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Pancreatic Neoplasms: HELP
Articles by Amanda J. Cross
Based on 4 articles published since 2010
(Why 4 articles?)
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Between 2010 and 2020, Amanda J. Cross wrote the following 4 articles about Pancreatic Neoplasms.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Clinical Trial Dietary consumption of advanced glycation end products and pancreatic cancer in the prospective NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study. 2015

Jiao, Li / Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael / Zimmerman, Thea Palmer / Duan, Zhigang / Chen, Liang / Kahle, Lisa / Risch, Adam / Subar, Amy F / Cross, Amanda J / Hollenbeck, Albert / Vlassara, Helen / Striker, Gary / Sinha, Rashmi. ·From the Sections of Gastroenterology and Hepatology (LJ and LC) and Health Services Research (LJ, ZD, and LC), Department of Medicine, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX · the Nutritional Epidemiology Branch, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics (RS-S and RS) and the Applied Research Program, Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences (AFS), National Cancer Institute, NIH, Rockville, MD · Westat, Rockville, MD (TPZ) · Information Management Services, Rockville, MD (LK and AR) · the Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Faculty of Medicine, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom (AJC) · the Division of Experimental Diabetes and Aging, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY (HV and GS) · and AARP, Washington, DC (AH). ·Am J Clin Nutr · Pubmed #25527756.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) are a heterogeneous group of compounds present in uncooked foods as well as in foods cooked at high temperatures. AGEs have been associated with insulin resistance, oxidative stress, and chronic inflammation in patients with diabetes. Dietary AGEs are an important contributor to the AGE pool in the body. N(ϵ)-(carboxymethyl)lysine (CML) AGE is one of the major biologically and chemically well-characterized AGE markers. The consumption of red meat, which is CML-AGE rich, has been positively associated with pancreatic cancer in men. OBJECTIVES: With the use of a published food CML-AGE database, we estimated the consumption of CML AGE in the prospective NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study and evaluated the association between CML-AGE consumption and pancreatic cancer and the mediating effect of CML AGE on the association between red meat consumption and pancreatic cancer. DESIGN: Multivariate Cox proportional hazard regression models were used to estimate HRs and 95% CIs for pancreatic cancer. RESULTS: During an average of 10.5 y of follow-up, we identified 2193 pancreatic cancer cases (1407 men and 786 women) from 528,251 subjects. With the comparison of subjects in the fifth and the first quintiles of CML-AGE consumption, we observed increased pancreatic cancer risk in men (HR: 1.43; 95% CI: 1.06, 1.93, P-trend = 0.003) but not women (HR: 1.14; 95% CI: 0.76, 1.72, P-trend = 0.42). Men in the highest quintile of red meat consumption had higher risk of pancreatic cancer (HR: 1.35; 95% CI: 1.07, 1.70), which attenuated after adjustment for CML-AGE consumption (HR: 1.20; 95% CI: 0.95, 1.53). CONCLUSION: Dietary CML-AGE consumption was associated with modestly increased risk of pancreatic cancer in men and may partially explain the positive association between red meat and pancreatic cancer.

2 Article Mediterranean diet and risk of pancreatic cancer in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition cohort. 2017

