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Pancreatic Neoplasms: HELP
Articles by Vincenzo Corbo
Based on 23 articles published since 2009
(Why 23 articles?)
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Between 2009 and 2019, V. Corbo wrote the following 23 articles about Pancreatic Neoplasms.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Review Preclinical Modelling of PDA: Is Organoid the New Black? 2019

D'Agosto, Sabrina / Andreani, Silvia / Scarpa, Aldo / Corbo, Vincenzo. ·ARC-Net Research Centre, University of Verona, 37134 Verona, Italy. sabrinaluigia.dagosto@univr.it. · ARC-Net Research Centre, University of Verona, 37134 Verona, Italy. silvia.andreani@univr.it. · ARC-Net Research Centre, University of Verona, 37134 Verona, Italy. aldo.scarpa@univr.it. · Department of Diagnostics and Public Health, University of Verona, 37134 Verona, Italy. aldo.scarpa@univr.it. · ARC-Net Research Centre, University of Verona, 37134 Verona, Italy. vincenzo.corbo@univr.it. · Department of Diagnostics and Public Health, University of Verona, 37134 Verona, Italy. vincenzo.corbo@univr.it. ·Int J Mol Sci · Pubmed #31195689.

ABSTRACT: Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) is a malignancy of the exocrine pancreas with the worst prognosis among all solid tumours, and soon to become the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths. A more comprehensive understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying this disease is crucial to the development of diagnostic tools as well as to the identification of more effective therapies. High-frequency mutations in PDA occur in "undruggable" genes, and molecular subtyping based on bulk transcriptome analysis does not yet nominate valid therapeutic intervention strategies. Genome-wide sequencing studies have also demonstrated a considerable intra- and inter-patient's genetic heterogeneity, which further complicate this dire scenario. More than in other malignancies, functionalization of the PDA genome and preclinical modelling at the individual patient level appear necessary to substantially improve survival rates for pancreatic cancer patients. Traditional human PDA models, including monolayer cell cultures and patient-derived xenografts, have certainly led to valuable biological insights in the past years. However, those model systems suffer from several limitations that have contributed to the lack of concordance between preclinical and clinical studies for PDA. Pancreatic ductal organoids have recently emerged as a reliable culture system to establish models from both normal and neoplastic pancreatic tissues. Pancreatic organoid cultures can be efficiently generated from small tissue biopsies, which opens up the possibility of longitudinal studies in individual patients. A proof-of-concept study has demonstrated that patient-derived PDA organoids are able to predict responses to conventional chemotherapy. The use of this three-dimensional culture system has already improved our understanding of PDA biology and promises to implement precision oncology by enabling the alignment of preclinical and clinical platforms to guide therapeutic intervention in PDA.

2 Review Clinical application of microRNA testing in neuroendocrine tumors of the gastrointestinal tract. 2014

Vicentini, Caterina / Fassan, Matteo / D'Angelo, Edoardo / Corbo, Vincenzo / Silvestris, Nicola / Nuovo, Gerard J / Scarpa, Aldo. ·ARC-Net Research Centre, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona 37134, Italy. · ARC-Net Research Centre, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona 37134, Italy. matteo.fassan@gmail.com. · Medical Oncology Unit, National Cancer Institute "Giovanni Paolo II", Bari 70124, Italy. · Comprehensive Cancer Centre, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210, USA. ·Molecules · Pubmed #24566314.

ABSTRACT: It is well documented that dysregulation of microRNAs is a hallmark of human cancers. Thus, this family of small non-coding regulatory molecules represents an excellent source of sensitive biomarkers. Unique microRNAs expression profiles have been associated with different types and subsets of gastrointestinal tumors including gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (GEP-NETs). GEP-NETs are a heterogeneous group of epithelial neoplasms with neuroendocrine differentiation. At present, early detection and surgical resection of GEP-NETs represent the best chance for a cure. Thus, clinically useful biomarkers for GEP-NETs that strongly correlate with early detection are urgently needed. The purpose of this review is to summarize the role of miRNAs in GEP-NET carcinogenesis and their possible use as novel diagnostic, prognostic and predictive biomarkers.

3 Review Molecular pathology of pancreatic cancer: from bench-to-bedside translation. 2012

Corbo, Vincenzo / Tortora, Giampaolo / Scarpa, Aldo. ·ARC-NET Research Centre, University Hospital of Verona, Verona, Italy. ·Curr Drug Targets · Pubmed #22458520.

ABSTRACT: Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (referred here as pancreatic cancer) is a lethal disease with the worst prognosis among all solid tumors. Surgical resection represents the only hope for cure but it is possible only in patients that present with local disease (about 20% of cases). Whether dismal prognosis of pancreatic cancer is a result of late diagnosis or early dissemination to distant organ is still a debate. Moreover, this disease shows an intrinsic chemotherapeutic resistance that has been mainly ascribed to the presence of a dense stromal reaction that significantly impairs drugs delivery. Clinical management of pancreatic cancer patients relies on few molecular markers (e.g., the diagnostic marker CA19-9) that, however, present several limitations to their use. The clinical usefulness of somatic alterations in well-characterized genes (such as KRAS and TP53), whose detection is technically feasible in different biological samples, has been extensively investigated leading to inconsistent results. Furthermore, none of the candidate molecular markers identified in recent years has shown an appropriate clinical performance and therefore none is routinely used. This depicts a scenario where the identification of novel and effective clinical biomarkers is mandatory. Very recent genome-wide comprehensive studies have shed light on the high degree of genetic complexity and heterogeneity of the pancreatic cancers. Although far from being introduced into the clinical settings, results from those studies are expected to change definitively the perspective through which we look at the clinical management of pancreatic cancer patients towards a personalized cancer medicine.

4 Article Perineural Invasion is a Strong Prognostic Moderator in Ampulla of Vater Carcinoma: A Meta-analysis. 2019

Luchini, Claudio / Veronese, Nicola / Nottegar, Alessia / Riva, Giulio / Pilati, Camilla / Mafficini, Andrea / Stubbs, Brendon / Simbolo, Michele / Mombello, Aldo / Corbo, Vincenzo / Cheng, Liang / Yachida, Shinichi / Wood, Laura D / Lawlor, Rita T / Salvia, Roberto / Scarpa, Aldo. ·National Institute of Gastroenterology-Research Hospital, IRCCS "S. de Bellis," Castellana Grotte, Bari. · Department of Surgery, Section of Pathology, San Bortolo Hospital, Vicenza, Italy. · Personalized Medicine, Pharmacogenomics, Therapeutic Optimization, Paris-Descartes University, Paris, France. · ARC-Net Research Center, University of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Health Service and Population Research Department, King's College London, London, United Kingdom. · Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN. · Division of Cancer Genomics, National Cancer Center Research Institute, Tokyo, Japan. · Department of General and Pancreatic Surgery, The Pancreas Institute, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona, Italy. ·Pancreas · Pubmed #30451797.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: Ampulla of Vater carcinoma (AVC) has a broad spectrum of different prognoses. As such, new moderators of survival are urgently needed. We aimed at clarifying the prognostic role of perineural invasion in AVC. METHODS: Using PubMed and SCOPUS databases, we conducted the first systematic review and meta-analysis on this topic. RESULTS: Analyzing 29 articles for a total of 2379 patients, we found that the presence of perineural invasion increased the risk of all-cause mortality more than 2 times (relative risk [RR], 2.07; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.78-2.42 [P < 0.0001]; hazard ratio [HR], 2.72; 95% CI, 1.86-3.97 [P < 0.0001]), of cancer-specific mortality more than 6 times (RR, 6.12; 95% CI, 3.25-11.54 [P < 0.0001]; HR, 6.59; 95% CI, 2.29-3.49 [P < 0.0001]), and of recurrence more than 2 times (RR, 2.63; 95% CI, 1.89-3.67 [P < 0.0001]; HR, 2.54; 95% CI, 1.24-5.21 [P = 0.01]). CONCLUSIONS: Perineural invasion is strongly associated with a poorer prognosis in AVC, influencing both survival and risk of recurrence. It should be reported in the final pathology report and should be taken into account by future oncologic staging systems, identifying a group of AVC with a more malignant biological behavior.

5 Article Molecular alterations associated with metastases of solid pseudopapillary neoplasms of the pancreas. 2019

Amato, Eliana / Mafficini, Andrea / Hirabayashi, Kenichi / Lawlor, Rita T / Fassan, Matteo / Vicentini, Caterina / Barbi, Stefano / Delfino, Pietro / Sikora, Katarzyna / Rusev, Borislav / Simbolo, Michele / Esposito, Irene / Antonello, Davide / Pea, Antonio / Sereni, Elisabetta / Ballotta, Maria / Maggino, Laura / Marchegiani, Giovanni / Ohike, Nobuyuki / Wood, Laura D / Salvia, Roberto / Klöppel, Günter / Zamboni, Giuseppe / Scarpa, Aldo / Corbo, Vincenzo. ·ARC-Net Research Centre, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Department of Diagnostics and Public Health, Section of Pathology, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Department of Pathology, Tokai University School of Medicine, Isehara, Japan. · Institute of Pathology, Heinrich-Heine-University and University Hospital of Düsseldorf, Düsseldorf, Germany. · Department of Surgery, General Surgery B, University of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Section of Anatomic Pathology, Azienda Ospedaliera Rovigo, Rovigo, Italy. · Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Showa University Fujigaoka Hospital, Yokohama, Japan. · Department of Pathology, The Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA. · Department of Pathology, Technical University Munich, Munich, Germany. · Division of Pathology, Sacro Cuore-Don Calabria Hospital, Negrar, Italy. ·J Pathol · Pubmed #30306561.

ABSTRACT: Solid pseudopapillary neoplasms (SPN) of the pancreas are rare, low-grade malignant neoplasms that metastasise to the liver or peritoneum in 10-15% of cases. They almost invariably present somatic activating mutations of CTNNB1. No comprehensive molecular characterisation of metastatic disease has been conducted to date. We performed whole-exome sequencing and copy-number variation (CNV) analysis of 10 primary SPN and comparative sequencing of five matched primary/metastatic tumour specimens by high-coverage targeted sequencing of 409 genes. In addition to CTNNB1-activating mutations, we found inactivating mutations of epigenetic regulators (KDM6A, TET1, BAP1) associated with metastatic disease. Most of these alterations were shared between primary and metastatic lesions, suggesting that they occurred before dissemination. Differently from mutations, the majority of CNVs were not shared among lesions from the same patients and affected genes involved in metabolic and pro-proliferative pathways. Immunostaining of 27 SPNs showed that loss or reduction of KDM6A and BAP1 expression was significantly enriched in metastatic SPNs. Consistent with an increased transcriptional response to hypoxia in pancreatic adenocarcinomas bearing KDM6A inactivation, we showed that mutation or reduced KDM6A expression in SPNs is associated with increased expression of the HIF1α-regulated protein GLUT1 at both primary and metastatic sites. Our results suggest that BAP1 and KDM6A function is a barrier to the development of metastasis in a subset of SPNs, which might open novel avenues for the treatment of this disease. © 2018 The Authors. The Journal of Pathology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland.

