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Pancreatic Neoplasms: HELP
Articles by Sara Cingarlini
Based on 16 articles published since 2010
(Why 16 articles?)
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Between 2010 and 2020, Sara Cingarlini wrote the following 16 articles about Pancreatic Neoplasms.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Editorial Prognostication and response assessment in liver and pancreatic tumors: The new imaging. 2015

De Robertis, Riccardo / Tinazzi Martini, Paolo / Demozzi, Emanuele / Puntel, Gino / Ortolani, Silvia / Cingarlini, Sara / Ruzzenente, Andrea / Guglielmi, Alfredo / Tortora, Giampaolo / Bassi, Claudio / Pederzoli, Paolo / D'Onofrio, Mirko. ·Riccardo De Robertis, Emanuele Demozzi, Gino Puntel, Mirko D'Onofrio, Department of Radiology, Verona Comprehensive Cancer Network, G.B. Rossi Hospital, University of Verona, 37134 Verona, Italy. ·World J Gastroenterol · Pubmed #26078555.

ABSTRACT: Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) and perfusion computed tomography (CT) are technical improvements of morphologic imaging that can evaluate functional properties of hepato-bilio-pancreatic tumors during conventional MRI or CT examinations. Nevertheless, the term "functional imaging" is commonly used to describe molecular imaging techniques, as positron emission tomography (PET) CT/MRI, which still represent the most widely used methods for the evaluation of functional properties of solid neoplasms; unlike PET or single photon emission computed tomography, functional imaging techniques applied to conventional MRI/CT examinations do not require the administration of radiolabeled drugs or specific equipments. Moreover, DWI and DCE-MRI can be performed during the same session, thus providing a comprehensive "one-step" morphological and functional evaluation of hepato-bilio-pancreatic tumors. Literature data reveal that functional imaging techniques could be proposed for the evaluation of these tumors before treatment, given that they may improve staging and predict prognosis or clinical outcome. Microscopic changes within neoplastic tissues induced by treatments can be detected and quantified with functional imaging, therefore these techniques could be used also for post-treatment assessment, even at an early stage. The aim of this editorial is to describe possible applications of new functional imaging techniques apart from molecular imaging to hepatic and pancreatic tumors through a review of up-to-date literature data, with a particular emphasis on pathological correlations, prognostic stratification and post-treatment monitoring.

2 Article Patterns of Recurrence after Resection for Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors: Who, When, and Where? 2019

Marchegiani, Giovanni / Landoni, Luca / Andrianello, Stefano / Masini, Gaia / Cingarlini, Sara / D'Onofrio, Mirko / De Robertis, Riccardo / Davì, Mariavittoria / Capelli, Paola / Manfrin, Erminia / Amodio, Antonio / Paiella, Salvatore / Malleo, Giuseppe / Damoli, Isacco / Miotto, Marco / Bianchi, Beatrice / Nessi, Chiara / Vivani, Elena / Scarpa, Aldo / Salvia, Roberto / Bassi, Claudio. ·Department of General and Pancreatic Surgery, The Pancreas Institute, University of Verona Hospital Trust, Verona, Italy. · Department of Oncology, The Pancreas Institute, University of Verona Hospital Trust, Verona, Italy. · Department of Radiology, The Pancreas Institute, University of Verona Hospital Trust, Verona, Italy. · Department of Medicine, University of Verona Hospital Trust, Verona, Italy. · Pathology, The Pancreas Institute, University of Verona Hospital Trust, Verona, Italy. · Department of Gastroenterology, The Pancreas Institute, University of Verona Hospital Trust, Verona, Italy. · Department of General and Pancreatic Surgery, The Pancreas Institute, University of Verona Hospital Trust, Verona, Italy, roberto.salvia@univr.it. ·Neuroendocrinology · Pubmed #30481765.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND/AIMS: Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (pan-NENs) represent an increasingly common indication for pancreatic resection, but there are few data regarding possible recurrence after surgery. The aim of the study was to describe the frequency, timing, and patterns of recurrence after resection for pan-NENs with consequent implications for postoperative follow-up. METHODS: We performed a retrospective analysis of pan-NENs resected between 1990 and 2015 at The Pancreas Institute, University of Verona Hospital Trust. Predictors of recurrence were assessed. Survival analysis was conducted using the Kaplan-Meier and conditional survival (CS) methods. RESULTS: The cohort consisted of 487 patients with a median follow-up of 71 months. Recurrence developed in 12.3%: 54 (11.1%) liver metastases, 11 (2.3%) local recurrence, 10 (2.1%) nodal recurrence, and 8 (1.6%) metastases in other organs. Thirty-one (6.4%) died due to disease recurrence. Size > 21 mm, G3 grade, nodal metastasis, and vascular infiltration were independent predictors of overall recurrence. Recurrence occurred either during the first year of follow-up (n = 9), or after 10 years (n = 4). CS analysis revealed that nonfunctioning G1 pan-NEN ≤20 mm without nodal metastasis or vascular invasion had a negligible risk of developing recurrence. In the present series, after 5 years of follow-up without developing recurrence, tumor recurrence occurred only in the form of liver metastases. CONCLUSIONS: Recurrence of pan-NENs is rare and is predicted by tumor size, nodal metastasis, grading, and vascular invasion. Patients with G1 pan-NEN without nodal metastasis and vascular invasion may be considered cured by surgery. After 5 years without recurrence, follow-up should focus on excluding the development of liver metastases.

