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Pancreatic Neoplasms: HELP
Articles by Claudio De Angelis
Based on 9 articles published since 2010
(Why 9 articles?)
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Between 2010 and 2020, Claudio De Angelis wrote the following 9 articles about Pancreatic Neoplasms.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Guideline Italian consensus guidelines for the diagnostic work-up and follow-up of cystic pancreatic neoplasms. 2014

Anonymous4770793 / Anonymous4780793 / Buscarini, Elisabetta / Pezzilli, Raffaele / Cannizzaro, Renato / De Angelis, Claudio / Gion, Massimo / Morana, Giovanni / Zamboni, Giuseppe / Arcidiacono, Paolo / Balzano, Gianpaolo / Barresi, Luca / Basso, Daniela / Bocus, Paolo / Calculli, Lucia / Capurso, Gabriele / Canzonieri, Vincenzo / Casadei, Riccardo / Crippa, Stefano / D'Onofrio, Mirko / Frulloni, Luca / Fusaroli, Pietro / Manfredi, Guido / Pacchioni, Donatella / Pasquali, Claudio / Rocca, Rodolfo / Ventrucci, Maurizio / Venturini, Silvia / Villanacci, Vincenzo / Zerbi, Alessandro / Falconi, Massimo / Anonymous4790793. ·Gastroenterology Unit, Maggiore Hospital, Crema, Italy. Electronic address: ebuscarini@rim.it. · Pancreas Unit, Department of Digestive Diseases and Internal Medicine, S. Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, Bologna, Italy. · Gastroenterology Unit, CRO-National Cancer Institute, Aviano, Italy. · Gastroenterology and Hepatology Department, A.O. San Giovanni Battista/Molinette, University of Turin, Turin, Italy. · Department of Clinical Pathology, AULSS 12, Venice, Italy. · Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Ospedale Cà Foncello, Treviso, Italy. · Department of Pathology, University of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Division of Gastroenterology and Gastrointestinal Endoscopy, Vita-Salute, Italy. · Department of Surgery, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy. · Gastroenterology and Endoscopy Unit, ISMETT, Palermo, Italy. · Department of Laboratory Medicine, University Hospital, Padua, Italy. · Gastroenterology Unit, Ospedale Sacro Cuore-Don Calabria, Negrar, Verona, Italy. · Department of Radiology, S. Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, Bologna, Italy. · Digestive and Liver Disease Unit, Faculty of Medicine and Psychology, Sapienza University of Rome at S. Andrea Hospital, Rome, Italy. · Division of Pathology, CRO-National Cancer Institute, IRCCS, Aviano, Italy. · Department of Surgery, University of Bologna, S. Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, Bologna, Italy. · Department of Surgery, Pancreas Unit, Università Politecnica delle Marche, Ancona, Italy. · Department of Radiology, University Hospital G.B. Rossi, University of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Department of Surgical and Gastroenterological Sciences, University of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Department of Clinical Medicine, University of Bologna, Bologna, Italy. · Gastroenterology Unit, Maggiore Hospital, Crema, Italy. · Pathology Unit, A.O. San Giovanni Battista/Molinette, Turin, Italy. · Surgery Unit IV, Department of Medical and Surgical Sciences, University of Padua, Padua, Italy. · Gastroenterology Unit, Mauriziano Hospital, Turin, Italy. · Department of Internal Medicine and Gastroenterology, Bentivoglio Hospital, Bologna, Italy. · 2nd Pathology Section, Spedali Civili, Brescia, Brescia, Italy. · Pancreatic Surgery, Department of Surgery, Humanitas Clinical and Research Center, Milan, Italy. ·Dig Liver Dis · Pubmed #24809235.

ABSTRACT: This report contains clinically oriented guidelines for the diagnostic work-up and follow-up of cystic pancreatic neoplasms in patients fit for treatment. The statements were elaborated by working groups of experts by searching and analysing the literature, and then underwent a consensus process using a modified Delphi procedure. The statements report recommendations regarding the most appropriate use and timing of various imaging techniques and of endoscopic ultrasound, the role of circulating and intracystic markers and the pathologic evaluation for the diagnosis and follow-up of cystic pancreatic neoplasms.

2 Review Endoscopic imaging in the management of gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. 2016

Pellicano, Rinaldo / Fagoonee, Sharmila / Altruda, Fiorella / Bruno, Mauro / Saracco, Giorgio M / De Angelis, Claudio. ·Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Molinette Hospital, Turin, Italy - eusdeang@hotmail.com. ·Minerva Endocrinol · Pubmed #27600643.

