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Pancreatic Neoplasms: HELP
Articles by Kwun-Ye Chu
Based on 5 articles published since 2010
(Why 5 articles?)
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Between 2010 and 2020, Kwun-Ye Chu wrote the following 5 articles about Pancreatic Neoplasms.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Clinical Trial Comparison of investigator-delineated gross tumour volumes and quality assurance in pancreatic cancer: Analysis of the on-trial cases for the SCALOP trial. 2016

Fokas, Emmanouil / Spezi, Emiliano / Patel, Neel / Hurt, Chris / Nixon, Lisette / Chu, Kwun-Ye / Staffurth, John / Abrams, Ross / Mukherjee, Somnath. ·Department of Oncology, CRUK/MRC Institute for Radiation Oncology, University of Oxford, UK. · School of Engineering, Cardiff University, UK. · Oxford University Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, UK. · Wales Cancer Trials Unit, Centre for Trials Research, Cardiff University, UK. · Department of Oncology, CRUK/MRC Institute for Radiation Oncology, University of Oxford, UK; Oxford University Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, UK. · Institute of Cancer and Genetics, Cardiff University, UK; Cardiff NCRI RTTQA Centre, Velindre NHS Trust, UK. · Department of Radiation Oncology, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, USA. · Department of Oncology, CRUK/MRC Institute for Radiation Oncology, University of Oxford, UK; Oxford University Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, UK. Electronic address: somnath.mukherjee@oncology.ox.ac.uk. ·Radiother Oncol · Pubmed #27497804.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: We performed a retrospective central review of tumour outlines in patients undergoing radiotherapy in the SCALOP trial. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The planning CT scans were reviewed retrospectively by a central review team, and the accuracy of investigators' GTV (iGTV) and PTV (iPTV) was compared to the trials team-defined gold standard (gsGTV and gsPTV) using the Jaccard Conformity Index (JCI) and Geographical Miss Index (GMI). The prognostic value of JCI and GMI was also assessed. The RT plans were also reviewed against protocol-defined constraints. RESULTS: 60 patients with diagnostic-quality planning scans were included. The median whole volume JCI for GTV was 0.64 (IQR: 0.43-0.82), and the median GMI was 0.11 (IQR: 0.05-0.22). For PTVs, the median JCI and GMI were 0.80 (IQR: 0.71-0.88) and 0.04 (IQR: 0.02-0.12) respectively. Tumour was completely missed in 1 patient, and⩾50% of the tumour was missed in 3. Patients with JCI for GTV⩾0.7 had 7.12 (95% CIs: 1.83-27.67, p=0.005) higher odds of progressing by 9months in multivariate analysis. Major deviations in RT planning were noted in 4.5% of cases. CONCLUSIONS: Radiotherapy workshops and real-time central review of contours are required in RT trials of pancreatic cancer.

2 Clinical Trial ARCII: A phase II trial of the HIV protease inhibitor Nelfinavir in combination with chemoradiation for locally advanced inoperable pancreatic cancer. 2016

Wilson, James M / Fokas, Emmanouil / Dutton, Susan J / Patel, Neel / Hawkins, Maria A / Eccles, Cynthia / Chu, Kwun-Ye / Durrant, Lisa / Abraham, Aswin G / Partridge, Mike / Woodward, Martha / O'Neill, Eric / Maughan, Tim / McKenna, W Gillies / Mukherjee, Somnath / Brunner, Thomas B. ·Department of Oncology, CRUK/MRC Institute for Radiation Oncology, University of Oxford, UK. · Centre for Statistics in Medicine, Nuffield Department of Orthopaedics, Rheumatology and Musculoskeletal Sciences, University of Oxford, UK. · Department of Radiology, Oxford University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, UK. · Department of Radiotherapy, Oxford University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, UK. · Department of Oncology, CRUK/MRC Institute for Radiation Oncology, University of Oxford, UK; Department of Radiotherapy, Oxford University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, UK. · Early Phase Research Hub, Department of Oncology, Oxford Cancer and Haematology Centre, Oxford University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, UK. · Department of Oncology, CRUK/MRC Institute for Radiation Oncology, University of Oxford, UK. Electronic address: somnath.mukherjee@oncology.ox.ac.uk. · Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Freiburg, Germany; German Cancer Consortium (DKTK), Heidelberg, Partner Site Freiburg, Germany. ·Radiother Oncol · Pubmed #27117177.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Nelfinavir can enhance intrinsic radiosensitivity, reduce hypoxia and improve vascularity. We conducted a phase II trial combining nelfinavir with chemoradiotherapy (CRT) for locally advanced inoperable pancreatic cancer (LAPC). MATERIALS AND METHODS: Radiotherapy (50.4Gy/28 fractions; boost to 59.4Gy/33 fractions) was administered with weekly gemcitabine and cisplatin. Nelfinavir started 3-10days before and was continued during CRT. The primary end-point was 1-year overall survival (OS). Secondary end-points included histological downstaging, radiological response, 1-year progression free survival (PFS), overall survival (OS) and treatment toxicity. An imaging sub-study (n=6) evaluated hypoxia ((18)F-Fluoromisonidazole-PET) and perfusion (perfusion CT) during induction nelfinavir. RESULTS: The study closed after recruiting 23 patients, due to non-availability of Nelfinavir in Europe. The 1-year OS was 73.4% (90% CI: 54.5-85.5%) and median OS was 17.4months (90% CI: 12.8-18.8). The 1-year PFS was 21.8% (90% CI: 8.9-38.3%) and median PFS was 5.5months (90% CI: 4.1-8.3). All patients experienced Grade 3/4 toxicity, but many were asymptomatic laboratory abnormalities. Four of 6 patients on the imaging sub-study demonstrated reduced hypoxia and increased perfusion post-nelfinavir. CONCLUSIONS: CRT combined with nelfinavir showed acceptable toxicity and promising survival in pancreatic cancer.

3 Clinical Trial A treatment planning comparison of four target volume contouring guidelines for locally advanced pancreatic cancer radiotherapy. 2013

Fokas, Emmanouil / Eccles, Cynthia / Patel, Neel / Chu, Kwun-Ye / Warren, Samantha / McKenna, W Gillies / Brunner, Thomas B. ·Gray Institute for Radiation Oncology and Biology, Department of Oncology, Oxford University, United Kingdom. emmanouil.fokas@kgu.de ·Radiother Oncol · Pubmed #23647755.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Contouring of target volumes varies significantly in radiotherapy of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). There is a lack of consensus as to whether elective lymph nodes (eLN's) should be included or not in the planning target volume (PTV). In the present study we analyzed the dosimetric coverage of the eLN's and organs at risk (OAR) by comparing four different contouring guidelines. METHODS AND MATERIALS: PTVs were delineated with (Oxford and RTOG guidelines) or without (Michigan and SCALOP guidelines) including the eLNs in eleven patients with PDAC. eLNs included the peripancreatic, paraaortic, paracaval, celiac trunk, superior mesenteric and portal vein clinical target volumes (CTVs). A 3D-CRT plan (50.40 Gy in 28 fractions) was performed to analyze and compare the dosimetric coverage of all eLNs and OAR between the 4 contouring guidelines. RESULTS: The size of Oxford and RTOG PTVs was comparable and significantly larger than the SCALOP and Michigan PTVs. Interestingly the eLNs received a significant amount of incidental dose irradiation by PTV-based plans that only aimed to treat the tumor without the eLNs. The dosimetric coverage of eLN presented a large variability according to the respective contouring methods. The difference in the size of the 4 PTVs was reflected to the dose distribution at the OAR. CONCLUSIONS: Our study provides important information regarding the impact of different contouring guidelines on the dose distribution to the eLNs and the OAR in patients with locally advanced PDAC treated with radiotherapy.

4 Article Endobiliary Stent Position Changes during External-beam Radiotherapy. 2015

Chu, Kwun-Ye / Eccles, Cynthia L / Brunner, Thomas B. ·CRUK/MRC Oxford Institute for Radiation Oncology, Department of Oncology, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom ; Radiotherapy Department, Churchill Hospital, Oxford University Hospitals NHS Trust, Oxford, United Kingdom. · CRUK/MRC Oxford Institute for Radiation Oncology, Department of Oncology, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom ; Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Freiburg, Freiburg im Breisgau, Germany. ·J Med Imaging Radiat Sci · Pubmed #26090069.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: Endobiliary stents can be used as surrogates for pancreatic localization when using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) during external-beam radiotherapy (EBRT). This work reports on interfraction stent position changes during EBRT for locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC). MATERIALS AND METHODS: Six patients with endobiliary stents who underwent EBRT for LAPC were assessed. Measurements from the most superior aspect of the stent (sup stent) and the most inferior aspect of the stent (inf stent) to the most inferior, posterior aspect of the L1 vertebra central spinous process were determined from daily treatment CBCTs and compared with those determined from the planning computed tomography (CT) scan. Changes in stent-L1 measurements were interpreted as changes in relative stent position. RESULTS: Three patients showed mean interfraction stent position changes of ≥1 cm when treatment measurements were compared with planning measurements. The sup stent for patient A moved to the right (2.66 ± 2.77 cm) and inferiorly (3.0 ± 3.12 cm), and the inf stent moved to the right (1.92 ± 2.02 cm) inferiorly (3.23 ± 3.34 cm) and posteriorly (1.41 ± 1.43 cm). The inf stent for patient B moved superiorly (2.23 ± 0.49 cm) and posteriorly (1.72 ± 0.59 cm). The sup and inf stent for patient F moved inferiorly (0.98 ± 0.35 cm and 1.21 ± 0.38 cm, respectively). The remaining three patients C, D, and E showed interfraction position changes of <1 cm. CONCLUSION: Endobiliary stent migration and deformation were observed in a small subset of patients. Further investigation is required before confirming their use as surrogates for LAPC target localization during image-guided EBRT.

5 Article Challenges in using ¹⁸F-fluorodeoxyglucose-PET-CT to define a biological radiotherapy boost volume in locally advanced pancreatic cancer. 2014

Wilson, James M / Mukherjee, Somnath / Chu, Kwun-Ye / Brunner, Thomas B / Partridge, Mike / Hawkins, Maria. ·CRUK/MRC Oxford Institute for Radiation Oncology, Gray Laboratories, University of Oxford, Old Road Campus Research Building, Off Roosevelt Drive, Oxford OX3 7DQ, UK. james.wilson@oncology.ox.ac.uk. ·Radiat Oncol · Pubmed #24962658.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The best method of identifying regions within pancreatic tumours that might benefit from an increased radiotherapy dose is not known. We investigated the utility of pre-treatment FDG-PET in predicting the spatial distribution of residual metabolic activity following chemoradiotherapy (CRT) in locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC). METHODS: 17 patients had FDG-PET/CT scans at baseline and six weeks post-CRT. Tumour segmentation was performed at 40% and 50% of SUVmax at baseline and 60%, 70%, 80% and 90% post-CRT. FDG-PET scans were non-rigidly registered to the radiotherapy planning CT using the CT component of the FDG-PET/CT. Percentage overlap of the post-CRT volumes with the pre-CRT volumes with one another and the gross tumour volume (GTV) was calculated. RESULTS: SUVmax decreased during CRT (median pre- 8.0 and post- 3.6, p < 0.0001). For spatial correlation analysis, 9 pairs of scans were included (Four were excluded following complete metabolic response, one patient had a non-FDG avid tumour, one had no post-CRT imaging, one had diffuse FDG uptake that could not be separated from normal tissues and one had an elevated blood glucose). The Pre40% and 50% of SUVmax volumes covered a mean of 50.8% and 30.3% of the GTV respectively. The mean% overlap of the 90%, 80%, 70%, 60% of SUVmax post-CRT with the Pre40% and Pre50% volumes were 83.3%, 84.0%, 83.7%, 77.9% and 77.8%, 69.9%, 74.5%, 64.8% respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Regions of residual metabolic activity following CRT can be predicted from the baseline FDG-PET and could aid definition of a biological target volume for non-uniform dose prescriptions.