6 Article PD-1, PD-L1, and CD163 in pancreatic undifferentiated carcinoma with osteoclast-like giant cells: expression patterns and clinical implications. 2018

Luchini, Claudio / Cros, Jerome / Pea, Antonio / Pilati, Camilla / Veronese, Nicola / Rusev, Borislav / Capelli, Paola / Mafficini, Andrea / Nottegar, Alessia / Brosens, Lodewijk A A / Noë, Michaël / Offerhaus, G Johan A / Chianchiano, Peter / Riva, Giulio / Piccoli, Paola / Parolini, Claudia / Malleo, Giuseppe / Lawlor, Rita T / Corbo, Vincenzo / Sperandio, Nicola / Barbareschi, Mattia / Fassan, Matteo / Cheng, Liang / Wood, Laura D / Scarpa, Aldo. ·Department of Diagnostics and Public Health, Section of Pathology, University of Verona, 37134 Verona, Italy. · Department of Pathology, Beaujon Hospital, 92110 Clichy, France; Paris-Diderot School of Medicine, Inflammation Research Center, 75013 Paris, France. · Department of Surgery, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, 37134 Verona, Italy. · Personalized Medicine, Pharmacogenomics, Therapeutic Optimization, Paris-Descartes University, 75006 Paris, France. · National Institute of Gastroenterology-Research Hospital, IRCCS "S. de Bellis," 70013, Castellana Grotte, Bari, Italy. · ARC-Net Research Center, University of Verona, 37134 Verona, Italy. · Department of Surgery, Section of Pathology, San Bortolo Hospital, 36100 Vicenza, Italy. · Department of Pathology, University Medical Center Utrecht, 3508 Utrecht, The Netherlands; Department of Pathology, Radboud University Medical Center, 6500, HB, Nijmegen, The Netherlands. · Department of Pathology, Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21211, USA. · Department of Pathology, University Medical Center Utrecht, 3508 Utrecht, The Netherlands. · Surgical Pathology Unit, Santa Chiara Hospital, 38122 Trento, Italy. · Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN 46202, USA. · Department of Pathology, Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21211, USA; Department of Oncology, Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21211, USA. Electronic address: ldwood@jhmi.edu. · Department of Diagnostics and Public Health, Section of Pathology, University of Verona, 37134 Verona, Italy; ARC-Net Research Center, University of Verona, 37134 Verona, Italy. Electronic address: aldo.scarpa@univr.it. ·Hum Pathol · Pubmed #30031096.

ABSTRACT: Undifferentiated carcinoma with osteoclast-like giant cells (UCOGC), a variant of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), has a striking genetic similarity to PDAC but a significantly improved overall survival. We hypothesize that this difference could be due to the immune response to the tumor, and as such, we investigated the expression of PD-1, PD-L1, and CD163 in a series of UCOGC. To this aim, 27 pancreatic UCOGCs (11 pure and 16 PDAC-associated), 5 extrapancreatic tumors with osteoclast-like giant cells and 10 pancreatic anaplastic carcinomas were immunostained using antibodies against PD-1, PD-L1, and CD163. In pancreatic UCOGCs, PD-L1 was expressed in neoplastic cells of 17 (63%) of 27 cases, more often in cases with an associated PDAC (P = .04). Expression of PD-L1 was associated with poor prognosis, confirmed by multivariate analysis: patients with PD-L1-positive UCOGCs had a risk of all-cause mortality that was 3 times higher than did patients with PD-L1-negative UCOGCs (hazard ratio, 3.397; 95% confidence interval, 1.023-18.375; P = .034). PD-L1 expression on tumor cells was also associated with aberrant P53 expression (P = .035). PD-1 was expressed on rare lymphocytes in 12 UCOGCs (44.4%), mainly located at the tumor periphery. CD163 was expressed on histiocytes, with a diffuse and strong staining pattern in all UCOGCs. Extrapancreatic tumors with osteoclast-like giant cells showed very similar staining patterns for the same proteins. Anaplastic carcinomas have some similarities to UCOGCs, but PD-L1 has no prognostic roles. Our results may have important implications for immunotherapeutic strategies in UCOGCs; these tumors may also represent a model for future therapeutic approaches against PDAC.

7 Article Lack of Association for Reported Endocrine Pancreatic Cancer Risk Loci in the PANDoRA Consortium. 2017

Campa, Daniele / Obazee, Ofure / Pastore, Manuela / Panzuto, Francesco / Liço, Valbona / Greenhalf, William / Katzke, Verena / Tavano, Francesca / Costello, Eithne / Corbo, Vincenzo / Talar-Wojnarowska, Renata / Strobel, Oliver / Zambon, Carlo Federico / Neoptolemos, John P / Zerboni, Giulia / Kaaks, Rudolf / Key, Timothy J / Lombardo, Carlo / Jamroziak, Krzysztof / Gioffreda, Domenica / Hackert, Thilo / Khaw, Kay-Tee / Landi, Stefano / Milanetto, Anna Caterina / Landoni, Luca / Lawlor, Rita T / Bambi, Franco / Pirozzi, Felice / Basso, Daniela / Pasquali, Claudio / Capurso, Gabriele / Canzian, Federico. ·Department of Biology, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. · Genomic Epidemiology Group, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Digestive and Liver Disease Unit, S. Andrea Hospital, "Sapienza" University of Rome, Rome, Italy. · Pancreatic and Digestive Endocrine Surgery, Department of Surgery, Oncology and Gastroenterology -DiSCOG, University of Padova, Padua, Italy. · Institute of Translational Medicine, Cancer Research UK Liverpool Cancer Trials Unit, Liverpool, United Kingdom. · Division of Cancer Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Division of Gastroenterology and Research Laboratory, Department of Surgery, IRCCS Scientific Institute and Regional General Hospital "Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza", San Giovanni Rotondo, Italy. · ARC-NET: Centre for Applied Research on Cancer, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Department of Digestive Tract Diseases, Medical University of Lodz, Lodz, Poland. · Department of General, Visceral and Transplantation Surgery, University Hospital Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany. · Department of Medicine - DIMED, University of Padova, Padua, Italy. · Cancer Epidemiology Unit, Nuffield Department of Population Health, University of Oxford, United Kingdom. · Division of General and Transplant Surgery, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. · Dipartimento di Ricerca Traslazionale e delle Nuove Tecnologie in Medicina e Chirurgia, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. · Department of Hematology, Institute of Hematology and Transfusion Medicine, Warsaw, Poland. · University of Cambridge School of Clinical Medicine, Cambridge, United Kingdom. · The Pancreas Institute, Department of Surgery, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Blood Transfusion Service, Azienda Ospedaliero Universitaria Meyer, Florence, Italy. · Department of Laboratory Medicine, University-Hospital of Padova, Padua, Italy. · Genomic Epidemiology Group, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. f.canzian@dkfz.de. ·Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev · Pubmed #28765340.

ABSTRACT:

8 Article Fhit down-regulation is an early event in pancreatic carcinogenesis. 2017

Fassan, Matteo / Rusev, Borislav / Corbo, Vincenzo / Gasparini, Pierluigi / Luchini, Claudio / Vicentini, Caterina / Mafficini, Andrea / Paiella, Salvatore / Salvia, Roberto / Cataldo, Ivana / Scarpa, Aldo / Huebner, Kay. ·ARC-NET Research Centre, Department of Diagnostics and Public Health, University of Verona, Verona, Italy. matteo.fassan@unipd.it. · Department of Medicine (DIMED), Surgical Pathology Unit, University of Padua, Via Gabelli 61, 35121, Padua, Italy. matteo.fassan@unipd.it. · ARC-NET Research Centre, Department of Diagnostics and Public Health, University of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Comprehensive Cancer Center, Department of Cancer Biology and Genetics, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USA. · Department of Diagnostics and Public Health, Surgical Pathology Unit, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Department of Pathology, Santa Chiara Hospital, Trento, Italy. · Department of Surgery, Unit of General Surgery B, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona, Italy. ·Virchows Arch · Pubmed #28289900.

ABSTRACT: Aberrant Fhit expression characterizes a large proportion of primary pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas (PDACs), but fragmentary information is available on Fhit expression during the phenotypic changes of pancreatic ductal epithelium during multistep transformation. We assessed Fhit expression by immunohistochemistry in two different multistep pancreatic carcinogenic processes: pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN) and intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasia (IPMN). We considered 105 surgically treated PDACs/IPMNs and selected 30 samples of non-neoplastic pancreatic parenchyma, 50 PanIN lesions, 30 IPMNs, 15 IPMNs with associated invasive carcinoma, and 60 adenocarcinomas. Normal pancreatic ducts and surrounding acinar cells consistently showed moderate to strong Fhit immunoreactivity. Significant down-regulation of Fhit expression was observed in association with increasing severity of dysplastia/neoplastia in both carcinogenic processes. This was further confirmed by studying multiple lesions obtained from the same surgical specimen. Of 60 PDACs, only 14 showed Fhit expression comparable to normal pancreatic ductal epithelium, while the remainder (77%) showed clearly negative or reduced Fhit expression. This study demonstrates that Fhit down-regulation is an early event in both multistep carcinogenic processes leading to PDAC.

9 Article Distinct populations of inflammatory fibroblasts and myofibroblasts in pancreatic cancer. 2017

Öhlund, Daniel / Handly-Santana, Abram / Biffi, Giulia / Elyada, Ela / Almeida, Ana S / Ponz-Sarvise, Mariano / Corbo, Vincenzo / Oni, Tobiloba E / Hearn, Stephen A / Lee, Eun Jung / Chio, Iok In Christine / Hwang, Chang-Il / Tiriac, Hervé / Baker, Lindsey A / Engle, Dannielle D / Feig, Christine / Kultti, Anne / Egeblad, Mikala / Fearon, Douglas T / Crawford, James M / Clevers, Hans / Park, Youngkyu / Tuveson, David A. ·Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, Cold Spring Harbor, NY 11724. · Lustgarten Foundation Pancreatic Cancer Research Laboratory, Cold Spring Harbor, NY 11724. · Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery, Umeå University, 901 85 Umeå, Sweden. · APC Microbiome Institute and School of Microbiology, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. · Department of Oncology, Clinica Universidad de Navarra, CIMA, IDISNA, Pamplona 31008, Spain. · ARC-Net centre for applied research on cancer, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, 37134 Verona, Italy. · Department of Diagnostic and Public Health, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, 37134 Verona, Italy. · Graduate Program in Molecular and Cellular Biology, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794. · University of Cambridge, Cancer Research UK, Cambridge Institute, Cambridge, UK. · Hofstra Northwell School of Medicine, Hempstead, NY 11550. · Hubrecht Institute, Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences (KNAW), University Medical Centre Utrecht and CancerGenomics.nl, 3584 CT Utrecht, Netherlands. ·J Exp Med · Pubmed #28232471.