3 Article The Evolution of Surgical Strategies for Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors (Pan-NENs): Time-trend and Outcome Analysis From 587 Consecutive Resections at a High-volume Institution. 2019

Landoni, Luca / Marchegiani, Giovanni / Pollini, Tommaso / Cingarlini, Sara / D'Onofrio, Mirko / Capelli, Paola / De Robertis, Riccardo / Davì, Maria V / Amodio, Antonio / Impellizzeri, Harmony / Malpaga, Anna / Miotto, Marco / Boninsegna, Letizia / Crepaz, Lorenzo / Nessi, Chiara / Zingaretti, Caterina C / Paiella, Salvatore / Esposito, Alessandro / Casetti, Luca / Malleo, Giuseppe / Tuveri, Massimiliano / Butturini, Giovanni / Salvia, Roberto / Scarpa, Aldo / Falconi, Massimo / Bassi, Claudio. ·General and Pancreatic Surgery Department, The Pancreas Institute-University of Verona Hospital Trust, Verona, Italy. · Department of Oncology, The Pancreas Institute-University of Verona Hospital Trust, Verona, Italy. · Department of Radiology, The Pancreas Institute-University of Verona Hospital Trust, Verona, Italy. · Department of Pathology, The Pancreas Institute-University of Verona Hospital Trust, Verona, Italy. · Department of Radiology, Pederzoli Hospital, Peschiera del Garda, Verona, Italy. · Department of Medicine, The Pancreas Institute-University of Verona Hospital Trust, Verona, Italy. · Division of Surgery, Ospedale "Sacro Cuore-Don Calabria", Negrar (VR), Italy. · Department of Surgery, Pederzoli Hospital, Peschiera del Garda, Verona, Italy. · Pancreatic Surgery Unit, Pancreas Translational & Clinical Research Center, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, "Vita-Salute" University, Milan, Italy. ·Ann Surg · Pubmed #29189384.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: The objective of the present analysis is 2-fold: first, to define the evolution of time trends on the surgical approach to pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms (Pan-NENs); second, to perform a complete analysis of the predictors of oncologic outcome. BACKGROUND: Reflecting their rarity and heterogeneity, Pan-NENs represent a clinical dilemma. In particular, there is a scarcity of data regarding their long-term follow-up after surgical resection. METHODS: From the Institutional Pan-NEN database, 587 resected cases from 1990 to 2015 were extracted. The time span was arbitrarily divided into 3 discrete clusters enabling a balanced comparison between patient groups. Analyses for predictors of recurrence and survival were performed, together with conditional survival analyses. RESULTS: Among the 587 resected Pan-NENs, 75% were nonfunctioning tumors, and 5% were syndrome-associated tumors. The mean age was 54 years (±14 years), and 51% of the patients were female. The median tumor size was 20 mm (range 4 to 140), 62% were G1, 32% were G2, and 4% were G3 tumors. Time trends analysis revealed that the number of resected Pan-NENs constantly increased, while the size (from 25 to 20 mm) and G1 proportion (from 65% to 49%) decreased during the study period. After a mean follow-up of 75 months, recurrence analysis revealed that nonfunctioning tumors, tumor grade, N1 status, and vascular invasion were all independent predictors of recurrence. Regardless of size, G1 nonfunctioning tumors with no nodal involvement and vascular invasion had a negligible risk of recurrence at 5 years. CONCLUSIONS: Pan-NENs have been increasingly diagnosed and resected during the last 3 decades, revealing reliable predictors of outcome. Functioning and nodal status, tumor grade, and vascular invasion accurately predict survival and recurrence with resulting implications for patient follow-up.

4 Article Metformin Use Is Associated With Longer Progression-Free Survival of Patients With Diabetes and Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors Receiving Everolimus and/or Somatostatin Analogues. 2018

Pusceddu, Sara / Vernieri, Claudio / Di Maio, Massimo / Marconcini, Riccardo / Spada, Francesca / Massironi, Sara / Ibrahim, Toni / Brizzi, Maria Pia / Campana, Davide / Faggiano, Antongiulio / Giuffrida, Dario / Rinzivillo, Maria / Cingarlini, Sara / Aroldi, Francesca / Antonuzzo, Lorenzo / Berardi, Rossana / Catena, Laura / De Divitiis, Chiara / Ermacora, Paola / Perfetti, Vittorio / Fontana, Annalisa / Razzore, Paola / Carnaghi, Carlo / Davì, Maria Vittoria / Cauchi, Carolina / Duro, Marilina / Ricci, Sergio / Fazio, Nicola / Cavalcoli, Federica / Bongiovanni, Alberto / La Salvia, Anna / Brighi, Nicole / Colao, Annamaria / Puliafito, Ivana / Panzuto, Francesco / Ortolani, Silvia / Zaniboni, Alberto / Di Costanzo, Francesco / Torniai, Mariangela / Bajetta, Emilio / Tafuto, Salvatore / Garattini, Silvio Ken / Femia, Daniela / Prinzi, Natalie / Concas, Laura / Lo Russo, Giuseppe / Milione, Massimo / Giacomelli, Luca / Buzzoni, Roberto / Delle Fave, Gianfranco / Mazzaferro, Vincenzo / de Braud, Filippo. ·Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori di Milano, ENETS Center of Excellence, Milan, Italy. Electronic address: sara.pusceddu@istitutotumori.mi.it. · Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori di Milano, ENETS Center of Excellence, Milan, Italy; Fondazione Istituto FIRC di Oncologia Molecolare (IFOM), Milan, Italy. · Dipartimento di Oncologia, Università degli Studi di Torino, A. O. Ordine Mauriziano, Turin, Italy. · Dipartimento di Oncologia, Santa Chiara Hospital, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria Pisana, Pisa, Italy. · IEO - Istituto Europeo di Oncologia, ENETS Center of Excellence, Milan, Italy. · Fondazione IRCCS Ca' Granda, Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Università degli Studi di Milano, Milan, Italy. · Centro di Osteoncologia e Tumori Rari, Istituto Scientifico Romagnolo per lo Studio e la Cura dei Tumori (IRST) IRCCS, Meldola, Italy. · Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria San Luigi Gonzaga, Orbassano, Italy. · Policlinico Sant'Orsola Malpighi, Bologna, Italy. · Unità di chirurgia tiroidea e paratiroidea, Istituto Nazionale per lo studio e la cura dei tumori "Fondazione G. Pascale" - IRCCS, Naples, Italy. · IOM- Istituto Oncologico del Mediterraneo, Catania, Italy. · Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria Sant'Andrea, ENETS Center of Excellence, Rome, Italy. · Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria, Verona, Italy. · Fondazione Poliambulanza, Brescia, Italy. · A. O. U. Careggi, Firenze, Italy. · Azienda Ospedaliero Universitaria Ospedali Riuniti, Ancona, Italy. · Policlinico di Monza, Monza, Italy. · IRCCS Fondazione Pascale, ENETS Center of Excellence, Naples, Italy. · Azienda Ospedaliero Universitaria Santa Maria della Misericordia, Udine, Italy. · Fondazione IRCCS Policlinico San Matteo, SC oncologia, Pavia, Italy. · Policlinico di Modena, Italy. · Unit of Endocrinology, Ospedale Mauriziano, Torino, Italy. · Istituto Clinico Humanitas, Rozzano, ENETS Center of Excellence, Italy. · Ospedale Policlinico Borgo Roma, Verona, Italy. · Ospedale S Croce e Carle, Cuneo, Italy. · Ospedale Valduce Como, Italy. · Endocrinology Section, Department of Clinical Medicine and Surgery, "Federico II" University of Naples, Italy. · Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori di Milano, ENETS Center of Excellence, Milan, Italy. · Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori di Milano, ENETS Center of Excellence, Milan, Italy; Medical-Surgical Science and Traslational Medicine Departement, Sapienza University, Rome, Italy. · Department of Surgical Sciences and Integrated Diagnostics, University of Genoa, Italy. · Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori di Milano, ENETS Center of Excellence, Milan, Italy; Universita' degli Studi di Milano, Milan, Italy. ·Gastroenterology · Pubmed #29655834.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND & AIMS: Metformin seems to have anticancer effects. However, it is not clear whether use of glycemia and metformin affect outcomes of patients with advanced pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (pNETs). We investigated the association between glycemia and progression-free survival (PFS) of patients with pNETs treated with everolimus and/or somatostatin analogues, as well as the association between metformin use and PFS time. METHODS: We performed a retrospective analysis of 445 patients with advanced pNET treated at 24 medical centers in Italy from 1999 through 2015. Data on levels of glycemia were collected at time of diagnosis of pNET, before treatment initiation, and during treatment with everolimus (with or without somatostatin analogues), octreotide, or lanreotide. Diabetes was defined as prior or current use of glycemia control medication and/or fasting plasma glucose level ≥ 126 mg/dL, hemoglobin A1c ≥ 6.5% (48 mmol/L), or a random sample of plasma glucose ≥ 200 mg/dL (11.1 mmol/L), with reported classic symptoms of hyperglycemia or hyperglycemic crisis. Patients were assigned to groups based on diagnosis of diabetes before or during antitumor therapy. PFS was compared between patients with vs without diabetes. Among patients with diabetes, the association between metformin use and PFS was assessed. We performed sensitivity and landmark analyses to exclude patients who developed diabetes while receiving cancer treatment and to exclude a potential immortal time bias related to metformin intake. RESULTS: PFS was significantly longer in patients with diabetes (median, 32.0 months) than without diabetes (median, 15.1 months) (hazard ratio for patients with vs without diabetes, 0.63; 95% confidence interval, 0.50-0.80; P = .0002). PFS of patients treated with metformin was significantly longer (median PFS, 44.2 months) than for patients without diabetes (hazard ratio for survival of patients with diabetes receiving metformin vs without diabetes, 0.45; 95% confidence interval, 0.32-0.62; P < .00001) and longer than for patients with diabetes receiving other treatments (median PFS, 20.8 months; hazard ratio, 0.49; 95% confidence interval, 0.34-0.69; P < .0001). In multivariable analysis, adjusted for other factors associated with outcomes, metformin was associated with longer PFS but level of glycemia was not. Metformin was associated with increased PFS of patients receiving somatostatin analogues and in those receiving everolimus, with or without somatostatin analogues. Sensitivity and landmark analyses produced similar results. CONCLUSIONS: In a retrospective study of patients with pNETs, we found a significant association between metformin use and longer PFS.