ABSTRACT: Gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (GEP-NETs) are a heterogeneous group of tumors deriving from the gastrointestinal (GI) neuroendocrine system. Since these neoplasms are usually very small, located deeply within the retroperitoneum or into an extramucosal site of the GI tract and, lastly, because they may be multi-sited, radiological imaging modalities, in combination with endoscopy, are the diagnostic workhorses in patients with GEP-NETs. Endoscopic approach is useful for detection, bioptic diagnosis and curative resection of small GEP-NETs of stomach, duodenum, jejuno-ileum, and colon-rectum. Moreover, endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS), associated with high frequency miniprobes, is a valuable procedure in regional staging of lesions of the GI wall and can provide information which has a remarkable impact on therapeutic choices. EUS is still the sole technique, in a substantial number of cases, providing a definitive diagnosis of pancreatic insulinoma and it detects and follows small lesions of the pancreas in patients with Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia type 1 syndrome. EUS should be performed in those cases in which morphological or molecular imaging modalities need to be supported because of negative or dubious results. In this review we describe the applications of endoscopic procedures in the management of GEP-NETs.

3 Article A rare case of gastric fistulization of a main-duct intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm. 2018

Cortegoso Valdivia, Pablo / Bruno, Mauro / Gaia, Silvia / Saracco, Giorgio M / De Angelis, Claudio. ·Department of Gastroenterology and Digestive Endoscopy, A.O.U. Città della Salute e della Scienza, University of Turin, Turin, Italy - pablo.cortegosovaldivia@studenti.unipr.it. · Department of Gastroenterology and Digestive Endoscopy, A.O.U. Città della Salute e della Scienza, University of Turin, Turin, Italy. · Department of Medical Sciences, University of Turin, Turin, Italy. ·Minerva Gastroenterol Dietol · Pubmed #29553226.

ABSTRACT: We report a rare case of gastric fistulization in a patient with main-duct (MD) intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN). Fistulization to adjacent organs is a rare complication of this disease, mainly affecting the duodenum; the fact that the stomach was the only organ involved makes this case even more peculiar. The diagnosis of the fistula was made after examination with endoscopic ultrasound, since a previous computed tomography scan could not detect it.

4 Article International Intraductal Papillary Mucinous Neoplasms Registry: Long-Term Results Based on the New Guidelines. 2017

Moris, Maria / Raimondo, Massimo / Woodward, Timothy A / Skinner, Verna J / Arcidiacono, Paolo G / Petrone, Maria C / De Angelis, Claudio / Manfrè, Selene / Carrara, Silvia / Jovani, Manol / Fusaroli, Pietro / Wallace, Michael B. ·From the *Department of Gastroenterology and †Clinical Studies Unit, Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, FL; ‡Department of Gastroenterology, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan; §Department of Gastroenterology, Azienda Universitario-Ospedaliera San Giovanni Battista, Turin; ∥Department of Gastroenterology, Humanitas Research Hospital, Milan; and ¶Department of Gastroenterology, University of Bologna/Hospital of Imola, Italy. ·Pancreas · Pubmed #28099263.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to analyze the outcomes of a long-term intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN) registry and evaluate new guidelines. METHODS: A prospectively maintained IPMN registry involving 6 centers in Europe and the United States was used to collect the data. Patients with more than 1-year follow-up and no malignancy diagnosed within the first 3 months of surveillance were included. RESULTS: From 1999 to 2014, 620 patients were included. The median follow-up time was 3 years. Thirty-seven (6%) patients developed malignancy with a median time from IPMN diagnosis to malignancy of 10.3 months. The 1-, 5-, and 10-year actuarial rates of disease-free survival were 97%, 93%, and 92% respectively. Four hundred thirty-one patients met criteria for low-risk branch duct IPMN consisting of cyst size less than 3 cm, with no solid component or main duct dilation. Eight malignancies were diagnosed in this subgroup, all of them within the first 5 years. From this subcohort, 112 patients had a follow-up time of more than 5 years, and no malignancy was diagnosed. CONCLUSIONS: In IPMN lesions with low-risk features at baseline, the risk of progression to malignancy after the first 5 years of follow-up was minimal. Furthermore, the main cyst characteristics remained unchanged during their surveillance.