ABSTRACT: Pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) differentiate into cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) that produce desmoplastic stroma, thereby modulating disease progression and therapeutic response in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA). However, it is unknown whether CAFs uniformly carry out these tasks or if subtypes of CAFs with distinct phenotypes in PDA exist. We identified a CAF subpopulation with elevated expression of α-smooth muscle actin (αSMA) located immediately adjacent to neoplastic cells in mouse and human PDA tissue. We recapitulated this finding in co-cultures of murine PSCs and PDA organoids, and demonstrated that organoid-activated CAFs produced desmoplastic stroma. The co-cultures showed cooperative interactions and revealed another distinct subpopulation of CAFs, located more distantly from neoplastic cells, which lacked elevated αSMA expression and instead secreted IL6 and additional inflammatory mediators. These findings were corroborated in mouse and human PDA tissue, providing direct evidence for CAF heterogeneity in PDA tumor biology with implications for disease etiology and therapeutic development.

10 Article Whole-genome landscape of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumours. 2017

Scarpa, Aldo / Chang, David K / Nones, Katia / Corbo, Vincenzo / Patch, Ann-Marie / Bailey, Peter / Lawlor, Rita T / Johns, Amber L / Miller, David K / Mafficini, Andrea / Rusev, Borislav / Scardoni, Maria / Antonello, Davide / Barbi, Stefano / Sikora, Katarzyna O / Cingarlini, Sara / Vicentini, Caterina / McKay, Skye / Quinn, Michael C J / Bruxner, Timothy J C / Christ, Angelika N / Harliwong, Ivon / Idrisoglu, Senel / McLean, Suzanne / Nourse, Craig / Nourbakhsh, Ehsan / Wilson, Peter J / Anderson, Matthew J / Fink, J Lynn / Newell, Felicity / Waddell, Nick / Holmes, Oliver / Kazakoff, Stephen H / Leonard, Conrad / Wood, Scott / Xu, Qinying / Nagaraj, Shivashankar Hiriyur / Amato, Eliana / Dalai, Irene / Bersani, Samantha / Cataldo, Ivana / Dei Tos, Angelo P / Capelli, Paola / Davì, Maria Vittoria / Landoni, Luca / Malpaga, Anna / Miotto, Marco / Whitehall, Vicki L J / Leggett, Barbara A / Harris, Janelle L / Harris, Jonathan / Jones, Marc D / Humphris, Jeremy / Chantrill, Lorraine A / Chin, Venessa / Nagrial, Adnan M / Pajic, Marina / Scarlett, Christopher J / Pinho, Andreia / Rooman, Ilse / Toon, Christopher / Wu, Jianmin / Pinese, Mark / Cowley, Mark / Barbour, Andrew / Mawson, Amanda / Humphrey, Emily S / Colvin, Emily K / Chou, Angela / Lovell, Jessica A / Jamieson, Nigel B / Duthie, Fraser / Gingras, Marie-Claude / Fisher, William E / Dagg, Rebecca A / Lau, Loretta M S / Lee, Michael / Pickett, Hilda A / Reddel, Roger R / Samra, Jaswinder S / Kench, James G / Merrett, Neil D / Epari, Krishna / Nguyen, Nam Q / Zeps, Nikolajs / Falconi, Massimo / Simbolo, Michele / Butturini, Giovanni / Van Buren, George / Partelli, Stefano / Fassan, Matteo / Anonymous7980896 / Khanna, Kum Kum / Gill, Anthony J / Wheeler, David A / Gibbs, Richard A / Musgrove, Elizabeth A / Bassi, Claudio / Tortora, Giampaolo / Pederzoli, Paolo / Pearson, John V / Waddell, Nicola / Biankin, Andrew V / Grimmond, Sean M. ·ARC-Net Centre for Applied Research on Cancer, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona 37134, Italy. · Department of Pathology and Diagnostics, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona 37134, Italy. · Wolfson Wohl Cancer Research Centre, Institute of Cancer Sciences, University of Glasgow, Garscube Estate, Switchback Road, Bearsden, Glasgow G61 1QH, UK. · West of Scotland Pancreatic Unit, Glasgow Royal Infirmary, Glasgow G31 2ER, UK. · The Kinghorn Cancer Centre, Cancer Division, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, University of New South Wales, 384 Victoria St, Darlinghurst, Sydney, New South Wales 2010, Australia. · Department of Surgery, Bankstown Hospital, Eldridge Road, Bankstown, Sydney, New South Wales 2200, Australia. · South Western Sydney Clinical School, Faculty of Medicine, University of New South Wales, Liverpool, New South Wales 2170, Australia. · QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Herston Road, Brisbane 4006, Australia. · Queensland Centre for Medical Genomics, Institute for Molecular Bioscience, The University of Queensland, St Lucia, Brisbane, Queensland 4072, Australia. · Department of Surgery, Pancreas Institute, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona 37134, Italy. · Medical Oncology, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Department of Pathology, General Hospital of Treviso, Department of Medicine, University of Padua, Italy. · Department of Medicine, Section of Endocrinology, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona, Italy. · The University of Queensland, School of Medicine, Brisbane 4006, Australia. · Pathology Queensland, Brisbane 4006, Australia. · Royal Brisbane and Women's Hospital, Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Brisbane 4006, Australia. · Institute of Health Biomedical Innovation, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Australia. · School of Environmental &Life Sciences, University of Newcastle, Ourimbah, New South Wales 2258, Australia. · Key Laboratory of Carcinogenesis and Translational Research (Ministry of Education/Beijing), Centre for Cancer Bioinformatics, Peking University Cancer Hospital &Institute, Beijing 100142, China. · Department of Surgery, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Ipswich Rd, Woollongabba, Queensland 4102, Australia. · Department of Anatomical Pathology. St Vincent's Hospital, Sydney, New South Wales 2010, Australia. · Academic Unit of Surgery, School of Medicine, College of Medical, Veterinary and Life Sciences, University of Glasgow, Glasgow Royal Infirmary, Glasgow G4 OSF, UK. · Department of Pathology, Queen Elizabeth University Hospital, Greater Glasgow &Clyde NHS, Glasgow G51 4TF, UK. · Department of Molecular and Human Genetics, Human Genome Sequencing Center, Baylor College of Medicine, One Baylor Plaza, MS226, Houston, Texas 77030-3411, USA. · Michael E. DeBakey Department of Surgery and The Elkins Pancreas Center, Baylor College of Medicine, One Baylor Plaza, Houston, Texas 77030-3411, USA. · Children's Hospital at Westmead, Westmead, New South Wales 2145, Australia. · Children's Medical Research Institute, The University of Sydney, Westmead, New South Wales 2145, Australia. · Department of Surgery, Royal North Shore Hospital, St Leonards, Sydney, New South Wales 2065, Australia. · University of Sydney. Sydney, New South Wales 2006, Australia. · Tissue Pathology and Diagnostic Oncology, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Camperdown, New South Wales 2050, Australia. · School of Medicine, Western Sydney University, Penrith, New South Wales 2175, Australia. · Department of Surgery, Fremantle Hospital, Alma Street, Fremantle, Western Australia 6160, Australia. · Department of Gastroenterology, Royal Adelaide Hospital, North Terrace, Adelaide, South Australia 5000, Australia. · School of Surgery M507, University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Highway, Nedlands, Western Australia 6009, Australia. · St John of God Pathology, 12 Salvado Rd, Subiaco, Western Australia 6008, Australia. · Bendat Family Comprehensive Cancer Centre, St John of God Subiaco Hospital, Subiaco, Western Australia 6008, Australia. · University of Melbourne Centre for Cancer Research, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, 3010, Victoria, Australia. ·Nature · Pubmed #28199314.

ABSTRACT: The diagnosis of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumours (PanNETs) is increasing owing to more sensitive detection methods, and this increase is creating challenges for clinical management. We performed whole-genome sequencing of 102 primary PanNETs and defined the genomic events that characterize their pathogenesis. Here we describe the mutational signatures they harbour, including a deficiency in G:C > T:A base excision repair due to inactivation of MUTYH, which encodes a DNA glycosylase. Clinically sporadic PanNETs contain a larger-than-expected proportion of germline mutations, including previously unreported mutations in the DNA repair genes MUTYH, CHEK2 and BRCA2. Together with mutations in MEN1 and VHL, these mutations occur in 17% of patients. Somatic mutations, including point mutations and gene fusions, were commonly found in genes involved in four main pathways: chromatin remodelling, DNA damage repair, activation of mTOR signalling (including previously undescribed EWSR1 gene fusions), and telomere maintenance. In addition, our gene expression analyses identified a subgroup of tumours associated with hypoxia and HIF signalling.