5 Article Can histogram analysis of MR images predict aggressiveness in pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors? 2018

De Robertis, Riccardo / Maris, Bogdan / Cardobi, Nicolò / Tinazzi Martini, Paolo / Gobbo, Stefano / Capelli, Paola / Ortolani, Silvia / Cingarlini, Sara / Paiella, Salvatore / Landoni, Luca / Butturini, Giovanni / Regi, Paolo / Scarpa, Aldo / Tortora, Giampaolo / D'Onofrio, Mirko. ·Department of Radiology, P. Pederzoli Hospital, Via Monte Baldo 24, 37019, Peschiera del Garda, Italy. riccardo.derobertis@hotmail.it. · Department of Computer Science, University of Verona, Strada le Grazie 15, 37134, Verona, Italy. · Department of Radiology, P. Pederzoli Hospital, Via Monte Baldo 24, 37019, Peschiera del Garda, Italy. · Department of Pathology, P. Pederzoli Hospital, Via Monte Baldo 24, 37019, Peschiera del Garda, Italy. · Department of Pathology, G.B. Rossi Hospital - University of Verona, Piazzale L.A. Scuro 10, 37134, Verona, Italy. · Department of Oncology, P. Pederzoli Hospital, Via Monte Baldo 24, 37019, Peschiera del Garda, Italy. · Department of Oncology, G.B. Rossi Hospital - University of Verona, Piazzale L.A. Scuro 10, 37134, Verona, Italy. · Department of Pancreatic Surgery, G.B. Rossi Hospital - University of Verona, Piazzale L.A. Scuro 10, 37134, Verona, Italy. · Department of Pancreatic Surgery, P. Pederzoli Hospital, Via Monte Baldo 24, 37019, Peschiera del Garda, Italy. · Department of Radiology, G.B. Rossi Hospital - University of Verona, Piazzale L.A. Scuro 10, 37134, Verona, Italy. ·Eur Radiol · Pubmed #29352378.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: To evaluate MRI derived whole-tumour histogram analysis parameters in predicting pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasm (panNEN) grade and aggressiveness. METHODS: Pre-operative MR of 42 consecutive patients with panNEN >1 cm were retrospectively analysed. T1-/T2-weighted images and ADC maps were analysed. Histogram-derived parameters were compared to histopathological features using the Mann-Whitney U test. Diagnostic accuracy was assessed by ROC-AUC analysis; sensitivity and specificity were assessed for each histogram parameter. RESULTS: ADC CONCLUSIONS: Whole-tumour histogram analysis of ADC maps may be helpful in predicting tumour grade, vascular involvement, nodal and liver metastases in panNENs. ADC KEY POINTS: • Whole-tumour ADC histogram analysis can predict aggressiveness in pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms. • ADC entropy and kurtosis are higher in aggressive tumours. • ADC histogram analysis can quantify tumour diffusion heterogeneity. • Non-invasive quantification of tumour heterogeneity can provide adjunctive information for prognostication.

