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Pancreatic Neoplasms: HELP
Articles by Andrea Coratti
Based on 14 articles published since 2010
(Why 14 articles?)
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Between 2010 and 2020, A. Coratti wrote the following 14 articles about Pancreatic Neoplasms.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Review Minimally invasive versus open pancreatic enucleation. Systematic review and meta-analysis of surgical outcomes. 2018

Guerra, Francesco / Giuliani, Giuseppe / Bencini, Lapo / Bianchi, Paolo P / Coratti, Andrea. ·Division of Oncological and Robotic General Surgery, Careggi University Hospital, Florence, Italy. · Division of General and Minimally Invasive Surgery, Misericordia Hospital, Grosseto, Italy. ·J Surg Oncol · Pubmed #29574729.

ABSTRACT: Parenchymal sparing procedures are gaining interest in pancreatic surgery and recent studies have reported that minimally invasive pancreatic enucleation may be associated with enhanced outcomes when compared with traditional surgery. By meta-analyzing the available data from the literature, minimally invasive surgery is not at higher risk of pancreatic fistula and offers a number of advantages over conventional surgery for pancreatic enucleation.

2 Review Minimally invasive surgical approach to pancreatic malignancies. 2015

Bencini, Lapo / Annecchiarico, Mario / Farsi, Marco / Bartolini, Ilenia / Mirasolo, Vita / Guerra, Francesco / Coratti, Andrea. ·Lapo Bencini, Mario Annecchiarico, Marco Farsi, Ilenia Bartolini, Vita Mirasolo, Francesco Guerra, Andrea Coratti, Department of Oncology, Division of Surgical Oncology and Robotics, Careggi University Hospital, 50131 Florence, Italy. ·World J Gastrointest Oncol · Pubmed #26690680.

ABSTRACT: Pancreatic surgery for malignancy is recognized as challenging for the surgeons and risky for the patients due to consistent perioperative morbidity and mortality. Furthermore, the oncological long-term results are largely disappointing, even for those patients who experience an uneventfully hospital stay. Nevertheless, surgery still remains the cornerstone of a multidisciplinary treatment for pancreatic cancer. In order to maximize the benefits of surgery, the advent of both laparoscopy and robotics has led many surgeons to treat pancreatic cancers with these new methodologies. The reduction of postoperative complications, length of hospital stay and pain, together with a shorter interval between surgery and the beginning of adjuvant chemotherapy, represent the potential advantages over conventional surgery. Lastly, a better cosmetic result, although not crucial in any cancerous patient, could also play a role by improving overall well-being and patient self-perception. The laparoscopic approach to pancreatic surgery is, however, difficult in inexperienced hands and requires a dedicated training in both advanced laparoscopy and pancreatic surgery. The recent large diffusion of the da Vinci(®) robotic platform seems to facilitate many of the technical maneuvers, such as anastomotic biliary and pancreatic reconstructions, accurate lymphadenectomy, and vascular sutures. The two main pancreatic operations, distal pancreatectomy and pancreaticoduodenectomy, are approachable by a minimally invasive path, but more limited interventions such as enucleation are also feasible. Nevertheless, a word of caution should be taken into account when considering the increasing costs of these newest technologies because the main concerns regarding these are the maintenance of all oncological standards and the lack of long-term follow-up. The purpose of this review is to examine the evidence for the use of minimally invasive surgery in pancreatic cancer (and less aggressive tumors), with particular attention to the oncological results and widespread reproducibility of each technique.

3 Review Challenges in robotic distal pancreatectomy: systematic review of current practice. 2015

Guerra, F / Pesi, B / Amore Bonapasta, S / Di Marino, M / Perna, F / Annecchiarico, M / Coratti, A. ·Division of Oncological and Robotic General Surgery, Careggi University Hospital, Florence, Italy - fra.guerra.mail@gmail.com. ·Minerva Chir · Pubmed #25916194.

