenterology and Digestive Endoscopy Unit, The Pancreas Institute, University of Verona Hospital Trust, Verona, Italy. · Department of Gastroenterology and Surgical Sciences, Bellaria-Maggiore Hospital, AUSL Bologna, University of Bologna, Bologna, Italy. · Digestive Endoscopy Unit, Catholic University, Rome, Italy. · Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Erasmus MC University Medical Center Rotterdam, Rotterdam, The Netherlands. · Digestive Endoscopy Unit, Division of Gastroenterology, Humanitas Research Hospital, Milan, Italy. · Department of Diagnostics and Public Health, Section of Pathology, University of Verona, Verona, Italy. ·Dig Endosc · Pubmed #29808529.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND AND AIM: Tissue acquisition in pancreatic cystic lesions (PCL) is the ideal method for diagnosis and risk stratification for malignancy of these lesions. Direct sampling from the walls of PCL with different devices has shown better results than cytology from cystic fluid. We carried out a retrospective, multicenter study to evaluate the feasibility, safety, and diagnostic yield of a micro-forceps, specifically designed to be used through a 19-gauge needle after endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS)-guided puncture of PCL. METHODS: We retrospectively collected data from patients who underwent EUS-through-the-needle biopsy (EUS-TTNB) in PCL at six referral centers. RESULTS: The sampling procedure was carried out in 56 patients (mean age 57.5 ± 13.1 years, M:F 17:39), and was technically successful in all of them (100%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 94-100%). Adverse events occurred in 9/56 (16.1%; 95% CI, 8-28%) patients, with self-limited intracystic hemorrhage the most common (7/56, 12.5%; 95% CI, 5-24%). All adverse events were mild, and resolved without any specific intervention. Specimens were considered adequate for histological diagnosis in 47/56 (83.9%; 95% CI, 72-92%). In two of these patients, despite the histological adequacy, a diagnosis could not be reached. In two other cases, a specimen sufficient for a cytological diagnosis was obtained. Overall diagnostic yield by combining cytological and histological samples was 47/56 (83.9%; 95% CI, 72-92%). CONCLUSION: EUS-TTNB with micro-forceps in PCL is feasible, safe, and has a high diagnostic yield. Future prospective studies are needed to better assess the clinical impact of EUS-TTNB on the management of PCL.

5 Article EUS elastography (strain ratio) and fractal-based quantitative analysis for the diagnosis of solid pancreatic lesions. 2018

Carrara, Silvia / Di Leo, Milena / Grizzi, Fabio / Correale, Loredana / Rahal, Daoud / Anderloni, Andrea / Auriemma, Francesco / Fugazza, Alessandro / Preatoni, Paoletta / Maselli, Roberta / Hassan, Cesare / Finati, Elena / Mangiavillano, Benedetto / Repici, Alessandro. ·Digestive Endoscopy Unit, Division of Gastroenterology, Humanitas Clinical and Research Center, Milan, Italy. · Digestive Endoscopy Unit, Division of Gastroenterology, Humanitas Clinical and Research Center, Milan, Italy; Department of Biomedical Sciences, Humanitas University, Milan, Italy. · Department of Biomedical Sciences, Humanitas University, Milan, Italy; Department of Immunology and Inflammation, Humanitas Clinical and Research Center, Milan, Italy. · Centro di Prevenzione Oncologica, Turin, Italy. · Department of Pathology, Humanitas Clinical and Research Center, Milan, Italy. · Endoscopic Unit, Nuovo Regina Margherita Hospital, Rome, Italy. · Digestive Endoscopy Unit, Humanitas Mater Domini, Varese, Italy. ·Gastrointest Endosc · Pubmed #29329992.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND AND AIMS: EUS elastography is useful in characterizing solid pancreatic lesions (SPLs), and fractal analysis-based technology has been used to evaluate geometric complexity in oncology. The aim of this study was to evaluate EUS elastography (strain ratio) and fractal analysis for the characterization of SPLs. METHODS: Consecutive patients with SPLs were prospectively enrolled between December 2015 and February 2017. Elastographic evaluation included parenchymal strain ratio (pSR) and wall strain ratio (wSR) and was performed with a new compact US processor. Elastographic images were analyzed using a computer program to determine the 3-dimensional histogram fractal dimension. A composite cytology/histology/clinical reference standard was used to assess sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and area under the receiver operating curve. RESULTS: Overall, 102 SPLs from 100 patients were studied. At final diagnosis, 69 (68%) were malignant and 33 benign. At elastography, both pSR and wSR appeared to be significantly higher in malignant as compared with benign SPLs (pSR, 24.5 vs 6.4 [P < .001]; wSR, 56.6 vs 15.3 [P < .001]). When the best cut-off levels of pSR and wSR at 9.10 and 16.2, respectively, were used, sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and area under the receiver operating curve were 88.4%, 78.8%, 89.7%, 76.9%, and 86.7% and 91.3%, 69.7%, 86.5%, 80%, and 85.7%, respectively. Fractal analysis showed a significant statistical difference (P = .0087) between the mean surface fractal dimension of malignant lesions (D = 2.66 ± .01) versus neuroendocrine tumor (D = 2.73 ± .03) and a statistical difference for all 3 channels red, green, and blue (P < .0001). CONCLUSIONS: EUS elastography with pSR and fractal-based analysis are useful in characterizing SPLs. (Clinical trial registration number: NCT02855151.).