5 Article Diagnostic Accuracy of Endoscopic Ultrasound-Guided Fine-Needle Aspiration Cytology, Carcinoembryonic Antigen, and Amylase in Intraductal Papillary Mucinous Neoplasm. 2016

Moris, Maria / Raimondo, Massimo / Woodward, Timothy A / Skinner, Verna / Arcidiacono, Paolo G / Petrone, Maria C / De Angelis, Claudio / Manfrè, Selene / Fusaroli, Pietro / Asbun, Horacio / Stauffer, John / Wallace, Michael B. ·From the *Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, FL; †Programa de Doctorat en Medicina, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain; ‡San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milano, Italy; §Azienda Universitario-Ospedaliera San Giovanni Battista, Torino, Italy; ∥University of Bologna/Hospital of Imola, Imola, Italy; and ¶Department of Surgery, Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, FL. ·Pancreas · Pubmed #26646270.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to determine the accuracy of cytology, carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), and amylase levels in the preoperative diagnosis of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMNs). METHODS: An international registry was started in 2005 and included patients with clinically suspected IPMNs. Those who underwent surgery and had preoperative endoscopic ultrasonography fine-needle aspiration were selected for the study. RESULTS: One hundred eighty patients were included. Cytological analysis for neoplastic cells in IPMNs showed high specificity (87.8%) but low sensitivity (39.4%). The median CEA level was 525.5 ng/mL (n = 78) in IPMNs versus 9.7 ng/mL in nonmucinous cysts (n = 6), showing an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) of 0.87. The optimal cutoff CEA value for distinguishing IPMN from nonmucinous cysts was 129 ng/mL. At this level, the sensitivity was 76.9%, and specificity was 83.3%, yielding a positive predictive value of 95.9% and a negative predictive value of 41.9%. Carcinoembryonic antigen was a poor predictor of neoplasia in IPMNs (AUC = 0.55). Amylase did not distinguish IPMNs from mucinous cystadenomas (MCAs) (median, 3759 U/L [n = 28 IPMNs] and 497 U/L [n = 3 MCAs], AUC = 0.65). CONCLUSIONS: Cytology has a limited role because of its lack of sensitivity. Carcinoembryonic antigen modestly differentiated between mucinous and nonmucinous lesions. Amylase did not distinguish IPMNs versus MCAs.

6 Article Risk factors for malignant progression of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms. 2015

Moris, Maria / Raimondo, Massimo / Woodward, Timothy A / Skinner, Verna / Arcidiacono, Paolo G / Petrone, Maria C / De Angelis, Claudio / Manfrè, Selene / Fusaroli, Pietro / Wallace, Michael B. ·Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, FL, USA; Programa de Doctorat en Medicina de la Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain. · Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, FL, USA. · San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milano, Italy. · Azienda Universitario-Ospedaliera San Giovanni Battista, Torino, Italy. · University of Bologna/Hospital of Imola, Imola, Italy. · Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, FL, USA. Electronic address: Wallace.michael@mayo.edu. ·Dig Liver Dis · Pubmed #25869552.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms of the pancreas are increasingly diagnosed. Due to their malignant potential, greater understanding of their nature is required. AIMS: Define risk factors for malignancy in intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms. METHODS: An international, multicentre study was performed in Europe and the United States. Clinical databases were reviewed for patients with intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms diagnosis. RESULTS: Of 1126 patients, 84 were diagnosed with invasive carcinoma/high-grade dysplasia and were compared to the rest of the cohort. Multivariate logistic analysis showed a statistically significant association between cancer/high-grade dysplasia and the variables smoking history (OR 1.9, 95% CI [1.1-3.1]), body mass index (OR 1.1, 95% CI [1-1.1]), symptoms (OR 3.4, 95% CI [1.9-6]), jaundice (OR 0.1, 95% CI [0-0.3]), and steatorrhea (OR 0.3, 95% CI [0.1-0.8]). Univariate analysis showed no association between malignancy and the cyst number/location (p=0.3 and p=0.5, respectively) although a strong association was shown for cyst size (p<0.001). The presence and size of nodules (p<0.01) and main duct involvement (p<0.001) were also strongly related with malignancy. CONCLUSION: The presence of jaundice and steatorrhea, smoking, high body mass index, and imaging features such as cyst size, main duct involvement, and the presence and size of mural nodules are associated with high-grade neoplasia in intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms.

7 Article A rare case of IgG4-related systemic disease manifesting with pancreatic head mass mimicking borderline resectable cancer. 2014

Franchello, Alessandro / Gonella, Federica / Campra, Donata / Limerutti, Giorgio / Bruno, Mauro / De Angelis, Claudio / Cassine, Davide / Fronda, Gianruggero / Silvestri, Stefano. ·Department of Surgery, Molinette Hospital, Turin, Italy. Electronic address: afranchello@cittadellasalute.to.it. · Department of Surgery, Molinette Hospital, Turin, Italy. · Department of Radiology, Molinette Hospital, Turin, Italy. · Department of Gastroenterology, Molinette Hospital, Turin, Italy. ·Int J Surg Case Rep · Pubmed #25460484.