6 Article Are Cystic Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors an Indolent Entity Results from a Single-Center Surgical Series. 2018

Paiella, Salvatore / Marchegiani, Giovanni / Miotto, Marco / Malpaga, Anna / Impellizzeri, Harmony / Montagnini, Greta / Pollini, Tommaso / Nessi, Chiara / Butturini, Giovanni / Capelli, Paola / Posenato, Ilaria / Scarpa, Aldo / D'Onofrio, Mirko / De Robertis, Riccardo / Cingarlini, Sara / Boninsegna, Letizia / Bassi, Claudio / Salvia, Roberto / Landoni, Luca. · ·Neuroendocrinology · Pubmed #28586782.

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: Cystic pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (CPanNETs) represent an uncommon variant of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PanNETs). Due to their rarity, there is a lack of knowledge with regard to clinical features and postoperative outcome. METHODS: The prospectively maintained surgical database of a high-volume institution was queried, and 46 resected CPanNETs were detected from 1988 to 2015. Clinical, demographic, and pathological features and survival outcomes of CPanNETs were described and matched with a population of 92 solid PanNETs (SPanNETs) for comparison. RESULTS: CPanNETs accounted for 7.8% of the overall number of resected PanNETs (46/587). CPanNETs were mostly sporadic (n = 42, 91%) and nonfunctioning (39%). Two functioning CPanNETs were detected (4.3%), and they were 2 gastrinomas. The median tumor diameter was 30 mm (range 10-120). All tumors were well differentiated, with 38 (82.6%) G1 and 8 (17.4%) G2 tumors. Overall, no CPanNET showed a Ki-67 >5%. A correct preoperative diagnosis of a CPanNET was made in half of the cases. After a median follow-up of >70 months, the 5- and 10-year overall survival of resected CPanNETs was 93.8 and 62.5%, respectively, compared to 92.7 and 84.6% for SPanNETs (p > 0.05). The 5- and 10-year disease-free survival rates were 94.5 and 88.2% for CPanNETs and 81.8 and 78.9% for SPanNETs, respectively (p > 0.05). CONCLUSION: In the setting of a surgical cohort, CPanNETs are rare, nonfunctional, and well-differentiated neoplasms. After surgical resection, they share the excellent outcome of their well-differentiated solid counterparts for both survival and recurrence.

7 Article Solid non-functioning endocrine tumors of the pancreas: correlating computed tomography and pathology. 2017

Zamboni, Giulia A / Ambrosetti, Maria Chiara / Zivelonghi, Caterina / Lombardo, Fabio / Butturini, Giovanni / Cingarlini, Sara / Capelli, Paola / Pozzi Mucelli, Roberto. ·Istituto di Radiologia, DAI Patologia e Diagnostica, Policlinico GB Rossi, AOUI Verona, Verona, Italy. Electronic address: gzamboni@hotmail.com. · Istituto di Radiologia, DAI Patologia e Diagnostica, Policlinico GB Rossi, AOUI Verona, Verona, Italy. · Chirurgia Generale e Del Pancreas, DAI Chirurgia e Oncologia, Istituto Del Pancreas, Policlinico GB Rossi, AOUI Verona, Verona, Italy. · Oncologia Medica, DAI Chirurgia e Oncologia, Policlinico GB Rossi, AOUI Verona, Verona, Italy. · UOC Anatomia e Istologia Patologica, DAI Patologia e Diagnostica, Policlinico GB Rossi, AOUI Verona, Verona, Italy. ·HPB (Oxford) · Pubmed #28784262.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Since prognosis and treatment of pancreatic endocrine tumors (pNET) are based on tumor grade, contrast-enhanced multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) features of solid non-functioning pNETs were studied and correlated with pathology tumor grading. METHODS: MDCTs of diagnosed pNETs were reviewed retrospectively. Each tumor was analyzed for location, size, homogeneity, margins, arterial and venous phase enhancement, main pancreatic duct diameter, calcifications, vascular invasion, lymph-nodes enlargement, and liver metastases. RESULTS: Of 154 pNETs presenting between January 2000 and May 2016 with available histology from resected specimen or biopsy, there were 65 G1, 72 G2 and 17 G3 pNETs. Tumor diameter varied significantly between the three groups. Tumors >20 mm were more frequently malignant and non-homogeneous than smaller tumors. G1 tumors were more commonly hypervascular and G3 tumors more often non-hypervascular in the arterial phase. Arterial phase non-hyperdensity and tumor non-homogeneity had a higher rate of metastatic lesions. Vascular invasion correlated with presence of metastases and histological grade. G3 tumors were all >20 mm (p = 0.007), more often non-hypervascular in the arterial phase (p = 0.0025), and non-hyperdense in the venous phase (p = 0.009), and showed more often vascular invasion (p = 0.0198). CONCLUSION: CT correlated with tumor grade; differentiating low-grade and high-grade pNETs through routine CT imaging might improve patient management.

8 Article Comparison of imaging-based and pathological dimensions in pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. 2017

Paiella, Salvatore / Impellizzeri, Harmony / Zanolin, Elisabetta / Marchegiani, Giovanni / Miotto, Marco / Malpaga, Anna / De Robertis, Riccardo / D'Onofrio, Mirko / Rusev, Borislav / Capelli, Paola / Cingarlini, Sara / Butturini, Giovanni / Davì, Maria Vittoria / Amodio, Antonio / Bassi, Claudio / Scarpa, Aldo / Salvia, Roberto / Landoni, Luca. ·Salvatore Paiella, Harmony Impellizzeri, Giovanni Marchegiani, Marco Miotto, Anna Malpaga, Claudio Bassi, Roberto Salvia, Luca Landoni, General and Pancreatic Surgery Department, Pancreas Institute, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, 37134 Verona, Italy. ·World J Gastroenterol · Pubmed #28533666.