ABSTRACT: Over the last decade, robotics has gained popularity and is increasingly employed to accomplish several abdominal surgical procedures. Nevertheless, pancreatectomies are regarded as demanding procedures for which the application of minimally-invasive surgery is still limited and its effectiveness has not been conclusively established. We aimed to investigate the current role of robot-assisted surgery to perform distal pancreatectomy. A systematic review of the English-language literature was conducted for articles dealing with robotic-assisted distal pancreatectomies. All relevant papers were evaluated on surgical and oncological outcomes. A total of 10 articles reporting on robotic distal pancreatectomies were finally considered in the analysis, including 259 patients. Mean operative time was 271 minutes (range 181-398); mean blood loss was 210 mL (range 104-361), in 11.6% of cases conversion to laparotomy occurred, spleen preservation was accomplished in 51.4% of procedures, mean time of postoperative hospital stay was 7 days. Overall, postoperative mortality and morbidity were 0% and 23.4% respectively, the mean number of lymph nodes harvested was 12.7. In all included series, no case of R1 resection was reported. Despite its relatively recent introduction in clinical practice, robotic-assisted surgery has been widely employed to perform distal pancreatectomy worldwide and it should be considered a safe and effective procedure. Both surgical and pathologic data support its application in the management of pancreatic lesions of the body and tail.

4 Review A systematic review on robotic pancreaticoduodenectomy. 2013

Cirocchi, Roberto / Partelli, Stefano / Trastulli, Stefano / Coratti, Andrea / Parisi, Amilcare / Falconi, Massimo. ·General Surgery, St. Maria Hospital, University of Perugia, Italy. Electronic address: cirocchiroberto@yahoo.it. ·Surg Oncol · Pubmed #24060451.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Robotic surgery might have several advantages in respect of the laparoscopic approach since might make more feasible the execution of a complex procedure such as pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD). The aim of the present systematic review is to evaluate the current state of the literature on robotic PD. METHODS: A systematic literature search was performed, from January 1st 2003 to July 31st 2012, for studies which reported PDs performed for neoplasm and in which at least one surgical reconstructive or resective step was robotically performed. RESULTS: Thirteen studies, representing 207 patients, met the inclusion criteria. The definition of the robotic approach was heterogeneous since the technique was defined as robotic, robotic-assisted, robot-assisted laparoscopic and robotic hybrid. Resection and reconstruction steps of robotic PD were also heterogeneous combining sequentially different approaches: totally robotic technique, laparoscopic-robotic resection and robotic reconstruction, laparoscopic resection and robotic reconstruction, hand port-assisted laparoscopic resection and robotic reconstruction, laparoscopic-robotic resection and reconstruction through mini-laparotomy. As regard the type of PD 66% were classic Whipple operations and 34% pylorus-preserving pancreatoduodenectomies. The management of pancreatic stump was a pancreaticogastrostomy in 23%, end-to-side pancreaticojejunostomy in 67%, and fibrin glue occlusion of the main pancreatic duct in 10% of cases. The overall procedure failure (rates of conversion to open surgery) was 14%. The overall morbidity rate was 58% and the reoperation rate was 7.3%. CONCLUSIONS: There have been an increasing number of recent case series suggesting increased utilization of robotic PD over the past decade. The technical approach is heterogenous. For highly selected patient, robotic PD is feasible with similar morbidity and mortality compared to open or purely laparoscopic approaches. Data on cost analysis are lacking and further studies are needed to evaluate also the cost-effectiveness of the robotic approach for PD in comparison to open or laparoscopic techniques. The current state of the art analysis on robotic DP can be also useful in planning future trials.

5 Review Current status of robotic distal pancreatectomy: a systematic review. 2013

Cirocchi, Roberto / Partelli, Stefano / Coratti, Andrea / Desiderio, Jacopo / Parisi, Amilcare / Falconi, Massimo. ·Digestive Surgery and Liver Unit, S. Maria Hospital, Via Tristano di Joannuccio n.4, Terni 05100, Italy. cirocchiroberto@yahoo.it ·Surg Oncol · Pubmed #23910929.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: The aim of this systematic review is to determine the potential advantages of robotic distal pancreatectomy (RDP). STUDY SELECTION: Both randomized and non-randomized studies. DATA EXTRACTION: Two investigators independently selected studies for inclusion by article abstraction and full text reviewing. DATA SYNTHESIS: Five non-RCTs were included in the review. The feasibility of RDP (95.4%) and spleen-preserving rate is between 50% and 100%. Mean OT varied between 298 min and 398 min with only completely robotic procedures, whereas mean OT was 293 in "laparoscopic/robotic" technique. Postoperative length of hospital stay ranged from 7 days to 13.7 days. The 30-day postoperative overall morbidity resulted between 0 and 18% of patients. CONCLUSIONS: RDP is an emergent technology for which there are not yet sufficient data to draw definitive conclusions with respect to conventional or laparoscopic surgery. The mean duration of RDP is longer with Da Vinci robot, but hospital stay is shorter even if it is influenced by hospital protocols. We cannot make any conclusions comparing the outcomes to laparoscopic or open procedures here, since none of these studies are randomized, and we all know that most of these surgeons selected the easier cases for robotic procedures. For these reasons randomized controlled trials are recommended to better evaluate RDP cost-effectiveness.