Molina-Montes, Esther / Sánchez, María-José / Buckland, Genevieve / Bueno-de-Mesquita, H B As / Weiderpass, Elisabete / Amiano, Pilar / Wark, Petra A / Kühn, Tilman / Katzke, Verena / Huerta, José María / Ardanaz, Eva / Quirós, José Ramón / Affret, Aurélie / His, Mathilde / Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine / Peeters, Petra H / Ye, Weimin / Sund, Malin / Boeing, Heiner / Iqbal, Khalid / Ohlsson, Bodil / Sonestedt, Emily / Tjønneland, Anne / Petersen, Kristina En / Travis, Ruth C / Skeie, Guri / Agnoli, Claudia / Panico, Salvatore / Palli, Domenico / Tumino, Rosario / Sacerdote, Carlotta / Freisling, Heinz / Huybrechts, Inge / Overvad, Kim / Trichopoulou, Antonia / Bamia, Christina / Vasilopoulou, Effie / Wareham, Nick / Khaw, Kay-Tee / Cross, Amanda J / Ward, Heather A / Riboli, Elio / Duell, Eric J. ·Genetic and Molecular Epidemiology Group, Spanish National Cancer Research Center (CNIO), Madrid, Spain. · Andalusian School of Public Health, Instituto de Investigación Biosanitaria ibs.GRANADA. Hospitales Universitarios de Granada/Universidad de Granada, Granada, Spain. · CIBER Epidemiología y Salud Pública, CIBERESP, Madrid, Spain. · Unit of Nutrition and Cancer, Cancer Epidemiology Research Programme, Catalan Institute of Oncology (ICO-IDIBELL), Barcelona, Spain. · Department for Determinants of Chronic Diseases (DCD), National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven, The Netherlands. · Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University Medical Centre, Utrecht, The Netherlands. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, The School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, UK. · Department of Social & Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. · Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Tromsø, The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway. · Department of Research, Cancer Registry of Norway, Institute of Population-Based Cancer Research, Oslo, Norway. · Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden. · Genetic Epidemiology Group, Folkhälsan Research Center, Helsinki, Finland. · Public Health Division of Gipuzkoa, BioDonostia Research Institute, San Sebastián, Spain. · Global eHealth Unit, Department of Primary Care and Public Health, The School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, UK. · Division of Cancer Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center (DFKZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Department of Epidemiology, Murcia Regional Health Council, IMIB-Arrixaca, Murcia, Spain. · Navarra Public Health Institute, Pamplona, Spain. · IdiSNA, Navarra Institute for Health Research, Pamplona, Spain. · Public Health Directorate, Asturias, Spain. · Université Paris-Saclay, Université Paris-Sud, UVSQ, CESP Generations and Health Team, INSERM, Villejuif, France. · Gustave Roussy, Villejuif F-94805, France. · Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands. · Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. · The Medical Biobank at Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden. · Department of Epidemiology, German Institute of Human Nutrition Potsdam-Rehbruecke, Nuthetal, Germany. · Department of Internal Medicine, Skane University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden. · Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden. · Danish Cancer Society Research Center, Unit of Diet, Genes and Environment, Copenhagen, Denmark. · Cancer Epidemiology Unit, Nuffield Department of Population Health, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK. · Epidemiology and Prevention Unit Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan, Italy. · Dipartimento di Medicina Clinica e Chirurgia, Federico II University, Naples, Italy. · Molecular and Nutritional Epidemiology Unit, Cancer Research and Prevention Institute-ISPO, Florence, Italy. · Cancer Registry and Histopathology Unit, 'Civic-M.P.Arezzo' Hospital, ASP Ragusa, Ragusa, Italy. · Unit of Cancer Epidemiology, Citta' della Salute e della Scienza Hospital, University of Turin and Centre for Cancer Prevention (CPO), Turin, Italy. · Section of Nutrition and Metabolism, International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC-WHO), Lyon, France. · Department of Public Health, Section of Epidemiology, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark. · Hellenic Health Foundation, Athens, Greece. · WHO Collaborating Center for Nutrition and Health, Unit of Nutritional Epidemiology and Nutrition in Public Health, Department of Hygiene, Epidemiology and Medical Statistics, University of Athens Medical School, Athens, Greece. · Medical Research Council (MCR), Epidemiology Unit, Cambridge, UK. · University of Cambridge, School of Clinical Medicine, Cambridge, UK. ·Br J Cancer · Pubmed #28170373.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The Mediterranean diet (MD) has been proposed as a means for cancer prevention, but little evidence has been accrued regarding its potential to prevent pancreatic cancer. We investigated the association between the adherence to the MD and pancreatic cancer risk within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cohort. METHODS: Over half a million participants from 10 European countries were followed up for over 11 years, after which 865 newly diagnosed exocrine pancreatic cancer cases were identified. Adherence to the MD was estimated through an adapted score without the alcohol component (arMED) to discount alcohol-related harmful effects. Cox proportional hazards regression models, stratified by age, sex and centre, and adjusted for energy intake, body mass index, smoking status, alcohol intake and diabetes status at recruitment, were used to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) associated with pancreatic cancer and their corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs). RESULTS: Adherence to the arMED score was not associated with risk of pancreatic cancer (HR high vs low adherence=0.99; 95% CI: 0.77-1.26, and HR per increments of two units in adherence to arMED=1.00; 95% CI: 0.94-1.06). There was no convincing evidence for heterogeneity by smoking status, body mass index, diabetes or European region. There was also no evidence of significant associations in analyses involving microscopically confirmed cases, plausible reporters of energy intake or other definitions of the MD pattern. CONCLUSIONS: A high adherence to the MD is not associated with pancreatic cancer risk in the EPIC study.