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a rare pancreatic disorder among chronic pancreatitis that can mimick pancreatic cancer (PC). Patients with type 1 AIP usually present obstructive jaundice associated with high level of IgG4 in serum and a pancreatic mass at radiological imaging; these disorders may be associated with other organs lesions presenting the same histopathological features, and in these cases AIP should be considered a pancreatic localization of an IgG4-related systemic disease. PRESENTATION OF CASE: We report the case of a young man with initial suspect of PC to be treated with surgery, and final diagnosis of AIP in the context of an IgG4-related systemic disease. DISCUSSION: Because of its similar features, several algorithms have been proposed for AIP diagnosis, based on combination of clinical/serological and radiological criteria. However, histology represents the only way to obtain definitive diagnosis, even if sometimes it is difficult to obtain biological samples. CONCLUSION: IgG4-related systemic disease must be taken into account among differential diagnosis during the workup for PC, in order to avoid unnecessary surgery.

8 Article Endoscopic ultrasonography for pancreatic cancer: current and future perspectives. 2013

De Angelis, Claudio / Brizzi, Rosario Francesco / Pellicano, Rinaldo. ·Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Endoscopy and Endosonography Center, San Giovanni Battista Hospital (Molinette), University of Turin, Italy. ·J Gastrointest Oncol · Pubmed #23730519.

ABSTRACT: A suspected pancreatic lesion can be a difficult challenge for the clinician. In the last years we have witnessed tumultuous technological improvements of the radiological and nuclear medicine imaging. Taking this into account, we will try to delineate the new role of endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) in pancreatic imaging and to place it in a shareable diagnostic and staging algorithm of pancreatic cancer (PC). To date the most accurate imaging techniques for the PC remain contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) and EUS. The latter has the highest accuracy in detecting small lesions, in assessing tumor size and lymph nodes involvement, but helical CT or an up-to-date magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) must be the first choice in patients with a suspected pancreatic lesion. After this first step there is place for EUS as a second diagnostic level in several cases: negative results on CT/MRI scans and persistent strong clinical suspicion of PC, doubtful results on CT/MRI scans or need for cyto-histological confirmation. In the near future there will be great opportunities for the development of diagnostic and therapeutic EUS and pancreatic pathology could be the best testing bench.

9 Article Interobserver agreement in contrast harmonic endoscopic ultrasound. 2012

Fusaroli, Pietro / Kypraios, Dimitrios / Mancino, Maria Grazia / Spada, Alessia / Benini, Maria Chiara / Bianchi, Marco / Bocus, Paolo / De Angelis, Claudio / De Luca, Leonardo / Fabbri, Carlo / Grillo, Antonino / Marzioni, Marco / Reggio, Dario / Togliani, Thomas / Zanarini, Stefano / Caletti, Giancarlo. ·Department of Clinical Medicine, GI Unit, University of Bologna/Imola Hospital, Italy Gastroenterology Unit, Bellaria Hospital, Bologna, Italy. pietro.fusaroli@unibo.it ·J Gastroenterol Hepatol · Pubmed #22414180.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND AND AIM: Contrast harmonic endoscopic ultrasound (CH-EUS) was recently introduced to clinical practice; its reproducibility among endosonographers is unknown. Our aim was to assess the interobserver agreement (IA) in CH-EUS. METHODS: Fifteen endosonographers (eight experienced and seven non-experienced) from 11 Italian EUS centers evaluated 80 video-cases (40 solid pancreatic lesions, 20 pancreatic cystic lesions and 20 submucosal lesions) of CH-EUS, according to the degree of enhancement, the pattern of distribution and the washout of the contrast agent. IA within each group and between the two groups of observers was assessed with the Fleiss kappa statistic. RESULTS: Overall IA was moderate for the uptake and fair for the pattern of distribution and the washout. In solid pancreatic lesions, IA was moderate for the uptake and fair for the pattern and the washout. In cystic pancreatic lesions, IA was uniformly moderate for the assessment of uptake, slight for the pattern and fair for the washout. In submucosal tumors, IA was substantial for the uptake, slight for the pattern and fair for the washout. Non-experienced endosonographers demonstrated, in most cases, comparable IA with the experienced ones. CONCLUSIONS: Interobserver agreement among endosonographers for CH EUS was satisfactory. In particular, overall IA varied from slight to substantial, being fair in the majority of cases. Inherent structural features of the lesions, as well as technical differences between the variables assessed, could have accounted for the fluctuation of the results. Outcomes of IA were reproducible between experienced and non-experienced endosonographers.