ABSTRACT: AIM: To establish the ability of magnetic resonance (MR) and computer tomography (CT) to predict pathologic dimensions of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PanNET) in a caseload of a tertiary referral center. METHODS: Patients submitted to surgery for PanNET at the Surgical Unit of the Pancreas Institute with at least 1 preoperative imaging examination (MR or CT scan) from January 2005 to December 2015 were included and data retrospectively collected. Exclusion criteria were: multifocal lesions, genetic syndromes, microadenomas or mixed tumors, metastatic disease and neoadjuvant therapy. Bland-Altman (BA) and Mountain-Plot (MP) statistics were used to compare size measured by each modality with the pathology size. Passing-Bablok (PB) regression analysis was used to check the agreement between MR and CT. RESULTS: Our study population consisted of 292 patients. Seventy-nine (27.1%) were functioning PanNET. The mean biases were 0.17 ± 7.99 mm, 1 ± 8.51 mm and 0.23 ± 9 mm, 1.2 ± 9.8 mm for MR and CT, considering the overall population and the subgroup of non-functioning- PanNET, respectively. Limits of agreement (LOA) included the vast majority of observations, indicating a good agreement between imaging and pathology. The MP further confirmed this finding and showed that the two methods are unbiased with respect to each other. Considering ≤ 2 cm non-functioning-PanNET, no statistical significance was found in the size estimation rate of MR and CT ( CONCLUSION: MR and CT scan are accurate and interchangeable imaging techniques in predicting pathologic dimensions of PanNET.

9 Article Perfusion CT Changes in Liver Metastases from Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors During Everolimus Treatment. 2017

D'Onofrio, Mirko / Cingarlini, Sara / Ortolani, Silvia / Crosara, Stefano / DE Robertis, Riccardo / Vallerio, Paola / Grego, Elisabetta / Ciaravino, Valentina / Ruzzenente, Andrea / Landoni, Luca / Scarpa, Aldo / Bassi, Claudio / Tortora, Giampaolo. ·Department of Diagnostic and Public Health, Institute of Radiology, G.B. Rossi Hospital, University of Verona, Verona, Italy mirko.donofrio@univr.it. · Department of Oncology, G.B. Rossi Hospital, University of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Department of Diagnostic and Public Health, Institute of Radiology, G.B. Rossi Hospital, University of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Department of Radiology, Pederzoli Hospital, Peschiera del Garda, Verona, Italy. · Department of Internal Medicine, G.B. Rossi Hospital, University of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Department of Hepato-biliary Surgery, G.B. Rossi Hospital, University of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Department of Pancreatic Surgery, G.B. Rossi Hospital, University of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Department of Pathology, G.B. Rossi Hospital, University of Verona, Verona, Italy. ·Anticancer Res · Pubmed #28314296.

ABSTRACT: AIM: To evaluate modifications of perfusional parameters assessed by perfusion computed tomography (P-CT) of liver metastases (LM) from pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PanNETs) during everolimus treatment. PATIENTS AND METHODS: All patients with LMs from G1-2 PanNETs undergoing everolimus treatment between January 2013 and January 2015 were prospectively evaluated with P-CT at baseline, and after 2 and 4 months of therapy. Size, perfusion, blood volume (BV), peak enhancement intensity (PEI) and time to peak for each lesion were calculated. RESULTS: A total of 33 LMs in nine patients with G1-2 PanNETs were prospectively evaluated: 23/33 (69.7%) were responders, 10/33 (30.3%) were non-responders. Among perfusional parameters, only numerical peak enhancement intensity values significantly differed between the two groups at baseline (p=0.043). BV increase was the most significant perfusional modification identifying responding lesions, even at an early stage of treatment, with a high positive predictive value (89.47%). CONCLUSION: P-CT seems to be useful for prediction of response to everolimus of LMs from PanNETs.

10 Article Whole-genome landscape of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumours. 2017

Scarpa, Aldo / Chang, David K / Nones, Katia / Corbo, Vincenzo / Patch, Ann-Marie / Bailey, Peter / Lawlor, Rita T / Johns, Amber L / Miller, David K / Mafficini, Andrea / Rusev, Borislav / Scardoni, Maria / Antonello, Davide / Barbi, Stefano / Sikora, Katarzyna O / Cingarlini, Sara / Vicentini, Caterina / McKay, Skye / Quinn, Michael C J / Bruxner, Timothy J C / Christ, Angelika N / Harliwong, Ivon / Idrisoglu, Senel / McLean, Suzanne / Nourse, Craig / Nourbakhsh, Ehsan / Wilson, Peter J / Anderson, Matthew J / Fink, J Lynn / Newell, Felicity / Waddell, Nick / Holmes, Oliver / Kazakoff, Stephen H / Leonard, Conrad / Wood, Scott / Xu, Qinying / Nagaraj, Shivashankar Hiriyur / Amato, Eliana / Dalai, Irene / Bersani, Samantha / Cataldo, Ivana / Dei Tos, Angelo P / Capelli, Paola / Davì, Maria Vittoria / Landoni, Luca / Malpaga, Anna / Miotto, Marco / Whitehall, Vicki L J / Leggett, Barbara A / Harris, Janelle L / Harris, Jonathan / Jones, Marc D / Humphris, Jeremy / Chantrill, Lorraine A / Chin, Venessa / Nagrial, Adnan M / Pajic, Marina / Scarlett, Christopher J / Pinho, Andreia / Rooman, Ilse / Toon, Christopher / Wu, Jianmin / Pinese, Mark / Cowley, Mark / Barbour, Andrew / Mawson, Amanda / Humphrey, Emily S / Colvin, Emily K / Chou, Angela / Lovell, Jessica A / Jamieson, Nigel B / Duthie, Fraser / Gingras, Marie-Claude / Fisher, William E / Dagg, Rebecca A / Lau, Loretta M S / Lee, Michael / Pickett, Hilda A / Reddel, Roger R / Samra, Jaswinder S / Kench, James G / Merrett, Neil D / Epari, Krishna / Nguyen, Nam Q / Zeps, Nikolajs / Falconi, Massimo / Simbolo, Michele / Butturini, Giovanni / Van Buren, George / Partelli, Stefano / Fassan, Matteo / Anonymous6880896 / Khanna, Kum Kum / Gill, Anthony J / Wheeler, David A / Gibbs, Richard A / Musgrove, Elizabeth A / Bassi, Claudio / Tortora, Giampaolo / Pederzoli, Paolo / Pearson, John V / Waddell, Nicola / Biankin, Andrew V / Grimmond, Sean M. ·ARC-Net Centre for Applied Research on Cancer, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona 37134, Italy. · Department of Pathology and Diagnostics, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona 37134, Italy. · Wolfson Wohl Cancer Research Centre, Institute of Cancer Sciences, University of Glasgow, Garscube Estate, Switchback Road, Bearsden, Glasgow G61 1QH, UK. · West of Scotland Pancreatic Unit, Glasgow Royal Infirmary, Glasgow G31 2ER, UK. · The Kinghorn Cancer Centre, Cancer Division, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, University of New South Wales, 384 Victoria St, Darlinghurst, Sydney, New South Wales 2010, Australia. · Department of Surgery, Bankstown Hospital, Eldridge Road, Bankstown, Sydney, New South Wales 2200, Australia. · South Western Sydney Clinical School, Faculty of Medicine, University of New South Wales, Liverpool, New South Wales 2170, Australia. · QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Herston Road, Brisbane 4006, Australia. · Queensland Centre for Medical Genomics, Institute for Molecular Bioscience, The University of Queensland, St Lucia, Brisbane, Queensland 4072, Australia. · Department of Surgery, Pancreas Institute, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona 37134, Italy. · Medical Oncology, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Department of Pathology, General Hospital of Treviso, Department of Medicine, University of Padua, Italy. · Department of Medicine, Section of Endocrinology, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona, Italy. · The University of Queensland, School of Medicine, Brisbane 4006, Australia. · Pathology Queensland, Brisbane 4006, Australia. · Royal Brisbane and Women's Hospital, Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Brisbane 4006, Australia. · Institute of Health Biomedical Innovation, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Australia. · School of Environmental &Life Sciences, University of Newcastle, Ourimbah, New South Wales 2258, Australia. · Key Laboratory of Carcinogenesis and Translational Research (Ministry of Education/Beijing), Centre for Cancer Bioinformatics, Peking University Cancer Hospital &Institute, Beijing 100142, China. · Department of Surgery, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Ipswich Rd, Woollongabba, Queensland 4102, Australia. · Department of Anatomical Pathology. St Vincent's Hospital, Sydney, New South Wales 2010, Australia. · Academic Unit of Surgery, School of Medicine, College of Medical, Veterinary and Life Sciences, University of Glasgow, Glasgow Royal Infirmary, Glasgow G4 OSF, UK. · Department of Pathology, Queen Elizabeth University Hospital, Greater Glasgow &Clyde NHS, Glasgow G51 4TF, UK. · Department of Molecular and Human Genetics, Human Genome Sequencing Center, Baylor College of Medicine, One Baylor Plaza, MS226, Houston, Texas 77030-3411, USA. · Michael E. DeBakey Department of Surgery and The Elkins Pancreas Center, Baylor College of Medicine, One Baylor Plaza, Houston, Texas 77030-3411, USA. · Children's Hospital at Westmead, Westmead, New South Wales 2145, Australia. · Children's Medical Research Institute, The University of Sydney, Westmead, New South Wales 2145, Australia. · Department of Surgery, Royal North Shore Hospital, St Leonards, Sydney, New South Wales 2065, Australia. · University of Sydney. Sydney, New South Wales 2006, Australia. · Tissue Pathology and Diagnostic Oncology, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Camperdown, New South Wales 2050, Australia. · School of Medicine, Western Sydney University, Penrith, New South Wales 2175, Australia. · Department of Surgery, Fremantle Hospital, Alma Street, Fremantle, Western Australia 6160, Australia. · Department of Gastroenterology, Royal Adelaide Hospital, North Terrace, Adelaide, South Australia 5000, Australia. · School of Surgery M507, University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Highway, Nedlands, Western Australia 6009, Australia. · St John of God Pathology, 12 Salvado Rd, Subiaco, Western Australia 6008, Australia. · Bendat Family Comprehensive Cancer Centre, St John of God Subiaco Hospital, Subiaco, Western Australia 6008, Australia. · University of Melbourne Centre for Cancer Research, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, 3010, Victoria, Australia. ·Nature · Pubmed #28199314.

ABSTRACT: The diagnosis of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumours (PanNETs) is increasing owing to more sensitive detection methods, and this increase is creating challenges for clinical management. We performed whole-genome sequencing of 102 primary PanNETs and defined the genomic events that characterize their pathogenesis. Here we describe the mutational signatures they harbour, including a deficiency in G:C > T:A base excision repair due to inactivation of MUTYH, which encodes a DNA glycosylase. Clinically sporadic PanNETs contain a larger-than-expected proportion of germline mutations, including previously unreported mutations in the DNA repair genes MUTYH, CHEK2 and BRCA2. Together with mutations in MEN1 and VHL, these mutations occur in 17% of patients. Somatic mutations, including point mutations and gene fusions, were commonly found in genes involved in four main pathways: chromatin remodelling, DNA damage repair, activation of mTOR signalling (including previously undescribed EWSR1 gene fusions), and telomere maintenance. In addition, our gene expression analyses identified a subgroup of tumours associated with hypoxia and HIF signalling.

11 Article Pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms: Magnetic resonance imaging features according to grade and stage. 2017

De Robertis, Riccardo / Cingarlini, Sara / Tinazzi Martini, Paolo / Ortolani, Silvia / Butturini, Giovanni / Landoni, Luca / Regi, Paolo / Girelli, Roberto / Capelli, Paola / Gobbo, Stefano / Tortora, Giampaolo / Scarpa, Aldo / Pederzoli, Paolo / D'Onofrio, Mirko. ·Riccardo De Robertis, Department of Radiology, Casa di Cura Pederzoli, 37019 Peschiera del Garda, Italy. ·World J Gastroenterol · Pubmed #28127201.

ABSTRACT: AIM: To describe magnetic resonance (MR) imaging features of pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms (PanNENs) according to their grade and tumor-nodes-metastases stage by comparing them to histopathology and to determine the accuracy of MR imaging features in predicting their biological behavior. METHODS: This study was approved by our institutional review board; requirement for informed patient consent was waived due to the retrospective nature of the study. Preoperative MR examinations of 55 PanNEN patients (29 men, 26 women; mean age of 57.6 years, range 21-83 years) performed between June 2013 and December 2015 were reviewed. Qualitative and quantitative features were compared between tumor grades and stages determined by histopathological analysis. RESULTS: Ill defined margins were more common in G2-3 and stage III-IV PanNENs than in G1 and low-stage tumors ( CONCLUSION: MR features of PanNENs vary according to their grade of differentiation and their stage at diagnosis and could predict the biological behavior of these tumors.

12 Article Role of Combined 68Ga-DOTATOC and 18F-FDG Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography in the Diagnostic Workup of Pancreas Neuroendocrine Tumors: Implications for Managing Surgical Decisions. 2017

Cingarlini, Sara / Ortolani, Silvia / Salgarello, Matteo / Butturini, Giovanni / Malpaga, Anna / Malfatti, Veronica / DʼOnofrio, Mirko / Davì, Maria Vittoria / Vallerio, Paola / Ruzzenente, Andrea / Capelli, Paola / Citton, Elia / Grego, Elisabetta / Trentin, Chiara / De Robertis, Riccardo / Scarpa, Aldo / Bassi, Claudio / Tortora, Giampaolo. ·From the *Department of Oncology, Comprehensive Cancer Center, G.B. Rossi University Hospital of Verona; †Department of Nuclear Medicine, Sacro Cuore Don Calabria Hospital, Negrar; ‡Hepato-Biliary and Pancreas Unit, Pederzoli Hospital, Peschiera; Departments of §Pancreatic Surgery, ∥Radiology, ¶Internal Medicine, #Hepatobiliary Surgery, and **Pathology, Comprehensive Cancer Center, G.B. Rossi University Hospital of Verona, Verona, Italy. ·Pancreas · Pubmed #27906872.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: Ga-DOTATOC (Ga) positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) is recommended in the workup of pancreas neuroendocrine tumors (PanNETs); evidence suggests that F-FDG (F) PET/CT can also provide prognostic information. Aims of this study were to assess the role of combined Ga- and F-PET/CT in the evaluation of grade (G) 1-2 PanNETs and to test the correlation between F-PET/CT positivity and tumor grade. METHODS: Preoperative Ga- and F-PET/CT of 35 patients with surgically resected G1-2 PanNETs were evaluated. For grading, the 2010 World Health Organization Classification was used; an ancillary analysis with Ki67 cutoffs at 5% to 20% was conducted. Correlation between F-PET/CT positivity (SUVmax > 3.5) and grade was assessed. RESULTS: Of 35 PanNETs, 28.6% and 71.4% were G1 and G2 as per World Health Organization. Ga-PET/CT showed high sensitivity (94.3%) in detecting G1-2 PanNETs. F-PET/CT was positive in 20% and 76% G1 and G2 tumors (P = 0.002). F-PET/CT identified G2 PanNETs with high positive predictive value (PPV, 90.5%). F-PET/CT correlated with tumor grade also in the ancillary analysis (P = 0.009). CONCLUSIONS: The high sensitivity of Ga-PET/CT in NET detection is known. The high PPV of F-PET/CT in the identification of G2 forms suggests its potential role in PanNETs prognostication and risk stratification.

13 Article Digital Subtraction of Magnetic Resonance Images Improves Detection and Characterization of Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Neoplasms. 2017

De Robertis, Riccardo / Tinazzi Martini, Paolo / Cingarlini, Sara / Ortolani, Silvia / Butturini, Giovanni / Regi, Paolo / Landoni, Luca / Tortora, Giampaolo / Pederzoli, Paolo / D'Onofrio, Mirko. ·From the *Department of Radiology, Casa di Cura Pederzoli, Peschiera del Garda; †PhD School in Inflammation, Immunity and Cancer, and ‡Department of Medical Oncology, G. B. Rossi Hospital, University of Verona, Verona; Departments of §Oncology and ∥Pancreatic Surgery, Casa di Cura Pederzoli, Peschiera del Garda; and ¶Department of Radiology, G. B. Rossi Hospital, University of Verona, Verona, Italy. ·J Comput Assist Tomogr · Pubmed #27861198.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of digital image subtraction of contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) images for detection and characterization of pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms (PanNENs). METHODS: Magnetic resonance examinations of 50 histologically verified PanNENs were retrospectively evaluated by 2 radiologists; 50 ductal adenocarcinomas were included as a control group. Late arterial phase images and correspondent subtracted images were analyzed. Tumor detectability on a subjective 3-point scale and contrast-to-noise ratios were compared across sequences using paired Student t tests. Tumor signal intensity was compared between sequences using χ or Fisher exact tests. RESULTS: Subjective conspicuity and contrast-to-noise ratios of PanNENs were significantly higher on subtracted images compared with correspondent late arterial phase images (P < 0.001 and P = 0.002). The rate of clearly hyperenhancing PanNENs was higher on subtracted images compared with arterial phase images (76% vs 36%). CONCLUSIONS: Digital image subtraction improves tumor conspicuity and allows better characterization of PanNENs compared with late arterial phase images.

14 Article Long-term follow-up and role of FDG PET in advanced pancreatic neuroendocrine patients treated with 2017

Sansovini, Maddalena / Severi, Stefano / Ianniello, Annarita / Nicolini, Silvia / Fantini, Lorenzo / Mezzenga, Emilio / Ferroni, Fabio / Scarpi, Emanuela / Monti, Manuela / Bongiovanni, Alberto / Cingarlini, Sara / Grana, Chiara Maria / Bodei, Lisa / Paganelli, Giovanni. ·Nuclear Medicine Unit, Istituto Scientifico Romagnolo per lo Studio e la Cura dei Tumori (IRST) IRCCS, Meldola, Italy. · Medical Physics Unit, Istituto Scientifico Romagnolo per lo Studio e la Cura dei Tumori (IRST) IRCCS, Meldola, Italy. · Radiology Unit, Istituto Scientifico Romagnolo per lo Studio e la Cura dei Tumori (IRST) IRCCS, Meldola, Italy. · Unit of Biostatistics and Clinical Trials, Istituto Scientifico Romagnolo per lo Studio e la Cura dei Tumori (IRST) IRCCS, Meldola, Italy. · Osteoncology and Rare Tumors Center, Istituto Scientifico Romagnolo per lo Studio e la Cura dei Tumori (IRST) IRCCS, Meldola, Italy. · Department of Oncology, Verona Comprehensive Cancer Network, G.B. Rossi Hospital, University of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Division of Nuclear Medicine, European Institute of Oncology Milan (IEO), Milan, Italy. · Nuclear Medicine Unit, Istituto Scientifico Romagnolo per lo Studio e la Cura dei Tumori (IRST) IRCCS, Meldola, Italy. giovanni.paganelli@irst.emr.it. ·Eur J Nucl Med Mol Imaging · Pubmed #27704193.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: Lu-DOTATATE (Lu-PRRT) is a valid therapeutic option in differentiated pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (P-NETs). FDG PET seems to be an important prognostic factor in P-NETs. We evaluated the efficacy of Lu-PRRT and the role of FDG PET in 60 patients with advanced P-NETs. METHODS: From March 2008 to June 2011, 60 consecutive patients with P-NETs were enrolled in the study. Follow-up lasted until March 2016. Eligible patients were treated with two different total cumulative activities (18.5 or 27.8 GBq in 5 cycles every 6-8 weeks), according to kidney and bone marrow parameters. RESULTS: Twenty-eight patients received a mean full activity (FA) of 25.9 GBq and 32 a mean reduced activity (RA) of 18.5 GBq. The disease control rate (DCR), defined as the sum of CR+PR+SD was 85.7 % in the FA group and 78.1 % in the RA group. Median progression-free survival (mPFS) was 53.4 months in the FA group and 21.7 months in the RA group (P = 0.353). Median overall survival (mOS) was not reached (nr) in FA patients and was 63.8 months in the RA group (P = 0.007). Fifty-five patients underwent an FDG PET scan before Lu-PRRT, 32 (58 %) showing an increased FDG uptake in tumor sites. mPFS was 21.1 months in FDG PET-positive patients and 68.7 months in the FDG PET-negative group (P < 0.0002), regardless of the total activity administered. CONCLUSION: Both FA and RA are active in patients undergoing Lu-PRRT. However, an FA of 27.8 GBq of Lu-PRRT prolongs PFS and OS compared to an RA of 18.5 GBq. Our results indicate that FDG PET is an independent prognostic factor in this patient setting.