3 Article Flavonoid and lignan intake and pancreatic cancer risk in the European prospective investigation into cancer and nutrition cohort. 2016

Molina-Montes, Esther / Sánchez, María-José / Zamora-Ros, Raul / Bueno-de-Mesquita, H B As / Wark, Petra A / Obon-Santacana, Mireia / Kühn, Tilman / Katzke, Verena / Travis, Ruth C / Ye, Weimin / Sund, Malin / Naccarati, Alessio / Mattiello, Amalia / Krogh, Vittorio / Martorana, Caterina / Masala, Giovanna / Amiano, Pilar / Huerta, José-María / Barricarte, Aurelio / Quirós, José-Ramón / Weiderpass, Elisabete / Angell Åsli, Lene / Skeie, Guri / Ericson, Ulrika / Sonestedt, Emily / Peeters, Petra H / Romieu, Isabelle / Scalbert, Augustin / Overvad, Kim / Clemens, Matthias / Boeing, Heiner / Trichopoulou, Antonia / Peppa, Eleni / Vidalis, Pavlos / Khaw, Kay-Tee / Wareham, Nick / Olsen, Anja / Tjønneland, Anne / Boutroun-Rualt, Marie-Christine / Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise / Cross, Amanda J / Lu, Yunxia / Riboli, Elio / Duell, Eric J. ·Andalusian School of Public Health, Instituto De Investigación Biosanitaria Ibs, GRANADA, Hospitales Universitarios De Granada/Universidad De Granada, Granada, Spain. · CIBERESP, CIBER Epidemiología Y Salud Pública, Spain. · Section of Nutrition and Metabolism, International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), Lyon, France. · National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven, The Netherlands. · Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University Medical Centre, Utrecht, The Netherlands. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, the School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom. · Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. · Global eHealth Unit, Department of Primary Care and Public Health, the School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom. · Unit of Nutrition and Cancer, Catalan Institute of Oncology (ICO-Idibell), Barcelona, Spain. · Division of Cancer Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Cancer Epidemiology Unit, Nuffield Department of Population Health, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom. · Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. · The Medical Biobank at Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden. · Molecular and Genetic Epidemiology Unit, HuGeF-Human Genetics Foundation, Torino, Italy. · Dipartimento Di Medicina Clinica E Chirurgia, Federico II University, Naples, Italy. · Epidemiology and Prevention Unit Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale Dei Tumori, Milan, Italy. · Cancer Registry ASP, Ragusa, Italy. · Molecular and Nutritional Epidemiology Unit, Cancer Research and Prevention Institute-ISPO, Florence, Italy. · Public Health Division of Gipuzkoa, BioDonostia Research Institute, San Sebastián, Spain. · Department of Epidemiology, Murcia Regional Health Council, IMIB-Arrixaca, Murcia, Spain. · Public Health Institute of Navarra, Pamplona, Spain. · Public Health Directorate, Asturias, Spain. · Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Tromsø, the Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway. · Department of Research, Cancer Registry of Norway, Oslo, Norway. · Genetic Epidemiology Group, Folkhälsan Research Center, Helsinki, Finland. · Department of Clinical Sciences in Malmö, Lund University, Lund, Sweden. · Department of Epidemiology, Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, University Medical Center, Utrecht, The Netherlands. · Department of Public Health, Section for Epidemiology, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark. · Department of Epidemiology, German Institute of Human Nutrition Potsdam-Rehbruecke, Nuthetal, Germany. · Hellenic Health Foundation, Athens, Greece. · WHO Collaborating Center for Nutrition and Health, Unit of Nutritional Epidemiology and Nutrition in Public Health, Department of Hygiene, Epidemiology, and Medical Statistics, University of Athens Medical School, Athens, Greece. · University of Cambridge School of Clinical Medicine, Cambridge, United Kingdom. · Epidemiology Unit, Medical Research Council, Cambridge, United Kingdom. · Danish Cancer Society Research Center, Copenhagen, Denmark. · Inserm, CESP Centre for Research in Epidemiology and Population Health, France. ·Int J Cancer · Pubmed #27184434.

