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Pancreatic Neoplasms: HELP
Articles by Gianfranco delle Fave
Based on 56 articles published since 2009
(Why 56 articles?)
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Between 2009 and 2019, G. Delle Fave wrote the following 56 articles about Pancreatic Neoplasms.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2 · 3
1 Guideline ENETS Consensus Guidelines for the Standards of Care in Neuroendocrine Tumors: biochemical markers. 2009

O'Toole, Dermot / Grossman, Ashley / Gross, David / Delle Fave, Gianfranco / Barkmanova, Jaroslava / O'Connor, Juan / Pape, Ulrich-Frank / Plöckinger, Ursula / Anonymous990637 / Anonymous1000637. ·Department of Gastroentereology and Clinical Medicine, St. James's Hospital and Trinity College, Dublin 8, Ireland. otooled1@tcd.ie ·Neuroendocrinology · Pubmed #19713711.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

2 Editorial Promising advances in the treatment of malignant pancreatic endocrine tumors. 2011

Jensen, Robert T / Delle Fave, Gianfranco. · ·N Engl J Med · Pubmed #21306243.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

3 Review Meta-analysis of mortality in patients with high-risk intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms under observation. 2018

Vanella, G / Crippa, S / Archibugi, L / Arcidiacono, P G / Delle Fave, G / Falconi, M / Capurso, G. ·Digestive and Liver Disease Unit, Sant'Andrea Hospital, Faculty of Medicine and Psychology, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy. · Pancreatic Surgery Unit, Pancreas Translational and Clinical Research Centre, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, 'Vita-Salute' University, Milan, Italy. · Pancreato-Biliary Endoscopy Division and Endosonography Division, Pancreas Translational and Clinical Research Centre, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy. ·Br J Surg · Pubmed #29405253.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Although consensus guidelines suggest that patients with high-risk intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMNs) should have surgery, a non-operative strategy is often selected in patients who are poor surgical candidates. The aim was to determine the risk of disease-related death from IPMN in patients with worrisome features or high-risk stigmata who were kept under observation. METHODS: A PubMed literature search was undertaken of articles published from August 1992 to June 2016 (updated October 2017). The methodology was developed from PRISMA and MOOSE checklists. Incidence proportions and rates of overall and IPMN-related deaths were calculated, with subgroup analyses for main-duct/mixed-type and branch-duct IPMNs. Quality of the studies, publication bias and heterogeneity were explored. RESULTS: Six studies reported data on overall mortality and eight described disease-specific mortality for 556 patients during follow-up ranging from 24·9 to 60·0 months. Pooled rates of overall and IPMN-related mortality were 30·9 (95 per cent c.i. 19·6 to 45·1) and 11·6 (6·0 to 21·2) per cent respectively. The pooled incidence rate for overall mortality was substantially higher than that for IPMN-related mortality: 78 (95 per cent c.i. 44 to 111) and 23 (9 to 37) per 1000 patient-years respectively. The pooled incidence rate for disease-specific mortality was considerably lower for branch-duct than for main-duct or mixed-type IPMNs: 5 (0 to 10) and 32 (12 to 52) per 1000 patient-years respectively. CONCLUSION: In patients unfit for surgery, IPMN-related mortality among patients with worrisome features and high-risk stigmata is low, and the risk of death from other causes much higher.

4 Review Antiproliferative effect of somatostatin analogs in advanced gastro-entero-pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors: a systematic review and meta-analysis. 2017

Merola, Elettra / Panzuto, Francesco / Delle Fave, Gianfranco. ·Department of Digestive and Liver Diseases, Sapienza University, Sant'Andrea Hospital, Rome, Italy. ·Oncotarget · Pubmed #28402955.

ABSTRACT: A meta-analysis has systematically investigated the antineoplastic efficacy and safety of somatostatin analogs (SSAs) in advanced gastro-entero-pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (GEP-NETs). Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) reporting the hazard ratio (HR) for disease progression (DP) were evaluated. Response rate and risk ratio (RR) for adverse events were also analyzed. A total of 289 patients (143 receiving SSAs vs. 146 placebo) were evaluated from two RCTs. A significant benefit from SSAs in terms of disease control was observed (HR 0.41, 95% CI: 0.29 to 0.58, P < 0.01; I20%), response rate being 58.0% vs. 32.2%, respectively.The occurrence of adverse events significantly differed from the placebo arm only in terms of biliary stones (RR 3.79, 95% CI: 1.28 to 11.17, P = 0.02; I20%). In conclusion, SSAs showed an antiproliferative effect in advanced GEP-NETs, with a good safety profile.

5 Review Gut microbiota and pancreatic diseases. 2017

Signoretti, Marianna / Roggiolani, Roberta / Stornello, Caterina / Delle Fave, Gianfranco / Capurso, Gabriele. ·Digestive and Liver Disease Unit, S. Andrea Hospital, Sapienza University, Rome, Italy. · Digestive and Liver Disease Unit, S. Andrea Hospital, Sapienza University, Rome, Italy - gabriele.capurso@gmail.com. ·Minerva Gastroenterol Dietol · Pubmed #28240004.

ABSTRACT: Changes in diet, lifestyle, and exposure to environmental risk factors account for the increased incidence of pancreatic disorders, including acute and chronic pancreatitis, and pancreatic cancer. The role of the microbiota in the development of pancreatic disorders is increasingly acknowledged. The translocation of gut bacteria and endotoxins following gut barrier failure is a key event contributing to the severity of acute pancreatitis, while small intestine bacterial overgrowth is common in patients with chronic pancreatitis and further worsens their symptoms and malnutrition. Specific molecular mimicry link the microbiota and Helicobacter pylori with autoimmune pancreatitis. Changes in the oral microbiota typical of periodontitis seem to be associated with an increased risk of developing pancreatic cancer. The composition of the gut microbiota is also unbalanced in the presence of risk factors for pancreatic cancer, such as obesity, smoking and diabetes. Helicobacter pylori infection, atrophic body gastritis and related decreased gastric acid secretion also seem associated with the risk of pancreatic cancer, although this area needs further research. The link between dysbiosis, immune response and proinflammatory status is most likely the key for these associations. The present review article will discuss current available evidence on the role of gut microbiota in pancreatic disorders, highlighting potential areas for future research.

6 Review Molecular pathogenesis and targeted therapy of sporadic pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. 2015

Capurso, Gabriele / Archibugi, Livia / Delle Fave, Gianfranco. ·Digestive and Liver Disease Unit, Faculty of Medicine and Psychology, Sapienza University of Rome at S. Andrea Hospital, Rome, Italy. ·J Hepatobiliary Pancreat Sci · Pubmed #25619712.

ABSTRACT: Over the past few years, knowledge regarding the molecular pathology of sporadic pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PNETs) has increased substantially, and a number of targeted agents have been tested in clinical trials in this tumor type. For some of these agents there is a strong biological rationale. Among them, the mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitor Everolimus and the antiangiogenic agent Sunitinib have both been approved for the treatment of PNETs. However, there is lack of knowledge regarding biomarkers able to predict their efficacy, and mechanisms of resistance. Other angiogenesis inhibitors, such as Pazopanib, inhibitors of Src, Hedgehog or of PI3K might all be useful in association or sequence with approved agents. On the other hand, the clinical significance, and potential for treatment of the most common mutations occurring in sporadic PNETs, in the MEN-1 gene and in ATRX and DAXX, remains uncertain. The present paper reviews the main molecular changes occurring in PNETs and how they might be linked with treatment options.

7 Review Diagnostic and therapeutic role of endoscopy in gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms. 2014

Attili, Fabia / Capurso, Gabriele / Vanella, Giuseppe / Fuccio, Lorenzo / Delle Fave, Gianfranco / Costamagna, Guido / Larghi, Alberto. ·Digestive Endoscopy Unit, Catholic University, Rome, Italy. · Division of Digestive and Liver Disease, University La Sapienza, Rome, Italy. · Division of Gastroenterology, S. Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, University of Bologna, Italy. · Digestive Endoscopy Unit, Catholic University, Rome, Italy. Electronic address: albertolarghi@yahoo.it. ·Dig Liver Dis · Pubmed #23731843.

ABSTRACT: Gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms have substantially increased over the last decades. Because of the indolent clinical course of the disease even in advance stages and the rise in the incidental diagnosis of small asymptomatic lesions, the prevalence of gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms is higher than that of pancreatic, gastric and oesophageal adenocarcinomas, making them the second most prevalent cancer type of the gastrointestinal tract. This increase in the overall prevalence of gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms has been paralleled by a growth in the importance of the endoscopist in the care of these patients, who usually require a multidisciplinary approach. In this manuscript the diagnostic and therapeutic role of endoscopic for gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms will be reviewed.

8 Review Signalling pathways passing Src in pancreatic endocrine tumours: relevance for possible combined targeted therapies. 2013

Capurso, Gabriele / Di Florio, Alessia / Sette, Claudio / Delle Fave, Gianfranco. ·Digestive and Liver Disease Unit, II Medical School, University of Rome La Sapienza, Rome, Italy. ·Neuroendocrinology · Pubmed #22441103.

ABSTRACT: The most frequent molecular abnormalities in pancreatic endocrine tumours (PETs) are mutations of the MEN1 gene, deregulation of the PI3K/AKT/mTOR signalling pathway and overactivation of growth factors and their receptors, such as the VEGF. On this basis, everolimus (Afinitor®; Novartis) and sunitinib (Sutent®; Pfizer) have both been approved by the FDA for the treatment of progressive, unresectable, locally advanced or metastatic PETs. However, molecular or surrogate markers able to predict the response of PET patients to treatment with these drugs are not available, and cancer cells treated with targeted therapies might develop escape pathways that evoke pro-survival feedback responses. The existence of cross-talk between different molecular pathways in PETs has been poorly investigated. In the present review, we present data supporting an important role for Src family kinases (SFKs) in PETs, together with the recent observation of a novel role for SFK in modulating the mTOR pathway activity. Of note, while treatment with everolimus triggered the activation of a survival response dependent on PI3K/AKT signalling in vitro, the simultaneous inhibition of SFKs blocked the activation of this unwanted escape signal. These studies might set the ground for the investigation of combined treatment of PETs with SFK and mTOR inhibitors.

9 Review Gastric and duodenal neuroendocrine tumours. 2012

O'Toole, Dermot / Delle Fave, Gianfranco / Jensen, Robert T. ·Department of Gastroenterology and Clinical Medicine, St James's Hospital and Trinity College, Dublin, Ireland. dermot.otoole@tcd.ie ·Best Pract Res Clin Gastroenterol · Pubmed #23582915.

ABSTRACT: Gastric neuroendocrine neoplasms (NENs) are increasing in frequency and have a varied spectrum with regard to histology, clinicopathologic background, stage, and prognosis. They are usually discovered incidentally, are for the most part benign and are associated with hypergastrinaemia (secondary either to chronic atrophic gastritis or rarely Zollinger-Ellison syndrome; types 1 and 2, respectively) or more rarely sporadic type 3. Applications of recent staging and grading systems - namely using Ki-67 proliferative indices - (from ENETS and WHO 2010) can be particularly helpful in further categorising these tumours. The natural history of Type 1 gastric carcinoids is generally (>95%) favourable and simple surveillance is usually recommended for small (<1 cm) T1 tumours, with local (endoscopic or surgical) resection for larger lesions. Other potential therapies such as somatostatin analogues and gastrin receptor antagonists may offer newer therapeutic possibilities. Rarely, gastric NENs have a malignant course and this is usually confined to Type 2 and especially Type 3 tumours; the latter mimic the biological course of gastric adenocarcinoma and require radical oncological therapies. Most duodenal NENs, apart from gastrinomas (that are not dealt with here) are sporadic and non functional. They are also increasing in frequency probably due to incidental discovery at endoscopy or imaging for other reasons and this may account for their overall good prognosis. Peri-ampullary and ampullary NENs may have a more aggressive outcome and should be carefully appraised and treated (often with surgical resection).

10 Review Novel molecular targets for the treatment of gastroenteropancreatic endocrine tumors: answers and unsolved problems. 2012

Capurso, Gabriele / Fendrich, Volker / Rinzivillo, Maria / Panzuto, Francesco / Bartsch, Detlef K / Delle Fave, Gianfranco. ·Digestive and Liver Disease Unit, S. Andrea Hospital, Faculty of Medicine and Psychology, Sapienza University of Rome at S. Andrea Hospital, Via di Grottarossa 1035, 00189 Rome, Italy. gianfranco.dellefave@uniroma1.it. ·Int J Mol Sci · Pubmed #23344019.

ABSTRACT: As more knowledge on molecular alterations favoring carcinogenesis and spreading of gastroenteropancreatic endocrine tumors has become available, a number of targeted agents interfering with key growth and angiogenic pathways have been explored in preclinical and clinical studies. The mTOR inhibitor Everolimus, and the multi-target antiangiogenetic agent Sunitinib, have been shown to be effective and thus have been approved by the FDA for treatment of pancreatic endocrine tumors. However, there is little data on the primary resistance to targeted agents on these tumors. The goals of the present review are to elucidate the possible advantage of combined treatments in overcoming induced resistances, and to identify biomarkers able to predict clinical efficacy. Moreover, the role of interesting targets for which a strong biological rationale exists, and specific inhibitors are available, such as the Src Family Kinases and the Hedgehog Pathway, are discussed. There is now need for more preclinical studies on cell lines and animal models to provide a stronger preclinical background in this field, as well as clinical trials specifically comparing one targeted therapy with another or combining different targeted agents.

11 Review Molecular pathology and genetics of pancreatic endocrine tumours. 2012

Capurso, Gabriele / Festa, Stefano / Valente, Roberto / Piciucchi, Matteo / Panzuto, Francesco / Jensen, Robert T / Delle Fave, Gianfranco. ·Digestive and Liver Disease Unit, Faculty of Medicine and Psychology, S. Andrea Hospital, Sapienza University of Rome, Via di Grottarossa 1035, 00189 Rome, Italy. ·J Mol Endocrinol · Pubmed #22586144.

ABSTRACT: Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumours (PETs) are the second most frequent pancreatic neoplasms. Their poor chemosensitivity, high rate of metastatic disease and relatively long survival make PETs an ideal field to be explored for novel therapies based on specific molecular changes. PETs are generally sporadic but can also arise within hereditary syndromes, such as multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1, von Hippel-Lindau, neurofibromatosis type 1 and tuberous sclerosis complex, which represent a model for sporadic cases too. Among allelic imbalances, main genomic changes involve gain of 17q, 7q and 20q and loss of 11q, 6q and 11p, which identify regions of putative candidate oncogenes or tumour suppressor genes (TSGs), respectively, sometime with potential prognostic significance. Overexpression of Src-like kinases and cyclin D1 (CCND1) oncogene has been described. As for TSGs, P53 (TP53), DPC4/SMAD4 and RB (RB1) are not implicated in PET tumorigenesis, while for p16INK4a (CDKN2A), TIMP3, RASSF1A and hMLH1, more data are available, suggesting a role for methylation as a silencing mechanism. In the last decade, gene expression profile studies, analysis of microRNAs and, more recently, large-scale mutational analysis have highlighted commonly altered molecular pathways in the pathology of PETs. The roles of the mammalian target of rapamycin pathway, and its connection with Src kinases, and the activity of a number of tyrosine kinase receptors seem to be pivotal, as confirmed by the results of recent clinical trials with targeted agents. Mutations of DAXX and ATRX are common and related to altered telomeres but not to prognosis.

12 Review Role of resection of the primary pancreatic neuroendocrine tumour only in patients with unresectable metastatic liver disease: a systematic review. 2011

Capurso, Gabriele / Bettini, Rossella / Rinzivillo, Maria / Boninsegna, Letizia / Delle Fave, Gianfranco / Falconi, Massimo. ·Digestive and Liver Disease Unit, II School of Medicine, 'Sapienza' University of Rome, Rome, Italy. ·Neuroendocrinology · Pubmed #21358176.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Surgery remains the only curative option for pancreatic neuroendocrine tumours (PNETs), but its indication is limited by metastatic disease in most patients. Indication for removing the primary lesion only in the setting of unresectable liver disease is controversial. The present systematic review aims at determining the potential bene- fits (survival, progression-free survival) or harms (morbidity, mortality) of surgical resection of the primary lesion only in patients with PNETs and unresectable metastases. METHODS: Medline was queried for studies reporting the outcome of PNET patients with unresectable liver metastases whenever there was an explicit comparison between resection of the primary lesion only ('active treatment') and no resection ('non-active treatment'). The primary outcome was survival; possible secondary outcomes were progression-free survival, treatment-related mortality and morbidity, and relief of symptoms. RESULTS: Only 3 cohort studies found were eligible and analysed; no meta-analysis could be performed. The number of patients undergoing 'active treatment' varied from 16 to 20, with a percentage ranging from 17 to 39% of cohorts. Survival was longer in patients who received 'active treatment' in 2 studies, and the 5-year survival rate also seemed higher, without significant complications. DISCUSSION: Available data suggest a possible benefit of resection of the primary lesion only in this setting. However, a bias towards a more aggressive surgical approach in patients with a better performance status or less advanced disease seems likely, and no conclusion can be drawn except for the need of randomised trials. We calculated that such a trial would require at least 118 patients per arm.

13 Review Biological targeted therapies in patients with advanced enteropancreatic neuroendocrine carcinomas. 2010

Fazio, Nicola / Cinieri, Saverio / Lorizzo, Katia / Squadroni, Michela / Orlando, Laura / Spada, Francesca / Maiello, Evaristo / Bodei, Lisa / Paganelli, Giovanni / Delle Fave, Gianfranco / de Braud, Filippo. ·European Institute of Oncology, IEO NET Study Group, Via Ripamonti 435, Milan, Italy. nicola.fazio@ieo.it ·Cancer Treat Rev · Pubmed #21129617.

ABSTRACT: Enteropancreatic (EP) neuroendocrine carcinomas (NECs) represent relatively rare and heterogeneous malignancies. They are the most common group among neuroendocrine tumors (NETs). In most cases they are advanced at diagnosis and slow-growing, therefore conditioning a better prognosis compared with non neuroendocrine carcinomas from the same sites. No standard medical therapy exists, except for somatostatin analogs in functioning tumors, and octreotide LAR in functioning or non functioning well differentiated NECs from small bowel. Several systemic therapeutic options exist, including chemotherapy, somatostatin analog, interferon, peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT), and molecular targeted drugs. Among them some therapies have specific biological tumor targets and can be defined as "biological targeted therapies". This review focuses on the status of EP NECs targeted therapies in the light of recent advances. Somatostatin receptors (SSTRs) are the first therapeutic target detected in EP NECs. Through them SS analogs and PRRT act, producing symptomatic, biochemical, and, to a lesser extent, antiproliferative effects. New SS analogs, covering a higher number of SSTR subtypes, were developed, including pasireotide (SOM230), which controls 25% of carcinoid syndromes resistant to full dose octreotide LAR. Chimeric analogs, which bind SSTR2/SSTR5 and dopamine-2 receptor subtype (D2), are in preclinical phase of development. Among the numerous molecular targeted agents investigated in NETs, mTOR inhibitors and VEGF/VEGFR/PDGFR inhibitors are in most advanced clinical phase of investigation. In particular, everolimus, sunitinib, and bevacizumab are all studied in phase III trials. Both everolimus and sunitinib produced significant survival benefit versus placebo in advanced progressing well-differentiated pancreatic NECs. Sunitinib data have been presented at the last ASCO in June 2010, and everolimus data will be presented at next ESMO in September 2010.

14 Review Molecular target therapy for gastroenteropancreatic endocrine tumours: biological rationale and clinical perspectives. 2009

Capurso, Gabriele / Fazio, Nicola / Festa, Stefano / Panzuto, Francesco / De Braud, Filippo / Delle Fave, Gianfranco. ·Digestive and Liver Disease Unit, S. Andrea Hospital, II Medical School, University "La Sapienza", Via Di Grottarossa 1035-1039, 00189, Rome, Italy. ·Crit Rev Oncol Hematol · Pubmed #19249226.

ABSTRACT: Gastroenteropancreatic endocrine tumours (GEP ETs) represent a relatively rare and heterogeneous group of neoplasms whose therapy can be challenging. The poorly differentiated, fast-growing cases are treated with chemotherapy. In the slow-growing ones, biotherapy is usually performed. Several categories of targeted therapies have been studied for their treatment in vitro and in vivo. A critical review of molecular alterations suggests a rationale for targeting angiogenesis, and the phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase (PI(3)K)/AKT/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway. Accordingly, antiangiogenic agents and mTOR inhibitors are presently the most tested agents in phase II and III studies. Bevacizumab, some multitarget inhibitors, and mTOR inhibitors showed promising results in patients with advanced GEP ETs. A limited activity has been reported for imatinib and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitors. Combinations of molecular targeted therapies with different sites of action, and somatostatin analogues may be relevant to avoid molecular escape pathways. Future trials should include more homogeneous groups of patients and pay more attention to the subgroup with progressive disease.

15 Clinical Trial Real-world study of everolimus in advanced progressive neuroendocrine tumors. 2014

Panzuto, Francesco / Rinzivillo, Maria / Fazio, Nicola / de Braud, Filippo / Luppi, Gabriele / Zatelli, Maria Chiara / Lugli, Francesca / Tomassetti, Paola / Riccardi, Ferdinando / Nuzzo, Carmen / Brizzi, Maria Pia / Faggiano, Antongiulio / Zaniboni, Alberto / Nobili, Elisabetta / Pastorelli, Davide / Cascinu, Stefano / Merlano, Marco / Chiara, Silvana / Antonuzzo, Lorenzo / Funaioli, Chiara / Spada, Francesca / Pusceddu, Sara / Fontana, Annalisa / Ambrosio, Maria Rosaria / Cassano, Alessandra / Campana, Davide / Cartenì, Giacomo / Appetecchia, Marialuisa / Berruti, Alfredo / Colao, Annamaria / Falconi, Massimo / Delle Fave, Gianfranco. ·Digestive and Liver Disease, Sapienza University of Rome, Sant'Andrea Hospital, Rome, Italy; Unit of Gastrointestinal and Neuroendocrine Tumors, European Institute of Oncology, Milan, Italy; Department of Medical Oncology, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale Tumori, Milan, Italy; Oncology and Hematology, Policlinico di Modena, Italy; Section of Endocrinology and Internal Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, University of Ferrara, Ferrara, Italy; Departments of Endocrinology and Oncologia Medica, Università Cattolica del S. Cuore, Rome, Italy; Departments of Medical and Surgical Sciences and Medical Oncology, S. Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, University of Bologna, Bologna, Italy; Oncology, Antonio Cardarelli Hospital, Naples, Italy; Division of Medical Oncology and Endocrinology Unit, Regina Elena National Cancer Institute Rome, IRCCS, Rome, Italy; Oncology, San Luigi Gonzaga Hospital, Orbassano, Torino, Italy; Department of Clinical Medicine and Surgery, Federico II University of Naples, Naples, Italy; Oncology, Fondazione Poliambulanza, Brescia, Italy; Oncology, Istituto Oncologico Veneto, Padova, Italy; Departments of Medical Oncology and Pancreatic Surgery, AOU Ospedali Riuniti, Università Politecnica delle Marche, Ancona, Italy; Oncology, S. Croce e Carle Hospital, Cuneo, Italy; Department of Medical Oncology A, IRCCS AOU San Martino-IST, Genova, Italy; Oncologia Medica 1, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria Careggi, Florence, Italy; Oncology, Niguarda Cancer Center, Ospedale Niguarda Ca' Granda, Milan, Italy; Oncologia, Spedali Civili di Brescia, University of Brescia, Brescia, Italy. · Digestive and Liver Disease, Sapienza University of Rome, Sant'Andrea Hospital, Rome, Italy; Unit of Gastrointestinal and Neuroendocrine Tumors, European Institute of Oncology, Milan, Italy; Department of Medical Oncology, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale Tumori, Milan, Italy; Oncology and Hematology, Policlinico di Modena, Italy; Section of Endocrinology and Internal Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, University of Ferrara, Ferrara, Italy; Departments of Endocrinology and Oncologia Medica, Università Cattolica del S. Cuore, Rome, Italy; Departments of Medical and Surgical Sciences and Medical Oncology, S. Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, University of Bologna, Bologna, Italy; Oncology, Antonio Cardarelli Hospital, Naples, Italy; Division of Medical Oncology and Endocrinology Unit, Regina Elena National Cancer Institute Rome, IRCCS, Rome, Italy; Oncology, San Luigi Gonzaga Hospital, Orbassano, Torino, Italy; Department of Clinical Medicine and Surgery, Federico II University of Naples, Naples, Italy; Oncology, Fondazione Poliambulanza, Brescia, Italy; Oncology, Istituto Oncologico Veneto, Padova, Italy; Departments of Medical Oncology and Pancreatic Surgery, AOU Ospedali Riuniti, Università Politecnica delle Marche, Ancona, Italy; Oncology, S. Croce e Carle Hospital, Cuneo, Italy; Department of Medical Oncology A, IRCCS AOU San Martino-IST, Genova, Italy; Oncologia Medica 1, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria Careggi, Florence, Italy; Oncology, Niguarda Cancer Center, Ospedale Niguarda Ca' Granda, Milan, Italy; Oncologia, Spedali Civili di Brescia, University of Brescia, Brescia, Italy gianfranco.dellefave@uniroma1.it. ·Oncologist · Pubmed #25117065.

ABSTRACT: Everolimus is a valid therapeutic option for neuroendocrine tumors (NETs); however, data in a real-world setting outside regulatory trials are sparse. The aim of this study was to determine everolimus tolerability and efficacy, in relation to previous treatments, in a compassionate use program. A total of 169 patients with advanced progressive NETs treated with everolimus were enrolled, including 85 with pancreatic NETs (pNETs) and 84 with nonpancreatic NETs (non-pNETs). Previous treatments included somatostatin analogs (92.9%), peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT; 50.3%), chemotherapy (49.7%), and PRRT and chemotherapy (22.8%). Overall, 85.2% of patients experienced adverse events (AEs), which were severe (grade 3-4) in 46.1%. The most frequent severe AEs were pneumonitis (8.3%), thrombocytopenia (7.7%), anemia (5.3%), and renal failure (3.5%). In patients previously treated with PRRT and chemotherapy, a 12-fold increased risk for severe toxicity was observed, with grade 3-4 AEs reported in 86.8% (vs. 34.3% in other patients). In addition, 63.3% of patients required temporarily everolimus discontinuation due to toxicity. Overall, 27.8% of patients died during a median follow-up of 12 months. Median progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were 12 months and 32 months, respectively. Similar disease control rates, PFS, and OS were reported in pNETs and non-pNETs. In the real-world setting, everolimus is safe and effective for the treatment of NETs of different origins. Higher severe toxicity occurred in patients previously treated with systemic chemotherapy and PRRT. This finding prompts caution when using this drug in pretreated patients and raises the issue of planning for everolimus before PRRT and chemotherapy in the therapeutic algorithm for advanced NETs.

16 Clinical Trial Ki-67 grading of nonfunctioning pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors on histologic samples obtained by EUS-guided fine-needle tissue acquisition: a prospective study. 2012

Larghi, Alberto / Capurso, Gabriele / Carnuccio, Antonella / Ricci, Riccardo / Alfieri, Sergio / Galasso, Domenico / Lugli, Francesca / Bianchi, Antonio / Panzuto, Francesco / De Marinis, Laura / Falconi, Massimo / Delle Fave, Gianfranco / Doglietto, Giovanni Battista / Costamagna, Guido / Rindi, Guido. ·Digestive Endoscopy Unit, Divisionof Digestive and Liver Disease, Catholic University, Rome, Italy. albertolarghi@yahoo.it ·Gastrointest Endosc · Pubmed #22898415.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Preoperative determination of Ki-67 expression, an important prognostic factor for grading nonfunctioning pancreatic endocrine tumors (NF-PETs), remains an important clinical challenge. OBJECTIVE: To prospectively evaluate the feasibility, yield, and clinical impact of EUS-guided fine-needle tissue acquisition (EUS-FNTA) with a large-gauge needle to obtain tissue samples for histologic diagnosis and Ki-67 analysis in patients with suspected NF-PETs. DESIGN: Prospective cohort study. SETTING: Tertiary-care academic medical center. PATIENTS: Consecutive patients with a single pancreatic lesion suspicious for NF-PET on imaging. INTERVENTION: EUS-FNTA with a 19-gauge needle. MAIN OUTCOME MEASUREMENTS: Feasibility and yield of EUS-FNTA for diagnosis and Ki-67 expression determination. RESULTS: Thirty patients (mean [± SD] age 55.7 ± 14.9 years), with a mean (± SD) lesion size of 16.9 ± 6.1 mm were enrolled. EUS-FNTA was successfully performed without complications in all patients, with a mean (± SD) of 2.7 ± 0.5 passes per patient. Adequate samples for histologic examination were obtained in 28 of the 30 patients (93.3%). Ki-67 determination could be performed in 26 of these 28 patients (92.9%, 86.6% overall), 12 of whom underwent surgical resection. Preoperative and postoperative Ki-67 proliferation indexes were concordant in 10 patients (83.3%), whereas 2 patients were upstaged from G1 to G2 or downstaged from G2 to G1, respectively. LIMITATIONS: Single center study with a single operator. CONCLUSION: In patients with suspected nonfunctioning low-grade to intermediate-grade pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (p-NETs), retrieval of tissue specimens with EUS-FNTA by using a 19-gauge needle is safe, feasible, and highly accurate for both diagnosis and Ki-67 determination. A Ki-67 proliferative index acquired through this technique might be of great help for further therapeutic decisions.

17 Clinical Trial Clinicopathological features of pancreatic endocrine tumors: a prospective multicenter study in Italy of 297 sporadic cases. 2010

Zerbi, Alessandro / Falconi, Massimo / Rindi, Guido / Delle Fave, Gianfranco / Tomassetti, Paola / Pasquali, Claudio / Capitanio, Vanessa / Boninsegna, Letizia / Di Carlo, Valerio / Anonymous6020648. ·Department of Surgery, Pancreas Unit, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy. zerbi.alessandro@hsr.it ·Am J Gastroenterol · Pubmed #20087335.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: Information on pancreatic endocrine tumors (PETs) comes mostly from small, retrospective, uncontrolled studies conducted on highly selected patients. The aim of the study was to describe the clinical and pathological features of PETs in a prospective, multicenter study. METHODS: Newly diagnosed, histologically proven, sporadic PETs observed from June 2004 to March 2007 in 24 Italian centers were included in a specific data set. RESULTS: Two hundred ninety-seven patients (mean age 58.6+/-14.7 years, females 51.2%, males 48.8%) were analyzed. In 73 cases (24.6%), the tumor was functioning (F) (53 insulinomas, 15 gastrinomas, 5 other syndromes) and in 232 (75.4%) it was non-functioning (NF); in 115 cases (38.7%), the diagnosis was incidental. The median tumor size was 20 mm (range 2-150). NF-PETs were significantly more represented among carcinomas (P<0.001). Nodal and liver metastases were detected in 84 (28.3%) and 85 (28.6%) cases, respectively. The presence of liver metastases was significantly higher in the NF-PETs than in the F-PETs (32.1% vs. 17.8%; P<0.05), and in the symptomatic than in the asymptomatic patients (34.6% vs. 19.1%; P<0.005). At the time of recruitment, the majority of patients (251, 84.5%) had undergone surgery, with complete resection in 209 cases (83.3%). CONCLUSIONS: This study points out the high number of new cases of PETs observed in Italy, with a high prevalence of NF and incidentally discovered forms. The size of the tumor was smaller and the rate of metastasis was lower than usually reported, suggesting a trend toward an earlier diagnosis.

18 Article Metformin Use Is Associated With Longer Progression-Free Survival of Patients With Diabetes and Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors Receiving Everolimus and/or Somatostatin Analogues. 2018

Pusceddu, Sara / Vernieri, Claudio / Di Maio, Massimo / Marconcini, Riccardo / Spada, Francesca / Massironi, Sara / Ibrahim, Toni / Brizzi, Maria Pia / Campana, Davide / Faggiano, Antongiulio / Giuffrida, Dario / Rinzivillo, Maria / Cingarlini, Sara / Aroldi, Francesca / Antonuzzo, Lorenzo / Berardi, Rossana / Catena, Laura / De Divitiis, Chiara / Ermacora, Paola / Perfetti, Vittorio / Fontana, Annalisa / Razzore, Paola / Carnaghi, Carlo / Davì, Maria Vittoria / Cauchi, Carolina / Duro, Marilina / Ricci, Sergio / Fazio, Nicola / Cavalcoli, Federica / Bongiovanni, Alberto / La Salvia, Anna / Brighi, Nicole / Colao, Annamaria / Puliafito, Ivana / Panzuto, Francesco / Ortolani, Silvia / Zaniboni, Alberto / Di Costanzo, Francesco / Torniai, Mariangela / Bajetta, Emilio / Tafuto, Salvatore / Garattini, Silvio Ken / Femia, Daniela / Prinzi, Natalie / Concas, Laura / Lo Russo, Giuseppe / Milione, Massimo / Giacomelli, Luca / Buzzoni, Roberto / Delle Fave, Gianfranco / Mazzaferro, Vincenzo / de Braud, Filippo. ·Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori di Milano, ENETS Center of Excellence, Milan, Italy. Electronic address: sara.pusceddu@istitutotumori.mi.it. · Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori di Milano, ENETS Center of Excellence, Milan, Italy; Fondazione Istituto FIRC di Oncologia Molecolare (IFOM), Milan, Italy. · Dipartimento di Oncologia, Università degli Studi di Torino, A. O. Ordine Mauriziano, Turin, Italy. · Dipartimento di Oncologia, Santa Chiara Hospital, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria Pisana, Pisa, Italy. · IEO - Istituto Europeo di Oncologia, ENETS Center of Excellence, Milan, Italy. · Fondazione IRCCS Ca' Granda, Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Università degli Studi di Milano, Milan, Italy. · Centro di Osteoncologia e Tumori Rari, Istituto Scientifico Romagnolo per lo Studio e la Cura dei Tumori (IRST) IRCCS, Meldola, Italy. · Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria San Luigi Gonzaga, Orbassano, Italy. · Policlinico Sant'Orsola Malpighi, Bologna, Italy. · Unità di chirurgia tiroidea e paratiroidea, Istituto Nazionale per lo studio e la cura dei tumori "Fondazione G. Pascale" - IRCCS, Naples, Italy. · IOM- Istituto Oncologico del Mediterraneo, Catania, Italy. · Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria Sant'Andrea, ENETS Center of Excellence, Rome, Italy. · Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria, Verona, Italy. · Fondazione Poliambulanza, Brescia, Italy. · A. O. U. Careggi, Firenze, Italy. · Azienda Ospedaliero Universitaria Ospedali Riuniti, Ancona, Italy. · Policlinico di Monza, Monza, Italy. · IRCCS Fondazione Pascale, ENETS Center of Excellence, Naples, Italy. · Azienda Ospedaliero Universitaria Santa Maria della Misericordia, Udine, Italy. · Fondazione IRCCS Policlinico San Matteo, SC oncologia, Pavia, Italy. · Policlinico di Modena, Italy. · Unit of Endocrinology, Ospedale Mauriziano, Torino, Italy. · Istituto Clinico Humanitas, Rozzano, ENETS Center of Excellence, Italy. · Ospedale Policlinico Borgo Roma, Verona, Italy. · Ospedale S Croce e Carle, Cuneo, Italy. · Ospedale Valduce Como, Italy. · Endocrinology Section, Department of Clinical Medicine and Surgery, "Federico II" University of Naples, Italy. · Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori di Milano, ENETS Center of Excellence, Milan, Italy. · Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori di Milano, ENETS Center of Excellence, Milan, Italy; Medical-Surgical Science and Traslational Medicine Departement, Sapienza University, Rome, Italy. · Department of Surgical Sciences and Integrated Diagnostics, University of Genoa, Italy. · Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori di Milano, ENETS Center of Excellence, Milan, Italy; Universita' degli Studi di Milano, Milan, Italy. ·Gastroenterology · Pubmed #29655834.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND & AIMS: Metformin seems to have anticancer effects. However, it is not clear whether use of glycemia and metformin affect outcomes of patients with advanced pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (pNETs). We investigated the association between glycemia and progression-free survival (PFS) of patients with pNETs treated with everolimus and/or somatostatin analogues, as well as the association between metformin use and PFS time. METHODS: We performed a retrospective analysis of 445 patients with advanced pNET treated at 24 medical centers in Italy from 1999 through 2015. Data on levels of glycemia were collected at time of diagnosis of pNET, before treatment initiation, and during treatment with everolimus (with or without somatostatin analogues), octreotide, or lanreotide. Diabetes was defined as prior or current use of glycemia control medication and/or fasting plasma glucose level ≥ 126 mg/dL, hemoglobin A1c ≥ 6.5% (48 mmol/L), or a random sample of plasma glucose ≥ 200 mg/dL (11.1 mmol/L), with reported classic symptoms of hyperglycemia or hyperglycemic crisis. Patients were assigned to groups based on diagnosis of diabetes before or during antitumor therapy. PFS was compared between patients with vs without diabetes. Among patients with diabetes, the association between metformin use and PFS was assessed. We performed sensitivity and landmark analyses to exclude patients who developed diabetes while receiving cancer treatment and to exclude a potential immortal time bias related to metformin intake. RESULTS: PFS was significantly longer in patients with diabetes (median, 32.0 months) than without diabetes (median, 15.1 months) (hazard ratio for patients with vs without diabetes, 0.63; 95% confidence interval, 0.50-0.80; P = .0002). PFS of patients treated with metformin was significantly longer (median PFS, 44.2 months) than for patients without diabetes (hazard ratio for survival of patients with diabetes receiving metformin vs without diabetes, 0.45; 95% confidence interval, 0.32-0.62; P < .00001) and longer than for patients with diabetes receiving other treatments (median PFS, 20.8 months; hazard ratio, 0.49; 95% confidence interval, 0.34-0.69; P < .0001). In multivariable analysis, adjusted for other factors associated with outcomes, metformin was associated with longer PFS but level of glycemia was not. Metformin was associated with increased PFS of patients receiving somatostatin analogues and in those receiving everolimus, with or without somatostatin analogues. Sensitivity and landmark analyses produced similar results. CONCLUSIONS: In a retrospective study of patients with pNETs, we found a significant association between metformin use and longer PFS.

19 Article Co-treatment with gemcitabine and nab-paclitaxel exerts additive effects on pancreatic cancer cell death. 2018

Passacantilli, Ilaria / Panzeri, Valentina / Terracciano, Francesca / Delle Fave, Gianfranco / Sette, Claudio / Capurso, Gabriele. ·Department of Biomedicine and Prevention, University of Rome 'Tor Vergata', I-00133 Rome, Italy. · Medical and Surgical Department of Clinical Sciences and Translational Medicine, Digestive and Liver Disease Unit, Sant'Andrea Hospital, 'Sapienza' University, I-00199 Rome, Italy. ·Oncol Rep · Pubmed #29393478.

ABSTRACT: Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is a highly aggressive cancer and current treatments exert small effects on life expectancy. The most common adjuvant treatment for PDAC is gemcitabine. However, relapse almost invariably occurs and most patients develop metastatic, incurable disease. The aim of the present study was to assess the activity of nanoparticle albumin-bound paclitaxel (nab-paclitaxel) alone or in combination with gemcitabine in PDAC cell lines displaying different degrees of sensitivity to gemcitabine treatment. We evaluated the effects of gemcitabine and nab-paclitaxel and their combination on cell proliferation, death, apoptosis and cell cycle distribution in PDAC cell lines either sensitive to gemcitabine, or with primary or secondary resistance to gemcitabine. Our results indicated that the dose‑response of PDAC cell lines to nab-paclitaxel was similar, regardless of their sensitivity to gemcitabine. In addition, nab-paclitaxel elicited similar cytotoxic effects on a PDAC cell line highly resistant to gemcitabine that was selected after prolonged exposure to the drug. Notably, we found that combined treatment with gemcitabine and nab-paclitaxel exerted additive effects on cell death, even at lower doses of the drugs. The combined treatment caused an increase in cell death by apoptosis and in cell cycle blockage in S phase, as assessed by flow cytometry and western blot analysis of the PARP-1 cleavage. These results revealed that a combined treatment with nab-paclitaxel may overcome resistance to gemcitabine and may represent a valuable therapeutic approach for PDAC.

20 Article Sunitinib in patients with pre-treated pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors: A real-world study. 2018

Rinzivillo, Maria / Fazio, Nicola / Pusceddu, Sara / Spallanzani, Andrea / Ibrahim, Toni / Campana, Davide / Marconcini, Riccardo / Partelli, Stefano / Badalamenti, Giuseppe / Brizzi, Maria Pia / Catena, Laura / Schinzari, Giovanni / Carnaghi, Carlo / Berardi, Rossana / Faggiano, Antongiulio / Antonuzzo, Lorenzo / Spada, Francesca / Gritti, Sara / Femia, Daniela / Gelsomino, Fabio / Bongiovanni, Alberto / Ricci, Sergio / Brighi, Nicole / Falconi, Massimo / Delle Fave, Gianfranco / Panzuto, Francesco. ·Digestive and Liver Disease, ENETS Center of Excellence Sant'Andrea Hospital - Sapienza University of Rome, Italy. · Division of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology and Neuroendocrine Tumors, ENETS Center of Excellence IEO, Milan, Italy. · Department of Medical Oncology, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Tumori Milano, ENETS Center of Excellence, Milan, Italy. · Division of Oncology, Department of Oncology and Haematology, University Hospital of Modena, Modena, Italy. · Osteoncology and Rare Tumors Center, Istituto Scientifico Romagnolo per lo Studio e la Cura dei Tumori (IRST) IRCCS, Meldola, Italy. · Department of Medical and Surgical Sciences, S.Orsola-Malpighi University Hospital, Bologna, Italy. · Department of Oncology, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria Pisana and University of Pisa, Istituto Toscano Tumori, Santa Chiara Hospital, Pisa, Italy. · Division of Pancreatic Surgery, Pancreas Translational and Clinical Research Center, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Vita e Salute University, Milan, Italy. · Department of Surgical and Oncological Sciences, University of Palermo, Palermo, Italy. · Medical Oncology, AOU S. Luigi Gonzaga Regione Gonzole 10, Orbassano, Italy. · Struttura di Oncologia Policlinico di Monza, Monza, MB, Italy. · Medical Oncology, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Rome, Italy. · Oncology Unit, Humanitas Clinical and Research Centre, Rozzano, Italy. · Medical Oncology, Università Politecnica delle Marche, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria Ospedali Riuniti Umberto I, Ancona, Italy. · Divisione di Endocrinologia, Dipartimento di Medicina Clinica e Chirurgia, Università di Napoli Federico II, ENETS Center of Excellence Naples, Italy. · S.C di Oncologia Medica, AOU Careggi Florence, Italy. · Department of Experimental, Diagnostic and Specialty Medicine, S.Orsola-Malpighi University Hospital, Bologna, Italy. · Digestive and Liver Disease, ENETS Center of Excellence Sant'Andrea Hospital - Sapienza University of Rome, Italy. Electronic address: fpanzuto@ospedalesantandrea.it. ·Pancreatology · Pubmed #29361429.

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: Besides data reported in a Phase-III trial, data on sunitinib in pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors (panNETs) are scanty. AIM: To evaluate sunitinib efficacy and tolerability in panNETs patients treated in a real-world setting. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Retrospective analysis of progressive panNETs treated with sunitinib. Efficacy was assessed by evaluating progression-free survival, overall survival, and disease control (DC) rate (stable disease (SD) + partial response + complete response). Data are reported as median (25th-75th IQR). RESULTS: Eighty patients were included. Overall, 71.1% had NET G2, 26.3% had NET G1, and 2.6% had NET G3 neoplasms. A total of 53 patients (66.3%) had received three or more therapeutic regimens before sunitinib, with 24 patients (30%) having been treated with four previous treatments. Median PFS was 10 months. Similar risk of progression was observed between NET G1 and NET G2 tumors (median PFS 11 months and 8 months, respectively), and between patients who had received ≥ 3 vs ≤ 2 therapeutic approaches before sunitinib (median PFS 9 months and 10 months, respectively). DC rate was 71.3% and SD was the most frequent observed response, occurring in 43 pts (53.8%). Overall, 59 pts (73.8%) experienced AEs, which were grade 1-2 in 43 of them (72.9%), grade 3 in 15 pts (25.4%), and grade 4 in one patient (1.7%). Six pts (7.5%) stopped treatment due to toxicity. CONCLUSIONS: The present real-world experience shows that sunitinib is a safe and effective treatment for panNETs, even in the clinical setting of heavily pre-treated, progressive diseases.

21 Article Exclusive and Combined Use of Statins and Aspirin and the Risk of Pancreatic Cancer: a Case-Control Study. 2017

Archibugi, Livia / Piciucchi, Matteo / Stigliano, Serena / Valente, Roberto / Zerboni, Giulia / Barucca, Viola / Milella, Michele / Maisonneuve, Patrick / Delle Fave, Gianfranco / Capurso, Gabriele. ·Digestive and Liver Disease Unit, S. Andrea Hospital, Faculty of Medicine and Psychology, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy. · Medical Oncology Unit, Istituto Nazionale Tumori Regina Elena (IFO), Rome, Italy. · Division of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, European Institute of Oncology, Milan, Italy. · Digestive and Liver Disease Unit, S. Andrea Hospital, Faculty of Medicine and Psychology, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy. gabriele.capurso@gmail.com. ·Sci Rep · Pubmed #29026148.

ABSTRACT: Data on the association between aspirin and statin use and Pancreatic Ductal AdenoCarcinoma (PDAC) risk are conflicting. These drugs are often co-prescribed, but no studies evaluated the potential combined or confounding effect of the two at the same time. We aimed to investigate the association between aspirin and statin exclusive and combined use and PDAC occurrence. Data on environmental factors, family and medical history were screened in a case-control study. PDAC cases were matched to controls for age and gender. Power calculation performed ahead. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals(CI) were obtained from multivariable logistic regression analysis. In 408 PDAC patients and 816 matched controls, overall statin (OR 0.61; 95%CI,0.43-0.88), but not aspirin use was associated to reduced PDAC risk. Compared to non-users, exclusive statin (OR 0.51; 95%CI,0.32-0.80) and exclusive aspirin users (OR 0.64; 95%CI,0.40-1.01) had reduced PDAC risk. Concomitant statin and aspirin use did not further reduce the risk compared with statin use alone and no interaction was evident. Statin protective association was dose-dependent, and consistent in most subgroups, being stronger in smokers, elderly, obese and non-diabetic patients. The present study suggests that statin use is associated to reduced PDAC risk, supporting a chemopreventive action of statins on PDAC.

22 Article Impact of Ki67 re-assessment at time of disease progression in patients with pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms. 2017

Panzuto, Francesco / Cicchese, Noemi / Partelli, Stefano / Rinzivillo, Maria / Capurso, Gabriele / Merola, Elettra / Manzoni, Marco / Pucci, Eugenio / Iannicelli, Elsa / Pilozzi, Emanuela / Rossi, Michele / Doglioni, Claudio / Falconi, Massimo / Delle Fave, Gianfranco. ·Digestive and Liver Disease Unit, Sant'Andrea Hospital Sapienza University of Rome, Roma, Italy. · Pancreatic Surgery Unit, Pancreas Translational & Clinical Research Center, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, "Vita-Salute" University, Milan, Italy. · Department of Endocrinology and Internal Medicine, San Raffaele Hospital Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy. · Department of Experimental Medicine and Pathology, Sant'Andrea Hospital Sapienza University of Rome, Roma, Italy. · Department of Radiology, Sant'Andrea Hospital Sapienza University of Rome, Roma, Italy. · Department of Pathology, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, "Vita-Salute" University, Milan, Italy. ·PLoS One · Pubmed #28644861.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Although re-assessment of proliferative activity by K67 evaluation during the course of neuroendocrine neoplasms (NENs) is recommended in selected patients, its impact on patients' management is not clear due to the lack of data supporting this practice. AIM: To investigate Ki67 change at time of progressive disease (PD) in entero-pancreatic NENs (EP-NENs). PATIENTS AND METHODS: Retrospective analysis of sporadic EP-NENs which received histological re-assessment after PD once radiologically documented. RESULTS: Forty-three patients were evaluated, including 24 pancreatic NENs (PNENs), and 19 small intestine NENs (SI-NENs). At time of initial histological evaluation, 19 patients had grade 1 (G1) NETs (44.2%), and 24 grade 2 (G2) NETs (55.8%), overall median Ki67 being 3% (range 1%-20%). At time of PD, 13 patients had G1 NETs (30.2%), 26 G2 NETs (60.5%), and 4 had grade 3 (G3) NECs (9.3%), thus resulting in a significant median Ki67 increase (8%, range 1%-70%; p = 0.0006), and a G upgrading in 12 patients (27.9%). A statistically significant Ki67 increase and G grading change at time of PD was observed in PNENs (p = 0.0005 and p = 0.028, respectively). Conversely, no statistically significant change occurred in non-PNENs. CONCLUSIONS: In PNENs with documented PD, Ki67 increase occurs in a significant proportion of patients, providing useful information necessary to choose appropriate therapeutic options.

23 Article Risk and protective factors for the occurrence of sporadic pancreatic endocrine neoplasms. 2017

Valente, Roberto / Hayes, Alastair J / Haugvik, Sven-Petter / Hedenström, Per / Siuka, Darko / Korsæth, Emilie / Kämmerer, Daniel / Robinson, Stuart M / Maisonneuve, Patrick / Delle Fave, Gianfranco / Lindkvist, Bjorn / Capurso, Gabriele. ·Digestive and Liver Disease UnitSant' Andrea Hospital, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy. · Department of General SurgeryRoyal Infirmary of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK. · Department of Hepato-Pancreato-Biliary SurgeryOslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway. · Unit of GastroenterologyDepartment of Medicine, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden. · Department of GastroenterologyUniversity Medical Centre Ljubljana, Ljubljana, Slovenia. · Department of General and Visceral SurgeryZentralklinik Bad Berka, Bad Berka, Germany. · Department of Hepatopancreatobiliary and Transplantation SurgeryThe Freeman Hospital, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK. · Division of Epidemiology and BiostatisticsEuropean Institute of Oncology, Milan, Italy. · Digestive and Liver Disease UnitSant' Andrea Hospital, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy gabriele.capurso@gmail.com. ·Endocr Relat Cancer · Pubmed #28566532.

ABSTRACT: Pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms (PNENs) represent 10% of all pancreatic tumors by prevalence. Their incidence has reportedly increased over recent decades in parallel with that of pancreatic adenocarcinoma. PNENs are relatively rare, and of the few institutions that have published potential risk factors, findings have been heterogeneous. Our objective was to investigate the association between potential risk and protective factors for the occurrence of sporadic PNENs across a European population from several institutions. A multinational European case-control study was conducted to examine the association of selected environmental, family and medical exposure factors using a standardized questionnaire in face-to-face interviews. A ratio of 1:3 cases to controls were sex and age matched at each study site. Adjusted univariate and multivariate logistic regression analysis were performed for statistically significant factors. The following results were obtained: In 201 cases and 603 controls, non-recent onset diabetes (OR 2.09, CI 1.27-3.46) was associated with an increased occurrence of PNENs. The prevalence of non-recent onset diabetes was higher both in cases with metastatic disease (TNM stage III-IV) or advanced grade (G3) at the time of diagnosis. The use of metformin in combination with insulin was also associated with a more aggressive phenotype. Drinking coffee was more frequent in cases with localized disease at diagnosis. Our study concluded that non-recent onset diabetes was associated with an increased occurrence of PNENs and the combination of metformin and insulin was consistent with a more aggressive PNEN phenotype. In contrast to previous studies, smoking, alcohol and first-degree family history of cancer were not associated with PNEN occurrence.

24 Article Prognostic impact of the cumulative dose and dose intensity of everolimus in patients with pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. 2017

Berardi, Rossana / Torniai, Mariangela / Pusceddu, Sara / Spada, Francesca / Ibrahim, Toni / Brizzi, Maria Pia / Antonuzzo, Lorenzo / Ferolla, Piero / Panzuto, Francesco / Silvestris, Nicola / Partelli, Stefano / Ferretti, Benedetta / Freddari, Federica / Gucciardino, Calogero / Testa, Enrica / Concas, Laura / Murgioni, Sabina / Bongiovanni, Alberto / Zichi, Clizia / Riva, Nada / Rinzivillo, Maria / Brunetti, Oronzo / Giustini, Lucio / Di Costanzo, Francesco / Delle Fave, Gianfranco / Fazio, Nicola / De Braud, Filippo / Falconi, Massimo / Cascinu, Stefano. ·Clinica di Oncologia Medica, Università Politecnica delle Marche, AOU Ospedali Riuniti di, Ancona, Italy. · Medicina Oncologica 1, ENETS Center of excellence, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Tumori, Milano, Italy. · Unità di Oncologia Medica Gastrointestinale e Tumori Neuroendocrini (Unit of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology and Neuroendocrine Tumors), IEO Istituto Europeo di Oncologia, Milano, Italy. · Osteoncology and Rare Tumors Center, Istituto Scientifico Romagnolo per lo Studio e la Cura dei Tumori (IRST) IRCCS, Meldola, Italy. · Oncologia Medica, A.O.U. San Luigi, Orbassano (TO), Italy. · SC di Oncologia Medica, Azienda Opedaliero-Universitaria Careggi, Firenze, Italy. · Doctorate Course in Genetics, Oncology and Clinical Medicine, University of Siena, Siena, Italy. · Multidisciplinary NET Group, Umbria Regional Cancer Network, Perugia, Italy. · Digestive and Liver Disease, Sapienza University of Rome, Sant'Andrea Hospital, Rome, Italy. · Medical Oncology Unit, National Cancer Institute Giovanni Paolo II, Bari, Italy. · Chirurgia del Pancreas, Università Politecnica delle Marche, AOU Ospedali Riuniti di, Ancona, Italy. · Chirurgia del Pancreas, Ospedale San Raffaele IRCCS, Università Vita e Salute, Milano, Italy. · Oncologia Medica, Ospedale di San Severino, San Severino Marche (MC), Italy. · Oncologia Medica, Ospedale di Senigallia, Senigallia, Italy. · Oncologia Medica, Ospedale di Fermo, Fermo, Italy. · Oncologia Medica, Ospedale di Urbino, Urbino, Italy. · Oncologia Medica, Università di Modena e Reggio Emilia, Modena, Italy. ·Cancer Med · Pubmed #28547856.

ABSTRACT: The aim of this work is to assess if cumulative dose (CD) and dose intensity (DI) of everolimus may affect survival of advanced pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PNETs) patients. One hundred and sixteen patients (62 males and 54 females, median age 55 years) with advanced PNETs were treated with everolimus for ≥3 months. According to a Receiver operating characteristics (ROC) analysis, patients were stratified into two groups, with CD ≤ 3000 mg (Group A; n = 68) and CD > 3000 mg (Group B; n = 48). The response rate and toxicity were comparable in the two groups. However, patients in group A experienced more dose modifications than patients in group B. Median OS was 24 months in Group A while in Group B it was not reached (HR: 26.9; 95% CI: 11.0-76.7; P < 0.0001). Patients who maintained a DI higher than 9 mg/day experienced a significantly longer OS and experienced a trend to higher response rate. Overall, our study results showed that both CD and DI of everolimus play a prognostic role for patients with advanced PNETs treated with everolimus. This should prompt efforts to continue everolimus administration in responsive patients up to at least 3000 mg despite delays or temporary interruptions.

25 Article Functional Imaging in the Follow-Up of Enteropancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors: Clinical Usefulness and Indications. 2017

Merola, Elettra / Pavel, Marianne E / Panzuto, Francesco / Capurso, Gabriele / Cicchese, Noemi / Rinke, Anja / Gress, Thomas M / Iannicelli, Elsa / Prosperi, Daniela / Pizzichini, Patrizia / Prasad, Vikas / Kump, Patrizia / Lipp, Rainer / Partelli, Stefano / Falconi, Massimo / Wiedenmann, Bertram / Delle Fave, Gianfranco. ·Digestive and Liver Diseases Unit, Sant'Andrea Hospital, 00189 Rome, Italy. · Department of Hepatology and Gastroenterology, Charité Universitätsmedizin, 13353 Berlin, Germany. · Department of Gastroenterology, University Hospital, 35043 Marburg, Germany. · Department of Radiology, Sant'Andrea Hospital, 00189 Rome, Italy. · Division of Nuclear Medicine, Sant'Andrea Hospital, 00189 Rome, Italy. · Department of Nuclear Medicine, Campus Virchow-Klinikum, Charité Universitätsmedizin, 13353 Berlin, Germany. · Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Department of Internal Medicine, Medical University, 8036 Graz Austria. · Division of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Radiology, Medical University, 8036 Graz Austria. · Pancreatic Surgery Unit, Vita-Salute University, San Raffaele Hospital Istituto di Ricovero e Cura a Carattere Scientifico, 20132 Milan, Italy. ·J Clin Endocrinol Metab · Pubmed #28324047.

ABSTRACT: Context: Functional imaging tests (FITs) detecting somatostatin receptor expression [i.e., somatostatin receptor scintigraphy, 68Ga-DOTA positron emission tomography/computed tomography (CT)] have a pivotal role in the diagnosis of neuroendocrine tumors (NETs), although their indication during follow-up still needs to be clarified. Objective: Investigate the role of FITs after diagnosis of metastatic enteropancreatic NETs, identifying patients who might benefit from these exams. Design: Multicenter retrospective analysis of metastatic enteropancreatic NETs. Setting: Analysis of imaging tests performed between January 1995 and December 2015 in Rome, Berlin, Milan, Marburg, or Graz. Subjects: One hundred forty-three patients with metastatic pancreatic NETs and small intestine NETs, at least 2-year follow-up, and positive FITs. Interventions: Patients had received CT every 6 months (unless clinical conditions and tumor behavior required shorter intervals) and FIT every 12 months. Main Outcome Measures: Clinical usefulness of FITs, defined as changes in patient management (indication to biopsy, medical therapy, surgery, or further imaging tests) due only to FITs. Results: FITs affected management in 73.4% of patients, mostly when G2 vs G1 [odds ratio (OR), 2.40; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.09 to 5.27; P = 0.03]. Changes were observed in a 12-month time frame especially with pancreatic NETs vs small intestine NETs (OR, 2.89; 95% CI, 1.09 - 7.67; P = 0.03) or metastases since diagnosis vs developed during follow-up (OR, 4.00; 95% CI, 1.43 to 11.17; P < 0.01). Conclusions: FITs used in addition to CT in the follow-up of stage IV enteropancreatic NETs improve patient management (especially for G2 tumors). Follow-up program should be tailored according to tumor features.

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