11 Article Hypermutation In Pancreatic Cancer. 2017

Humphris, Jeremy L / Patch, Ann-Marie / Nones, Katia / Bailey, Peter J / Johns, Amber L / McKay, Skye / Chang, David K / Miller, David K / Pajic, Marina / Kassahn, Karin S / Quinn, Michael C J / Bruxner, Timothy J C / Christ, Angelika N / Harliwong, Ivon / Idrisoglu, Senel / Manning, Suzanne / Nourse, Craig / Nourbakhsh, Ehsan / Stone, Andrew / Wilson, Peter J / Anderson, Matthew / Fink, J Lynn / Holmes, Oliver / Kazakoff, Stephen / Leonard, Conrad / Newell, Felicity / Waddell, Nick / Wood, Scott / Mead, Ronald S / Xu, Qinying / Wu, Jianmin / Pinese, Mark / Cowley, Mark J / Jones, Marc D / Nagrial, Adnan M / Chin, Venessa T / Chantrill, Lorraine A / Mawson, Amanda / Chou, Angela / Scarlett, Christopher J / Pinho, Andreia V / Rooman, Ilse / Giry-Laterriere, Marc / Samra, Jaswinder S / Kench, James G / Merrett, Neil D / Toon, Christopher W / Epari, Krishna / Nguyen, Nam Q / Barbour, Andrew / Zeps, Nikolajs / Jamieson, Nigel B / McKay, Colin J / Carter, C Ross / Dickson, Euan J / Graham, Janet S / Duthie, Fraser / Oien, Karin / Hair, Jane / Morton, Jennifer P / Sansom, Owen J / Grützmann, Robert / Hruban, Ralph H / Maitra, Anirban / Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine A / Schulick, Richard D / Wolfgang, Christopher L / Morgan, Richard A / Lawlor, Rita T / Rusev, Borislav / Corbo, Vincenzo / Salvia, Roberto / Cataldo, Ivana / Tortora, Giampaolo / Tempero, Margaret A / Anonymous5740887 / Hofmann, Oliver / Eshleman, James R / Pilarsky, Christian / Scarpa, Aldo / Musgrove, Elizabeth A / Gill, Anthony J / Pearson, John V / Grimmond, Sean M / Waddell, Nicola / Biankin, Andrew V. ·The Kinghorn Cancer Centre, Darlinghurst, and the Cancer Research Program, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, Darlinghurst, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. · QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia; Queensland Centre for Medical Genomics, Institute for Molecular Bioscience, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. · Queensland Centre for Medical Genomics, Institute for Molecular Bioscience, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia; Wolfson Wohl Cancer Research Centre, Institute of Cancer Sciences, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, Scotland, United Kingdom. · Wolfson Wohl Cancer Research Centre, Institute of Cancer Sciences, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, Scotland, United Kingdom; Department of Surgery, Bankstown Hospital, Bankstown, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia; South Western Sydney Clinical School, Faculty of Medicine, University of New South Wales Australia, Liverpool, New South Wales, Australia; West of Scotland Pancreatic Unit, Glasgow Royal Infirmary, Glasgow, United Kingdom. · The Kinghorn Cancer Centre, Darlinghurst, and the Cancer Research Program, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, Darlinghurst, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia; Queensland Centre for Medical Genomics, Institute for Molecular Bioscience, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. · The Kinghorn Cancer Centre, Darlinghurst, and the Cancer Research Program, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, Darlinghurst, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia; St Vincent's Clinical School, Faculty of Medicine, University of New South Wales Australia, Darlinghurst, New South Wales, Australia. · Queensland Centre for Medical Genomics, Institute for Molecular Bioscience, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia; Genetic and Molecular Pathology, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia; School of Biological Sciences, The University of Adelaide, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia. · Queensland Centre for Medical Genomics, Institute for Molecular Bioscience, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. · Queensland Centre for Medical Genomics, Institute for Molecular Bioscience, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia; St Vincent's Clinical School, Faculty of Medicine, University of New South Wales Australia, Darlinghurst, New South Wales, Australia. · The Kinghorn Cancer Centre, Darlinghurst, and the Cancer Research Program, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, Darlinghurst, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia; South Eastern Area Laboratory Services Pathology, Prince of Wales Hospital, Randwick, New South Wales, Australia; Sonic Genetics, Douglass Hanly Moir Pathology, New South Wales, Australia. · The Kinghorn Cancer Centre, Darlinghurst, and the Cancer Research Program, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, Darlinghurst, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia; Wolfson Wohl Cancer Research Centre, Institute of Cancer Sciences, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, Scotland, United Kingdom. · The Kinghorn Cancer Centre, Darlinghurst, and the Cancer Research Program, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, Darlinghurst, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia; Macarthur Cancer Therapy Centre, Campbelltown Hospital, New South Wales, Australia. · The Kinghorn Cancer Centre, Darlinghurst, and the Cancer Research Program, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, Darlinghurst, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia; Department of Anatomical Pathology, SydPath, St Vincent's Hospital, New South Wales, Australia. · The Kinghorn Cancer Centre, Darlinghurst, and the Cancer Research Program, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, Darlinghurst, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia; School of Environmental and Life Sciences, University of Newcastle, Ourimbah, New South Wales, Australia. · Department of Surgery, Royal North Shore Hospital, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia; University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. · The Kinghorn Cancer Centre, Darlinghurst, and the Cancer Research Program, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, Darlinghurst, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia; University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia; Tissue Pathology and Diagnostic Oncology, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Camperdown, New South Wales, Australia. · Department of Surgery, Bankstown Hospital, Bankstown, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia; School of Medicine, Western Sydney University, Penrith, New South Wales, Australia. · Department of Surgery, Fiona Stanley Hospital, Murdoch, Washington. · Department of Gastroenterology, Royal Adelaide Hospital, North Terrace, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia. · Department of Surgery, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Woollongabba, Queensland, Australia. · School of Surgery, University of Western Australia, Australia and St John of God Pathology, Subiaco, Washington. · Wolfson Wohl Cancer Research Centre, Institute of Cancer Sciences, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, Scotland, United Kingdom; West of Scotland Pancreatic Unit, Glasgow Royal Infirmary, Glasgow, United Kingdom; Academic Unit of Surgery, School of Medicine, College of Medical, Veterinary and Life Sciences, University of Glasgow, Glasgow Royal Infirmary, Glasgow, United Kingdom. · West of Scotland Pancreatic Unit, Glasgow Royal Infirmary, Glasgow, United Kingdom. · Wolfson Wohl Cancer Research Centre, Institute of Cancer Sciences, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, Scotland, United Kingdom; Department of Medical Oncology, Beatson West of Scotland Cancer Centre, Glasgow, United Kingdom. · Department of Pathology, Southern General Hospital, Greater Glasgow & Clyde National Health Service, Glasgow, United Kingdom. · Greater Glasgow and Clyde Bio-repository, Pathology Department, Queen Elizabeth University Hospital, Glasgow, United Kingdom. · Cancer Research UK Beatson Institute, Glasgow, United Kingdom; Institute for Cancer Science, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, United Kingdom. · Universitätsklinikum Erlangen, Erlangen, Germany. · Department of Pathology, The Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland. · Department of Surgery, The Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland. · ARC-NET Center for Applied Research on Cancer, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona, Italy; Department of Pathology and Diagnostics, University of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Department of Medicine, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Division of Hematology and Oncology, University of California, San Francisco, California. · Australian Pancreatic Cancer Genome Initiative. · Wolfson Wohl Cancer Research Centre, Institute of Cancer Sciences, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, Scotland, United Kingdom. · Universitätsklinikum Erlangen, Department of Surgery, University of Erlangen-Nueremberg, Germany. · The Kinghorn Cancer Centre, Darlinghurst, and the Cancer Research Program, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, Darlinghurst, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia; Wolfson Wohl Cancer Research Centre, Institute of Cancer Sciences, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, Scotland, United Kingdom; St Vincent's Clinical School, Faculty of Medicine, University of New South Wales Australia, Darlinghurst, New South Wales, Australia. · The Kinghorn Cancer Centre, Darlinghurst, and the Cancer Research Program, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, Darlinghurst, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia; University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia; Department of Anatomical Pathology, Royal North Shore Hospital, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. · Queensland Centre for Medical Genomics, Institute for Molecular Bioscience, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia; University of Melbourne Centre for Cancer Research, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. · QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia; Queensland Centre for Medical Genomics, Institute for Molecular Bioscience, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. Electronic address: nic.waddell@qimrberghofer.edu.au. · Wolfson Wohl Cancer Research Centre, Institute of Cancer Sciences, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, Scotland, United Kingdom; Department of Surgery, Bankstown Hospital, Bankstown, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia; South Western Sydney Clinical School, Faculty of Medicine, University of New South Wales Australia, Liverpool, New South Wales, Australia; West of Scotland Pancreatic Unit, Glasgow Royal Infirmary, Glasgow, United Kingdom. Electronic address: andrew.biankin@glasgow.ac.uk. ·Gastroenterology · Pubmed #27856273.

ABSTRACT: Pancreatic cancer is molecularly diverse, with few effective therapies. Increased mutation burden and defective DNA repair are associated with response to immune checkpoint inhibitors in several other cancer types. We interrogated 385 pancreatic cancer genomes to define hypermutation and its causes. Mutational signatures inferring defects in DNA repair were enriched in those with the highest mutation burdens. Mismatch repair deficiency was identified in 1% of tumors harboring different mechanisms of somatic inactivation of MLH1 and MSH2. Defining mutation load in individual pancreatic cancers and the optimal assay for patient selection may inform clinical trial design for immunotherapy in pancreatic cancer.

12 Article Functional single nucleotide polymorphisms within the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 2A/2B region affect pancreatic cancer risk. 2016

Campa, Daniele / Pastore, Manuela / Gentiluomo, Manuel / Talar-Wojnarowska, Renata / Kupcinskas, Juozas / Malecka-Panas, Ewa / Neoptolemos, John P / Niesen, Willem / Vodicka, Pavel / Delle Fave, Gianfranco / Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas / Gazouli, Maria / Pacetti, Paola / Di Leo, Milena / Ito, Hidemi / Klüter, Harald / Soucek, Pavel / Corbo, Vincenzo / Yamao, Kenji / Hosono, Satoyo / Kaaks, Rudolf / Vashist, Yogesh / Gioffreda, Domenica / Strobel, Oliver / Shimizu, Yasuhiro / Dijk, Frederike / Andriulli, Angelo / Ivanauskas, Audrius / Bugert, Peter / Tavano, Francesca / Vodickova, Ludmila / Zambon, Carlo Federico / Lovecek, Martin / Landi, Stefano / Key, Timothy J / Boggi, Ugo / Pezzilli, Raffaele / Jamroziak, Krzysztof / Mohelnikova-Duchonova, Beatrice / Mambrini, Andrea / Bambi, Franco / Busch, Olivier / Pazienza, Valerio / Valente, Roberto / Theodoropoulos, George E / Hackert, Thilo / Capurso, Gabriele / Cavestro, Giulia Martina / Pasquali, Claudio / Basso, Daniela / Sperti, Cosimo / Matsuo, Keitaro / Büchler, Markus / Khaw, Kay-Tee / Izbicki, Jakob / Costello, Eithne / Katzke, Verena / Michalski, Christoph / Stepien, Anna / Rizzato, Cosmeri / Canzian, Federico. ·Department of Biology, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. · Genomic Epidemiology Group, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Department of Digestive Tract Diseases, Medical University of Lodz, Lodz, Poland. · Department of Gastroenterology, Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, Kaunas, Lithuania. · Institute for Health Research Liverpool Pancreas Biomedical Research Unit, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, United Kingdom. · Department of General, Visceral and Transplantation Surgery, Heidelberg University Hospital, Heidelberg, Germany. · Institute of Experimental Medicine, Czech Academy of Science, Prague, Czech Republic. · Institute of Biology and Medical Genetics, 1st Medical Faculty, Charles University, Prague, Czech Republic. · Digestive and Liver Disease Unit, S. Andrea Hospital, 'Sapienza' University of Rome, Rome, Italy. · Department for Determinants of Chronic Diseases (DCD), National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven, The Netherlands. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, The School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom. · Department of Social & Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. · Department of Basic Medical Sciences, Laboratory of Biology, Medical School, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece. · Oncological Department Massa Carrara Azienda USL Toscana Nord Ovest, Carrara, Italy. · Gastroenterology and Gastrointestinal Endoscopy Unit, Vita-Salute San Raffaele University, IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy. · Division Epidemiology and Prevention, Aichi Cancer Center Research Institute, Nagoya, Japan. · Institute of Transfusion Medicine and Immunology, German Red Cross Blood Service Baden-Württemberg - Hessen gGmbH, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Mannheim, Germany. · Laboratory of Toxicogenomics, National Institute of Public Health, Prague, Czech Republic. · Laboratory of Pharmacogenomics, Biomedical Center, Faculty of Medicine in Pilsen, Charles University in Prague, Pilsen, Czech Republic. · ARC-Net Research Centre, and Department of Diagnostics and Public Health University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Department of Gastroenterology, Aichi Cancer Center Hospital, Nagoya, Japan. · Division of Cancer Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Department of General, Visceral and Thoracic Surgery, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany. · Division of Gastroenterology and Research Laboratory, IRCCS Scientific Institute and Regional General Hospital "Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza", San Giovanni Rotondo, Italy. · Department of Gastroenterological Surgery, Aichi Cancer Center Hospital, Nagoya, Japan. · Department of Pathology, Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Biomedical Center, Faculty of Medicine in Pilsen, Charles University in Prague, Prague, Czech Republic. · Department of Medicine - DIMED, University of Padova, Padova, Italy. · Department of Surgery I, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, Palacky University Olomouc and University Hospital Olomouc, Olomouc, Czech Republic. · Epidemiology Unit Nuffield Department of Population Health University of Oxford, Oxford, UK. · Division of General and Transplant Surgery, Pisa University Hospital, Pisa, Italy. · Pancreas Unit, Department of Digestive System, Dant'Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, Bologna, Italy. · Department of Hematology, Institute of Hematology and Transfusion Medicine, Warsaw, Poland. · Department of Oncology, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, Palacky University Olomouc and University Hospital Olomouc, Olomouc, Czech Republic. · Blood Transfusion Service, Azienda Ospedaliero Universitaria Meyer, Florence, Italy. · Department of Surgery, Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Colorectal Unit, First Department of Propaedeutic Surgery, Athens Medical School, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece. · Department of Surgery, Oncology and Gastroenterology-DiSCOG, University of Padova, Padova, Italy. · Department of Laboratory Medicine, University-Hospital of Padova, Padova, Italy. · Division of Molecular Medicine, Aichi Cancer Center Research Institute, Nagoya, Japan. · Clinical Gerontology Unit, Addenbrooke’s Hospital, School of Clinical Medicine, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK. · Laboratory of Clinical, Transplant Immunology and Genetics, Copernicus Memorial Hospital, Lodz, Poland. · Department of Translational Research and New Technologies in Medicine and Surgery, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. ·Oncotarget · Pubmed #27486979.

ABSTRACT: The CDKN2A (p16) gene plays a key role in pancreatic cancer etiology. It is one of the most commonly somatically mutated genes in pancreatic cancer, rare germline mutations have been found to be associated with increased risk of developing familiar pancreatic cancer and CDKN2A promoter hyper-methylation has been suggested to play a critical role both in pancreatic cancer onset and prognosis. In addition several unrelated SNPs in the 9p21.3 region, that includes the CDNK2A, CDNK2B and the CDNK2B-AS1 genes, are associated with the development of cancer in various organs. However, association between the common genetic variability in this region and pancreatic cancer risk is not clearly understood. We sought to fill this gap in a case-control study genotyping 13 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 2,857 pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) patients and 6,111 controls in the context of the Pancreatic Disease Research (PANDoRA) consortium. We found that the A allele of the rs3217992 SNP was associated with an increased pancreatic cancer risk (ORhet=1.14, 95% CI 1.01-1.27, p=0.026, ORhom=1.30, 95% CI 1.12-1.51, p=0.00049). This pleiotropic variant is reported to be a mir-SNP that, by changing the binding site of one or more miRNAs, could influence the normal cell cycle progression and in turn increase PDAC risk. In conclusion, we observed a novel association in a pleiotropic region that has been found to be of key relevance in the susceptibility to various types of cancer and diabetes suggesting that the CDKN2A/B locus could represent a genetic link between diabetes and pancreatic cancer risk.

13 Article Genomic analyses identify molecular subtypes of pancreatic cancer. 2016

Bailey, Peter / Chang, David K / Nones, Katia / Johns, Amber L / Patch, Ann-Marie / Gingras, Marie-Claude / Miller, David K / Christ, Angelika N / Bruxner, Tim J C / Quinn, Michael C / Nourse, Craig / Murtaugh, L Charles / Harliwong, Ivon / Idrisoglu, Senel / Manning, Suzanne / Nourbakhsh, Ehsan / Wani, Shivangi / Fink, Lynn / Holmes, Oliver / Chin, Venessa / Anderson, Matthew J / Kazakoff, Stephen / Leonard, Conrad / Newell, Felicity / Waddell, Nick / Wood, Scott / Xu, Qinying / Wilson, Peter J / Cloonan, Nicole / Kassahn, Karin S / Taylor, Darrin / Quek, Kelly / Robertson, Alan / Pantano, Lorena / Mincarelli, Laura / Sanchez, Luis N / Evers, Lisa / Wu, Jianmin / Pinese, Mark / Cowley, Mark J / Jones, Marc D / Colvin, Emily K / Nagrial, Adnan M / Humphrey, Emily S / Chantrill, Lorraine A / Mawson, Amanda / Humphris, Jeremy / Chou, Angela / Pajic, Marina / Scarlett, Christopher J / Pinho, Andreia V / Giry-Laterriere, Marc / Rooman, Ilse / Samra, Jaswinder S / Kench, James G / Lovell, Jessica A / Merrett, Neil D / Toon, Christopher W / Epari, Krishna / Nguyen, Nam Q / Barbour, Andrew / Zeps, Nikolajs / Moran-Jones, Kim / Jamieson, Nigel B / Graham, Janet S / Duthie, Fraser / Oien, Karin / Hair, Jane / Grützmann, Robert / Maitra, Anirban / Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine A / Wolfgang, Christopher L / Morgan, Richard A / Lawlor, Rita T / Corbo, Vincenzo / Bassi, Claudio / Rusev, Borislav / Capelli, Paola / Salvia, Roberto / Tortora, Giampaolo / Mukhopadhyay, Debabrata / Petersen, Gloria M / Anonymous91128 / Munzy, Donna M / Fisher, William E / Karim, Saadia A / Eshleman, James R / Hruban, Ralph H / Pilarsky, Christian / Morton, Jennifer P / Sansom, Owen J / Scarpa, Aldo / Musgrove, Elizabeth A / Bailey, Ulla-Maja Hagbo / Hofmann, Oliver / Sutherland, Robert L / Wheeler, David A / Gill, Anthony J / Gibbs, Richard A / Pearson, John V / Waddell, Nicola / Biankin, Andrew V / Grimmond, Sean M. ·Queensland Centre for Medical Genomics, Institute for Molecular Bioscience, The University of Queensland, St Lucia, Brisbane, Queensland 4072, Australia. · Wolfson Wohl Cancer Research Centre, Institute of Cancer Sciences, University of Glasgow, Garscube Estate, Switchback Road, Bearsden, Glasgow G61 1BD, UK. · The Kinghorn Cancer Centre, 370 Victoria St, Darlinghurst, and the Cancer Research Program, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, 384 Victoria St, Darlinghurst, Sydney, New South Wales 2010, Australia. · Department of Surgery, Bankstown Hospital, Eldridge Road, Bankstown, Sydney, New South Wales 2200, Australia. · South Western Sydney Clinical School, Faculty of Medicine, University of New South Wales, Liverpool, New South Wales 2170, Australia. · QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Herston, Queensland 4006, Australia. · Department of Molecular and Human Genetics, Human Genome Sequencing Center, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas 77030, USA. · Michael DeBakey Department of Surgery, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas 77030, USA. · Dan L. Duncan Cancer Center, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas 77030, USA. · Department of Human Genetics, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112, USA. · Genetic and Molecular Pathology, SA Pathology, Adelaide, South Australia 5000, Australia. · School of Biological Sciences, The University of Adelaide, Adelaide, South Australia 5000, Australia. · Harvard Chan Bioinformatics Core, Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA. · Macarthur Cancer Therapy Centre, Campbelltown Hospital, New South Wales 2560, Australia. · Department of Pathology. SydPath, St Vincent's Hospital, Sydney, NSW 2010, Australia. · St Vincent's Clinical School, Faculty of Medicine, University of New South Wales, New South Wales 2052, Australia. · School of Environmental &Life Sciences, University of Newcastle, Ourimbah, New South Wales 2258, Australia. · Department of Surgery, Royal North Shore Hospital, St Leonards, Sydney, New South Wales 2065, Australia. · University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales 2006, Australia. · Tissue Pathology and Diagnostic Oncology, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Camperdown New South Wales 2050, Australia. · School of Medicine, University of Western Sydney, Penrith, New South Wales 2175, Australia. · Fiona Stanley Hospital, Robin Warren Drive, Murdoch, Western Australia 6150, Australia. · Department of Gastroenterology, Royal Adelaide Hospital, North Terrace, Adelaide, South Australia 5000, Australia. · Department of Surgery, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Ipswich Rd, Woollongabba, Queensland 4102, Australia. · School of Surgery M507, University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Hwy, Nedlands 6009, Australia and St John of God Pathology, 12 Salvado Rd, Subiaco, Western Australia 6008, Australia. · Academic Unit of Surgery, School of Medicine, College of Medical, Veterinary and Life Sciences, University of Glasgow, Glasgow Royal Infirmary, Glasgow G4 OSF, UK. · West of Scotland Pancreatic Unit, Glasgow Royal Infirmary, Glasgow G31 2ER, UK. · Department of Medical Oncology, Beatson West of Scotland Cancer Centre, 1053 Great Western Road, Glasgow G12 0YN, UK. · Department of Pathology, Southern General Hospital, Greater Glasgow &Clyde NHS, Glasgow G51 4TF, UK. · GGC Bio-repository, Pathology Department, Southern General Hospital, 1345 Govan Road, Glasgow G51 4TY, UK. · Department of Surgery, TU Dresden, Fetscherstr. 74, 01307 Dresden, Germany. · Departments of Pathology and Translational Molecular Pathology, UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston Texas 77030, USA. · The David M. Rubenstein Pancreatic Cancer Research Center and Department of Pathology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York 10065, USA. · Department of Pathology, The Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21231, USA. · Department of Surgery, The Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21231, USA. · ARC-Net Applied Research on Cancer Centre, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona 37134, Italy. · Department of Pathology and Diagnostics, University of Verona, Verona 37134, Italy. · Department of Surgery, Pancreas Institute, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona 37134, Italy. · Department of Medical Oncology, Comprehensive Cancer Centre, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona 37134, Italy. · Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota 55905, USA. · Elkins Pancreas Center, Baylor College of Medicine, One Baylor Plaza, MS226, Houston, Texas 77030-3411, USA. · Cancer Research UK Beatson Institute, Glasgow G61 1BD, UK. · Institute for Cancer Science, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ, UK. · University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria 3010, Australia. ·Nature · Pubmed #26909576.

ABSTRACT: Integrated genomic analysis of 456 pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas identified 32 recurrently mutated genes that aggregate into 10 pathways: KRAS, TGF-β, WNT, NOTCH, ROBO/SLIT signalling, G1/S transition, SWI-SNF, chromatin modification, DNA repair and RNA processing. Expression analysis defined 4 subtypes: (1) squamous; (2) pancreatic progenitor; (3) immunogenic; and (4) aberrantly differentiated endocrine exocrine (ADEX) that correlate with histopathological characteristics. Squamous tumours are enriched for TP53 and KDM6A mutations, upregulation of the TP63∆N transcriptional network, hypermethylation of pancreatic endodermal cell-fate determining genes and have a poor prognosis. Pancreatic progenitor tumours preferentially express genes involved in early pancreatic development (FOXA2/3, PDX1 and MNX1). ADEX tumours displayed upregulation of genes that regulate networks involved in KRAS activation, exocrine (NR5A2 and RBPJL), and endocrine differentiation (NEUROD1 and NKX2-2). Immunogenic tumours contained upregulated immune networks including pathways involved in acquired immune suppression. These data infer differences in the molecular evolution of pancreatic cancer subtypes and identify opportunities for therapeutic development.

14 Article Whole genomes redefine the mutational landscape of pancreatic cancer. 2015

Waddell, Nicola / Pajic, Marina / Patch, Ann-Marie / Chang, David K / Kassahn, Karin S / Bailey, Peter / Johns, Amber L / Miller, David / Nones, Katia / Quek, Kelly / Quinn, Michael C J / Robertson, Alan J / Fadlullah, Muhammad Z H / Bruxner, Tim J C / Christ, Angelika N / Harliwong, Ivon / Idrisoglu, Senel / Manning, Suzanne / Nourse, Craig / Nourbakhsh, Ehsan / Wani, Shivangi / Wilson, Peter J / Markham, Emma / Cloonan, Nicole / Anderson, Matthew J / Fink, J Lynn / Holmes, Oliver / Kazakoff, Stephen H / Leonard, Conrad / Newell, Felicity / Poudel, Barsha / Song, Sarah / Taylor, Darrin / Waddell, Nick / Wood, Scott / Xu, Qinying / Wu, Jianmin / Pinese, Mark / Cowley, Mark J / Lee, Hong C / Jones, Marc D / Nagrial, Adnan M / Humphris, Jeremy / Chantrill, Lorraine A / Chin, Venessa / Steinmann, Angela M / Mawson, Amanda / Humphrey, Emily S / Colvin, Emily K / Chou, Angela / Scarlett, Christopher J / Pinho, Andreia V / Giry-Laterriere, Marc / Rooman, Ilse / Samra, Jaswinder S / Kench, James G / Pettitt, Jessica A / Merrett, Neil D / Toon, Christopher / Epari, Krishna / Nguyen, Nam Q / Barbour, Andrew / Zeps, Nikolajs / Jamieson, Nigel B / Graham, Janet S / Niclou, Simone P / Bjerkvig, Rolf / Grützmann, Robert / Aust, Daniela / Hruban, Ralph H / Maitra, Anirban / Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine A / Wolfgang, Christopher L / Morgan, Richard A / Lawlor, Rita T / Corbo, Vincenzo / Bassi, Claudio / Falconi, Massimo / Zamboni, Giuseppe / Tortora, Giampaolo / Tempero, Margaret A / Anonymous400822 / Gill, Anthony J / Eshleman, James R / Pilarsky, Christian / Scarpa, Aldo / Musgrove, Elizabeth A / Pearson, John V / Biankin, Andrew V / Grimmond, Sean M. ·1] Queensland Centre for Medical Genomics, Institute for Molecular Bioscience, The University of Queensland, St Lucia, Brisbane, Queensland 4072, Australia [2] QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Herston Road, Brisbane 4006, Australia. · 1] The Kinghorn Cancer Centre, Cancer Division, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, University of New South Wales, 384 Victoria St, Darlinghurst, Sydney, New South Wales 2010, Australia [2] St Vincent's Clinical School, Faculty of Medicine, University of New South Wales, New South Wales 2010, Australia. · Queensland Centre for Medical Genomics, Institute for Molecular Bioscience, The University of Queensland, St Lucia, Brisbane, Queensland 4072, Australia. · 1] The Kinghorn Cancer Centre, Cancer Division, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, University of New South Wales, 384 Victoria St, Darlinghurst, Sydney, New South Wales 2010, Australia [2] Department of Surgery, Bankstown Hospital, Eldridge Road, Bankstown, Sydney, New South Wales 2200, Australia [3] South Western Sydney Clinical School, Faculty of Medicine, University of New South Wales, Liverpool, New South Wales 2170, Australia [4] Wolfson Wohl Cancer Research Centre, Institute of Cancer Sciences, University of Glasgow, Garscube Estate, Switchback Road, Bearsden, Glasgow G61 1BD, UK. · 1] Queensland Centre for Medical Genomics, Institute for Molecular Bioscience, The University of Queensland, St Lucia, Brisbane, Queensland 4072, Australia [2] Wolfson Wohl Cancer Research Centre, Institute of Cancer Sciences, University of Glasgow, Garscube Estate, Switchback Road, Bearsden, Glasgow G61 1BD, UK. · The Kinghorn Cancer Centre, Cancer Division, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, University of New South Wales, 384 Victoria St, Darlinghurst, Sydney, New South Wales 2010, Australia. · 1] The Kinghorn Cancer Centre, Cancer Division, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, University of New South Wales, 384 Victoria St, Darlinghurst, Sydney, New South Wales 2010, Australia [2] Wolfson Wohl Cancer Research Centre, Institute of Cancer Sciences, University of Glasgow, Garscube Estate, Switchback Road, Bearsden, Glasgow G61 1BD, UK. · 1] The Kinghorn Cancer Centre, Cancer Division, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, University of New South Wales, 384 Victoria St, Darlinghurst, Sydney, New South Wales 2010, Australia [2] Department of Anatomical Pathology, St Vincent's Hospital, Sydney, New South Wales 2010, Australia. · 1] The Kinghorn Cancer Centre, Cancer Division, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, University of New South Wales, 384 Victoria St, Darlinghurst, Sydney, New South Wales 2010, Australia [2] School of Environmental &Life Sciences, University of Newcastle, Ourimbah, New South Wales 2258, Australia. · 1] Department of Surgery, Royal North Shore Hospital, St Leonards, Sydney, New South Wales 2065, Australia [2] University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales 2006, Australia. · 1] The Kinghorn Cancer Centre, Cancer Division, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, University of New South Wales, 384 Victoria St, Darlinghurst, Sydney, New South Wales 2010, Australia [2] University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales 2006, Australia [3] Tissue Pathology and Diagnostic Oncology, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Camperdown, New South Wales 2050, Australia. · 1] Department of Surgery, Bankstown Hospital, Eldridge Road, Bankstown, Sydney, New South Wales 2200, Australia [2] School of Medicine, University of Western Sydney, Penrith, New South Wales 2175, Australia. · Department of Surgery, Fremantle Hospital, Alma Street, Fremantle, Western Australia 6160, Australia. · Department of Gastroenterology, Royal Adelaide Hospital, North Terrace, Adelaide, South Australia 5000, Australia. · Department of Surgery, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Ipswich Rd, Woollongabba, Queensland 4102, Australia. · 1] School of Surgery M507, University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Highway, Nedlands 6009, Australia [2] St John of God Pathology, 12 Salvado Rd, Subiaco, Western Australia 6008, Australia [3] Bendat Family Comprehensive Cancer Centre, St John of God Subiaco Hospital, Subiaco, Western Australia 6008, Australia. · 1] Wolfson Wohl Cancer Research Centre, Institute of Cancer Sciences, University of Glasgow, Garscube Estate, Switchback Road, Bearsden, Glasgow G61 1BD, UK [2] Academic Unit of Surgery, School of Medicine, College of Medical, Veterinary and Life Sciences, University of Glasgow, Glasgow Royal Infirmary, Glasgow G4 OSF, UK [3] West of Scotland Pancreatic Unit, Glasgow Royal Infirmary, Glasgow G31 2ER, UK. · 1] Wolfson Wohl Cancer Research Centre, Institute of Cancer Sciences, University of Glasgow, Garscube Estate, Switchback Road, Bearsden, Glasgow G61 1BD, UK [2] Department of Medical Oncology, Beatson West of Scotland Cancer Centre, 1053 Great Western Road, Glasgow G12 0YN, UK. · Norlux Neuro-Oncology Laboratory, CRP-Santé Luxembourg, 84 Val Fleuri, L-1526, Luxembourg. · Norlux Neuro-Oncology, Department of Biomedicine, University of Bergen, Jonas Lies vei 91, N-5019 Bergen, Norway. · Departments of Surgery and Pathology, TU Dresden, Fetscherstr. 74, 01307 Dresden, Germany. · Department of Pathology, The Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21231, USA. · Departments of Pathology and Translational Molecular Pathology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston Texas 77030, USA. · The David M. Rubenstein Pancreatic Cancer Research Center and Department of Pathology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York 10065, USA. · Department of Surgery, The Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21231, USA. · 1] ARC-NET Centre for Applied Research on Cancer, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona 37134, Italy [2] Department of Pathology and Diagnostics, University of Verona, Verona 37134, Italy. · ARC-NET Centre for Applied Research on Cancer, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona 37134, Italy. · Department of Surgery and Oncology, Pancreas Institute, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona 37134, Italy. · 1] Department of Surgery and Oncology, Pancreas Institute, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona 37134, Italy [2] Departments of Surgery and Pathology, Ospedale Sacro Cuore Don Calabria Negrar, Verona 37024, Italy. · 1] Department of Pathology and Diagnostics, University of Verona, Verona 37134, Italy [2] Departments of Surgery and Pathology, Ospedale Sacro Cuore Don Calabria Negrar, Verona 37024, Italy. · Department of Oncology, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona 37134, Italy. · Division of Hematology and Oncology, University of California, San Francisco, California 94122, USA. · 1] The Kinghorn Cancer Centre, Cancer Division, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, University of New South Wales, 384 Victoria St, Darlinghurst, Sydney, New South Wales 2010, Australia [2] University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales 2006, Australia. · Wolfson Wohl Cancer Research Centre, Institute of Cancer Sciences, University of Glasgow, Garscube Estate, Switchback Road, Bearsden, Glasgow G61 1BD, UK. ·Nature · Pubmed #25719666.

ABSTRACT: Pancreatic cancer remains one of the most lethal of malignancies and a major health burden. We performed whole-genome sequencing and copy number variation (CNV) analysis of 100 pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas (PDACs). Chromosomal rearrangements leading to gene disruption were prevalent, affecting genes known to be important in pancreatic cancer (TP53, SMAD4, CDKN2A, ARID1A and ROBO2) and new candidate drivers of pancreatic carcinogenesis (KDM6A and PREX2). Patterns of structural variation (variation in chromosomal structure) classified PDACs into 4 subtypes with potential clinical utility: the subtypes were termed stable, locally rearranged, scattered and unstable. A significant proportion harboured focal amplifications, many of which contained druggable oncogenes (ERBB2, MET, FGFR1, CDK6, PIK3R3 and PIK3CA), but at low individual patient prevalence. Genomic instability co-segregated with inactivation of DNA maintenance genes (BRCA1, BRCA2 or PALB2) and a mutational signature of DNA damage repair deficiency. Of 8 patients who received platinum therapy, 4 of 5 individuals with these measures of defective DNA maintenance responded.

15 Article Organoid models of human and mouse ductal pancreatic cancer. 2015

Boj, Sylvia F / Hwang, Chang-Il / Baker, Lindsey A / Chio, Iok In Christine / Engle, Dannielle D / Corbo, Vincenzo / Jager, Myrthe / Ponz-Sarvise, Mariano / Tiriac, Hervé / Spector, Mona S / Gracanin, Ana / Oni, Tobiloba / Yu, Kenneth H / van Boxtel, Ruben / Huch, Meritxell / Rivera, Keith D / Wilson, John P / Feigin, Michael E / Öhlund, Daniel / Handly-Santana, Abram / Ardito-Abraham, Christine M / Ludwig, Michael / Elyada, Ela / Alagesan, Brinda / Biffi, Giulia / Yordanov, Georgi N / Delcuze, Bethany / Creighton, Brianna / Wright, Kevin / Park, Youngkyu / Morsink, Folkert H M / Molenaar, I Quintus / Borel Rinkes, Inne H / Cuppen, Edwin / Hao, Yuan / Jin, Ying / Nijman, Isaac J / Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine / Leach, Steven D / Pappin, Darryl J / Hammell, Molly / Klimstra, David S / Basturk, Olca / Hruban, Ralph H / Offerhaus, George Johan / Vries, Robert G J / Clevers, Hans / Tuveson, David A. ·Hubrecht Institute, Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences (KNAW), University Medical Centre Utrecht and CancerGenomics.nl, 3584 CT Utrecht, the Netherlands; foundation Hubrecht Organoid Technology (HUB), 3584 CT Utrecht, the Netherlands. · Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, Cold Spring Harbor, NY 11724, USA; Lustgarten Foundation Pancreatic Cancer Research Laboratory, Cold Spring Harbor, NY 11724, USA. · Hubrecht Institute, Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences (KNAW), University Medical Centre Utrecht and CancerGenomics.nl, 3584 CT Utrecht, the Netherlands. · Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, Cold Spring Harbor, NY 11724, USA; Lustgarten Foundation Pancreatic Cancer Research Laboratory, Cold Spring Harbor, NY 11724, USA; Graduate Program in Molecular and Cellular Biology, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794, USA. · Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, Cold Spring Harbor, NY 11724, USA; Lustgarten Foundation Pancreatic Cancer Research Laboratory, Cold Spring Harbor, NY 11724, USA; Rubenstein Center for Pancreatic Cancer Research, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY 10065, USA; Weill Medical College at Cornell University, New York, NY 10065, USA. · Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, Cold Spring Harbor, NY 11724, USA. · Lustgarten Foundation Pancreatic Cancer Research Laboratory, Cold Spring Harbor, NY 11724, USA; Watson School of Biological Sciences, Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, Cold Spring Harbor, NY 11724, USA. · Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, Cold Spring Harbor, NY 11724, USA; Lustgarten Foundation Pancreatic Cancer Research Laboratory, Cold Spring Harbor, NY 11724, USA; Graduate Program in Genetics, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794, USA. · Department of Pathology, University Medical Centre Utrecht, 3584 CX Utrecht, the Netherlands. · Department of Surgery, University Medical Center Utrecht, 3584 CX Utrecht, the Netherlands. · Rubenstein Center for Pancreatic Cancer Research, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY 10065, USA. · Department of Pathology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY 10065, USA. · The Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21231, USA. · Hubrecht Institute, Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences (KNAW), University Medical Centre Utrecht and CancerGenomics.nl, 3584 CT Utrecht, the Netherlands. Electronic address: h.clevers@hubrecht.eu. · Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, Cold Spring Harbor, NY 11724, USA; Lustgarten Foundation Pancreatic Cancer Research Laboratory, Cold Spring Harbor, NY 11724, USA; Rubenstein Center for Pancreatic Cancer Research, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY 10065, USA. Electronic address: dtuveson@cshl.edu. ·Cell · Pubmed #25557080.

ABSTRACT: Pancreatic cancer is one of the most lethal malignancies due to its late diagnosis and limited response to treatment. Tractable methods to identify and interrogate pathways involved in pancreatic tumorigenesis are urgently needed. We established organoid models from normal and neoplastic murine and human pancreas tissues. Pancreatic organoids can be rapidly generated from resected tumors and biopsies, survive cryopreservation, and exhibit ductal- and disease-stage-specific characteristics. Orthotopically transplanted neoplastic organoids recapitulate the full spectrum of tumor development by forming early-grade neoplasms that progress to locally invasive and metastatic carcinomas. Due to their ability to be genetically manipulated, organoids are a platform to probe genetic cooperation. Comprehensive transcriptional and proteomic analyses of murine pancreatic organoids revealed genes and pathways altered during disease progression. The confirmation of many of these protein changes in human tissues demonstrates that organoids are a facile model system to discover characteristics of this deadly malignancy.

16 Article Reporting tumor molecular heterogeneity in histopathological diagnosis. 2014

Mafficini, Andrea / Amato, Eliana / Fassan, Matteo / Simbolo, Michele / Antonello, Davide / Vicentini, Caterina / Scardoni, Maria / Bersani, Samantha / Gottardi, Marisa / Rusev, Borislav / Malpeli, Giorgio / Corbo, Vincenzo / Barbi, Stefano / Sikora, Katarzyna O / Lawlor, Rita T / Tortora, Giampaolo / Scarpa, Aldo. ·Applied Research on Cancer Network (ARC-NET) and Department of Pathology and Diagnostics, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Applied Research on Cancer Network (ARC-NET) and Department of Pathology and Diagnostics, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona, Italy; Department of Surgery, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Department of Medicine, Oncology Unit, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona, Italy. ·PLoS One · Pubmed #25127237.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Detection of molecular tumor heterogeneity has become of paramount importance with the advent of targeted therapies. Analysis for detection should be comprehensive, timely and based on routinely available tumor samples. AIM: To evaluate the diagnostic potential of targeted multigene next-generation sequencing (TM-NGS) in characterizing gastrointestinal cancer molecular heterogeneity. METHODS: 35 gastrointestinal tract tumors, five of each intestinal type gastric carcinomas, pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas, pancreatic intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms, ampulla of Vater carcinomas, hepatocellular carcinomas, cholangiocarcinomas, pancreatic solid pseudopapillary tumors were assessed for mutations in 46 cancer-associated genes, using Ion Torrent semiconductor-based TM-NGS. One ampulla of Vater carcinoma cell line and one hepatic carcinosarcoma served to assess assay sensitivity. TP53, PIK3CA, KRAS, and BRAF mutations were validated by conventional Sanger sequencing. RESULTS: TM-NGS yielded overlapping results on matched fresh-frozen and formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues, with a mutation detection limit of 1% for fresh-frozen high molecular weight DNA and 2% for FFPE partially degraded DNA. At least one somatic mutation was observed in all tumors tested; multiple alterations were detected in 20/35 (57%) tumors. Seven cancers displayed significant differences in allelic frequencies for distinct mutations, indicating the presence of intratumor molecular heterogeneity; this was confirmed on selected samples by immunohistochemistry of p53 and Smad4, showing concordance with mutational analysis. CONCLUSIONS: TM-NGS is able to detect and quantitate multiple gene alterations from limited amounts of DNA, moving one step closer to a next-generation histopathologic diagnosis that integrates morphologic, immunophenotypic, and multigene mutational analysis on routinely processed tissues, essential for personalized cancer therapy.

17 Article Genome-wide DNA methylation patterns in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma reveal epigenetic deregulation of SLIT-ROBO, ITGA2 and MET signaling. 2014

Nones, Katia / Waddell, Nic / Song, Sarah / Patch, Ann-Marie / Miller, David / Johns, Amber / Wu, Jianmin / Kassahn, Karin S / Wood, David / Bailey, Peter / Fink, Lynn / Manning, Suzanne / Christ, Angelika N / Nourse, Craig / Kazakoff, Stephen / Taylor, Darrin / Leonard, Conrad / Chang, David K / Jones, Marc D / Thomas, Michelle / Watson, Clare / Pinese, Mark / Cowley, Mark / Rooman, Ilse / Pajic, Marina / Anonymous840784 / Butturini, Giovanni / Malpaga, Anna / Corbo, Vincenzo / Crippa, Stefano / Falconi, Massimo / Zamboni, Giuseppe / Castelli, Paola / Lawlor, Rita T / Gill, Anthony J / Scarpa, Aldo / Pearson, John V / Biankin, Andrew V / Grimmond, Sean M. ·Queensland Centre for Medical Genomics, Institute for Molecular Bioscience, The University of Queensland, St Lucia, Brisbane, QLD, Australia. ·Int J Cancer · Pubmed #24500968.

ABSTRACT: The importance of epigenetic modifications such as DNA methylation in tumorigenesis is increasingly being appreciated. To define the genome-wide pattern of DNA methylation in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas (PDAC), we captured the methylation profiles of 167 untreated resected PDACs and compared them to a panel of 29 adjacent nontransformed pancreata using high-density arrays. A total of 11,634 CpG sites associated with 3,522 genes were significantly differentially methylated (DM) in PDAC and were capable of segregating PDAC from non-malignant pancreas, regardless of tumor cellularity. As expected, PDAC hypermethylation was most prevalent in the 5' region of genes (including the proximal promoter, 5'UTR and CpG islands). Approximately 33% DM genes showed significant inverse correlation with mRNA expression levels. Pathway analysis revealed an enrichment of aberrantly methylated genes involved in key molecular mechanisms important to PDAC: TGF-β, WNT, integrin signaling, cell adhesion, stellate cell activation and axon guidance. Given the recent discovery that SLIT-ROBO mutations play a clinically important role in PDAC, the role of epigenetic perturbation of axon guidance was pursued in more detail. Bisulfite amplicon deep sequencing and qRT-PCR expression analyses confirmed recurrent perturbation of axon guidance pathway genes SLIT2, SLIT3, ROBO1, ROBO3, ITGA2 and MET and suggests epigenetic suppression of SLIT-ROBO signaling and up-regulation of MET and ITGA2 expression. Hypomethylation of MET and ITGA2 correlated with high gene expression, which was associated with poor survival. These data suggest that aberrant methylation plays an important role in pancreatic carcinogenesis affecting core signaling pathways with potential implications for the disease pathophysiology and therapy.

18 Article Pancreatic cancer genomes reveal aberrations in axon guidance pathway genes. 2012

Biankin, Andrew V / Waddell, Nicola / Kassahn, Karin S / Gingras, Marie-Claude / Muthuswamy, Lakshmi B / Johns, Amber L / Miller, David K / Wilson, Peter J / Patch, Ann-Marie / Wu, Jianmin / Chang, David K / Cowley, Mark J / Gardiner, Brooke B / Song, Sarah / Harliwong, Ivon / Idrisoglu, Senel / Nourse, Craig / Nourbakhsh, Ehsan / Manning, Suzanne / Wani, Shivangi / Gongora, Milena / Pajic, Marina / Scarlett, Christopher J / Gill, Anthony J / Pinho, Andreia V / Rooman, Ilse / Anderson, Matthew / Holmes, Oliver / Leonard, Conrad / Taylor, Darrin / Wood, Scott / Xu, Qinying / Nones, Katia / Fink, J Lynn / Christ, Angelika / Bruxner, Tim / Cloonan, Nicole / Kolle, Gabriel / Newell, Felicity / Pinese, Mark / Mead, R Scott / Humphris, Jeremy L / Kaplan, Warren / Jones, Marc D / Colvin, Emily K / Nagrial, Adnan M / Humphrey, Emily S / Chou, Angela / Chin, Venessa T / Chantrill, Lorraine A / Mawson, Amanda / Samra, Jaswinder S / Kench, James G / Lovell, Jessica A / Daly, Roger J / Merrett, Neil D / Toon, Christopher / Epari, Krishna / Nguyen, Nam Q / Barbour, Andrew / Zeps, Nikolajs / Anonymous1421514 / Kakkar, Nipun / Zhao, Fengmei / Wu, Yuan Qing / Wang, Min / Muzny, Donna M / Fisher, William E / Brunicardi, F Charles / Hodges, Sally E / Reid, Jeffrey G / Drummond, Jennifer / Chang, Kyle / Han, Yi / Lewis, Lora R / Dinh, Huyen / Buhay, Christian J / Beck, Timothy / Timms, Lee / Sam, Michelle / Begley, Kimberly / Brown, Andrew / Pai, Deepa / Panchal, Ami / Buchner, Nicholas / De Borja, Richard / Denroche, Robert E / Yung, Christina K / Serra, Stefano / Onetto, Nicole / Mukhopadhyay, Debabrata / Tsao, Ming-Sound / Shaw, Patricia A / Petersen, Gloria M / Gallinger, Steven / Hruban, Ralph H / Maitra, Anirban / Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine A / Schulick, Richard D / Wolfgang, Christopher L / Morgan, Richard A / Lawlor, Rita T / Capelli, Paola / Corbo, Vincenzo / Scardoni, Maria / Tortora, Giampaolo / Tempero, Margaret A / Mann, Karen M / Jenkins, Nancy A / Perez-Mancera, Pedro A / Adams, David J / Largaespada, David A / Wessels, Lodewyk F A / Rust, Alistair G / Stein, Lincoln D / Tuveson, David A / Copeland, Neal G / Musgrove, Elizabeth A / Scarpa, Aldo / Eshleman, James R / Hudson, Thomas J / Sutherland, Robert L / Wheeler, David A / Pearson, John V / McPherson, John D / Gibbs, Richard A / Grimmond, Sean M. ·The Kinghorn Cancer Centre, 370 Victoria Street, Darlinghurst, Sydney, New South Wales 2010, Australia. ·Nature · Pubmed #23103869.

