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Pancreatic Neoplasms: HELP
Articles by Shu-Chun Chuang
Based on 4 articles published since 2010
(Why 4 articles?)
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Between 2010 and 2020, S-C Chuang wrote the following 4 articles about Pancreatic Neoplasms.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Article Inflammation marker and risk of pancreatic cancer: a nested case-control study within the EPIC cohort. 2012

Grote, V A / Kaaks, R / Nieters, A / Tjønneland, A / Halkjær, J / Overvad, K / Skjelbo Nielsen, M R / Boutron-Ruault, M C / Clavel-Chapelon, F / Racine, A / Teucher, B / Becker, S / Pischon, T / Boeing, H / Trichopoulou, A / Cassapa, C / Stratigakou, V / Palli, D / Krogh, V / Tumino, R / Vineis, P / Panico, S / Rodríguez, L / Duell, E J / Sánchez, M-J / Dorronsoro, M / Navarro, C / Gurrea, A B / Siersema, P D / Peeters, P H M / Ye, W / Sund, M / Lindkvist, B / Johansen, D / Khaw, K-T / Wareham, N / Allen, N E / Travis, R C / Fedirko, V / Jenab, M / Michaud, D S / Chuang, S-C / Romaguera, D / Bueno-de-Mesquita, H B / Rohrmann, S. ·Division of Cancer Epidemiology (c020), German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 581, Heidelberg 69120, Germany. ·Br J Cancer · Pubmed #22617158.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Established risk factors for pancreatic cancer include smoking, long-standing diabetes, high body fatness, and chronic pancreatitis, all of which can be characterised by aspects of inflammatory processes. However, prospective studies investigating the relation between inflammatory markers and pancreatic cancer risk are scarce. METHODS: We conducted a nested case-control study within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition, measuring prediagnostic blood levels of C-reactive protein (CRP), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and soluble receptors of tumour necrosis factor-α (sTNF-R1, R2) in 455 pancreatic cancer cases and 455 matched controls. Odds ratios (ORs) were estimated using conditional logistic regression models. RESULTS: None of the inflammatory markers were significantly associated with risk of pancreatic cancer overall, although a borderline significant association was observed for higher circulating sTNF-R2 (crude OR=1.52 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.97-2.39), highest vs lowest quartile). In women, however, higher sTNF-R1 levels were significantly associated with risk of pancreatic cancer (crude OR=1.97 (95% CI 1.02-3.79)). For sTNF-R2, risk associations seemed to be stronger for diabetic individuals and those with a higher BMI. CONCLUSION: Prospectively, CRP and IL-6 do not seem to have a role in our study with respect to risk of pancreatic cancer, whereas sTNF-R1 seemed to be a risk factor in women and sTNF-R2 might be a mediator in the risk relationship between overweight and diabetes with pancreatic cancer. Further large prospective studies are needed to clarify the role of proinflammatory proteins and cytokines in the pathogenesis of exocrine pancreatic cancer.

2 Article Plasma cotinine levels and pancreatic cancer in the EPIC cohort study. 2012

Leenders, Max / Chuang, Shu-Chun / Dahm, Christina C / Overvad, Kim / Ueland, Per Magne / Midttun, Oivind / Vollset, Stein Emil / Tjønneland, Anne / Halkjaer, Jytte / Jenab, Mazda / Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise / Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine / Kaaks, Rudolf / Canzian, Federico / Boeing, Heiner / Weikert, Cornelia / Trichopoulou, Antonia / Bamia, Christina / Naska, Androniki / Palli, Domenico / Pala, Valeria / Mattiello, Amalia / Tumino, Rosario / Sacerdote, Carlotta / van Duijnhoven, Fränzel J B / Peeters, Petra H M / van Gils, Carla H / Lund, Eiliv / Rodriguez, Laudina / Duell, Eric J / Pérez, María-José Sánchez / Molina-Montes, Esther / Castaño, José María Huerta / Barricarte, Aurelio / Larrañaga, Nerea / Johansen, Dorthe / Lindkvist, Björn / Sund, Malin / Ye, Weimin / Khaw, Kay-Tee / Wareham, Nicholas J / Michaud, Dominique S / Riboli, Elio / Xun, Wei W / Allen, Naomi E / Crowe, Francesca L / Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas / Vineis, Paolo. ·School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, UK. m.leenders-6@umcutrecht.nl ·Int J Cancer · Pubmed #21953524.

ABSTRACT: Smoking is an established risk factor for pancreatic cancer, previously investigated by the means of questionnaires. Using cotinine as a biomarker for tobacco exposure allows more accurate quantitative analyses to be performed. This study on pancreatic cancer, nested within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC cohort), included 146 cases and 146 matched controls. Using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, plasma cotinine levels were analyzed on average 8.0 years before cancer onset (5-95% range: 2.8-12.0 years). The relation between plasma cotinine levels and pancreatic cancer was analyzed with conditional logistic regression for different levels of cotinine in a population of never and current smokers. This was also done for the self-reported number of smoked cigarettes per day at baseline. Every increase of 350 nmol/L of plasma cotinine was found to significantly elevate risk of pancreatic cancer [odds ratio (OR): 1.33, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.11-1.60]. People with a cotinine level over 1187.8 nmol/L, a level comparable to smoking 17 cigarettes per day, have an elevated risk of pancreatic cancer, compared to people with cotinine levels below 55 nmol/L (OR: 3.66, 95% CI: 1.44-9.26). The results for self-reported smoking at baseline also show an increased risk of pancreatic cancer from cigarette smoking based on questionnaire information. People who smoke more than 30 cigarettes per day showed the highest risk compared to never smokers (OR: 4.15, 95% CI: 1.02-16.42). This study is the first to show that plasma cotinine levels are strongly related to pancreatic cancer.

3 Article A U-shaped relationship between plasma folate and pancreatic cancer risk in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition. 2011

Chuang, Shu-Chun / Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael / Ueland, Per Magne / Vollset, Stein Emil / Midttun, Øivind / Olsen, Anja / Tjønneland, Anne / Overvad, Kim / Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine / Morois, Sophie / Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise / Teucher, Birgit / Kaaks, Rudolf / Weikert, Cornelia / Boeing, Heiner / Trichopoulou, Antonia / Benetou, Vassiliki / Naska, Androniki / Jenab, Mazda / Slimani, Nadia / Romieu, Isabelle / Michaud, Dominique S / Palli, Domenico / Sieri, Sabina / Panico, Salvatore / Sacerdote, Carlotta / Tumino, Rosario / Skeie, Guri / Duell, Eric J / Rodriguez, Laudina / Molina-Montes, Esther / Huerta, José Marı A / Larrañaga, Nerea / Gurrea, Aurelio Barricarte / Johansen, Dorthe / Manjer, Jonas / Ye, Weimin / Sund, Malin / Peeters, Petra H M / Jeurnink, Suzanne / Wareham, Nicholas / Khaw, Kay-Tee / Crowe, Francesca / Riboli, Elio / Bueno-de-Mesquita, Bas / Vineis, Paolo. ·School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, UK. ·Eur J Cancer · Pubmed #21411310.

ABSTRACT: Folate intake has shown an inverse association with pancreatic cancer; nevertheless, results from plasma measurements were inconsistent. The aim of this study is to examine the association between plasma total homocysteine, methionine, folate, cobalamin, pyridoxal 5'-phosphate, riboflavin, flavin mononucleotide and pancreatic cancer risk in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). We conducted a nested case-control study in the EPIC cohort, which has an average of 9.6 years of follow-up (1992-2006), using 463 incident pancreatic cancer cases. Controls were matched to each case by center, sex, age (± 1 year), date (± 1 year) and time (± 3 h) at blood collection and fasting status. Conditional logistic regression was used to calculate the odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI), adjusting for education, smoking status, plasma cotinine concentration, alcohol drinking, body mass index and diabetes status. We observed a U-shaped association between plasma folate and pancreatic cancer risk. The ORs for plasma folate ≤ 5, 5-10, 10-15 (reference), 15-20, and > 20 nmol/L were 1.58 (95% CI=0.72-3.46), 1.39 (0.93-2.08), 1.0 (reference), 0.79 (0.52-1.21), and 1.34 (0.89-2.02), respectively. Methionine was associated with an increased risk in men (per quintile increment: OR=1.17, 95% CI=1.00-1.38) but not in women (OR=0.91, 95% CI=0.78-1.07; p for heterogeneity <0.01). Our results suggest a U-shaped association between plasma folate and pancreatic cancer risk in both men and women. The positive association that we observed between methionine and pancreatic cancer may be sex dependent and may differ by time of follow-up. However, the mechanisms behind the observed associations warrant further investigation.

4 Article Exposure to environmental tobacco smoke in childhood and incidence of cancer in adulthood in never smokers in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition. 2011

Chuang, Shu-Chun / Gallo, Valentina / Michaud, Dominique / Overvad, Kim / Tjønneland, Anne / Clavel-Chapelon, Francoise / Romieu, Isabelle / Straif, Kurt / Palli, Domenico / Pala, Valeria / Tumino, Rosario / Sacerdote, Carlotta / Panico, Salvatore / Peeters, Petra H / Lund, Eiliv / Gram, Inger Torhild / Manjer, Jonas / Borgquist, Signe / Riboli, Elio / Vineis, Paolo. ·School of Public Health, Imperial College London, St Mary's Campus, Norfolk Place, W2 1PG, London, UK. s-c.chuang@imperial.ac.uk ·Cancer Causes Control · Pubmed #21279734.

ABSTRACT: The association between childhood environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) exposure and adult cancer risk is controversial; we examined this relationship in never smokers within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cohort. Over an average of 10 years, 8,372 cases of cancer were diagnosed in 112,430 never smokers in EPIC. Childhood ETS was self-reported by participants at baseline, along with other lifestyle factors. Hazard ratios (HR) for ETS exposure in childhood and their 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated by Cox proportional hazards models stratified by age, sex, and study center and adjusted for education, alcohol drinking, body mass index, physical activity, non-alcoholic energy intake, fruit and vegetable intake, and adulthood ETS exposure. Models were further adjusted for reproductive factors for female cancers, for meat intake for digestive system cancers, and for diabetes status for pancreatic cancer. No association was observed between childhood ETS exposure and overall cancer risks (HR = 0.97, 95% CI = 0.92-1.02), and for selected sites. The only exception was pancreatic cancer, as previously reported by Vrieling et al., among those who had been exposed daily in childhood (overall HR = 2.09, 95% CI = 1.14-3.84). In conclusion, childhood ETS exposure might not be a major risk factor for common cancers in adulthood.