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Pancreatic Neoplasms: HELP
Articles by Stephen J. Clarke
Based on 7 articles published since 2010
(Why 7 articles?)
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Between 2010 and 2020, S. Clarke wrote the following 7 articles about Pancreatic Neoplasms.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Article Biomarker panel predicts survival after resection in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma: A multi-institutional cohort study. 2019

Nahm, Christopher B / Turchini, John / Jamieson, Nigel / Moon, Elizabeth / Sioson, Loretta / Itchins, Malinda / Arena, Jennifer / Colvin, Emily / Howell, Viive M / Pavlakis, Nick / Clarke, Stephen / Samra, Jaswinder S / Gill, Anthony J / Mittal, Anubhav. ·The University of Sydney Northern Clinical School, Sydney, NSW, Australia; Upper Gastrointestinal Surgical Unit, Royal North Shore Hospital, St. Leonards, NSW Australia; Bill Walsh Translational Cancer Research Laboratory, Kolling Institute, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia; Sydney Vital, Kolling Institute, Sydney, NSW, Australia. · The University of Sydney Northern Clinical School, Sydney, NSW, Australia; Cancer Diagnosis and Pathology, Kolling Institute, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia. · Wolfson Wohl Cancer Research Centre, Institute of Cancer Sciences, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, UK. · Bill Walsh Translational Cancer Research Laboratory, Kolling Institute, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia; Sydney Vital, Kolling Institute, Sydney, NSW, Australia. · Cancer Diagnosis and Pathology, Kolling Institute, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia; Sydney Vital, Kolling Institute, Sydney, NSW, Australia. · The University of Sydney Northern Clinical School, Sydney, NSW, Australia; Bill Walsh Translational Cancer Research Laboratory, Kolling Institute, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia; Department of Medical Oncology, Royal North Shore Hospital, St. Leonards, NSW, Australia; Sydney Vital, Kolling Institute, Sydney, NSW, Australia. · Department of Medical Oncology, Royal North Shore Hospital, St. Leonards, NSW, Australia; Australian Pancreatic Centre, Royal North Shore Hospital, St. Leonards, NSW, Australia. · The University of Sydney Northern Clinical School, Sydney, NSW, Australia; Bill Walsh Translational Cancer Research Laboratory, Kolling Institute, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia; Sydney Vital, Kolling Institute, Sydney, NSW, Australia. · The University of Sydney Northern Clinical School, Sydney, NSW, Australia; Bill Walsh Translational Cancer Research Laboratory, Kolling Institute, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia; Department of Medical Oncology, Royal North Shore Hospital, St. Leonards, NSW, Australia; Sydney Vital, Kolling Institute, Sydney, NSW, Australia; Australian Pancreatic Centre, Royal North Shore Hospital, St. Leonards, NSW, Australia. · The University of Sydney Northern Clinical School, Sydney, NSW, Australia; Upper Gastrointestinal Surgical Unit, Royal North Shore Hospital, St. Leonards, NSW Australia; Sydney Vital, Kolling Institute, Sydney, NSW, Australia; Australian Pancreatic Centre, Royal North Shore Hospital, St. Leonards, NSW, Australia; Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences, Macquarie University, Sydney, NSW, Australia. · The University of Sydney Northern Clinical School, Sydney, NSW, Australia; Cancer Diagnosis and Pathology, Kolling Institute, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia; Australian Pancreatic Centre, Royal North Shore Hospital, St. Leonards, NSW, Australia; Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences, Macquarie University, Sydney, NSW, Australia. · The University of Sydney Northern Clinical School, Sydney, NSW, Australia; Upper Gastrointestinal Surgical Unit, Royal North Shore Hospital, St. Leonards, NSW Australia; Australian Pancreatic Centre, Royal North Shore Hospital, St. Leonards, NSW, Australia; Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences, Macquarie University, Sydney, NSW, Australia. Electronic address: anubhav.mittal@sydney.edu.au. ·Eur J Surg Oncol · Pubmed #30348604.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Up to 60% of patients who undergo curative-intent pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) resection experience disease recurrence within six months. We recently published a systematic review of prognostic immunohistochemical biomarkers in PDAC and shortlisted a panel of those reported with the highest level of evidence, including p53, p16, Ca-125, S100A4, FOXC1, EGFR, mesothelin, CD24 and UPAR. This study aims to discover and validate the prognostic significance of a combinatorial panel of tumor biomarkers in patients with resected PDAC. METHODS: Patients who underwent PDAC resection were included from a single institution discovery cohort and a multi-institutional validation cohort. Tumors in the discovery cohort were stained immunohistochemically for all nine shortlisted biomarkers. Biomarkers significantly associated with overall survival (OS) were reevaluated as a combinatorial panel in both discovery and validation cohorts for its prognostic significance. RESULTS: 224 and 191 patients were included in the discovery and validation cohorts, respectively. In both cohorts, S100A4, Ca-125 and mesothelin expression were associated with shorter OS. In both cohorts, the number of these biomarkers expressed was significantly associated with OS (discovery cohort 36.8 vs. 26.4 vs 16.3 vs 12.8 months, P < 0.001; validation cohort 25.2 vs 18.3 vs 13.6 vs 11.9 months, P = 0.008 for expression of zero, one, two and three biomarkers, respectively). On multivariable analysis, expression of at least one of three biomarkers was independently associated with shorter OS. CONCLUSION: Combinations of S100A4, Ca-125 and mesothelin expression stratify survival after resection of localized PDAC. Co-expression of all three biomarkers is associated with the poorest prognostic outcome.

2 Article Tailored first-line and second-line CDK4-targeting treatment combinations in mouse models of pancreatic cancer. 2018

Chou, Angela / Froio, Danielle / Nagrial, Adnan M / Parkin, Ashleigh / Murphy, Kendelle J / Chin, Venessa T / Wohl, Dalia / Steinmann, Angela / Stark, Rhys / Drury, Alison / Walters, Stacey N / Vennin, Claire / Burgess, Andrew / Pinese, Mark / Chantrill, Lorraine A / Cowley, Mark J / Molloy, Timothy J / Anonymous170925 / Waddell, Nicola / Johns, Amber / Grimmond, Sean M / Chang, David K / Biankin, Andrew V / Sansom, Owen J / Morton, Jennifer P / Grey, Shane T / Cox, Thomas R / Turchini, John / Samra, Jaswinder / Clarke, Stephen J / Timpson, Paul / Gill, Anthony J / Pajic, Marina. ·The Kinghorn Cancer Centre, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. · Faculty of Medicine, St Vincent's Clinical School, University of NSW, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. · Department of Anatomical Pathology, SYDPATH, Darlinghurst, Australia. · Crown Princess Mary Cancer Centre, Westmead Hospital, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. · St. Vincent's Hospital, Darlinghurst, Australia. · St Vincent's Centre for Applied Medical Research, Darlinghurst, New South Wales, Australia. · Department of Genetics and Computational Biology, QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Queensland, Australia. · University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. · Wolfson Wohl Cancer Research Centre, Institute of Cancer Sciences, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, UK. · West of Scotland Pancreatic Unit, Glasgow Royal Infirmary, Glasgow, UK. · Department of Surgery, Cancer Research UK, Beatson Institute, Institute of Cancer Sciences, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, UK. · Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. · Department of Anatomical Pathology, Royal North Shore Hospital, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. · Cancer Diagnosis and Pathology Research Group, Kolling Institute of Medical Research, New South Wales, Australia. · Department of Surgery, Royal North Shore Hospital, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. ·Gut · Pubmed #29080858.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: Extensive molecular heterogeneity of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA), few effective therapies and high mortality make this disease a prime model for advancing development of tailored therapies. The p16-cyclin D-cyclin-dependent kinase 4/6-retinoblastoma (RB) protein (CDK4) pathway, regulator of cell proliferation, is deregulated in PDA. Our aim was to develop a novel personalised treatment strategy for PDA based on targeting CDK4. DESIGN: Sensitivity to potent CDK4/6 inhibitor PD-0332991 (palbociclib) was correlated to protein and genomic data in 19 primary patient-derived PDA lines to identify biomarkers of response. In vivo efficacy of PD-0332991 and combination therapies was determined in subcutaneous, intrasplenic and orthotopic tumour models derived from genome-sequenced patient specimens and genetically engineered model. Mechanistically, monotherapy and combination therapy were investigated in the context of tumour cell and extracellular matrix (ECM) signalling. Prognostic relevance of companion biomarker, RB protein, was evaluated and validated in independent PDA patient cohorts (>500 specimens). RESULTS: Subtype-specific in vivo efficacy of PD-0332991-based therapy was for the first time observed at multiple stages of PDA progression: primary tumour growth, recurrence (second-line therapy) and metastatic setting and may potentially be guided by a simple biomarker (RB protein). PD-0332991 significantly disrupted surrounding ECM organisation, leading to increased quiescence, apoptosis, improved chemosensitivity, decreased invasion, metastatic spread and PDA progression in vivo. RB protein is prevalent in primary operable and metastatic PDA and may present a promising predictive biomarker to guide this therapeutic approach. CONCLUSION: This study demonstrates the promise of CDK4 inhibition in PDA over standard therapy when applied in a molecular subtype-specific context.