15 Article Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Neoplasms: Clinical Value of Diffusion-Weighted Imaging. 2016

De Robertis, Riccardo / D'Onofrio, Mirko / Zamboni, Giulia / Tinazzi Martini, Paolo / Gobbo, Stefano / Capelli, Paola / Butturini, Giovanni / Girelli, Roberto / Ortolani, Silvia / Cingarlini, Sara / Pederzoli, Paolo / Scarpa, Aldo. ·Department of Radiology, Casa di cura Pederzoli, Peschiera del Garda, Italy. ·Neuroendocrinology · Pubmed #26646652.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND/AIMS: Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) can depict random motions of water molecules in biological tissues during magnetic resonance (MR) examinations. Few papers have tested its application to pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms (PanNENs). The aim of this paper is to assess the clinical value of DWI regarding the identification and characterization of PanNENs and diagnosis of liver metastases. METHODS: Preoperative MR examinations of 30 PanNEN patients were retrospectively reviewed; 30 patients with pathologically proven pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) were included to compare the imaging features. Qualitative and quantitative MR features were compared between histotypes. A blinded-reader comparison of diagnostic confidence for PanNENs and liver metastases was conducted on randomized image sets. All results were compared with pathological data. RESULTS: PanNEN conspicuity was higher on DW images compared to conventional MR sequences. DWI had higher detection rates for PanNENs than had conventional sequences (93.3 vs. 71.1%). Sharp margins and absence of main pancreatic duct/common bile duct dilation and chronic pancreatitis were more common among PanNENs as compared to PDACs. Arterial iso- or hyperenhancement and portal hyperenhancement were more frequent within PanNENs as compared to PDACs. No differences between histotypes were found for quantitative features. Arterial-phase images had the highest interobserver agreement for the diagnosis of PanNEN (Cohen's κ = 0.667). DWI provided the highest detection rate for liver metastases as well as excellent interobserver agreement for the diagnosis of liver metastases (κ = 0.932), with good accuracy (AUC = 0.879-0.869). CONCLUSION: DWI has clinical value regarding the identification of PanNENs and the diagnosis of liver metastases, while conventional MR sequences are fundamental for their characterization.

16 Article A prospective non-randomised single-center study comparing laparoscopic and robotic distal pancreatectomy. 2015

Butturini, Giovanni / Damoli, Isacco / Crepaz, Lorenzo / Malleo, Giuseppe / Marchegiani, Giovanni / Daskalaki, Despoina / Esposito, Alessandro / Cingarlini, Sara / Salvia, Roberto / Bassi, Claudio. ·General Surgery B, The Pancreas Institute, Verona University Hospital Trust, Piazzale L.A. Scuro, 10, 37134, Verona, Italy. giovanni.butturini@ospedaleuniverona.it. · General Surgery B, The Pancreas Institute, Verona University Hospital Trust, Piazzale L.A. Scuro, 10, 37134, Verona, Italy. · Department of Oncology, The Pancreas Institute, Verona University Hospital Trust, Piazzale L.A. Scuro, 10, 37134, Verona, Italy. ·Surg Endosc · Pubmed #25552231.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy (LDP) is increasing in popularity thanks to the benefits that have been recently demonstrated by many authors. The Da Vinci(®) Surgical System could overcome some limits of laparoscopy, helping the surgeons to perform safer and faster difficult procedures. Nowadays, prospective clinical trials comparing LDP to robotic distal pancreatectomy (RDP) are lacking. The aim of this study is to present a prospective comparison between the two techniques. METHODS: Since November 2011, all patients suitable for minimally invasive distal pancreatectomy were assigned either to LDP or RDP, depending on the availability of the Da Vinci(®) Surgical System for our Surgical Unit. Demographics, clinical, and intra- and postoperative data, including estimated costs of the procedure, were prospectively collected. Follow-up included cross-sectional imaging ended on April 2014. RESULTS: Twenty-two patients underwent RDP and 21 LDP; patients' characteristics were similar. The median operative time was longer and procedures' cost was double in RDP group. The conversion to open rate and the median length of postoperative hospital stay were 4.5 % and 7 days, respectively, in both groups. Pancreatic fistula developed in 57.1 % (12/21) and 50 % (11/22) of LDP and RDP, respectively (p = 0.870), being grade A the most frequent. Mortality was nil and an R0 resection was achieved in all Patients. The overall number of lymph nodes harvested was similar between the two groups. CONCLUSIONS: Both RDP and LDP are valid techniques for the treatment of distal pancreatic tumors. The advantages of RDP are claimed by many but still under investigation. Some of these advantages are more subjective than objective, and it seems difficult to demonstrate a real superiority of one technique over the other in a standardized fashion. In our experience, laparoscopy has not been abandoned in favor of the robot: we continue to perform both approaches choosing upon single patient's characteristics.