ABSTRACT: Pancreatic cancer is a highly lethal malignancy with few effective therapies. We performed exome sequencing and copy number analysis to define genomic aberrations in a prospectively accrued clinical cohort (n = 142) of early (stage I and II) sporadic pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. Detailed analysis of 99 informative tumours identified substantial heterogeneity with 2,016 non-silent mutations and 1,628 copy-number variations. We define 16 significantly mutated genes, reaffirming known mutations (KRAS, TP53, CDKN2A, SMAD4, MLL3, TGFBR2, ARID1A and SF3B1), and uncover novel mutated genes including additional genes involved in chromatin modification (EPC1 and ARID2), DNA damage repair (ATM) and other mechanisms (ZIM2, MAP2K4, NALCN, SLC16A4 and MAGEA6). Integrative analysis with in vitro functional data and animal models provided supportive evidence for potential roles for these genetic aberrations in carcinogenesis. Pathway-based analysis of recurrently mutated genes recapitulated clustering in core signalling pathways in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, and identified new mutated genes in each pathway. We also identified frequent and diverse somatic aberrations in genes described traditionally as embryonic regulators of axon guidance, particularly SLIT/ROBO signalling, which was also evident in murine Sleeping Beauty transposon-mediated somatic mutagenesis models of pancreatic cancer, providing further supportive evidence for the potential involvement of axon guidance genes in pancreatic carcinogenesis.

19 Article Pancreatic endocrine tumours: mutational and immunohistochemical survey of protein kinases reveals alterations in targetable kinases in cancer cell lines and rare primaries. 2012

Corbo, V / Beghelli, S / Bersani, S / Antonello, D / Talamini, G / Brunelli, M / Capelli, P / Falconi, M / Scarpa, A. ·ARC-NET Center for the Applied Research on Cancer-Networking, Department of Pathology and Diagnostics, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona, Italy. ·Ann Oncol · Pubmed #21447618.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Kinases represent potential therapeutic targets in pancreatic endocrine tumours (PETs). PATIENTS AND METHODS: Thirty-five kinase genes were sequenced in 36 primary PETs and three PET cell lines: (i) 4 receptor tyrosine kinases (RTK), epithelial growth factor receptor (EGFR), human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), tyrosine-protein kinase KIT (KIT), platelet-derived growth factor receptor alpha (PDGFRalpha); (ii) 6 belonging to the Akt/mTOR pathway; and (iii) 25 frequently mutated in cancers. The immunohistochemical expression of the four RTKs and the copy number of EGFR and HER2 were assessed in 140 PETs. RESULTS: Somatic mutations were found in KIT in one and ATM in two primary neoplasms. Among 140 PETs, EGFR was immunopositive in 18 (13%), HER2 in 3 (2%), KIT in 16 (11%), and PDGFRalpha in 135 (96%). HER2 amplification was found in 2/130 (1.5%) PETs. KIT membrane immunostaining was significantly associated with tumour aggressiveness and shorter patient survival. PET cell lines QGP1, CM and BON harboured mutations in FGFR3, FLT1/VEGFR1 and PIK3CA, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Only rare PET cases, harbouring either HER2 amplification or KIT mutation, might benefit from targeted drugs. KIT membrane expression deserves further attention as a prognostic marker. ATM mutation is involved in a proportion of PET. The finding of specific mutations in PET cell lines renders these models useful for preclinical studies involving pathway-specific therapies.

20 Article Src kinase activity coordinates cell adhesion and spreading with activation of mammalian target of rapamycin in pancreatic endocrine tumour cells. 2011

Di Florio, Alessia / Adesso, Laura / Pedrotti, Simona / Capurso, Gabriele / Pilozzi, Emanuela / Corbo, Vincenzo / Scarpa, Aldo / Geremia, Raffaele / Delle Fave, Gianfranco / Sette, Claudio. ·Department of Public Health and Cell Biology, University of Rome Tor Vergata, Italy. ·Endocr Relat Cancer · Pubmed #21712346.

ABSTRACT: Pancreatic endocrine tumours (PETs) are rare and heterogeneous neoplasms, often diagnosed at metastatic stage, for which no cure is currently available. Recently, activation of two pathways that support proliferation and invasiveness of cancer cells, the Src family kinase (SFK) and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathways, was demonstrated in PETs. Since both pathways represent suitable targets for therapeutic intervention, we investigated their possible interaction in PETs. Western blot and immunofluorescence analyses indicated that SFK and mTOR activity correlate in PET cell lines. We also found that SFKs coordinate cell adhesion and spreading with activation of the mTOR pathway in PET cells. Live cell metabolic labelling and biochemical studies demonstrated that SFK activity enhance mTOR-dependent translation initiation. Furthermore, microarray analysis of the mRNAs associated with polyribosomes revealed that SFKs regulate mTOR-dependent translation of specific transcripts, with an enrichment in mRNAs encoding cell cycle proteins. Importantly, a synergic inhibition of proliferation was observed in PET cells concomitantly treated with SFK and mTOR inhibitors, without activation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/AKT pro-survival pathway. Tissue microarray analysis revealed activation of Src and mTOR in some PET samples, and identified phosphorylation of 4E-BP1 as an independent marker of poor prognosis in PETs. Thus, our work highlights a novel link between the SFK and mTOR pathways, which regulate the translation of mRNAs for cell cycle regulators, and suggest that crosstalk between these pathways promotes PET cell proliferation.

21 Article Mutational profiling of kinases in human tumours of pancreatic origin identifies candidate cancer genes in ductal and ampulla of vater carcinomas. 2010

Corbo, Vincenzo / Ritelli, Rossana / Barbi, Stefano / Funel, Niccola / Campani, Daniela / Bardelli, Alberto / Scarpa, Aldo. ·ARC-NET Research Center, University of Verona, Policlinico GB Rossi, Verona, Italy. ·PLoS One · Pubmed #20838624.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Protein kinases are key regulators of cellular processes (such as proliferation, apoptosis and invasion) that are often deregulated in human cancers. Accordingly, kinase genes have been the first to be systematically analyzed in human tumors leading to the discovery that many oncogenes correspond to mutated kinases. In most cases the genetic alterations translate in constitutively active kinase proteins, which are amenable of therapeutic targeting. Tumours of the pancreas are aggressive neoplasms for which no effective therapeutic strategy is currently available. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We conducted a DNA-sequence analysis of a selected set of 35 kinase genes in a panel of 52 pancreatic exocrine neoplasms, including 36 pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, and 16 ampulla of Vater cancer. Among other changes we found somatic mutations in ATM, EGFR, EPHA3, EPHB2, and KIT, none of which was previously described in cancers. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Although the alterations identified require further experimental evaluation, the localization within defined protein domains indicates functional relevance for most of them. Some of the mutated genes, including the tyrosine kinases EPHA3 and EPHB2, are clearly amenable to pharmacological intervention and could represent novel therapeutic targets for these incurable cancers.

22 Article MEN1 in pancreatic endocrine tumors: analysis of gene and protein status in 169 sporadic neoplasms reveals alterations in the vast majority of cases. 2010

Corbo, Vincenzo / Dalai, Irene / Scardoni, Maria / Barbi, Stefano / Beghelli, Stefania / Bersani, Samantha / Albarello, Luca / Doglioni, Claudio / Schott, Christina / Capelli, Paola / Chilosi, Marco / Boninsegna, Letizia / Becker, Karl-Friedrich / Falconi, Massimo / Scarpa, Aldo. ·ARC-NET Research Center Department of Pathology, University of Verona, Policlinico G.B. Rossi c/o Piastra Odontoiatrica, Piazzale L.A. Scuro 10, Verona, Italy. ·Endocr Relat Cancer · Pubmed #20566584.

ABSTRACT: Pancreatic endocrine tumors (PETs) may be part of hereditary multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1) syndrome. While MEN1 gene mutation is the only ascertained genetic anomaly described in PETs, no data exist on the cellular localization of MEN1-encoded protein, menin, in normal pancreas and PETs. A total of 169 PETs were used to assess the i) MEN1 gene mutational status in 100 clinically sporadic PETs by direct DNA sequencing, ii) immunohistochemical expression of menin in normal pancreas and 140 PETs, including 71 cases screened for gene mutations, and iii) correlation of these findings with clinical-pathological parameters. Twenty-seven PETs showed mutations that were somatic in 25 patients and revealed to be germline in 2 patients. Menin immunostaining showed strong nuclear and very faint cytoplasmic signal in normal islet cells, whereas it displayed abnormal location and expression levels in 80% of tumors. PETs harboring MEN1 truncating mutations lacked nuclear protein, and most PETs with MEN1 missense mutations showed a strong cytoplasmic positivity for menin. Menin was also misplaced in a significant number of cases lacking MEN1 mutations. In conclusion, the vast majority of PETs showed qualitative and/or quantitative alterations in menin localization. In 30% of cases, this was associated with MEN1 mutations affecting sequences involved in nuclear localization or protein-protein interaction. In cases lacking MEN1 mutations, the alteration of one of the menin interactors may have prevented its proper localization, as suggested by recent data showing that menin protein shuttles between the nucleus and cytoplasm and also affects the subcellular localization of its interactors.

23 Minor Lack of growth inhibitory synergism with combined MAPK/PI3K inhibition in preclinical models of pancreatic cancer. 2017

Ciuffreda, L / Del Curatolo, A / Falcone, I / Conciatori, F / Bazzichetto, C / Cognetti, F / Corbo, V / Scarpa, A / Milella, M. ·Medical Oncology 1, Regina Elena National Cancer Institute, Rome. · ARC-Net Research Centre and Department of Pathology, University of Verona, Verona. · University of Rome, La Sapienza, Rome, Italy. ·Ann Oncol · Pubmed #28666315.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --