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Pancreatic Neoplasms: HELP
Articles by Tatjana Crnogorac-Jurcevic
Based on 23 articles published since 2010
(Why 23 articles?)
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Between 2010 and 2020, T. Crnogorac-Jurcevic wrote the following 23 articles about Pancreatic Neoplasms.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Review Reduced risk of pancreatic cancer associated with asthma and nasal allergies. 2017

Gomez-Rubio, Paulina / Zock, Jan-Paul / Rava, Marta / Marquez, Mirari / Sharp, Linda / Hidalgo, Manuel / Carrato, Alfredo / Ilzarbe, Lucas / Michalski, Christoph / Molero, Xavier / Farré, Antoni / Perea, José / Greenhalf, William / O'Rorke, Michael / Tardón, Adonina / Gress, Thomas / Barberà, Victor / Crnogorac-Jurcevic, Tatjana / Domínguez-Muñoz, Enrique / Muñoz-Bellvís, Luís / Alvarez-Urturi, Cristina / Balcells, Joaquim / Barneo, Luis / Costello, Eithne / Guillén-Ponce, Carmen / Kleeff, Jörg / Kong, Bo / Lawlor, Rita / Löhr, Matthias / Mora, Josefina / Murray, Lim / O'Driscoll, Damian / Peláez, Pablo / Poves, Ignasi / Scarpa, Aldo / Real, Francisco X / Malats, Núria / Anonymous5500850. ·Genetic and Molecular Epidemiology Group, Spanish National Cancer Research Center (CNIO), Madrid, Spain. · Centre for Research in Environmental Epidemiology (CREAL), Barcelona, Spain. · National Cancer Registry Ireland, Cork, Ireland, and Institute of Health & Society, Newcastle University, UK. · Hospital Madrid-Norte-Sanchinarro, Madrid, Spain. · Department of Oncology, Hospital Ramón y Cajal, Madrid, Spain. · Hospital del Mar-Parc de Salut Mar, Barcelona, Spain. · Technical University of Munich, Munich, Germany. · Exocrine Pancreas Research Unit, Hospital Universitari Vall d'Hebron, Barcelona, Spain. · Hospital de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau, Barcelona, Spain. · Department of Surgery, 12 de Octubre University Hospital, Madrid, Spain. · The Royal Liverpool University Hospital, Liverpool, UK. · Centre for Public Health, Queen's University Belfast, Belfast, UK. · Instituto Universitario de Oncología del Principado de Asturias, Oviedo, Spain. · Department of Gastroenterology, University Hospital Giessen and Marburg, Marburg, Germany. · Laboratorio de Genética Molecular, Hospital General Universitario de Elche, Elche, Spain. · Centre for Molecular Oncology, Barts Cancer Institute, Queen Mary University of London, London, UK. · Hospital Clínico Universitario de Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela, Spain. · Cirugía General y del Aparato Digestivo, Hospital Universitario de Salamanca, Salamanca, Spain. · Department of Pathology and Diagnostics, University of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Gastrocentrum, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. · Epithelial Carcinogenesis Group, Spanish National Cancer Research Centre (CNIO), Madrid, Spain. ·Gut · Pubmed #26628509.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: Studies indicate an inverse association between ductal adenocarcinoma of the pancreas (PDAC) and nasal allergies. However, controversial findings are reported for the association with asthma. Understanding PDAC risk factors will help us to implement appropriate strategies to prevent, treat and diagnose this cancer. This study assessed and characterised the association between PDAC and asthma and corroborated existing reports regarding the association between allergies and PDAC risk. DESIGN: Information about asthma and allergies was collated from 1297 PDAC cases and 1024 controls included in the PanGenEU case-control study. Associations between PDAC and atopic diseases were studied using multilevel logistic regression analysis. Meta-analyses of association studies on these diseases and PDAC risk were performed applying random-effects model. RESULTS: Asthma was associated with lower risk of PDAC (OR 0.64, 95% CI 0.47 to 0.88), particularly long-standing asthma (>=17 years, OR 0.39, 95% CI 0.24 to 0.65). Meta-analysis of 10 case-control studies sustained our results (metaOR 0.73, 95% CI 0.59 to 0.89). Nasal allergies and related symptoms were associated with lower risk of PDAC (OR 0.66, 95% CI 0.52 to 0.83 and OR 0.59, 95% CI 0.46 to 0.77, respectively). These results were supported by a meta-analysis of nasal allergy studies (metaOR 0.6, 95% CI 0.5 to 0.72). Skin allergies were not associated with PDAC risk. CONCLUSIONS: This study shows a consistent inverse association between PDAC and asthma and nasal allergies, supporting the notion that atopic diseases are associated with reduced cancer risk. These results point to the involvement of immune and/or inflammatory factors that may either foster or restrain pancreas carcinogenesis warranting further research to understand the molecular mechanisms driving this association.

2 Article AGR2, a unique tumor-associated antigen, is a promising candidate for antibody targeting. 2019

Liu, Alvin Y / Kanan, Adelle D / Radon, Tomasz P / Shah, Siama / Weeks, Mark E / Foster, Julie M / Sosabowski, Jane K / Dumartin, Laurent / Crnogorac-Jurcevic, Tatjana. ·Department of Urology, Institute for Stem Cell and Regenerative Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA. · Centre for Molecular Oncology, Barts Cancer Institute, Queen Mary University of London, London, UK. ·Oncotarget · Pubmed #31303962.

ABSTRACT: Anterior gradient 2 (AGR2), a protein disulfide isomerase, shows two subcellular localizations: intracellular (iAGR2) and extracellular (eAGR2). In healthy cells that express AGR2, the predominant form is iAGR2, which resides in the endoplasmic reticulum. In contrast, cancer cells secrete and express eAGR2 on the cell surface. We wanted to test if AGR2 is a cancer-specific tumor-associated antigen. We utilized two AGR2 antibodies, P3A5 and P1G4, for

3 Article Perineural invasion in pancreatic cancer: proteomic analysis and in vitro modelling. 2019

Alrawashdeh, Wasfi / Jones, Richard / Dumartin, Laurent / Radon, Tomasz P / Cutillas, Pedro R / Feakins, Roger M / Dmitrovic, Branko / Demir, Ihsan Ekin / Ceyhan, Guralp O / Crnogorac-Jurcevic, Tatjana. ·Centre for Molecular Oncology, Barts Cancer Institute, Queen Mary University of London, UK. · MS Bioworks, LLC, Ann Arbor, MI, USA. · Centre for Haemato-Oncology, Bart Cancer Institute, Queen Mary University of London, UK. · Department of Histopathology, Royal London Hospital, UK. · Department of Pathology and Forensic Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Osijek, Croatia. · Department of Surgery, Klinikum rechts der Isar Technische Universität, Munich, Germany. ·Mol Oncol · Pubmed #30690892.

ABSTRACT: Perineural invasion (PNI) is a common and characteristic feature of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) that is associated with poor prognosis, tumor recurrence, and generation of pain. However, the molecular alterations in cancer cells and nerves within PNI have not previously been comprehensively analyzed. Here, we describe our proteomic analysis of the molecular changes underlying neuro-epithelial interactions in PNI using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) in microdissected PNI and non-PNI cancer, as well as in invaded and noninvaded nerves from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded PDAC tissues. In addition, an in vitro model of PNI was developed using a co-culture system comprising PDAC cell lines and PC12 cells as the neuronal element. The overall proteomic profiles of PNI and non-PNI cancer appeared largely similar. In contrast, upon invasion by cancer cells, nerves demonstrated widespread plasticity with a pattern consistent with neuronal injury. The up-regulation of SCG2 (secretogranin II) and neurosecretory protein VGF (nonacronymic) in invaded nerves in PDAC tissues was further validated using immunohistochemistry. The tested PDAC cell lines were found to be able to induce neuronal plasticity in PC12 cells in our in vitro established co-culture model. Changes in expression levels of VGF, as well as of two additional proteins previously reported to be overexpressed in PNI, Nestin and Neuromodulin (GAP43), closely recapitulated our proteomic findings in PDAC tissues. Furthermore, induction of VGF, while not necessary for PC12 survival, mediated neurite extension induced by PDAC cell lines. In summary, here we report the proteomic alterations underlying PNI in PDAC and confirm that PDAC cells are able to induce neuronal plasticity. In addition, we describe a novel, simple, and easily adaptable co-culture model for in vitro study of neuro-epithelial interactions.

4 Article Pancreatic cancer and autoimmune diseases: An association sustained by computational and epidemiological case-control approaches. 2019

Gomez-Rubio, Paulina / Piñero, Janet / Molina-Montes, Esther / Gutiérrez-Sacristán, Alba / Marquez, Mirari / Rava, Marta / Michalski, Christoph W / Farré, Antoni / Molero, Xavier / Löhr, Matthias / Perea, José / Greenhalf, William / O'Rorke, Michael / Tardón, Adonina / Gress, Thomas / Barberá, Victor M / Crnogorac-Jurcevic, Tatjana / Muñoz-Bellvís, Luís / Domínguez-Muñoz, Enrique / Balsells, Joaquim / Costello, Eithne / Yu, Jingru / Iglesias, Mar / Ilzarbe, Lucas / Kleeff, Jörg / Kong, Bo / Mora, Josefina / Murray, Liam / O'Driscoll, Damian / Poves, Ignasi / Lawlor, Rita T / Ye, Weimin / Hidalgo, Manuel / Scarpa, Aldo / Sharp, Linda / Carrato, Alfredo / Real, Francisco X / Furlong, Laura I / Malats, Núria / Anonymous2240962. ·Genetic and Molecular Epidemiology Group, Spanish National Cancer Research Center CNIO, Madrid, Spain. · Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red en Oncología (CIBERONC), Enfermedades Hepáticas y Digestivas (CIBERHD), and Epidemiología y Salud Pública (CIBERESP), Barcelona, Spain. · Research Program on Biomedical Informatics (GRIB), Hospital del Mar Research Institute (IMIM), Universidad Pompeu Fabra (UPF), Barcelona, Spain. · Department of Surgery, Technical University of Munich, Munich, Germany. · Department of Surgery, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany. · Department of Gastroenterology, Hospital de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau, Barcelona, Spain. · Hospital Universitaru Vall d'Hebron, Exocrine Pancreas Research Unit and Vall d'Hebron Research Institute (VHIR), Barcelona, Spain. · Universitat Auntònoma de Barcelona, Campus de la UAB, Barcelona, Spain. · Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology (CLINTEC), Karolinska Institutet and University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden. · Department of Surgery, University Hospital 12 de Octubre, Madrid, Spain. · Department of Molecular and Clinical Cancer Medicine, The Royal Liverpool University Hospital, Liverpool, United Kingdom. · Centre for Public Health, Queen's University Belfast, Belfast, United Kingdom. · Department of Medicine, Instituto Universitario de Oncología del Principado de Asturias, Oviedo, Spain. · Department of Gastroenterology, University Hospital of Giessen and Marburg, Marburg, Germany. · Laboratorio de Genética Molecular, Hospital General Universitario de Elche, Elche, Spain. · Centre for Molecular Oncology, John Vane Science Centre, Barts Cancer Institute, Queen Mary University of London, London, United Kingdom. · General and Digestive Surgery Department, Hospital Universitario de Salamanca, Salamanca, Spain. · Department of Gastroenterology, Hospital Clínico Universitario de Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela, Spain. · Department of Gastroenterology, Hospital del Mar/Parc de Salut Mar, Barcelona, Spain. · Department of Visceral, Vascular and Endocrine Surgery, Martin-Luther-University Halle-Wittenberg, Halle, (Saale), Germany. · Cancer Data Registrars, National Cancer Registry Ireland, Cork, Ireland. · ARC-Net Centre for Applied Research on Cancer, Department of Pathology and Diagnostics, University Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet and University Hospital, Sweden. · Hospital Madrid-Norte-Sanchinarro and Spanish National Cancer Research Centre (CNIO), Madrid, Spain. · Rosenberg Clinical Cancer Center, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA. · Institute of Health and Society, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, United Kingdom. · Department of Oncology, Hospital Ramón y Cajal, Madrid, Spain. · Epithelial Carcinogenesis Group, Spanish National Cancer Research Centre (CNIO), Madrid, Spain. · Departament de Ciències Experimentals i de la Salut, Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain. · PanGenEU Study Investigators (Additional file 1: Annex S1). ·Int J Cancer · Pubmed #30229903.

ABSTRACT: Deciphering the underlying genetic basis behind pancreatic cancer (PC) and its associated multimorbidities will enhance our knowledge toward PC control. The study investigated the common genetic background of PC and different morbidities through a computational approach and further evaluated the less explored association between PC and autoimmune diseases (AIDs) through an epidemiological analysis. Gene-disease associations (GDAs) of 26 morbidities of interest and PC were obtained using the DisGeNET public discovery platform. The association between AIDs and PC pointed by the computational analysis was confirmed through multivariable logistic regression models in the PanGen European case-control study population of 1,705 PC cases and 1,084 controls. Fifteen morbidities shared at least one gene with PC in the DisGeNET database. Based on common genes, several AIDs were genetically associated with PC pointing to a potential link between them. An epidemiologic analysis confirmed that having any of the nine AIDs studied was significantly associated with a reduced risk of PC (Odds Ratio (OR) = 0.74, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.58-0.93) which decreased in subjects having ≥2 AIDs (OR = 0.39, 95%CI 0.21-0.73). In independent analyses, polymyalgia rheumatica, and rheumatoid arthritis were significantly associated with low PC risk (OR = 0.40, 95%CI 0.19-0.89, and OR = 0.73, 95%CI 0.53-1.00, respectively). Several inflammatory-related morbidities shared a common genetic component with PC based on public databases. These molecular links could shed light into the molecular mechanisms underlying PC development and simultaneously generate novel hypotheses. In our study, we report sound findings pointing to an association between AIDs and a reduced risk of PC.

5 Article Demographic, clinical, and pathological features of early onset pancreatic cancer patients. 2018

Ntala, Chara / Debernardi, Silvana / Feakins, Roger M / Crnogorac-Jurcevic, Tatjana. ·Barts Cancer Institute, Queen Mary University of London, John Vane Science Centre, Charterhouse Square, London, EC1M 6BQ, UK. · Department of Cellular Pathology, Royal London Hospital, Barts Health NHS Trust, Pathology and Pharmacy Building, Newark Street, London, E1 2ES, UK. · Barts Cancer Institute, Queen Mary University of London, John Vane Science Centre, Charterhouse Square, London, EC1M 6BQ, UK. t.c.jurcevic@qmul.ac.uk. ·BMC Gastroenterol · Pubmed #30208959.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Early onset pancreatic cancer (EOPC), i.e. pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) occurring in patients below 50 years of age, is rare and there is limited information regarding risk factors, molecular basis and outcome. This study aimed to determine the demographic and clinicopathological features and survival figures for EOPC. METHODS: A retrospective analysis of patients treated at the Royal London Hospital for PDAC between September 2004 and September 2015 was performed. Data on demographics, risk factors, presentation, pathological features, treatment and survival outcome were compared in EOPC and older PDAC patients. RESULTS: Of 369 PDAC cases identified, 35 (9.5%) were EOPC. Compared to older patients, EOPC patients were more frequently male (71% vs 54%, p = 0.043) and less commonly of British origin (37% vs 70%, p = 0.002). There was no significant difference regarding the prevalence of any of the risk factors known to be associated with older PDAC patients. Fewer EOPC patients presented with resectable disease (23% vs 44%, p = 0.015) and more received adjuvant chemo/radiotherapy (60% vs 46%, p = 0.008). The overall median survival and stage specific survival did not differ significantly between the two groups, although a longer survival for localized disease was seen in EOPC patients (25 months (12.9-37, 95%CI) vs 13 months (10.5-15.5 95%CI) for older PDAC patients). CONCLUSIONS: The EOPC patients had different demographics and were more likely than their older PDAC counterparts to be male. Typically they presented with more advanced disease, received more aggressive treatment, and had on overall similar survival outcome.

6 Article Risk of pancreatic cancer associated with family history of cancer and other medical conditions by accounting for smoking among relatives. 2018

Molina-Montes, E / Gomez-Rubio, P / Márquez, M / Rava, M / Löhr, M / Michalski, C W / Molero, X / Farré, A / Perea, J / Greenhalf, W / Ilzarbe, L / O'Rorke, M / Tardón, A / Gress, T / Barberà, V M / Crnogorac-Jurcevic, T / Domínguez-Muñoz, E / Muñoz-Bellvís, L / Balsells, J / Costello, E / Huang, J / Iglesias, M / Kleeff, J / Kong, Bo / Mora, J / Murray, L / O'Driscoll, D / Poves, I / Scarpa, A / Ye, W / Hidalgo, M / Sharp, L / Carrato, A / Real, F X / Malats, N / Anonymous1210933. ·Spanish National Cancer Research Center (CNIO), Genetic and Molecular Epidemiology Group, Madrid, and CIBERONC, Spain. · Karolinska Institutet and University Hospital, Gastrocentrum, Stockholm, Sweden. · Technical University of Munich, Department of Surgery, Munich, Germany. · University of Heidelberg, Department of Surgery, Heidelberg, Germany. · Hospital Universitari Vall d'Hebron, Vall d'Hebron Research Institute (VHIR), Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Barcelona, and CIBEREHD, Spain. · Hospital de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau, Department of Gastroenterology, Barcelona, Spain. · University Hospital 12 de Octubre, Department of Surgery, Madrid, Spain. · Royal Liverpool University Hospital, Department of Molecular and Clinical Cancer Medicine, Liverpool, UK. · Hospital del Mar-Parc de Salut Mar, Barcelona, Spain. · Queen's University Belfast, Centre for Public Health, Belfast, UK. · Instituto Universitario de Oncología del Principado de Asturias, Department of Medicine, Oviedo, and CIBERESP, Spain. · University Hospital of Giessen and Marburg, Department of Gastroenterology, Marburg, Germany. · General University Hospital of Elche, Molecular Genetics Laboratory, Elche, Spain. · Barts Cancer Institute, Centre for Molecular Oncology, Queen Mary University of London, London, UK. · University Clinical Hospital of Santiago de Compostela, Department of Gastroenterology, Santiago de Compostela, Spain. · Salamanca University Hospital, General and Digestive Surgery Department, Salamanca, Spain. · Martin-Luther-University Halle-Wittenberg, Department of Visceral, Vascular and Endocrine Surgery, Halle (Saale), Germany. · National Cancer Registry Ireland and HRB Clinical Research Facility, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. · ARC-Net Centre for Applied Research on Cancer and Department of Pathology and Diagnostics, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Madrid-Norte-Sanchinarro Hospital, Madrid, Spain. · Newcastle University, Institute of Health and Society, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK. · Ramón y Cajal University Hospital, Department of Oncology, IRYCIS, Alcala University, Madrid, and CIBERONC, Spain. · Spanish National Cancer Research Centre (CNIO), Epithelial Carcinogenesis Group, Madrid, Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Departament de Ciències Experimentals i de la Salut, Barcelona, and CIBERONC, Spain. ·Int J Epidemiol · Pubmed #29329392.

ABSTRACT: Background: Family history (FH) of pancreatic cancer (PC) has been associated with an increased risk of PC, but little is known regarding the role of inherited/environmental factors or that of FH of other comorbidities in PC risk. We aimed to address these issues using multiple methodological approaches. Methods: Case-control study including 1431 PC cases and 1090 controls and a reconstructed-cohort study (N = 16 747) made up of their first-degree relatives (FDR). Logistic regression was used to evaluate PC risk associated with FH of cancer, diabetes, allergies, asthma, cystic fibrosis and chronic pancreatitis by relative type and number of affected relatives, by smoking status and other potential effect modifiers, and by tumour stage and location. Familial aggregation of cancer was assessed within the cohort using Cox proportional hazard regression. Results: FH of PC was associated with an increased PC risk [odds ratio (OR) = 2.68; 95% confidence interval (CI): 2.27-4.06] when compared with cancer-free FH, the risk being greater when ≥ 2 FDRs suffered PC (OR = 3.88; 95% CI: 2.96-9.73) and among current smokers (OR = 3.16; 95% CI: 2.56-5.78, interaction FHPC*smoking P-value = 0.04). PC cumulative risk by age 75 was 2.2% among FDRs of cases and 0.7% in those of controls [hazard ratio (HR) = 2.42; 95% CI: 2.16-2.71]. PC risk was significantly associated with FH of cancer (OR = 1.30; 95% CI: 1.13-1.54) and diabetes (OR = 1.24; 95% CI: 1.01-1.52), but not with FH of other diseases. Conclusions: The concordant findings using both approaches strengthen the notion that FH of cancer, PC or diabetes confers a higher PC risk. Smoking notably increases PC risk associated with FH of PC. Further evaluation of these associations should be undertaken to guide PC prevention strategies.