ABSTRACT: Despite the potential cancer preventive effects of flavonoids and lignans, their ability to reduce pancreatic cancer risk has not been demonstrated in epidemiological studies. Our aim was to examine the association between dietary intakes of flavonoids and lignans and pancreatic cancer risk in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cohort. A total of 865 exocrine pancreatic cancer cases occurred after 11.3 years of follow-up of 477,309 cohort members. Dietary flavonoid and lignan intake was estimated through validated dietary questionnaires and the US Department of Agriculture (USDA) and Phenol Explorer databases. Hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using age, sex and center-stratified Cox proportional hazards models, adjusted for energy intake, body mass index (BMI), smoking, alcohol and diabetes status. Our results showed that neither overall dietary intake of flavonoids nor of lignans were associated with pancreatic cancer risk (multivariable-adjusted HR for a doubling of intake = 1.03, 95% CI: 0.95-1.11 and 1.02; 95% CI: 0.89-1.17, respectively). Statistically significant associations were also not observed by flavonoid subclasses. An inverse association between intake of flavanones and pancreatic cancer risk was apparent, without reaching statistical significance, in microscopically confirmed cases (HR for a doubling of intake = 0.96, 95% CI: 0.91-1.00). In conclusion, we did not observe an association between intake of flavonoids, flavonoid subclasses or lignans and pancreatic cancer risk in the EPIC cohort.

4 Article Pancreatic cancer and exposure to dietary nitrate and nitrite in the NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study. 2011

Aschebrook-Kilfoy, Briseis / Cross, Amanda J / Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael Z / Schatzkin, Arthur / Hollenbeck, Albert R / Sinha, Rashmi / Ward, Mary H. ·Occupational and Environmental Epidemiology Branch, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, Rockville, Maryland 20892, USA. kilfoyb@mail.nih.gov ·Am J Epidemiol · Pubmed #21685410.

ABSTRACT: Nitrate and nitrite are precursors of N-nitroso compounds, which induce tumors of the pancreas in animals. The authors evaluated the relation of dietary nitrate and nitrite to pancreatic cancer risk in the NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study. Nitrate and nitrite intakes were assessed at baseline using a 124-item food frequency questionnaire. During approximately 10 years of follow-up between 1995 and 2006, 1,728 incident pancreatic cancer cases were identified. There was no association between total nitrate or nitrite intake and pancreatic cancer in men or women. However, men in the highest quintile of summed nitrate/nitrite intake from processed meat had a nonsignificantly elevated risk of pancreatic cancer (hazard ratio = 1.18, 95% confidence interval: 0.95, 1.47; P-trend = 0.11). The authors observed a stronger increase in risk among men for nitrate/nitrite intake from processed meat at ages 12-13 years (highest quintile vs. lowest: hazard ratio = 1.32, 95% confidence interval: 0.99, 1.76; P-trend = 0.11), though the relation did not achieve statistical significance. The authors found no associations between adult or adolescent nitrate or nitrite intake from processed meats and pancreatic cancer among women. These results provide modest evidence that processed meat sources of dietary nitrate and nitrite may be associated with pancreatic cancer among men and provide no support for the hypothesis in women.