3 Article Retrospective cohort analysis of neoadjuvant treatment and survival in resectable and borderline resectable pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma in a high volume referral centre. 2017

Itchins, M / Arena, J / Nahm, C B / Rabindran, J / Kim, S / Gibbs, E / Bergamin, S / Chua, T C / Gill, A J / Maher, R / Diakos, C / Wong, M / Mittal, A / Hruby, G / Kneebone, A / Pavlakis, N / Samra, J / Clarke, S. ·Department of Oncology, Royal North Shore Hospital, Sydney, NSW, Australia; Sydney Medical School (Northern), The University of Sydney, Australia. Electronic address: mitchins@gmail.com. · Department of Oncology, Royal North Shore Hospital, Sydney, NSW, Australia. · Upper GI Surgical Unit, Department of Gastrointestinal Surgery, Royal North Shore Hospital, Sydney, NSW, Australia; Sydney Medical School (Northern), The University of Sydney, Australia. · Upper GI Surgical Unit, Department of Gastrointestinal Surgery, Royal North Shore Hospital, Sydney, NSW, Australia. · National Health and Medical Research Council Clinical Trial Centre (NHMRC CTC), The University of Sydney, Australia. · Sydney Medical School (Northern), The University of Sydney, Australia; Cancer Diagnosis and Pathology, Kolling Institute, Royal North Shore Hospital, Sydney, Australia. · Department of Radiology, Royal North Shore Hospital, Australia. · Department of Oncology, Royal North Shore Hospital, Sydney, NSW, Australia; Sydney Medical School (Northern), The University of Sydney, Australia; Northern Cancer Institute, Sydney, NSW, Australia. · Department of Medical Oncology, Gosford Hospital, New South Wales, Australia. · Department of Oncology, Royal North Shore Hospital, Sydney, NSW, Australia; Sydney Medical School (Northern), The University of Sydney, Australia. ·Eur J Surg Oncol · Pubmed #28688722.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is a deadly disease. Neoadjuvant therapy (NA) with chemotherapy (NAC) and radiotherapy (RT) prior to surgery provides promise. In the absence of prospective data, well annotated clinical data from high-volume units may provide pilot data for randomised trials. METHODS: Medical records from a tertiary hospital in Sydney, Australia, were analysed to identify all patients with resectable or borderline resectable PDAC. Data regarding treatment, toxicity and survival were collected. RESULTS: Between January 1 2010 and April 1 2016, 220 sequential patients were treated: 87 with NA and 133 with upfront operation (UO). Forty-three NA patients (52%) and 5 UO patients (4%) were borderline resectable at diagnosis. Twenty-four borderline patients received NA RT, 22 sequential to NAC. The median overall survival (OS) in the NA group was 25.9 months (mo); 95% CI (21.1-43.0 mo) compared to 26.9 mo (19.7, 32.7) in the UO; HR 0.89; log-ranked p-value = 0.58. Sixty-nine NA patients (79%) were resected, mOS was 29.2 mo (22.27, not reached (NR)). Twenty-two NA (31%) versus 22 UO (17%) were node negative at operation (N0). In those managed with NAC/RT the mOS was 29.0 mo (17.3, NR). There were no post-operative deaths with NA within 90-days and three in the UO arm. DISCUSSION: This is a hypothesis generating retrospective review of a selected real-world population in a high-throughput unit. Treatment with NA was well tolerated. The long observed survival in this group may be explained by lymph node sterilisation by NA, and the achievement of R0 resection in a greater proportion of patients.