7 Article Noninvasive Diagnosis of Pancreatic Cancer Through Detection of Volatile Organic Compounds in Urine. 2018

Arasaradnam, Ramesh P / Wicaksono, Alfian / O'Brien, Harrison / Kocher, Hemant M / Covington, James A / Crnogorac-Jurcevic, Tatjana. ·Department of Gastroenterology, University Hospital Coventry & Warwick, Applied Biological Sciences, University of Coventry, Coventry, UK. · School of Engineering and Medical School, University of Warwick, Warwick, UK. · Centre for Molecular Oncology, Barts Cancer Institute, Queen Mary University of London, London, UK. · Centre for Tumour Biology, Barts Cancer Institute, Queen Mary University of London, London, UK. ·Gastroenterology · Pubmed #29129714.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

8 Article The Pancreatic Expression Database: 2018 update. 2018

Marzec, Jacek / Dayem Ullah, Abu Z / Pirrò, Stefano / Gadaleta, Emanuela / Crnogorac-Jurcevic, Tatjana / Lemoine, Nicholas R / Kocher, Hemant M / Chelala, Claude. ·Bioinformatics Unit, Centre for Molecular Oncology, Barts Cancer Institute, Queen Mary University London, London EC1M 6BQ, UK. · Centre for Molecular Oncology, Barts Cancer Institute, Queen Mary University London, London EC1M 6BQ, UK. · Centre for Tumour Biology, Barts Cancer Institute, Queen Mary University London, London EC1M 6BQ, UK. · Centre for Computational Biology, Life Sciences Initiative, Queen Mary University London, UK. ·Nucleic Acids Res · Pubmed #29059374.

ABSTRACT: The Pancreatic Expression Database (PED, http://www.pancreasexpression.org) continues to be a major resource for mining pancreatic -omics data a decade after its initial release. Here, we present recent updates to PED and describe its evolution into a comprehensive resource for extracting, analysing and integrating publicly available multi-omics datasets. A new analytical module has been implemented to run in parallel with the existing literature mining functions. This analytical module has been created using rich data content derived from pancreas-related specimens available through the major data repositories (GEO, ArrayExpress) and international initiatives (TCGA, GENIE, CCLE). Researchers have access to a host of functions to tailor analyses to meet their needs. Results are presented using interactive graphics that allow the molecular data to be visualized in a user-friendly manner. Furthermore, researchers are provided with the means to superimpose layers of molecular information to gain greater insight into alterations and the relationships between them. The literature-mining module has been improved with a redesigned web appearance, restructured query platforms and updated annotations. These updates to PED are in preparation for its integration with the Pancreatic Cancer Research Fund Tissue Bank (PCRFTB), a vital resource of pancreas cancer tissue for researchers to support and promote cutting-edge research.

9 Article Splice variants as novel targets in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. 2017

Wang, Jun / Dumartin, Laurent / Mafficini, Andrea / Ulug, Pinar / Sangaralingam, Ajanthah / Alamiry, Namaa Audi / Radon, Tomasz P / Salvia, Roberto / Lawlor, Rita T / Lemoine, Nicholas R / Scarpa, Aldo / Chelala, Claude / Crnogorac-Jurcevic, Tatjana. ·Centre for Molecular Oncology, Barts Cancer Institute, Queen Mary University of London, John Vane Science Centre, London, EC1M 6BQ, UK. j.a.wang@qmul.ac.uk. · Centre for Molecular Oncology, Barts Cancer Institute, Queen Mary University of London, John Vane Science Centre, London, EC1M 6BQ, UK. · ARC-Net Research Centre and Department of Diagnostics and Publich Health, Section of Pathology, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Centre for Molecular Oncology, Barts Cancer Institute, Queen Mary University of London, John Vane Science Centre, London, EC1M 6BQ, UK. t.c.jurcevic@qmul.ac.uk. ·Sci Rep · Pubmed #28592875.

ABSTRACT: Despite a wealth of genomic information, a comprehensive alternative splicing (AS) analysis of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) has not been performed yet. In the present study, we assessed whole exome-based transcriptome and AS profiles of 43 pancreas tissues using Affymetrix exon array. The AS analysis of PDAC indicated on average two AS probe-sets (ranging from 1-28) in 1,354 significantly identified protein-coding genes, with skipped exon and alternative first exon being the most frequently utilised. In addition to overrepresented extracellular matrix (ECM)-receptor interaction and focal adhesion that were also seen in transcriptome differential expression (DE) analysis, Fc gamma receptor-mediated phagocytosis and axon guidance AS genes were also highly represented. Of note, the highest numbers of AS probe-sets were found in collagen genes, which encode the characteristically abundant stroma seen in PDAC. We also describe a set of 37 'hypersensitive' genes which were frequently targeted by somatic mutations, copy number alterations, DE and AS, indicating their propensity for multidimensional regulation. We provide the most comprehensive overview of the AS landscape in PDAC with underlying changes in the spliceosomal machinery. We also collate a set of AS and DE genes encoding cell surface proteins, which present promising diagnostic and therapeutic targets in PDAC.

10 Article A systems approach identifies time-dependent associations of multimorbidities with pancreatic cancer risk. 2017

Gomez-Rubio, P / Rosato, V / Márquez, M / Bosetti, C / Molina-Montes, E / Rava, M / Piñero, J / Michalski, C W / Farré, A / Molero, X / Löhr, M / Ilzarbe, L / Perea, J / Greenhalf, W / O'Rorke, M / Tardón, A / Gress, T / Barberá, V M / Crnogorac-Jurcevic, T / Muñoz-Bellvís, L / Domínguez-Muñoz, E / Gutiérrez-Sacristán, A / Balsells, J / Costello, E / Guillén-Ponce, C / Huang, J / Iglesias, M / Kleeff, J / Kong, B / Mora, J / Murray, L / O'Driscoll, D / Peláez, P / Poves, I / Lawlor, R T / Carrato, A / Hidalgo, M / Scarpa, A / Sharp, L / Furlong, L I / Real, F X / La Vecchia, C / Malats, N / Anonymous3520902. ·Genetic and Molecular Epidemiology Group, Spanish National Cancer Research Center (CNIO), Madrid, and CIBERONC, Spain. · Branch of Medical Statistics, Biometry and Epidemiology "G.A. Maccacaro," Department of Clinical Sciences and Community Health, University of Milan, Milan. · Unit of Medical Statistics, Biometry and Bioinformatics, National Cancer Institute, IRCCS Foundation, Milan. · Department of Epidemiology, Mario Negri Institute for Pharmacological Research-IRCCS, Milan, Italy. · Research Programme on Biomedical Informatics (GRIB), Hospital del Mar Research Institute (IMIM), Pompeu Fabra Univeristy (UPF), Barcelona, Spain. · Department of Surgery, Technical University of Munich, Munich. · Department of Surgery, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany. · Department of Gastroenterology, Santa Creu i Sant Pau Hospital, Barcelona. · Exocrine Pancreas Research Unit and Vall d'Hebron Research Institute (VHIR), Vall d'Hebron University Hospital, Barcelona. · Department of Medicine, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Barcelona. · Network of Biomedical Research Centres (CIBER), Hepatic and Digestive Diseases and Epidemiology and Public Health, Madrid, Spain. · Gastrocentrum, Karolinska Institutet and University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden. · Department of Gastroenterology, Parc de Salut Mar University Hospital, Barcelona. · Department of Surgery, 12 de Octubre University Hospital, Madrid, Spain. · Department of Molecular and Clinical Cancer Medicine, The Royal Liverpool University Hospital, Liverpool. · Centre for Public Health, Queen's University Belfast, Belfast, UK. · Department of Medicine, University Institute of Oncology of Asturias, Oviedo, Spain. · Department of Gastroenterology, University Hospital of Giessen and Marburg, Marburg, Germany. · Molecular Genetics Laboratory, General University Hospital of Elche, Elche, Spain. · Centre for Molecular Oncology, Barts Cancer Institute, Queen Mary University of London, John Vane Science Centre, London, UK. · General and Digestive Surgery Department, Salamanca University Hospital, Salamanca. · Department of Gastroenterology, Clinical University Hospital of Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela. · Department of Oncology, Ramón y Cajal Hospital, Madrid, and CIBERONC, Spain. · Research Programme, National Cancer Registry Ireland. · ARC-Net Centre for Applied Research on Cancer and Department of Pathology and Diagnostics, University and Hospital trust of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Clara Campal Integrated Oncological Centre, Sanchinarro Hospital, Madrid, Spain. · Institute of Health & Society, Newcastle University, UK. · Epithelial Carcinogenesis Group, Spanish National Cancer Research Centre (CNIO), Madrid, and CIBERONC. · Department of Experimental and Health Sciences, Pompeu Fabra University, Barcelona, Spain. ·Ann Oncol · Pubmed #28383714.

ABSTRACT: Background: Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is usually diagnosed in late adulthood; therefore, many patients suffer or have suffered from other diseases. Identifying disease patterns associated with PDAC risk may enable a better characterization of high-risk patients. Methods: Multimorbidity patterns (MPs) were assessed from 17 self-reported conditions using hierarchical clustering, principal component, and factor analyses in 1705 PDAC cases and 1084 controls from a European population. Their association with PDAC was evaluated using adjusted logistic regression models. Time since diagnosis of morbidities to PDAC diagnosis/recruitment was stratified into recent (<3 years) and long term (≥3 years). The MPs and PDAC genetic networks were explored with DisGeNET bioinformatics-tool which focuses on gene-diseases associations available in curated databases. Results: Three MPs were observed: gastric (heartburn, acid regurgitation, Helicobacter pylori infection, and ulcer), metabolic syndrome (obesity, type-2 diabetes, hypercholesterolemia, and hypertension), and atopic (nasal allergies, skin allergies, and asthma). Strong associations with PDAC were observed for ≥2 recently diagnosed gastric conditions [odds ratio (OR), 6.13; 95% confidence interval CI 3.01-12.5)] and for ≥3 recently diagnosed metabolic syndrome conditions (OR, 1.61; 95% CI 1.11-2.35). Atopic conditions were negatively associated with PDAC (high adherence score OR for tertile III, 0.45; 95% CI, 0.36-0.55). Combining type-2 diabetes with gastric MP resulted in higher PDAC risk for recent (OR, 7.89; 95% CI 3.9-16.1) and long-term diagnosed conditions (OR, 1.86; 95% CI 1.29-2.67). A common genetic basis between MPs and PDAC was observed in the bioinformatics analysis. Conclusions: Specific multimorbidities aggregate and associate with PDAC in a time-dependent manner. A better characterization of a high-risk population for PDAC may help in the early diagnosis of this cancer. The common genetic basis between MP and PDAC points to a mechanistic link between these conditions.

11 Article ER stress protein AGR2 precedes and is involved in the regulation of pancreatic cancer initiation. 2017

Dumartin, L / Alrawashdeh, W / Trabulo, S M / Radon, T P / Steiger, K / Feakins, R M / di Magliano, M P / Heeschen, C / Esposito, I / Lemoine, N R / Crnogorac-Jurcevic, T. ·Centre for Molecular Oncology, Barts Cancer Institute, Queen Mary University of London, London, UK. · Centre for Stem Cells in Cancer &Ageing, Barts Cancer Institute, Queen Mary University of London, London, UK. · Institute of Pathology, Technische Universität München, Munich, Germany. · Department of Histopathology, Royal London Hospital, London, UK. · Department of Surgery, Cell and Developmental Biology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, USA. · Institute of Pathology, Heinrich-Heine-University of Düsseldorf, Germany. ·Oncogene · Pubmed #27941872.

ABSTRACT: The mechanisms of initiation of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) are still largely unknown. In the present study, we analysed the role of anterior gradient-2 (AGR2) in the earliest stages of pancreatic neoplasia. Immunohistochemical analysis of chronic pancreatitis (CP) and peritumoral areas in PDAC tissues showed that AGR2 was present in tubular complexes (TC) and early pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanINs). Moreover, AGR2 was also found in discrete subpopulations of non-transformed cells neighbouring these pre-neoplastic lesions. In primary cells derived from human patient-derived xenograft (PDX) model, flow-cytometry revealed that AGR2 was overexpressed in pancreatic cancer stem cells (CSC) compared with non-stem cancer cells. In LSL-Kras

12 Article Identification of a Three-Biomarker Panel in Urine for Early Detection of Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma. 2015

Radon, Tomasz P / Massat, Nathalie J / Jones, Richard / Alrawashdeh, Wasfi / Dumartin, Laurent / Ennis, Darren / Duffy, Stephen W / Kocher, Hemant M / Pereira, Stephen P / Guarner posthumous, Luisa / Murta-Nascimento, Cristiane / Real, Francisco X / Malats, Núria / Neoptolemos, John / Costello, Eithne / Greenhalf, William / Lemoine, Nick R / Crnogorac-Jurcevic, Tatjana. ·Centre for Molecular Oncology, Barts Cancer Institute, Queen Mary University of London, London, United Kingdom. · Centre for Cancer Prevention, Wolfson Institute of Preventive Medicine, Queen Mary University of London, London, United Kingdom. · MS Bioworks, LLC, Ann Arbor, Michigan. · Centre for Tumour Biology, Barts Cancer Institute, Queen Mary University of London, London, United Kingdom. · Institute for Liver and Digestive Health, University College London, London, United Kingdom. · Hospital General Universitari Vall Hebron, Barcelona, Spain. · Hospital del Mar - Parc de Salut Mar, Barcelona, Spain. · Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Oncológicas (CNIO), Madrid, Spain. · The NIHR Liverpool Pancreas Biomedical Research Unit, Liverpool, United Kingdom. · Centre for Molecular Oncology, Barts Cancer Institute, Queen Mary University of London, London, United Kingdom. t.c.jurcevic@qmul.ac.uk. ·Clin Cancer Res · Pubmed #26240291.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: Noninvasive biomarkers for early detection of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) are currently not available. Here, we aimed to identify a set of urine proteins able to distinguish patients with early-stage PDAC from healthy individuals. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: Proteomes of 18 urine samples from healthy controls, chronic pancreatitis, and patients with PDAC (six/group) were assayed using GeLC/MS/MS analysis. The selected biomarkers were subsequently validated with ELISA assays using multiple logistic regression applied to a training dataset in a multicenter cohort comprising 488 urine samples. RESULTS: LYVE-1, REG1A, and TFF1 were selected as candidate biomarkers. When comparing PDAC (n = 192) with healthy (n = 87) urine specimens, the resulting areas under the receiver-operating characteristic curves (AUC) of the panel were 0.89 [95% confidence interval (CI), 0.84-0.94] in the training (70% of the data) and 0.92 (95% CI, 0.86-0.98) in the validation (30% of the data) datasets. When comparing PDAC stage I-II (n = 71) with healthy urine specimens, the panel achieved AUCs of 0.90 (95% CI, 0.84-0.96) and 0.93 (95% CI, 0.84-1.00) in the training and validation datasets, respectively. In PDAC stage I-II and healthy samples with matching plasma CA19.9, the panel achieved a higher AUC of 0.97 (95% CI, 0.94-0.99) than CA19.9 (AUC = 0.88; 95% CI, 0.81-0.95, P = 0.005). Adding plasma CA19.9 to the panel increased the AUC from 0.97 (95% CI, 0.94-0.99) to 0.99 (95% CI, 0.97-1.00, P = 0.04), but did not improve the comparison of stage I-IIA PDAC (n = 17) with healthy urine. CONCLUSIONS: We have established a novel, three-protein biomarker panel that is able to detect patients with early-stage pancreatic cancer in urine specimens.

13 Article Dual-action combination therapy enhances angiogenesis while reducing tumor growth and spread. 2015

Wong, Ping-Pui / Demircioglu, Fevzi / Ghazaly, Essam / Alrawashdeh, Wasfi / Stratford, Michael R L / Scudamore, Cheryl L / Cereser, Biancastella / Crnogorac-Jurcevic, Tatjana / McDonald, Stuart / Elia, George / Hagemann, Thorsten / Kocher, Hemant M / Hodivala-Dilke, Kairbaan M. ·Centre for Tumor Biology, Barts Cancer Institute-a CR-UK Centre of Excellence, Queen Mary University of London, John Vane Science Centre, Charterhouse Square, London EC1M 6BQ, UK. · Centre for Haemato-Oncology, Barts Cancer Institute-a CR-UK Centre of Excellence, Queen Mary University of London, John Vane Science Centre, Charterhouse Square, London EC1M 6BQ, UK. · Centre for Molecular Oncology, Barts Cancer Institute-a CR-UK Centre of Excellence, Queen Mary University of London, John Vane Science Centre, Charterhouse Square, London EC1M 6BQ, UK. · CRUK/MRC Oxford Institute for Radiation Oncology, Department of Oncology, University of Oxford, Old Road Campus Research Building, Oxford OX3 7DQ, UK. · Mary Lyon Centre, MRC Harwell, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Oxfordshire OX11 0RD, UK. · Centre for Cancer Inflammation, Barts Cancer Institute-a CR-UK Centre of Excellence, Queen Mary University of London, John Vane Science Centre, Charterhouse Square, London EC1M 6BQ, UK; Barts and the London HPB Centre, The Royal London Hospital, Barts Health NHS Trust, London E1 1BB, UK. · Centre for Tumor Biology, Barts Cancer Institute-a CR-UK Centre of Excellence, Queen Mary University of London, John Vane Science Centre, Charterhouse Square, London EC1M 6BQ, UK; Barts and the London HPB Centre, The Royal London Hospital, Barts Health NHS Trust, London E1 1BB, UK. · Centre for Tumor Biology, Barts Cancer Institute-a CR-UK Centre of Excellence, Queen Mary University of London, John Vane Science Centre, Charterhouse Square, London EC1M 6BQ, UK. Electronic address: k.hodivala-dilke@qmul.ac.uk. ·Cancer Cell · Pubmed #25584895.

ABSTRACT: Increasing chemotherapy delivery to tumors, while enhancing drug uptake and reducing side effects, is a primary goal of cancer research. In mouse and human cancer models in vivo, we show that coadministration of low-dose Cilengitide and Verapamil increases tumor angiogenesis, leakiness, blood flow, and Gemcitabine delivery. This approach reduces tumor growth, metastasis, and minimizes side effects while extending survival. At a molecular level, this strategy alters Gemcitabine transporter and metabolizing enzyme expression levels, enhancing the potency of Gemcitabine within tumor cells in vivo and in vitro. Thus, the dual action of low-dose Cilengitide, in vessels and tumor cells, improves chemotherapy efficacy. Overall, our data demonstrate that vascular promotion therapy is a means to improve cancer treatment.

14 Article The pancreatic expression database: recent extensions and updates. 2014

Dayem Ullah, Abu Z / Cutts, Rosalind J / Ghetia, Millika / Gadaleta, Emanuela / Hahn, Stephan A / Crnogorac-Jurcevic, Tatjana / Lemoine, Nicholas R / Chelala, Claude. ·Centre for Molecular Oncology, Barts Cancer Institute, Queen Mary University of London, Charterhouse Square, London EC1M 6BQ, UK and Molecular GI-Onkologie (MGO), University of Bochum, Germany. ·Nucleic Acids Res · Pubmed #24163255.

ABSTRACT: The Pancreatic Expression Database (PED, http://www.pancreasexpression.org) is the only device currently available for mining of pancreatic cancer literature data. It brings together the largest collection of multidimensional pancreatic data from the literature including genomic, proteomic, microRNA, methylomic and transcriptomic profiles. PED allows the user to ask specific questions on the observed levels of deregulation among a broad range of specimen/experimental types including healthy/patient tissue and body fluid specimens, cell lines and murine models as well as related treatments/drugs data. Here we provide an update to PED, which has been previously featured in the Database issue of this journal. Briefly, PED data content has been substantially increased and expanded to cover methylomics studies. We introduced an extensive controlled vocabulary that records specific details on the samples and added data from large-scale meta-analysis studies. The web interface has been improved/redesigned with a quick search option to rapidly extract information about a gene/protein of interest and an upload option allowing users to add their own data to PED. We added a user guide and implemented integrated graphical tools to overlay and visualize retrieved information. Interoperability with biomart-compatible data sets was significantly improved to allow integrative queries with pancreatic cancer data.

15 Article Molecular analysis of precursor lesions in familial pancreatic cancer. 2013

Crnogorac-Jurcevic, Tatjana / Chelala, Claude / Barry, Sayka / Harada, Tomohiko / Bhakta, Vipul / Lattimore, Sam / Jurcevic, Stipo / Bronner, Mary / Lemoine, Nicholas R / Brentnall, Teresa A. ·Molecular Oncology Centre, Barts Cancer Institute, Queen Mary University of London, London, United Kingdom. T.C.Jurcevic@qmul.ac.uk ·PLoS One · Pubmed #23372777.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: With less than a 5% survival rate pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is almost uniformly lethal. In order to make a significant impact on survival of patients with this malignancy, it is necessary to diagnose the disease early, when curative surgery is still possible. Detailed knowledge of the natural history of the disease and molecular events leading to its progression is therefore critical. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We have analysed the precursor lesions, PanINs, from prophylactic pancreatectomy specimens of patients from four different kindreds with high risk of familial pancreatic cancer who were treated for histologically proven PanIN-2/3. Thus, the material was procured before pancreatic cancer has developed, rather than from PanINs in a tissue field that already contains cancer. Genome-wide transcriptional profiling using such unique specimens was performed. Bulk frozen sections displaying the most extensive but not microdissected PanIN-2/3 lesions were used in order to obtain the holistic view of both the precursor lesions and their microenvironment. A panel of 76 commonly dysregulated genes that underlie neoplastic progression from normal pancreas to PanINs and PDAC were identified. In addition to shared genes some differences between the PanINs of individual families as well as between the PanINs and PDACs were also seen. This was particularly pronounced in the stromal and immune responses. CONCLUSIONS: Our comprehensive analysis of precursor lesions without the invasive component provides the definitive molecular proof that PanIN lesions beget cancer from a molecular standpoint. We demonstrate the need for accumulation of transcriptomic changes during the progression of PanIN to PDAC, both in the epithelium and in the surrounding stroma. An identified 76-gene signature of PDAC progression presents a rich candidate pool for the development of early diagnostic and/or surveillance markers as well as potential novel preventive/therapeutic targets for both familial and sporadic pancreatic adenocarcinoma.

16 Article S100P is a metastasis-associated gene that facilitates transendothelial migration of pancreatic cancer cells. 2013

Barry, Sayka / Chelala, Claude / Lines, Kate / Sunamura, Makoto / Wang, Amu / Marelli-Berg, Federica M / Brennan, Caroline / Lemoine, Nicholas R / Crnogorac-Jurcevic, Tatjana. ·Centre for Molecular Oncology, Barts Cancer Institute, Queen Mary University of London, Charterhouse Square, London, EC1M 6BQ, UK. ·Clin Exp Metastasis · Pubmed #23007696.

ABSTRACT: Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is the 5th most common cause of cancer death in the UK and the 4th in the US. The vast majority of deaths following pancreatic cancer are due to metastatic spread, hence understanding the metastatic process is vital for identification of critically needed novel therapeutic targets. An enriched set of 33 genes differentially expressed in common between primary PDAC and liver metastases, when compared to normal tissues, was obtained through global gene expression profiling. This metastasis-associated gene set comprises transcripts from both cancer (S100P, S100A6, AGR2, etc.) and adjacent stroma (collagens type I, III, and V, etc.), thus reinforcing the concept of a continuous crosstalk between the two compartments in both primary tumours and their metastases. The expression of S100P, SFN, VCAN and collagens was further validated in additional primary PDACs and matched liver metastatic lesions, while the functional significance of one of the most highly expressed genes, S100P, was studied in more detail. We show that this protein increases the transendothelial migration of PDAC cancer cells in vitro, which was also confirmed in vivo experiments using a zebrafish embryo model. Thus S100P facilitates cancer cell intravasation/extravasation, critical steps in the hematogenous dissemination of pancreatic cancer cells.

17 Article S100P-binding protein, S100PBP, mediates adhesion through regulation of cathepsin Z in pancreatic cancer cells. 2012

Lines, Kate E / Chelala, Claude / Dmitrovic, Branko / Wijesuriya, Nilukshi / Kocher, Hemant M / Marshall, John F / Crnogorac-Jurcevic, Tatjana. ·Center for Molecular Oncology, Barts Cancer Institute, Queen Mary University of London, London, United Kingdom. ·Am J Pathol · Pubmed #22330678.

ABSTRACT: Several S100 proteins are up-regulated in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), the most significant being S100P. We previously reported on S100PBP, a binding partner of S100P, that shows no homology to any described protein and whose functions are completely unknown. To determine S100PBP expression across human tissues and organs, immunohistochemistry was performed using both multiorgan- and in-house-constructed pancreatic tissue microarrays. To establish S100PBP functions, cell lines with either stably overexpressed or silenced S100PBP were generated and investigated using Affymetrix gene expression arrays and complementary functional assays. We show that S100PBP is differentially expressed in various healthy and tumor specimens, which is both cancer- and tissue-type dependent. In healthy pancreas, S100PBP is expressed in the nuclear/perinuclear region of both exocrine and endocrine compartments. In early precancerous lesions, S100PBP is translocated to the cytoplasm, whereas in PDAC and metastatic lesions, its expression is significantly diminished. The most pronounced phenotypic change after manipulation of S100PBP expression was seen in adhesion; this was significantly reduced after S100PBP up-regulation and increased after S100PBP silencing. Up-regulation or silencing of S100PBP also led to a concomitant change in the levels of the protease cathepsin Z, the silencing of which significantly reduced PDAC cell adhesion. We further demonstrate that the interaction of cathepsin Z with arginine-glycine-aspartic acid-binding integrins, specifically αvβ5, mediates the changes seen in adhesion of PDAC cells.

18 Article Proteome of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma and lymph node metastases. 2012

Naidoo, Kalnisha / Jones, Richard / Dmitrovic, Branko / Wijesuriya, Nilukshi / Kocher, Hemant / Hart, Ian R / Crnogorac-Jurcevic, Tatjana. ·Centre for Molecular Oncology, Barts Cancer Institute, Queen Mary University of London, London, UK. ·J Pathol · Pubmed #22081483.

ABSTRACT: Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is a major cause of cancer-related death, largely due to metastatic disease. To better understand PDAC metastatic spread and identify novel therapeutic targets, we analysed the proteome of primary tumours and matched lymph node (LN) metastases. As frozen specimens of metastatic lesions are scarce, we examined formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues. This poses technical challenges because of the cross-linkages induced by fixation. Using laser capture microdissection (PALM system), we isolated malignant epithelia from seven FFPE primary PDAC tumours and matched LN metastases. Following dissection, samples were analysed in duplicate using Multidimensional Protein Identification Technology (MudPIT); this resulted in the identification of 1504 proteins, 854 of which were common to all samples analysed. Comparison of the obtained proteins with data from previous proteomics studies on pancreatic tissue, pancreatic juice, serum, and urine resulted in a less than 30% overlap, indicating that our study has substantially expanded the current database of proteins expressed in this malignancy. Statistical analysis further showed that 115/854 proteins (13.5%) were significantly differentially expressed (g-value ≥ 3.8). Two proteins, S100P and 14-3-3 sigma, with highly significant g-values were confirmed to be significantly differentially expressed (S100P: p = 0.05 and 14-3-3 sigma: p < 0.001) in a larger series of 55 cases of matched primary PDAC and LN metastases using immunohistochemistry. Thus, laser capture microdissection of FFPE tissue coupled with downstream proteomic analysis is a valid approach for the investigation of metastatic PDAC. This is the first study to establish and compare the protein composition of primary PDAC and matched LN metastases, and has resulted in the identification of several potential epithelial-specific therapeutic targets, including 14-3-3 sigma and S100P.

19 Article AGR2 is a novel surface antigen that promotes the dissemination of pancreatic cancer cells through regulation of cathepsins B and D. 2011

Dumartin, Laurent / Whiteman, Hannah J / Weeks, Mark E / Hariharan, Deepak / Dmitrovic, Branko / Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine A / Brentnall, Teresa A / Bronner, Mary P / Feakins, Roger M / Timms, John F / Brennan, Caroline / Lemoine, Nicholas R / Crnogorac-Jurcevic, Tatjana. ·Centre for Molecular Oncology, Barts Cancer Institute, Queen Mary University of London, London, United Kingdom. ·Cancer Res · Pubmed #21948970.

ABSTRACT: Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) remains one of the most lethal cancers largely due to disseminated disease at the time of presentation. Here, we investigated the role and mechanism of action of the metastasis-associated protein anterior gradient 2 (AGR2) in the pathogenesis of pancreatic cancer. AGR2 was induced in all sporadic and familial pancreatic intraepithelial precursor lesions (PanIN), PDACs, circulating tumor cells, and metastases studied. Confocal microscopy and flow cytometric analyses indicated that AGR2 localized to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and the external surface of tumor cells. Furthermore, induction of AGR2 in tumor cells regulated the expression of several ER chaperones (PDI, CALU, RCN1), proteins of the ubiquitin-proteasome degradation pathway (HIP2, PSMB2, PSMA3, PSMC3, and PSMB4), and lysosomal proteases [cathepsin B (CTSB) and cathepsin D (CTSD)], in addition to promoting the secretion of the precursor form pro-CTSD. Importantly, the invasiveness of pancreatic cancer cells was proportional to the level of AGR2 expression. Functional downstream targets of the proinvasive activity of AGR2 included CTSB and CTSD in vitro, and AGR2, CTSB, and CTSD were essential for the dissemination of pancreatic cancer cells in vivo. Taken together, the results suggest that AGR2 promotes dissemination of pancreatic cancer and that its cell surface targeting may permit new strategies for early detection as well as therapeutic management.

20 Article A global insight into a cancer transcriptional space using pancreatic data: importance, findings and flaws. 2011

Gadaleta, Emanuela / Cutts, Rosalind J / Kelly, Gavin P / Crnogorac-Jurcevic, Tatjana / Kocher, Hemant M / Lemoine, Nicholas R / Chelala, Claude. ·Centre for Molecular Oncology, Barts Cancer Institute, Queen Mary University of London, London EC1M 6BQ, UK. ·Nucleic Acids Res · Pubmed #21724610.

ABSTRACT: Despite the increasing wealth of available data, the structure of cancer transcriptional space remains largely unknown. Analysis of this space would provide novel insights into the complexity of cancer, assess relative implications in complex biological processes and responses, evaluate the effectiveness of cancer models and help uncover vital facets of cancer biology not apparent from current small-scale studies. We conducted a comprehensive analysis of pancreatic cancer-expression space by integrating data from otherwise disparate studies. We found (i) a clear separation of profiles based on experimental type, with patient tissue samples, cell lines and xenograft models forming distinct groups; (ii) three subgroups within the normal samples adjacent to cancer showing disruptions to biofunctions previously linked to cancer; and (iii) that ectopic subcutaneous xenografts and cell line models do not effectively represent changes occurring in pancreatic cancer. All findings are available from our online resource for independent interrogation. Currently, the most comprehensive analysis of pancreatic cancer to date, our study primarily serves to highlight limitations inherent with a lack of raw data availability, insufficient clinical/histopathological information and ambiguous data processing. It stresses the importance of a global-systems approach to assess and maximise findings from expression profiling of malignant and non-malignant diseases.

21 Article The Pancreatic Expression database: 2011 update. 2011

Cutts, Rosalind J / Gadaleta, Emanuela / Hahn, Stephan A / Crnogorac-Jurcevic, Tatjana / Lemoine, Nicholas R / Chelala, Claude. ·Centre for Molecular Oncology and Imaging, Institute of Cancer and CR-UK Centre, Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry, Queen Mary University of London, Charterhouse Square, London EC1M 6BQ, UK. ·Nucleic Acids Res · Pubmed #20959292.

ABSTRACT: The Pancreatic Expression database (PED, http://www.pancreasexpression.org) has established itself as the main repository for pancreatic-derived -omics data. For the past 3 years, its data content and access have increased substantially. Here we describe several of its new and improved features, such as data content, which now includes over 60,000 measurements derived from transcriptomics, proteomics, genomics and miRNA profiles from various pancreas-centred reports on a broad range of specimen and experimental types. We also illustrate the capabilities of its interface, which allows integrative queries that can combine PED data with a growing number of biological resources such as NCBI, Ensembl, UniProt and Reactome. Thus, PED is capable of retrieving and integrating different types of -omics, annotations and clinical data. We also focus on the importance of data sharing and interoperability in the cancer field, and the integration of PED into the International Cancer Genome Consortium (ICGC) data portal.

22 Article PRSS3 promotes tumour growth and metastasis of human pancreatic cancer. 2010

Jiang, Guozhong / Cao, Fengyu / Ren, Guoping / Gao, Dongling / Bhakta, Vipul / Zhang, Yunhan / Cao, Hua / Dong, Ziming / Zang, Weidong / Zhang, Shuijun / Wong, Han Hsi / Hiley, Crispin / Crnogorac-Jurcevic, Tatjana / Lemoine, Nick R / Wang, Yaohe. ·The London School of Medicine and Dentistry, Queen Mary University of London, London, UK. ·Gut · Pubmed #20947888.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Metastasis accounts for the poor outcome of patients with pancreatic cancer. We recently discovered PRSS3 to be over-expressed in metastatic human pancreatic cancer cells. This study aimed to elucidate the role of PRSS3 in the growth and metastasis of human pancreatic cancer. METHODS: PRSS3 expression in human pancreatic cancer cell lines was detected by qPCR and immunoblotting. The effect of PRSS3 on cancer cell proliferation, migration and invasion in vitro, tumour growth and metastasis in vivo were investigated by manipulation of PRSS3 expression in human pancreatic cancer cell lines. VEGF expression was detected by ELISA, and the pathway through which PRSS3 regulates VEGF expression was investigated. The therapeutic effect of targeting this pathway on metastasis was assessed in vivo. Immunohistochemistry was employed to detect PRSS3 expression in human pancreatic cancer tissues. RESULTS: PRSS3 was over-expressed in the metastatic PaTu8988s cell line, but not in the non-metastatic PaTu8988t cell line. Over-expression of PRSS3 promoted pancreatic cancer cell proliferation as well as invasion in vitro, and tumour progression and metastasis in vivo. Stepwise investigations demonstrated that PRSS3 upregulates VEGF expression via the PAR1-mediated ERK pathway. ERK inhibitor significantly delayed the progression of metastases of pancreatic cancer and prolonged the survival of animals bearing metastatic pancreatic cancer (p<0.05). 40.54% of human pancreatic cancers (n=74) were positive for PRSS3 protein. A significant correlation was observed between PRSS3 expression and metastasis (p<0.01). Multivariate Cox regression analysis indicated that patients with PRSS3 expression in their tumours had a shorter survival time compared to those without PRSS3 expression (p<0.05). CONCLUSION: PRSS3 plays an important role in the progression, metastasis and prognosis of human pancreatic cancer. Targeting the PRSS3 signalling pathway may be an effective and feasible approach for treatment of this lethal cancer.

23 Article Dual-color proteomic profiling of complex samples with a microarray of 810 cancer-related antibodies. 2010

Schröder, Christoph / Jacob, Anette / Tonack, Sarah / Radon, Tomasz P / Sill, Martin / Zucknick, Manuela / Rüffer, Sven / Costello, Eithne / Neoptolemos, John P / Crnogorac-Jurcevic, Tatjana / Bauer, Andrea / Fellenberg, Kurt / Hoheisel, Jörg D. ·Division of Functional Genome Analysis, Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum, 69120 Heidelberg, Germany. christoph.schroeder@dkfz.de ·Mol Cell Proteomics · Pubmed #20164060.

ABSTRACT: Antibody microarrays have the potential to enable comprehensive proteomic analysis of small amounts of sample material. Here, protocols are presented for the production, quality assessment, and reproducible application of antibody microarrays in a two-color mode with an array of 1,800 features, representing 810 antibodies that were directed at 741 cancer-related proteins. In addition to measures of array quality, we implemented indicators for the accuracy and significance of dual-color detection. Dual-color measurements outperform a single-color approach concerning assay reproducibility and discriminative power. In the analysis of serum samples, depletion of high-abundance proteins did not improve technical assay quality. On the contrary, depletion introduced a strong bias in protein representation. In an initial study, we demonstrated the applicability of the protocols to proteins derived from urine samples. We identified differences between urine samples from pancreatic cancer patients and healthy subjects and between sexes. This study demonstrates that biomedically relevant data can be produced. As demonstrated by the thorough quality analysis, the dual-color antibody array approach proved to be competitive with other proteomic techniques and comparable in performance to transcriptional microarray analyses.