6 Article Robotic distal pancreatectomy with selective closure of pancreatic duct: surgical outcomes. 2019

Moraldi, Luca / Pesi, Benedetta / Bencini, Lapo / Farsi, Marco / Annecchiarico, Mario / Coratti, Andrea. ·Division of Oncological and Robotic General Surgery, Careggi University Hospital, Florence, Italy. · Division of Oncological and Robotic General Surgery, Careggi University Hospital, Florence, Italy. benedettaps@gmail.com. ·Updates Surg · Pubmed #30430370.

ABSTRACT: Pancreatic fistula is the main post-operative complication of distal pancreatectomy associated with other further complications, such as intra-abdominal abscesses, wound infection, sepsis, electrolyte imbalance, malabsorption and hemorrhage. Surgeons have tried various techniques to close the stump of the remaining pancreas, but the controversy regarding the impact of stapler closure and suture closure of the pancreatic stump is far from resolved. In this study, we reported our technique and results of robotic assisted distal pancreatectomy with ultrasound identification and consequent selective closure of pancreatic duct. Twenty-one patients underwent consecutive robotic-assisted distal pancreatectomy were included in our study. We describe our technique and analyzed the operative and peri-operative data including mean operative time, intra-operative bleeding, blood transfusions necessity, conversion rate, mortality and morbidity rate, pancreatic fistula rate and grade, time of refeeding and canalization, length of hospital stay and readmission. Median operative time was 260 min. No conversion occurred. Estimated blood loss was 100 mL (range 50-200). No blood transfusions were performed. Mortality rate was 0%. One (5%) patient had a major complication, while 9 (43%) patients had minor complications (grade I). Three (14%) patients developed pancreatic fistula (grade B), while two (10%) patients had a biochemical leak. No late pancreatic fistula and re-operation occurred. The refeeding was started at second day (range 1^-6^) and the median canalization time was 4 days (range 2-7). The median hospital stay was 6 days (range 3-25) with a readmission rate of 0%. Robotic distal pancreatectomy can be considered safe and feasible. Our technique is easily reproducible, with good surgical results.

7 Article Surgical and oncological outcomes of our first 59 cases of robotic pancreaticoduodenectomy. 2019

Guerra, F / Checcacci, P / Vegni, A / di Marino, M / Annecchiarico, M / Farsi, M / Coratti, A. ·Division of Oncological and Robotic Surgery, Careggi University Hospital, Largo Brambilla, 2, 50134 Florence, Italy. Electronic address: fra.guerra.mail@gmail.com. · Division of Oncological and Robotic Surgery, Careggi University Hospital, Largo Brambilla, 2, 50134 Florence, Italy. ·J Visc Surg · Pubmed #30115586.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: Robotics has shown encouraging results for a number of technically demanding abdominal surgeries including pancreaticoduodenectomy, which has originally represented a relative contraindication to the application of the minimally-invasive technique. We aimed to investigate the perioperative, clinicopathologic, and oncological outcomes of robot-assisted pancreaticoduodenectomy by assessing a consecutive series of totally robotic procedures. METHODS: All consecutive patients who underwent robotic pancreaticoduodenectomy were included in the present analysis. Perioperative, clinicopathologic and oncological outcomes were examined. In order to investigate the role of the learning curve, surgical outcomes were also used to compare the early and the late phase of our experience. RESULTS: A total of 59 patients underwent surgery. Median hospital stay was 9 days (5 - 110), with an overall morbidity and mortality of 37% and 3%, respectively. Of note, the rate of clinically relevant pancreatic fistula was 11.8%. R0 resections were achieved in 96% of patients and the 3-year disease-free and overall survivals were 37.2 and 61.9%, respectively. Overall, surgical outcomes did not vary significantly between the first and the late phase of the series. CONCLUSIONS: Robotic pancreaticoduodenectomy can be performed competently. It satisfies all features of oncological adequacy and may offer a number of advantages over standard procedures in terms of surgical results.

