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Pancreatic Neoplasms: HELP
Articles by Fareeda Coxon
Based on 4 articles published since 2009
(Why 4 articles?)
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Between 2009 and 2019, F. Coxon wrote the following 4 articles about Pancreatic Neoplasms.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Clinical Trial Vandetanib plus gemcitabine versus placebo plus gemcitabine in locally advanced or metastatic pancreatic carcinoma (ViP): a prospective, randomised, double-blind, multicentre phase 2 trial. 2017

Middleton, Gary / Palmer, Daniel H / Greenhalf, William / Ghaneh, Paula / Jackson, Richard / Cox, Trevor / Evans, Anthony / Shaw, Victoria E / Wadsley, Jonathan / Valle, Juan W / Propper, David / Wasan, Harpreet / Falk, Stephen / Cunningham, David / Coxon, Fareeda / Ross, Paul / Madhusudan, Srinivasan / Wadd, Nick / Corrie, Pippa / Hickish, Tamas / Costello, Eithne / Campbell, Fiona / Rawcliffe, Charlotte / Neoptolemos, John P. ·University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham, UK. · Liverpool Cancer Research UK Cancer Trials Unit and LCTU-GCPLabs, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK; Clatterbridge Cancer Centre NHS Foundation Trust, Wirral, UK. · Liverpool Cancer Research UK Cancer Trials Unit and LCTU-GCPLabs, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK. · Weston Park Hospital, Sheffield Teaching Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Sheffield, UK. · Division of Molecular and Clinical Cancer Sciences, University of Manchester, Manchester, UK; Christie NHS Foundation Trust, Manchester, UK. · Centre for Cancer and Inflammation, Barts Cancer Institute, London, UK. · Hammersmith Hospital, London, UK. · Bristol Haematology and Oncology Centre, University Hospital Bristol NHS Foundation Trust, Bristol, UK. · Royal Marsden, Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK. · Northern Centre for Cancer Care, Newcastle upon Tyne Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Freeman Hospital, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK. · Guy's Hospital, Guy's and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK. · Nottingham City Hospital, Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust, Nottingham, UK. · James Cook University Hospital, South Tees Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Middlesborough, UK. · Cambridge University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Cambridge, UK. · Poole Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Bournemouth University, Poole, UK. · Liverpool Cancer Research UK Cancer Trials Unit and LCTU-GCPLabs, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK. Electronic address: j.p.neoptolemos@liverpool.ac.uk. ·Lancet Oncol · Pubmed #28259610.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Erlotinib is an EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor that has shown a significant but only marginally improved median overall survival when combined with gemcitabine in patients with locally advanced and metastatic pancreatic cancer. Vandetanib is a novel tyrosine kinase inhibitor of VEGFR2, RET, and EGFR, all of which are in involved in the pathogenesis of pancreatic cancer. We investigated the clinical efficacy of vandetanib when used in combination with gemcitabine in patients with advanced pancreatic cancer. METHODS: The Vandetanib in Pancreatic Cancer (ViP) trial was a phase 2 double-blind, multicentre, randomised placebo-controlled trial in previously untreated adult patients (aged ≥18 years) diagnosed with locally advanced or metastatic carcinoma of the pancreas confirmed by cytology or histology. Patients had to have an Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) score of 0-2 and a documented life expectancy of at least 3 months. Patients were randomly assigned 1:1 to receive vandetanib plus gemcitabine (vandetanib group) or placebo plus gemcitabine (placebo group) according to pre-generated sequences produced on the principle of randomly permuted blocks with variable block sizes of two and four. Patients were stratified at randomisation by disease stage and ECOG performance status. All patients received gemcitabine 1000 mg/m FINDINGS: Patients were screened and enrolled between Oct 24, 2011, and Oct 7, 2013. Of 381 patients screened, 142 eligible patients were randomly assigned to treatment (72 to the vandetanib group and 70 to the placebo group). At database lock on July 15, 2015, at a median follow-up of 24·9 months (IQR 24·3 to not attainable), 131 patients had died: 70 (97%) of 72 in the vandetanib group and 61 (87%) of 70 in the placebo group. The median overall survival was 8·83 months (95% CI 7·11-11·58) in the vandetanib group and 8·95 months (6·55-11·74) in the placebo group (hazard ratio 1·21, 80·8% CI 0·95-1·53; log rank χ INTERPRETATION: The addition of vandetanib to gemcitabine monotherapy did not improve overall survival in advanced pancreatic cancer. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors might still have potential in the treatment of pancreatic cancer but further development requires the identification of biomarkers to specifically identify responsive cancer subtypes. FUNDING: Cancer Research UK and AstraZeneca.

2 Clinical Trial Gemcitabine and capecitabine with or without telomerase peptide vaccine GV1001 in patients with locally advanced or metastatic pancreatic cancer (TeloVac): an open-label, randomised, phase 3 trial. 2014

Middleton, Gary / Silcocks, Paul / Cox, Trevor / Valle, Juan / Wadsley, Jonathan / Propper, David / Coxon, Fareeda / Ross, Paul / Madhusudan, Srinivasan / Roques, Tom / Cunningham, David / Falk, Stephen / Wadd, Nick / Harrison, Mark / Corrie, Pippa / Iveson, Tim / Robinson, Angus / McAdam, Karen / Eatock, Martin / Evans, Jeff / Archer, Caroline / Hickish, Tamas / Garcia-Alonso, Angel / Nicolson, Marianne / Steward, William / Anthoney, Alan / Greenhalf, William / Shaw, Victoria / Costello, Eithne / Naisbitt, Dean / Rawcliffe, Charlotte / Nanson, Gemma / Neoptolemos, John. ·University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham, UK. · Liverpool Cancer Research UK Cancer Trials Unit and GCLP Facility, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK. · Manchester Academic Health Sciences Centre, Christie Hospital NHS Foundation Trust and University of Manchester, Manchester UK. · Weston Park Hospital, Sheffield Teaching Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Sheffield, UK. · St Bartholomew's Hospital, Barts Health NHS Trust, West Smithfield, London, UK. · Northern Centre for Cancer Care, The Newcastle upon Tyne Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Freeman Hospital, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK. · Guy's Hospital, Guy's and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK. · Nottingham City Hospital, Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust, Nottingham, UK. · Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital, Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Norwich, UK. · The Royal Marsden, The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK. · Bristol Haematology And Oncology Centre, University Hospital Bristol NHS Foundation Trust, Bristol, UK. · The James Cook University Hospital, South Tees Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Middleborough, UK. · Mount Vernon Hospital, The Hillingdon Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Northwood, UK. · Addenbrookes Hospital, Cambridge University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Cambridge, UK. · Southampton General Hospital, University Hospital Southampton NHS Foundation Trust, Southampton, Hampshire, UK. · Conquest Hospital, East Sussex Healthcare NHS Trust, The Ridge, St Leonards-on-Sea, East Sussex, UK. · Peterborough City Hospital, Peterborough and Stamford Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Edith, Cavell Campus, Peterborough, UK. · Belfast City Hospital, Belfast Health and Social Care Trust, Belfast, UK. · University of Glasgow, Beatson West of Scotland Cancer Centre, Glasgow, UK. · Queen Alexandra Hospital, Portsmouth Hospitals NHS Trust, Cosham, Portsmouth, UK. · Royal Bournemouth Hospital, The Royal Bournemouth and Christchurch Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Bournemouth, UK. · Glan Clwyd Hospital, University Health Board, Rhyl, Denbighshire, UK. · Abderdeen Royal Infirmary, NHS Grampian, Aberdeen, UK. · Leicester Royal Infirmary, University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust, Leicester, UK. · St James University Hospital, The Leeds Teaching Hospital Trust, Beckett Street, Leeds, UK. · Liverpool Cancer Research UK Cancer Trials Unit and GCLP Facility, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK. Electronic address: j.p.neoptolemos@liverpool.ac.uk. ·Lancet Oncol · Pubmed #24954781.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: We aimed to assess the efficacy and safety of sequential or simultaneous telomerase vaccination (GV1001) in combination with chemotherapy in patients with locally advanced or metastatic pancreatic cancer. METHODS: TeloVac was a three-group, open-label, randomised phase 3 trial. We recruited patients from 51 UK hospitals. Eligible patients were treatment naive, aged older than 18 years, with locally advanced or metastatic pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, and Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status of 0-2. Patients were randomly assigned (1:1:1) to receive either chemotherapy alone, chemotherapy with sequential GV1001 (sequential chemoimmunotherapy), or chemotherapy with concurrent GV1001 (concurrent chemoimmunotherapy). Treatments were allocated with equal probability by means of computer-generated random permuted blocks of sizes 3 and 6 in equal proportion. Chemotherapy included six cycles of gemcitabine (1000 mg/m(2), 30 min intravenous infusion, at days 1, 8, and 15) and capecitabine (830 mg/m(2) orally twice daily for 21 days, repeated every 28 days). Sequential chemoimmunotherapy included two cycles of combination chemotherapy, then an intradermal lower abdominal injection of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF; 75 μg) and GV1001 (0·56 mg; days 1, 3, and 5, once on weeks 2-4, and six monthly thereafter). Concurrent chemoimmunotherapy included giving GV1001 from the start of chemotherapy with GM-CSF as an adjuvant. The primary endpoint was overall survival; analysis was by intention to treat. This study is registered as an International Standard Randomised Controlled Trial, number ISRCTN4382138. FINDINGS: The first patient was randomly assigned to treatment on March 29, 2007, and the trial was terminated on March 27, 2011. Of 1572 patients screened, 1062 were randomly assigned to treatment (358 patients were allocated to the chemotherapy group, 350 to the sequential chemoimmunotherapy group, and 354 to the concurrent chemoimmunotherapy group). We recorded 772 deaths; the 290 patients still alive were followed up for a median of 6·0 months (IQR 2·4-12·2). Median overall survival was not significantly different in the chemotherapy group than in the sequential chemoimmunotherapy group (7·9 months [95% CI 7·1-8·8] vs 6·9 months [6·4-7·6]; hazard ratio [HR] 1·19, 98·25% CI 0·97-1·48, p=0·05), or in the concurrent chemoimmunotherapy group (8·4 months [95% CI 7·3-9·7], HR 1·05, 98·25% CI 0·85-1·29, p=0·64; overall log-rank of χ(2)2df=4·3; p=0·11). The commonest grade 3-4 toxic effects were neutropenia (68 [19%] patients in the chemotherapy group, 58 [17%] patients in the sequential chemoimmunotherapy group, and 79 [22%] patients in the concurrent chemoimmunotherapy group; fatigue (27 [8%] in the chemotherapy group, 35 [10%] in the sequential chemoimmunotherapy group, and 44 [12%] in the concurrent chemoimmunotherapy group); and pain (34 [9%] patients in the chemotherapy group, 39 [11%] in the sequential chemoimmunotherapy group, and 41 [12%] in the concurrent chemoimmunotherapy group). INTERPRETATION: Adding GV1001 vaccination to chemotherapy did not improve overall survival. New strategies to enhance the immune response effect of telomerase vaccination during chemotherapy are required for clinical efficacy. FUNDING: Cancer Research UK and KAEL-GemVax.

3 Clinical Trial A phase Ib/IIa trial to evaluate the CCK2 receptor antagonist Z-360 in combination with gemcitabine in patients with advanced pancreatic cancer. 2010

Meyer, T / Caplin, M E / Palmer, D H / Valle, J W / Larvin, M / Waters, J S / Coxon, F / Borbath, I / Peeters, M / Nagano, E / Kato, H. ·UCL, London, UK. t.meyer@ucl.ac.uk ·Eur J Cancer · Pubmed #20006921.

ABSTRACT: AIM: To evaluate the combination of the gastrin antagonist Z-360 and gemcitabine for advanced pancreatic cancer. METHODS: Previously untreated patients with PC were randomly allocated to Z-360 120 mg, 240 mg or placebo. Z-360/placebo was given on day -3 and gemcitabine 1000 mg/m(2) commenced on day 1 followed by Z-360 on day 2. Thereafter Z-360/placebo was given twice daily concurrently with standard dose of gemcitabine. Pharmacokinetics for both drugs was measured alone and in combination. Toxicity, response and quality of life were also recorded. RESULTS: Thirty-three patients with a median age of 62 years were randomised of which six had locally advanced disease and 26 had metastatic disease. Analysis of the area under the plasma concentration versus time curve (AUC), the maximum observed concentration (Cmax(obs)) and the time of the maximum observed concentration (Tmax(obs)) for Z-360, gemcitabine and 2,2-difluorodeoxyuridine (dFdU), could not exclude an effect on the systemic exposure to Z-360, gemcitabine and dFdU when co-administration of Z-360 and gemcitabine was compared with single agent administration. The most commonly reported adverse events were nausea, abdominal pain, vomiting and fatigue. At the end of the study, 62.5%, 25% and 60% had stable disease in the 120 mg, 240 mg and placebo group, respectively. A higher proportion of patients in Z-360 groups reported improvement in pain. CONCLUSIONS: Z-360 is safe and well tolerated when combined with gemcitabine. A Phase III trial is needed to determine whether the combination of Z-360 and gemcitabine is superior to gemcitabine alone in advanced PC.

4 Article Sulfatase-2: a prognostic biomarker and candidate therapeutic target in patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. 2016

Alhasan, Sari F / Haugk, Beate / Ogle, Laura F / Beale, Gary S / Long, Anna / Burt, Alastair D / Tiniakos, Dina / Televantou, Despina / Coxon, Fareeda / Newell, David R / Charnley, Richard / Reeves, Helen L. ·Northern Institute for Cancer Research, Paul O'Gorman Building, The Medical School, Framlington Place, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne NE2 4HH, UK. · Department of Cellular Pathology, Royal Victoria Infirmary, Newcastle upon Tyne Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Newcastle upon Tyne NE1 4LP, UK. · School of Medicine, Eleanor Harrald Building, Frome Road, The University of Adelaide, Adelaide, 5000 South Australia, Australia. · Institute of Cellular Medicine, The Medical School, Framlington Place, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne NE2 4HH, UK. · Hepatopancreatobiliary multidisciplinary team, Freeman Hospital, Newcastle-upon-Tyne Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Newcastle upon Tyne NE7 7DN, UK. ·Br J Cancer · Pubmed #27560551.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is the fifth most common cause of cancer death in the UK. Its poor prognosis is attributed to late detection and limited therapeutic options. Expression of SULF2, an endosulfatase that modulates heparan sulfate proteoglycan 6-O-sulfation and is reportedly tumourigenic in different types of cancer, was investigated. METHODS: SULF2 expression was determined immunohistochemically in archival surgical resection tissue sections from 93 patients with a confirmed histological diagnosis of PDAC between 2002 and 2008 followed for a median of 9 years. Relationships with clinico-pathological parameters and patient survival were explored. RESULTS: The majority of PDACs showed positive SULF2 staining in tumour cells and intratumoural or tumour-adjacent stroma. Greater than 25% SULF2-positive tumour cells was present in 60% of cancers and correlated with tumour stage (P=0.002) and perineural invasion (P=0.024). SULF2 intensity was scored moderate or strong in 81% of cancers and positively correlated with vascular invasion (P=0.015). High SULF2 expression, defined as >50% SULF2-positive tumour cells and strong SULF2 staining, was associated with shorter time to radiological progression (P=0.018, HR 1.98, CI 1.13-3.47). Similarly, by multivariate analysis, high SULF2 expression was independently associated with poorer survival (P=0.004, HR 2.10, CI 1.26-3.54), with a median survival of 11 months vs 21 months for lower PDAC SULF2. CONCLUSIONS: Elevated SULF2 in PDAC was associated with advanced tumour stage, vascular invasion, shorter interval to radiological progression and shorter overall survival. SULF2 may have roles as a prognostic biomarker and as a therapeutic target for patients with PDAC.