4 Article Somatostatin Receptor SSTR-2a Expression Is a Stronger Predictor for Survival Than Ki-67 in Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors. 2015

Mehta, Shreya / de Reuver, Philip R / Gill, Preetjote / Andrici, Juliana / D'Urso, Lisa / Mittal, Anubhav / Pavlakis, Nick / Clarke, Stephen / Samra, Jaswinder S / Gill, Anthony J. ·From Department of Gastrointestinal Surgery, Royal North Shore Hospital and North Shore Private Hospital, University of Sydney, New South Wales, Australia (SM, PDR, PG, AM, JSS) · Department of Medical Oncology, Royal North Shore Hospital and North Shore Private Hospital, University of Sydney, New South Wales, Australia (NP, SC) · Macquarie University Hospital, Macquarie University, New South Wales, Australia (JSS) · and Department of Anatomical Pathology Royal North Shore Hospital, Cancer Diagnosis and Pathology Group, Kolling Institute of Medical Research, University of Sydney, New South Wales, Australia (JA, LDU, AJG). ·Medicine (Baltimore) · Pubmed #26447992.

ABSTRACT: Somatostatin receptors (SSTR) are commonly expressed by neuroendocrine tumors. Expression of SSTR-2a and SSTR-5 may impact symptomatic management; however, the impact on survival is unclear. The aim of this study is to correlate SSTR-2a and SSTR-5 expression in pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PNETs) with survival. This study is designed to determine the prognostic significance of somatostatin receptors SSTR-2a and SSTR-5 in PNETs. This retrospective cohort study included cases of resected PNETs between 1992 and 2014. Clinical data, histopathology, expression of SSTR and Ki-67 by immunohistochemistry, and long-term survival were analyzed. A total of 99 cases were included in this study. The mean age was 57.8 years (18-87 years) and median tumor size was 25 mm (range 8-160 mm). SSTR-2a and SSTR-5 expression was scored as negative (n = 19, 19.2%; n = 75, 75.8%, respectively) and positive (n = 80, 80.1%; n = 24, 24.2%). The median follow-up was 49 months. SSTR-2a expression was associated with improved overall survival, with cumulative survival rates at 1, 3, and 5 years being 97.5%, 91.5%, and 82.9%, respectively. Univariate analysis demonstrated better survival in SSTR-2a positive patients (log rank P = 0.04). SSTR-5 expression was not associated with survival outcomes (log rank P = 0.94). Multivariate analysis showed that positive SSTR-2a expression is a stronger prognostic indicator for overall survival [Hazard Ratio (HR): 0.2, 95% Confidence interval (CI): 0.1-0.8] compared to high Ki-67 (HR: 0.8, 95% CI: 0.1-5.7). Expression of SSTR-2a is an independent positive prognostic factor for survival in PNETs.

5 Article Pathogenic PALB2 mutation in metastatic pancreatic adenocarcinoma and neuroendocrine tumour: A case report. 2015

Chan, David / Clarke, Stephen / Gill, Anthony J / Chantrill, Lorraine / Samra, Jas / Li, Bob T / Barnes, Tristan / Nahar, Kazi / Pavlakis, Nick. ·Northern Sydney Cancer Centre, Royal North Shore Hospital, St. Leonards, NSW, Australia. · Garvan Institute of Medical Research, Darlinghurst, NSW, Australia. · Thoracic Oncology Service, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY, USA. ·Mol Clin Oncol · Pubmed #26171187.

ABSTRACT: Adenocarcinoma of the pancreas is an aggressive malignancy with poor prognosis. Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumours (PNET) comprise ~3% of primary pancreatic neoplasms and they are more heterogeneous in their histological character and outcome. This is the case report of a 73-year-old female patient with synchronously diagnosed pancreatic adenocarcinoma and PNET, which is likely associated with a pathogenic partner and localizer of breast cancer 2, early onset (PALB2) mutation. The potential pathogenic significance of PALB2 and its association with various malignancies were investigated and the potential role of PALB2 in conferring sensitivity to chemotherapeutic agents, such as mitomycin C and cisplatin, was discussed. This case report highlights the significance of ongoing research into the molecular pathogenesis of pancreatic cancer, which may help guide the selection of optimal treatments for this disease, as well as the need for ongoing study of PALB2 as a possible predictive marker of response to DNA-damaging agents.

6 Article Adverse tumor biology associated with mesenterico-portal vein resection influences survival in patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. 2014

Wang, F / Gill, A J / Neale, M / Puttaswamy, V / Gananadha, S / Pavlakis, N / Clarke, S / Hugh, T J / Samra, J S. ·Department of Gastrointestinal Surgery, Royal North Shore Hospital and North Shore Private Hospital, University of Sydney, St Leonards, NSW, Australia, fwang1881@gmail.com. ·Ann Surg Oncol · Pubmed #24558067.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Although pancreatoduodenectomy (PD) with mesenterico-portal vein resection (VR) can be performed safely in patients with resectable pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), the impact of this approach on long-term survival is controversial. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Analyses of a prospectively collected database revealed 122 consecutive patients with PDAC who underwent PD with (PD+VR) or without (PD-VR) VR between January 2004 and May 2012. Clinical data, operative results, and survival outcomes were analysed. RESULTS: Sixty-four (53 %) patients underwent PD+VR. The majority (84 %) of the venous reconstructions were performed with a primary end-to-end anastomosis. Demographic and postoperative outcomes were similar between the two groups. American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) score, duration of operation, intraoperative blood loss, and blood transfusion requirement were significantly greater in the PD+VR group compared with the PD-VR group. Furthermore, the tumor size was larger, and the rates of periuncinate neural invasion and positive resection margin were higher in the PD+VR group compared with the PD-VR group. Histological venous involvement occurred in 47 of 62 (76 %) patients in the PD+VR group. At a median follow-up of 29 months, the median overall survival (OS) was 18 months for the PD+VR group, and 31 months for the PD-VR group (p = 0.016). ASA score, lymph node metastasis, neurovascular invasion, and tumor differentiation were predictive of survival. The need for VR in itself was not prognostic of survival. CONCLUSIONS: PD with VR has similar morbidity but worse OS compared with a PD-VR. Although VR is not predictive of survival, tumors requiring a PD+VR have more adverse biological features.

7 Article Diagnostic Accuracy of Imaging Modalities in the Evaluation of Vascular Invasion in Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma: A Meta-Analysis. 2013

Li, Angela E / Li, Bob T / Ng, Bernard H K / McCormack, Sam / Vedelago, John / Clarke, Stephen / Pavlakis, Nick / Samra, Jaswinder. ·Department of Radiology, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Camperdown NSW 2050, Australia. · Department of Medical Oncology, Royal North Shore Hospital, St Leonards NSW 2065, Australia. · Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, Camperdown NSW 2050, Australia. · Imaging Partners Online, Sydney NSW 2000, Australia. · Department of Gastrointestinal Surgery, Royal North Shore Hospital, St Leonards NSW 2065, Australia. ·World J Oncol · Pubmed #29147335.

ABSTRACT: Background: The extent of vascular invasion is a key factor determining the resectability of non-metastatic pancreatic adenocarcinoma. The purpose of this study is to determine the diagnostic accuracy of computed tomography (CT), endoscopic ultrasound (EUS), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the pre-operative evaluation of vascular invasion in pancreatic adenocarcinoma, with surgery as the reference standard. Methods: A search of the MEDLINE database for relevant articles in the English language published between January 2000 and February 2009 was performed. From each study, 2 × 2 tables were obtained, and pooled sensitivity, specificity, positive likelihood ratios, negative likelihood ratios and diagnostic odds ratios were calculated for each modality, along with a summary receiver operating characteristics (SROC) curve. Results: 16 studies with a total of 797 patients who had surgical assessment of vascular invasion were included in the analysis. Several studies evaluated more than one imaging modality, allowing 24 datasets to be obtained in total. Sensitivity was highest for CT (0.73, 95% CI 0.67 - 0.79), followed by EUS (0.66, 95% CI 0.56 - 0.75) and MRI (0.63, 95% CI 0.48 - 0.77). The specificity for all three imaging modalities was comparable. The diagnostic odds ratios for CT, EUS and MRI were 45.9 (95% CI 18.0 - 117.4), 23.0 (95%CI 9.4 - 56.6), 23.9 (95% CI 5.4 - 105.1) respectively. Conclusion: CT was more accurate than EUS and MRI in the evaluation of vascular invasion in pancreatic adenocarcinoma and should be the first line investigation in pre-operative staging.