8 Article Ultrasound-Guided Robotic Enucleation of Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors. 2019

Di Benedetto, Fabrizio / Magistri, Paolo / Ballarin, Roberto / Tarantino, Giuseppe / Bartolini, Ilenia / Bencini, Lapo / Moraldi, Luca / Annecchiarico, Mario / Guerra, Francesco / Coratti, Andrea. ·1 University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Modena Italy. · 2 Sapienza-University of Rome, Rome, Italy. · 3 Careggi University Hospital, Florence, Italy. ·Surg Innov · Pubmed #30066609.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PanNETs) are relatively rare neoplasms with a low to mild malignant potential. They can be further divided into functioning and nonfunctioning, according to their secretive activity. Surgery is an optimal approach, but the classic open approach is challenging, with some patients having long hospitalization and potentially life-threatening complications. The robotic approach for PanNETs may represent an option to optimize their management. METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed our prospectively maintained databases from 2 high-volume Italian centers for pancreatic surgery. Demographics, pathological characteristics, perioperative outcome, and medium-term follow-up of patients who underwent robotic pancreatic enucleations were collected. RESULTS: Twelve patients with final diagnosis of PanNET were included. The mean age of the patients was 53.8 years (25-77). The median body mass index was 26 (24-29). Three lesions were functioning insulinomas, while the others were nonfunctioning tumors. No deaths occurred. Mild postoperative complications occurred, except for 1 grade B pancreatic fistula. The mean postoperative stay was 3.9 days (2-5). CONCLUSIONS: Our results confirm that robotic enucleation is a feasible and safe approach for the treatment of PanNETs, with short hospital stay and low incidence of morbidity.

9 Article Peripheral ENO1-specific T cells mirror the intratumoral immune response and their presence is a potential prognostic factor for pancreatic adenocarcinoma. 2016

Niccolai, Elena / Cappello, Paola / Taddei, Antonio / Ricci, Federica / D'Elios, Mario Milco / Benagiano, Marisa / Bechi, Paolo / Bencini, Lapo / Ringressi, Maria Novella / Coratti, Andrea / Cianchi, Fabio / Bonello, Lisa / Di Celle, Paola Francia / Prisco, Domenico / Novelli, Francesco / Amedei, Amedeo. ·Department of Experimental and Clinical Medicine, University of Florence, and Department of Biomedicine, Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria Careggi (AOUC), I-50134 Florence, Italy. · Centre for Experimental Research and Medical Studies (CERMS), AOU City of Health and Science of Turin, and Department of Molecular Biotechnology and Health Sciences, University of Turin, I-10126 Turin, Italy. · Department of Surgery and Translational Medicine, University of Florence, and Department of Biomedicine, Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria Careggi (AOUC), I-50134 Florence, Italy. · Division of General and Oncologic Surgery, Department of Oncology, Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria Careggi (AOUC), I-50134 Florence, Italy. · General Anatomopathology and Molecular Oncogenetics - AOU City of Health and Science of Turin, I-10126 Turin, Italy. ·Int J Oncol · Pubmed #27210467.

ABSTRACT: Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is an aggressive disease with an average survival of 4-6 months following diagnosis. Surgical resection is the only treatment with curative intent, but resectable PDAC patients are in the minority. Also, unlike other neoplasms, PDAC is resistant to conventional and targeted chemotherapy. Innovative treatments, such as immunotherapy, can be very important and the study of the immune response is fundamental. We previously demonstrated that PDAC patients show tumor-infiltrating T cells specific to α-enolase (ENO1), a glycolytic enzyme over-expressed by pancreatic tumor cells, which plays an important role in promoting cell migration and cancer metastasis. In the present study, we evaluate the functional anticancer proprieties of ENO1-specific T cells isolated from the peripheral blood of PDAC patients. Furthermore, comparing the T cell receptor repertoire of ENO1-specific peripheral and infiltrating tumor T cells from the same patient suggests that ENO1-specific T cells, despite having a different functional profile, can recirculate from the tumor to the periphery. Finally, of clinical relevance, the presence of peripheral ENO1-specific T cells has a prognostic value and significantly correlates with a longer survival.