6 Article Do pancreatic cancer and chronic pancreatitis share the same genetic risk factors? A PANcreatic Disease ReseArch (PANDoRA) consortium investigation. 2018

Campa, Daniele / Pastore, Manuela / Capurso, Gabriele / Hackert, Thilo / Di Leo, Milena / Izbicki, Jakob R / Khaw, Kay-Tee / Gioffreda, Domenica / Kupcinskas, Juozas / Pasquali, Claudio / Macinga, Peter / Kaaks, Rudolf / Stigliano, Serena / Peeters, Petra H / Key, Timothy J / Talar-Wojnarowska, Renata / Vodicka, Pavel / Valente, Roberto / Vashist, Yogesh K / Salvia, Roberto / Papaconstantinou, Ioannis / Shimizu, Yasuhiro / Valsuani, Chiara / Zambon, Carlo Federico / Gazouli, Maria / Valantiene, Irena / Niesen, Willem / Mohelnikova-Duchonova, Beatrice / Hara, Kazuo / Soucek, Pavel / Malecka-Panas, Ewa / Bueno-de-Mesquita, H B As / Johnson, Theron / Brenner, Herman / Tavano, Francesca / Fogar, Paola / Ito, Hidemi / Sperti, Cosimo / Butterbach, Katja / Latiano, Anna / Andriulli, Angelo / Cavestro, Giulia Martina / Busch, Olivier R C / Dijk, Frederike / Greenhalf, William / Matsuo, Keitaro / Lombardo, Carlo / Strobel, Oliver / König, Anna-Katharina / Cuk, Katarina / Strothmann, Hendrik / Katzke, Verena / Cantore, Maurizio / Mambrini, Andrea / Oliverius, Martin / Pezzilli, Raffaele / Landi, Stefano / Canzian, Federico. ·Department of Biology, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. · Genomic Epidemiology Group, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Digestive and Liver Disease Unit, S. Andrea Hospital 'Sapienza' University of Rome, Rome, Italy. · Department of General Surgery, University Hospital Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany. · Gastroenterology and Gastrointestinal Endoscopy Unit, Vita-Salute San Raffaele University, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy. · Department of General, Visceral and Thoracic Surgery, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany. · Clinical Gerontology Unit, Addenbrooke's Hospital, University of Cambridge School of Clinical Medicine, Cambridge, United Kingdom. · Division of Gastroenterology and Research Laboratory, Department of Surgery, IRCCS Scientific Institute and Regional General Hospital "Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza", San Giovanni Rotondo, Italy. · Department of Gastroenterology, Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, Kaunas, Lithuania. · Department of Surgery, Oncology and Gastroenterology (DiSCOG), University of Padova, Padova, Italy. · Institute of Experimental Medicine, Czech Academy of Sciences and Institute of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Prague, Czech Republic. · Division of Cancer Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Department of Epidemiology, Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands. · MRC-PHE Centre for Environment and Health, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Imperial College, London, United Kingdom. · Cancer Epidemiology Unit, Nuffield Department of Population Health, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom. · Department of Digestive Tract Diseases, Medical University of Lodz, Lodz, Poland. · Department of Visceral Surgery, Kantonsspital Aarau AG, Aarau, Switzerland. · Department of Surgery, Pancreas Institute, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Second Department of Surgery, Aretaieion Hospital, School of Medicine, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece. · Department of Gastroenterological Surgery, Aichi Cancer Center Hospital, Nagoya, Japan. · Oncological Department, Azienda USL Toscana Nord Ovest, Oncological Unit of Massa Carrara, Carrara, Massa and Carrara, Italy. · Department of Medicine (DIMED), University of Padova, Padova, Italy. · Department of Basic Medical Sciences, Laboratory of Biology, School of Medicine, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece. · Department of Oncology, Palacky University Medical School and Teaching Hospital, Olomouc, Czech Republic. · Department of Gastroenterology, Aichi Cancer Center Hospital, Nagoya, Japan. · Biomedical Center, Faculty of Medicine in Pilsen, Charles University in Prague, Pilsen, Czech Republic. · Department for Determinants of Chronic Diseases (DCD), National Institute for Public Health and the Environment, Bilthoven, The Netherlands. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, The School of Public Health, Imperial College London, St Mary's Campus, London, United Kingdom. · Department of Social & Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. · Division of Clinical Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Division of Preventive Oncology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), and National Center for Tumor Diseases (NCT), Heidelberg, Germany. · German Cancer Consortium (DKTK), German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Department of Laboratory Medicine, University-Hospital of Padova, Padova, Italy. · Division of Molecular and Clinical Epidemiology, Aichi Cancer Center Research Institute, Nagoya, Japan. · Department of Epidemiology, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya, Japan. · Department of Surgery, Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. · Department of Pathology, Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. · Institute for Health Research, Liverpool Pancreas Biomedical Research Unit, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, United Kingdom. · Division of General and Transplant Surgery, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. · Dipartimento di Ricerca Traslazionale e delle Nuove Tecnologie in Medicina e Chirurgia, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. · Transplant Surgery Department, Institute for Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Prague, Czech Republic. · Pancreas Unit, Department of Digestive Diseases and Internal Medicine Sant'Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, Bologna, Italy. ·Int J Cancer · Pubmed #28913878.

ABSTRACT: Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is a very aggressive tumor with a five-year survival of less than 6%. Chronic pancreatitis (CP), an inflammatory process in of the pancreas, is a strong risk factor for PDAC. Several genetic polymorphisms have been discovered as susceptibility loci for both CP and PDAC. Since CP and PDAC share a consistent number of epidemiologic risk factors, the aim of this study was to investigate whether specific CP risk loci also contribute to PDAC susceptibility. We selected five common SNPs (rs11988997, rs379742, rs10273639, rs2995271 and rs12688220) that were identified as susceptibility markers for CP and analyzed them in 2,914 PDAC cases, 356 CP cases and 5,596 controls retrospectively collected in the context of the international PANDoRA consortium. We found a weak association between the minor allele of the PRSS1-PRSS2-rs10273639 and an increased risk of developing PDAC (OR

7 Article Rectal metastases from malignant mucinous cystic neoplasm of the pancreas mimicking a rectal carcinoma. 2018

Carrara, Silvia / Di Leo, Milena / Spaggiari, Paola / Bagnoli, Pietro Francesco / Repici, Alessandro. ·Digestive Endoscopy Unit, Division of Gastroenterology, Humanitas Clinical and Research Center, Humanitas University, Milan, Italy. · Digestive Endoscopy Unit, Division of Gastroenterology, Humanitas Clinical and Research Center, Department of Biomedical Sciences, Humanitas University, Milan, Italy. · Department of Pathology, Humanitas Clinical and Research Center, Humanitas University, Milan, Italy. · Department of Cancer Surgery, Humanitas Clinical and Research Center, Humanitas University, Milan, Italy. ·Gastrointest Endosc · Pubmed #28673644.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

8 Article The Golden Compass to the Depths. 2016

Carrara, Silvia / Di Leo, Milena / Zerbi, Alessandro. ·Digestive Endoscopy Unit, Division of Gastroenterology, Humanitas Research Hospital, Rozzano Milan, Italy. · Pancreatic Surgery Unit, Humanitas Research Hospital, Rozzano Milan, Italy. ·Gastroenterology · Pubmed #27713050.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

9 Article Single-session double-stent placement in concomitant malignant biliary and duodenal obstruction with a cautery-tipped lumen apposing metal stent. 2016

Anderloni, Andrea / Buda, Andrea / Carrara, Silvia / Di Leo, Milena / Fugazza, Alessandro / Maselli, Roberta / Repici, Alessandro. ·Digestive Endoscopy Unit, Division of Gastroenterology, Humanitas Research Hospital, Rozzano, Milan, Italy. · Gastroenterology Unit, Department of Gastrointestinal Oncological Surgery, "S. Maria del Prato" Hospital, Feltre, Italy. ·Endoscopy · Pubmed #27706541.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

10 Article Functional single nucleotide polymorphisms within the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 2A/2B region affect pancreatic cancer risk. 2016

Campa, Daniele / Pastore, Manuela / Gentiluomo, Manuel / Talar-Wojnarowska, Renata / Kupcinskas, Juozas / Malecka-Panas, Ewa / Neoptolemos, John P / Niesen, Willem / Vodicka, Pavel / Delle Fave, Gianfranco / Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas / Gazouli, Maria / Pacetti, Paola / Di Leo, Milena / Ito, Hidemi / Klüter, Harald / Soucek, Pavel / Corbo, Vincenzo / Yamao, Kenji / Hosono, Satoyo / Kaaks, Rudolf / Vashist, Yogesh / Gioffreda, Domenica / Strobel, Oliver / Shimizu, Yasuhiro / Dijk, Frederike / Andriulli, Angelo / Ivanauskas, Audrius / Bugert, Peter / Tavano, Francesca / Vodickova, Ludmila / Zambon, Carlo Federico / Lovecek, Martin / Landi, Stefano / Key, Timothy J / Boggi, Ugo / Pezzilli, Raffaele / Jamroziak, Krzysztof / Mohelnikova-Duchonova, Beatrice / Mambrini, Andrea / Bambi, Franco / Busch, Olivier / Pazienza, Valerio / Valente, Roberto / Theodoropoulos, George E / Hackert, Thilo / Capurso, Gabriele / Cavestro, Giulia Martina / Pasquali, Claudio / Basso, Daniela / Sperti, Cosimo / Matsuo, Keitaro / Büchler, Markus / Khaw, Kay-Tee / Izbicki, Jakob / Costello, Eithne / Katzke, Verena / Michalski, Christoph / Stepien, Anna / Rizzato, Cosmeri / Canzian, Federico. ·Department of Biology, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. · Genomic Epidemiology Group, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Department of Digestive Tract Diseases, Medical University of Lodz, Lodz, Poland. · Department of Gastroenterology, Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, Kaunas, Lithuania. · Institute for Health Research Liverpool Pancreas Biomedical Research Unit, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, United Kingdom. · Department of General, Visceral and Transplantation Surgery, Heidelberg University Hospital, Heidelberg, Germany. · Institute of Experimental Medicine, Czech Academy of Science, Prague, Czech Republic. · Institute of Biology and Medical Genetics, 1st Medical Faculty, Charles University, Prague, Czech Republic. · Digestive and Liver Disease Unit, S. Andrea Hospital, 'Sapienza' University of Rome, Rome, Italy. · Department for Determinants of Chronic Diseases (DCD), National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven, The Netherlands. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, The School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom. · Department of Social & Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. · Department of Basic Medical Sciences, Laboratory of Biology, Medical School, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece. · Oncological Department Massa Carrara Azienda USL Toscana Nord Ovest, Carrara, Italy. · Gastroenterology and Gastrointestinal Endoscopy Unit, Vita-Salute San Raffaele University, IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy. · Division Epidemiology and Prevention, Aichi Cancer Center Research Institute, Nagoya, Japan. · Institute of Transfusion Medicine and Immunology, German Red Cross Blood Service Baden-Württemberg - Hessen gGmbH, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Mannheim, Germany. · Laboratory of Toxicogenomics, National Institute of Public Health, Prague, Czech Republic. · Laboratory of Pharmacogenomics, Biomedical Center, Faculty of Medicine in Pilsen, Charles University in Prague, Pilsen, Czech Republic. · ARC-Net Research Centre, and Department of Diagnostics and Public Health University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Department of Gastroenterology, Aichi Cancer Center Hospital, Nagoya, Japan. · Division of Cancer Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Department of General, Visceral and Thoracic Surgery, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany. · Division of Gastroenterology and Research Laboratory, IRCCS Scientific Institute and Regional General Hospital "Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza", San Giovanni Rotondo, Italy. · Department of Gastroenterological Surgery, Aichi Cancer Center Hospital, Nagoya, Japan. · Department of Pathology, Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Biomedical Center, Faculty of Medicine in Pilsen, Charles University in Prague, Prague, Czech Republic. · Department of Medicine - DIMED, University of Padova, Padova, Italy. · Department of Surgery I, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, Palacky University Olomouc and University Hospital Olomouc, Olomouc, Czech Republic. · Epidemiology Unit Nuffield Department of Population Health University of Oxford, Oxford, UK. · Division of General and Transplant Surgery, Pisa University Hospital, Pisa, Italy. · Pancreas Unit, Department of Digestive System, Dant'Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, Bologna, Italy. · Department of Hematology, Institute of Hematology and Transfusion Medicine, Warsaw, Poland. · Department of Oncology, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, Palacky University Olomouc and University Hospital Olomouc, Olomouc, Czech Republic. · Blood Transfusion Service, Azienda Ospedaliero Universitaria Meyer, Florence, Italy. · Department of Surgery, Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Colorectal Unit, First Department of Propaedeutic Surgery, Athens Medical School, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece. · Department of Surgery, Oncology and Gastroenterology-DiSCOG, University of Padova, Padova, Italy. · Department of Laboratory Medicine, University-Hospital of Padova, Padova, Italy. · Division of Molecular Medicine, Aichi Cancer Center Research Institute, Nagoya, Japan. · Clinical Gerontology Unit, Addenbrooke’s Hospital, School of Clinical Medicine, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK. · Laboratory of Clinical, Transplant Immunology and Genetics, Copernicus Memorial Hospital, Lodz, Poland. · Department of Translational Research and New Technologies in Medicine and Surgery, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. ·Oncotarget · Pubmed #27486979.

ABSTRACT: The CDKN2A (p16) gene plays a key role in pancreatic cancer etiology. It is one of the most commonly somatically mutated genes in pancreatic cancer, rare germline mutations have been found to be associated with increased risk of developing familiar pancreatic cancer and CDKN2A promoter hyper-methylation has been suggested to play a critical role both in pancreatic cancer onset and prognosis. In addition several unrelated SNPs in the 9p21.3 region, that includes the CDNK2A, CDNK2B and the CDNK2B-AS1 genes, are associated with the development of cancer in various organs. However, association between the common genetic variability in this region and pancreatic cancer risk is not clearly understood. We sought to fill this gap in a case-control study genotyping 13 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 2,857 pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) patients and 6,111 controls in the context of the Pancreatic Disease Research (PANDoRA) consortium. We found that the A allele of the rs3217992 SNP was associated with an increased pancreatic cancer risk (ORhet=1.14, 95% CI 1.01-1.27, p=0.026, ORhom=1.30, 95% CI 1.12-1.51, p=0.00049). This pleiotropic variant is reported to be a mir-SNP that, by changing the binding site of one or more miRNAs, could influence the normal cell cycle progression and in turn increase PDAC risk. In conclusion, we observed a novel association in a pleiotropic region that has been found to be of key relevance in the susceptibility to various types of cancer and diabetes suggesting that the CDKN2A/B locus could represent a genetic link between diabetes and pancreatic cancer risk.