10 Article Initial Experience With Robotic Pancreatic Surgery: Technical Feasibility and Oncological Implications. 2016

Coratti, Andrea / Di Marino, Michele / Coratti, Francesco / Baldoni, Giulia / Guerra, Francesco / Amore Bonapasta, Stefano / Bencini, Lapo / Farsi, Marco / Annecchiarico, Mario. ·*Department of Oncology, Division of Oncological and Robotic General Surgery, Careggi University Hospital, Florence †International School of Robotic Surgery, Misericordia Hospital, Grosseto, Italy. ·Surg Laparosc Endosc Percutan Tech · Pubmed #26766310.

ABSTRACT: Robotic surgery has been introduced in the field of minimally invasive surgery to improve the handling of high-demanding procedures with encouraging results. We aimed to evaluate the clinical safety and the oncological adequacy of robot-assisted pancreatic surgery by analyzing a consecutive series in terms of surgical and oncological outcomes. A total of 53 consecutive cases including 36 pancreatoduodenectomies (PD) and 14 distal pancreatectomies (DP) were evaluated. The overall postoperative morbidity and mortality were 32% and 3.8%, respectively. Radical resection was achieved in 93.7% of PD and 100% of DP, with a mean number of harvested lymph nodes of 29.8 for PD and 20.5 for DP. The 3-year cumulative overall survival was 44.2% and 73.9% for patient with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma and nonductal malignancy, respectively. Robotic technology may be useful to reproduce conventional open pancreatic surgery with a minimally invasive approach, overcoming some of the intrinsic limitations of conventional laparoscopy.

11 Article Intra-tumoral IFN-γ-producing Th22 cells correlate with TNM staging and the worst outcomes in pancreatic cancer. 2016

Niccolai, Elena / Taddei, Antonio / Ricci, Federica / Rolla, Simona / D'Elios, Mario Milco / Benagiano, Marisa / Bechi, Paolo / Bencini, Lapo / Ringressi, Maria Novella / Pini, Alessandro / Castiglione, Francesca / Giordano, Daniele / Satolli, Maria Antonietta / Coratti, Andrea / Cianchi, Fabio / Bani, Daniele / Prisco, Domenico / Novelli, Francesco / Amedei, Amedeo. ·Department of Experimental and Clinical Medicine, University of Florence, Largo Brambilla 3, 50134 Florence, Italy. · Immunogenetics and Transplant Biology Service, Azienda Ospedaliera Città della Salute e della Scienza di Torino, via Santena 19, 10126 Turin, Italy. · Centre for Experimental Research and Medical Studies (CERMS), Azienda Ospedaliera Città della Salute e della Scienza di Torino, via Cherasco 15, 10126 Turin, Italy Molecular Biology Center and Department of Molecular Biotechnology and Health Sciences, University of Turin, via Nizza 52, 10126 Turin, Italy. · Department of Experimental and Clinical Medicine, University of Florence, Largo Brambilla 3, 50134 Florence, Italy Department of Neuro-Skeletal Muscle and Sensory Organs, Interdisciplinary Internal Medicine Unit, Azienda Ospedaliero Universitaria Careggi, 50134 Florence, Italy. · Department of Surgery and Translational Medicine, University of Florence, Viale Michelangiolo 41, 50125 Florence, Italy Department of Biomedicine, Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria Careggi (AOUC), Largo Brambilla 3, 50134 Florence, Italy. · Department of Oncology, Division of General and Oncologic Surgery, Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria Careggi (AOUC), Largo Brambilla 3, 50134 Florence, Italy. · Centro Oncologico Ematologico Subalpino (COES), AOU Città della Salute e della Scienza di Torino, 10126 Turin, Italy. · Immunogenetics and Transplant Biology Service, Azienda Ospedaliera Città della Salute e della Scienza di Torino, via Santena 19, 10126 Turin, Italy Centre for Experimental Research and Medical Studies (CERMS), Azienda Ospedaliera Città della Salute e della Scienza di Torino, via Cherasco 15, 10126 Turin, Italy Molecular Biology Center and Department of Molecular Biotechnology and Health Sciences, University of Turin, via Nizza 52, 10126 Turin, Italy aamedei@unifi.it franco.novelli@unito.it. · Department of Experimental and Clinical Medicine, University of Florence, Largo Brambilla 3, 50134 Florence, Italy Department of Neuro-Skeletal Muscle and Sensory Organs, Interdisciplinary Internal Medicine Unit, Azienda Ospedaliero Universitaria Careggi, 50134 Florence, Italy aamedei@unifi.it franco.novelli@unito.it. ·Clin Sci (Lond) · Pubmed #26590104.

ABSTRACT: PDAC (pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma) is the fifth leading cause of cancer-related death. The causes of this cancer remain unknown, but increasing evidence indicates a key role of the host immune response and cytokines in human carcinogenesis. Intra-tumoral IL (interleukin)-22 levels have been shown to be elevated in PDAC patients. However, little is known regarding the expression and clinical relevance of Th22 cells in human PDAC and, furthermore, which TILs (tumour-infiltrating lymphocytes) are the main producers of IL-22 is unknown. In the present study, we characterized the functional proprieties of the different subsets of IL-22-producing TILs and analysed their relationship with the TNM staging system and patient survival. We have demonstrated for the first time that, in PDAC patients, the T-cells co-producing IFN-γ (interferon γ) and exerting perforin-mediated cytotoxicity are the major intra-tumoral source of IL-22. In addition, isolated Th22 cells were able to induce apoptosis, which was antagonized by IL-22. Finally, we observed that the IL-22-producing T-cells were significantly increased in tumour tissue and that this increase was positively correlated with TNM staging of PDAC and poorer patient survival. These novel findings support the dual role of the anti-tumour immune system and that IL-22-producing cells may participate in PDAC pathogenesis. Therefore monitoring Th22 levels could be a good diagnostic parameter, and blocking IL-22 signalling may represent a viable method for anti-PDAC therapies.

12 Article Robotic distal pancreatectomy with or without preservation of spleen: a technical note. 2014

Parisi, Amilcare / Coratti, Francesco / Cirocchi, Roberto / Grassi, Veronica / Desiderio, Jacopo / Farinacci, Federico / Ricci, Francesco / Adamenko, Olga / Economou, Anastasia Iliana / Cacurri, Alban / Trastulli, Stefano / Renzi, Claudio / Castellani, Elisa / Di Rocco, Giorgio / Redler, Adriano / Santoro, Alberto / Coratti, Andrea. ·Department of Digestive and Liver Surgery Unit, St Maria Hospital, Viale Tristano di Joannuccio 1, 05100 Terni, Italy. veronicagrassi@hotmail.it. ·World J Surg Oncol · Pubmed #25248464.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Distal pancreatectomy (DP) is a surgical procedure performed to remove the pancreatic tail jointly with a variable part of the pancreatic body and including a spleen resection in the case of conventional distal pancreatectomy or not in the spleen-preserving distal pancreatectomy. METHODS: In this article, we describe a standardized operative technique for fully robotic distal pancreatectomy. RESULTS: In the last decade, the use of robotic systems has become increasingly common as an approach for benign and malignant pancreatic disease treatment. Robotic Distal Pancreatectomy (RDP) is an emerging technology for which sufficient data to draw definitive conclusions in surgical oncology are still not available because the follow-up period after surgery is too short (less than 2 years). CONCLUSIONS: RDP is an emerging technology for which sufficient data to draw definitive conclusions of value in surgical oncology are still not available, however this techniques is safe and reproducible by surgeons that possess adequate skills.

13 Article Robot-assisted pancreatic surgery. 2014

Coratti, A / Annecchiarico, M. ·Department of Surgery, Division of General and Minimally Invasive Surgery, Misericordia Hospital, 58100 Grosseto, Italy. corattian@gmail.com. ·Br J Surg · Pubmed #24652659.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

14 Minor Splenic preservation during open and minimally-invasive distal pancreatectomy. 2015

Guerra, Francesco / Pesi, Benedetta / Fatucchi, Lorenzo Maria / Amore Bonapasta, Stefano / Coratti, Andrea. ·Division of Oncological and Robotic General Surgery, Careggi University Hospital, Florence, Italy. Electronic address: fra.guerra.mail@gmail.com. · Division of Oncological and Robotic General Surgery, Careggi University Hospital, Florence, Italy. ·Surgery · Pubmed #26032823.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --