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Pancreatic Neoplasms: HELP
Articles by Fei-Bo Chen
Based on 10 articles published since 2009
(Why 10 articles?)
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Between 2009 and 2019, Fei Chen wrote the following 10 articles about Pancreatic Neoplasms.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Review Inherited pancreatic cancer. 2017

Chen, Fei / Roberts, Nicholas J / Klein, Alison P. ·Department of Epidemiology, The Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD, USA. · Department of Pathology, Department of Oncology, The Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, The Johns Hopkins Medical Institution, Baltimore, MD, USA. · Department of Epidemiology, The Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD, USA; Department of Pathology, Department of Oncology, The Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, The Johns Hopkins Medical Institution, Baltimore, MD, USA. aklein1@jhmi.edu. ·Chin Clin Oncol · Pubmed #29307198.

ABSTRACT: Pancreatic cancers arise through a series of genetic events both inherited and acquired. Inherited genetic changes, both high penetrance and low penetrance, are an important component of pancreatic cancer risk, and may be used to characterize populations who will benefit from early detection. Furthermore, pancreatic cancer patients with inherited mutations may be particularly sensitive to certain targeted agents, providing an opportunity to personalized treatment. Family history of pancreatic cancer is one of the strongest risk factors for the disease, and is associated with an increased risk of caners at other sites, including but not limited to breast, ovarian and colorectal cancer. The goal of this chapter is to discuss the importance of family history of pancreatic cancer, and the known genes that account for a portion of the familial clustering of pancreatic cancer.

2 Review Simultaneous resection of abdominal cancer and synchronous pancreaticoduodenal metastasis: indications and literature review. 2012

Tan, Jing Wang / Wang, Hong Dong / Hu, Ben Shun / Chen, Ke / Xu, Hong Bin / Chen, Fei / Tan, Yun Chang / Dong, Jia Hong. ·Institute of Hepatobiliary Surgery, Chinese PLA General Hospital, Beijing, China. ·J Dig Dis · Pubmed #22988928.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: This study was aimed to identify the potential indications for simultaneous resection of abdominal cancer and synchronous pancreaticoduodenal metastasis (SRAPM) and improve the efficacy of SRAPM. METHODS: The data of 34 patients who underwent SRAPM were retrospectively reviewed. The intraoperative findings, morbidity and mortality, patterns of tumor invasion in the pancreas and duodenum, lymph node metastases, long-term outcomes and causes of death were evaluated. RESULTS: Fourteen patients (41.2%) developed complications, and 2 died of pancreatic fistulas with abdominal bleeding. The in-hospital mortality was 5.9%. The overall 1-year, 2-year and 3-year survival rates were 52.9%, 32.3% and 21.8%, respectively. The survival rates depended on the primary tumor, the invasion pattern, the presence of metastatic lymph nodes at the paraaortic site and the presence of residual tumor. The follow-up outcomes revealed that the main causes of death were as follows: systemic metastasis (n = 7), peritoneal metastasis (n = 6) and intrahepatic metastasis (n = 6). CONCLUSIONS: SRAPM is indicated for low-grade malignant tumors and in cases with direct invasion of the pancreaticoduodenum. The presence of metastatic lymph nodes at the paraaortic site, intrahepatic metastasis, micro-peritoneal metastasis, and distinct metastasis should be contraindications for the surgical procedure.

3 Article Novel three‑lncRNA signature predicts survival in patients with pancreatic cancer. 2018

Wu, Bin / Wang, Kaixuan / Fei, Janguo / Bao, Yi / Wang, Xiaoguang / Song, Zhengwei / Chen, Fei / Gao, Jun / Zhong, Zhengxiang. ·Department of Hepatobiliary Surgery, The Second Hospital of Jiaxing, Jiaxing, Zhejiang 314000, P.R. China. · Department of Gastroenterology, Changhai Hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai 200000, P.R. China. · Department of Hepatobiliary Surgery, The Second Hospital of Jiaxing, Jiaxing, Zhejiang 314000, P.R. China. · Department of Central Laboratory, The Second Hospital of Jiaxing, Jiaxing, Zhejiang 314000, P.R. China. · Department of Gastroenterology, Changhai Hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai 200000, P.R. China. ·Oncol Rep · Pubmed #30542694.

ABSTRACT: A growing body of evidence confirms that long non‑coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have an important role in biological processes by regulating gene expression at multiple levels. Dysregulated lncRNAs may be potential prognostic biomarkers or targets for the development of cancer treatments. However, the prognostic role of an lncRNA signature in pancreatic cancer has not been investigated. Pancreatic cancer lncRNA expression profiles from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) were analyzed in the current study. The prognostic value of differentially expressed lncRNAs (DElncRNAs) was evaluated via the Kaplan‑Meier method. A risk score model was established based on the potential prognostic lncRNAs. The biological functions of lncRNAs were predicted by functional enrichment analysis. Then, an lncRNA‑mRNA co‑expression network was established and predicted the function of the lncRNAs. Seven DElncRNAs that were significantly associated with the prognosis of pancreatic cancer were identified. Patients were classified into high‑risk and low‑risk groups using a risk score based on a three‑lncRNA signature. There was a significant difference in overall survival (OS) between the groups (median OS 1.33 vs. 3.65 years; log‑rank test, P=0.0000). Cox regression analysis and ROC curves demonstrated that the three‑lncRNA signature may be an effective independent prognostic biomarker in patients with pancreatic. The functional enrichment analysis showed that lncRNA AL137789.1, one component of the three‑lncRNA signature, may be associated with tumor immune responses. In the present study, a novel three‑lncRNA signature that was established that may be useful in predicting survival among patients with pancreatic cancer. These lncRNAs may be involved in tumor immunity and thus affect the prognosis of patients.

4 Article [Pancreatitis as the initial manifestation and abdominal lymph node enlargement in a boy]. 2018

Fang, You-Hong / Peng, Ke-Rong / Chen, Fei-Bo / Tang, Lu-Jing / Chen, Jie. ·Department of Gastroenterology, Children's Hospital, Zhejiang University School of Medicine, Hangzhou 310052, China. hzcjie@zju.edu.cn. ·Zhongguo Dang Dai Er Ke Za Zhi · Pubmed #30369361.

ABSTRACT: A boy aged 14 years had abdominal pain as the major manifestation, with elevated serum amylase and lipase. Abdominal ultrasound performed early after onset in another hospital showed enlargement of the pancreas and a reduction in echo. Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) showed pancreatic duct dilation and an unclear image of the head of the pancreas. Acute pancreatitis was considered. However, his symptoms were not relieved after fasting, fluid infusion, anti-acid therapy, and somatostatin therapy. Then, abdominal CT scan and MRCP found multiple low-density lesions of the pancreas and enlargement of the hilar and retroperitoneal lymph nodes. Exploratory laparotomy found pancreatic edema and multiple hilar nodules with unclear boundaries, and pathological biopsy showed anaplastic large-cell lymphoma. Since the liver, the spleen, bone marrow, and the central nervous system were not involved, he was diagnosed with stage III primary pancreatic lymphoma. After vindesine and dexamethasone were used to reduce tumor load, the patient underwent vindesine-pirarubicin-asparaginase-dexamethasone chemotherapy once and vinorelbine-dexamethasone chemotherapy 8 times. Imaging examination still showed multiple low-density lesions of the pancreas and retroperitoneal lymph node enlargement. His parents discontinued treatment. It is concluded that the rare causes of acute pancreatitis with poor response to conventional treatment should be considered, especially for patients with abdominal lymph node enlargement. Extranodal lymphoma should be considered, and lymph node biopsy should be performed as early as possible to confirm diagnosis. The prognosis of pancreatic lymphoma is associated with clinical stage and pathology.

5 Article Genome-wide meta-analysis identifies five new susceptibility loci for pancreatic cancer. 2018

Klein, Alison P / Wolpin, Brian M / Risch, Harvey A / Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael Z / Mocci, Evelina / Zhang, Mingfeng / Canzian, Federico / Childs, Erica J / Hoskins, Jason W / Jermusyk, Ashley / Zhong, Jun / Chen, Fei / Albanes, Demetrius / Andreotti, Gabriella / Arslan, Alan A / Babic, Ana / Bamlet, William R / Beane-Freeman, Laura / Berndt, Sonja I / Blackford, Amanda / Borges, Michael / Borgida, Ayelet / Bracci, Paige M / Brais, Lauren / Brennan, Paul / Brenner, Hermann / Bueno-de-Mesquita, Bas / Buring, Julie / Campa, Daniele / Capurso, Gabriele / Cavestro, Giulia Martina / Chaffee, Kari G / Chung, Charles C / Cleary, Sean / Cotterchio, Michelle / Dijk, Frederike / Duell, Eric J / Foretova, Lenka / Fuchs, Charles / Funel, Niccola / Gallinger, Steven / M Gaziano, J Michael / Gazouli, Maria / Giles, Graham G / Giovannucci, Edward / Goggins, Michael / Goodman, Gary E / Goodman, Phyllis J / Hackert, Thilo / Haiman, Christopher / Hartge, Patricia / Hasan, Manal / Hegyi, Peter / Helzlsouer, Kathy J / Herman, Joseph / Holcatova, Ivana / Holly, Elizabeth A / Hoover, Robert / Hung, Rayjean J / Jacobs, Eric J / Jamroziak, Krzysztof / Janout, Vladimir / Kaaks, Rudolf / Khaw, Kay-Tee / Klein, Eric A / Kogevinas, Manolis / Kooperberg, Charles / Kulke, Matthew H / Kupcinskas, Juozas / Kurtz, Robert J / Laheru, Daniel / Landi, Stefano / Lawlor, Rita T / Lee, I-Min / LeMarchand, Loic / Lu, Lingeng / Malats, Núria / Mambrini, Andrea / Mannisto, Satu / Milne, Roger L / Mohelníková-Duchoňová, Beatrice / Neale, Rachel E / Neoptolemos, John P / Oberg, Ann L / Olson, Sara H / Orlow, Irene / Pasquali, Claudio / Patel, Alpa V / Peters, Ulrike / Pezzilli, Raffaele / Porta, Miquel / Real, Francisco X / Rothman, Nathaniel / Scelo, Ghislaine / Sesso, Howard D / Severi, Gianluca / Shu, Xiao-Ou / Silverman, Debra / Smith, Jill P / Soucek, Pavel / Sund, Malin / Talar-Wojnarowska, Renata / Tavano, Francesca / Thornquist, Mark D / Tobias, Geoffrey S / Van Den Eeden, Stephen K / Vashist, Yogesh / Visvanathan, Kala / Vodicka, Pavel / Wactawski-Wende, Jean / Wang, Zhaoming / Wentzensen, Nicolas / White, Emily / Yu, Herbert / Yu, Kai / Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne / Zheng, Wei / Kraft, Peter / Li, Donghui / Chanock, Stephen / Obazee, Ofure / Petersen, Gloria M / Amundadottir, Laufey T. ·Department of Oncology, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, 21231, USA. aklein1@jhmi.edu. · Department of Pathology, Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, 21287, USA. aklein1@jhmi.edu. · Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA, 02215, USA. · Department of Chronic Disease Epidemiology, Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, CT, 06520, USA. · Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, 20892, USA. · Department of Oncology, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, 21231, USA. · Laboratory of Translational Genomics, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, 20892, USA. · Genomic Epidemiology Group, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), 69120, Heidelberg, Germany. · Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY, 10016, USA. · Department of Population Health, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY, 10016, USA. · Department of Environmental Medicine, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY, 10016, USA. · Department of Health Sciences Research, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN, 55905, USA. · Department of Pathology, Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, 21287, USA. · Lunenfeld-Tanenbaum Research Institute of Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, M5G 1×5, Canada. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, 94158, USA. · International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), 69372, Lyon, France. · Division of Clinical Epidemiology and Aging Research, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), 69120, Heidelberg, Germany. · Division of Preventive Oncology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), 69120, Heidelberg, Germany. · National Center for Tumor Diseases (NCT), 69120, Heidelberg, Germany. · Department for Determinants of Chronic Diseases (DCD), National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), 3720 BA, Bilthoven, The Netherlands. · Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University Medical Centre, 3584 CX, Utrecht, The Netherlands. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, SW7 2AZ, UK. · Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, 50603, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. · Division of Preventive Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA, 02215, USA. · Department of Epidemiology, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA, 02115, USA. · Department of Biology, University of Pisa, 56126, Pisa, Italy. · Digestive and Liver Disease Unit, 'Sapienza' University of Rome, 00185, Rome, Italy. · Gastroenterology and Gastrointestinal Endoscopy Unit, Vita-Salute San Raffaele University, IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, 20132, Milan, Italy. · Cancer Genomics Research Laboratory, National Cancer Institute, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, Leidos Biomedical Research Inc., Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research, Frederick, MD, 21702, USA. · Cancer Care Ontario, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, M5G 2L7, Canada. · Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, M5T 3M7, Canada. · Department of Pathology, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, 1007 MB, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Unit of Nutrition and Cancer, Cancer Epidemiology Research Program, Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute (IDIBELL), Catalan Institute of Oncology (ICO), Barcelona, 08908, Spain. · Department of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, Masaryk Memorial Cancer Institute, 65653, Brno, Czech Republic. · Yale Cancer Center, New Haven, CT, 06510, USA. · Department of Translational Research and The New Technologies in Medicine and Surgery, University of Pisa, 56126, Pisa, Italy. · Division of Aging, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA, 02115, USA. · Boston VA Healthcare System, Boston, MA, 02132, USA. · Department of Basic Medical Sciences, Laboratory of Biology, Medical School, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, 106 79, Athens, Greece. · Cancer Epidemiology and Intelligence Division, Cancer Council Victoria, Melbourne, VIC, 3004, Australia. · Centre for Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Melbourne School of Population and Global Health, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC, 3010, Australia. · Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, Monash University, Melbourne, VIC, 3004, Australia. · Division of Public Health Sciences, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA, 98109, USA. · SWOG Statistical Center, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA, 98109, USA. · Department of General Surgery, University Hospital Heidelberg, 69120, Heidelberg, Germany. · Department of Preventive Medicine, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, 90032, USA. · Department of Epidemiology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, 77230, USA. · First Department of Medicine, University of Szeged, 6725, Szeged, Hungary. · Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, 20892, USA. · Department of Radiation Oncology, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, 21231, USA. · Institute of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, Charles University, 2nd Faculty of Medicine, 150 06, Prague 5, Czech Republic. · Epidemiology Research Program, American Cancer Society, Atlanta, GA, 30303, USA. · Department of Hematology, Institute of Hematology and Transfusion Medicine, 02-776, Warsaw, Poland. · Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Faculty of Medicine, University of Ostrava, 701 03, Ostrava, Czech Republic. · Faculty of Medicine, University of Olomouc, 771 47, Olomouc, Czech Republic. · Division of Cancer Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), 69120, Heidelberg, Germany. · School of Clinical Medicine, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, CB2 0SP, UK. · Glickman Urological and Kidney Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH, 44195, USA. · ISGlobal, Centre for Research in Environmental Epidemiology (CREAL), 08003, Barcelona, Spain. · CIBER Epidemiología y Salud Pública (CIBERESP), 08003, Barcelona, Spain. · Hospital del Mar Institute of Medical Research (IMIM), Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, 08003, Barcelona, Spain. · Universitat Pompeu Fabra (UPF), 08002, Barcelona, Spain. · Department of Gastroenterology, Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, 44307, Kaunas, Lithuania. · Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY, 10065, USA. · ARC-NET: Centre for Applied Research on Cancer, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, 37134, Verona, Italy. · Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA, 02115, USA. · Cancer Epidemiology Program, University of Hawaii Cancer Center, Honolulu, HI, 96813, USA. · Genetic and Molecular Epidemiology Group, Spanish National Cancer Research Center (CNIO), 28029, Madrid, Spain. · CIBERONC, 28029, Madrid, Spain. · Oncology Department, ASL1 Massa Carrara, Carrara, 54033, Italy. · Department of Public Health Solutions, National Institute for Health and Welfare, 00271, Helsinki, Finland. · Department of Oncology, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, Palacky University Olomouc and University Hospital, 775 20, Olomouc, Czech Republic. · Population Health Department, QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Brisbane, 4029, Australia. · Department of General Surgery, University of Heidelburg, Heidelberg, Germany. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY, 10065, USA. · Department of Surgery, Oncology and Gastroenterology (DiSCOG), University of Padua, 35124, Padua, Italy. · Pancreas Unit, Department of Digestive Diseases and Internal Medicine, Sant'Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, 40138, Bologna, Italy. · Epithelial Carcinogenesis Group, Spanish National Cancer Research Centre-CNIO, 28029, Madrid, Spain. · Departament de Ciències Experimentals i de la Salut, Universitat Pompeu Fabra, 08002, Barcelona, Spain. · Centre de Recherche en Épidémiologie et Santé des Populations (CESP, Inserm U1018), Facultés de Medicine, Université Paris-Saclay, UPS, UVSQ, Gustave Roussy, 94800, Villejuif, France. · Division of Epidemiology, Department of Medicine, Vanderbilt Epidemiology Center, Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN, 37232, USA. · Department of Medicine, Georgetown University, Washington, 20057, USA. · Laboratory for Pharmacogenomics, Biomedical Center, Faculty of Medicine in Pilsen, Charles University, 323 00, Pilsen, Czech Republic. · Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Umeå University, 901 85, Umeå, Sweden. · Department of Digestive Tract Diseases, Medical University of Łodz, 90-647, Łodz, Poland. · Division of Gastroenterology and Research Laboratory, IRCCS Scientific Institute and Regional General Hospital "Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza", 71013, San Giovanni Rotondo, FG, Italy. · Division of Research, Kaiser Permanente Northern California, Oakland, CA, 94612, USA. · Department of General, Visceral and Thoracic Surgery, University Hamburg-Eppendorf, 20246, Hamburg, Germany. · Department of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD, 21205, USA. · Department of Molecular Biology of Cancer, Institute of Experimental Medicine, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, 142 20, Prague 4, Czech Republic. · Department of Epidemiology and Environmental Health, University at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY, 14214, USA. · Department of Computational Biology, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, TN, 38105, USA. · Department of Epidemiology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, 98195, USA. · Perlmutter Cancer Center, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY, 10016, USA. · Department of Biostatistics, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA, 02115, USA. · Department of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, 77030, USA. · Laboratory of Translational Genomics, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, 20892, USA. amundadottirl@mail.nih.gov. ·Nat Commun · Pubmed #29422604.

ABSTRACT: In 2020, 146,063 deaths due to pancreatic cancer are estimated to occur in Europe and the United States combined. To identify common susceptibility alleles, we performed the largest pancreatic cancer GWAS to date, including 9040 patients and 12,496 controls of European ancestry from the Pancreatic Cancer Cohort Consortium (PanScan) and the Pancreatic Cancer Case-Control Consortium (PanC4). Here, we find significant evidence of a novel association at rs78417682 (7p12/TNS3, P = 4.35 × 10

6 Article Detection of K-ras gene mutations in feces by magnetic nanoprobe in patients with pancreatic cancer: A preliminary study. 2018

Wang, Xiaoguang / Wang, Jingshuai / Chen, Fei / Zhong, Zhengxiang / Qi, Lifeng. ·Department of Surgery, Jiaxing Second Hospital, Jiaxing, Zhejiang 314000, P.R. China. · Institute for Biomedical Engineering and Nano Science, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200092, P.R. China. · Foxgene Co. Ltd., Wuxi, Jiangsu 200014, P.R. China. ·Exp Ther Med · Pubmed #29250161.

ABSTRACT: The present study aimed to investigate the feasibility and effectiveness of detecting K-ras mutation by using magnetic nanoparticles in fecal samples of patients with pancreatic cancer at different stages. The novel methodology of K-ras mutation detection was compared to the existing methodology of cancer antigen (CA)19-9 examination. Patients with pancreatic cancer (n=88), pancreatic benign diseases who displayed chronic pancreatitis (n=35), pancreatic mucinous cyst neoplasms (n=10) and pancreatic serous cyst (n=9) admitted to the Department of Surgery, Jiaxing Second Hospital were enrolled in the present study. Fecal samples were collected from all patients, DNA was extracted and magnetic nanoprobe was then used to detect K-ras mutation. The results obtained using the novel magnetic nanoprobe detection technique showed a K-ras mutation rate of 81.8% (72/88) in the patients with pancreatic cancer and 18.5% (10/54) in patients with pancreatic benign diseases. In patients with pancreatic cancer, the K-ras mutation rate was comparable in stages I + IIA and IIB + III + IV (78.9 vs. 84.0%; P>0.05). The sensitivity and specificity of K-ras mutation for detection of pancreatic cancer was 81.8 and 81.5%, respectively. Sixty-eight pancreatic cancer patients had >37 U/ml CA99 with a sensitivity and specificity for pancreatic cancer detection of 77.3 and 77.8%, which was not significantly lower than detection by the fecal K-ras mutations (P>0.05). Combinational detection of fecal K-ras mutations and serum CA19-9 significantly increased the sensitivity regarding pancreatic cancer detection to 97.7% (P<0.05), while the specificity was not enhanced (80.9%; P>0.05) compared with fecal K-ras mutations or CA19-9 alone. The findings showed that the magnetic nanoprobe is able to detect fecal K-ras mutations in different stages of pancreatic cancer, with comparable sensitivity and specificity to CA19-9 examination for differentiating pancreatic cancer. Furthermore, combined detection of CA19-9 and K-ras mutations has enhanced sensitivity compared with CA19-9 alone.

7 Article Sumoylation in p27kip1 via RanBP2 promotes cancer cell growth in cholangiocarcinoma cell line QBC939. 2017

Yang, Jun / Liu, Yan / Wang, Bing / Lan, Hongzhen / Liu, Ying / Chen, Fei / Zhang, Ju / Luo, Jian. ·Department of Vascular Surgery, Tongji Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, 430030, China. · Department of Geriatrics, Tongji Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 1095 Jiefang Avenue, Wuhan, 430030, Hubei, People's Republic of China. · Department of Bile Duct and Pancreatic Surgery, Tongji Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, 430030, China. · CAS Key Laboratory of Genome Sciences & Information, Beijing Institute of Genomics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 100101, China. · Collaborative Innovation Center for Genetics and Development, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 100101, China. · Department of Geriatrics, Tongji Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 1095 Jiefang Avenue, Wuhan, 430030, Hubei, People's Republic of China. luojian76@126.com. ·BMC Mol Biol · Pubmed #28882106.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Cholangiocarcinoma is one of the deadly disease with poor 5-year survival and poor response to conventional therapies. Previously, we found that p27kip1 nuclear-cytoplasmic translocation confers proliferation potential to cholangiocarcinoma cell line QBC939 and this process is mediated by crm-1. However, no other post-transcriptional regulation was found in this process including sumoylation in cholangiocarcinoma. RESULTS: In this study, we explored the role of sumoylation in the nuclear-cytoplasmic translocation of p27kip1 and its involvement of QBC939 cells' proliferation. First, we identified K73 as the sumoylation site in p27kip1. By utilizing plasmid flag-p27kip1, HA-RanBP2, GST-RanBP2 and His-p27kip1 and immunoprecipitation assay, we validated that p27kip1 can serve as the sumoylation target of RanBP2 in QBC939. Furthermore, we confirmed crm-1's role in promoting nuclear-cytoplasmic translocation of p27kip1 and found that RanBP2's function relies on crm-1. However, K73R mutated p27kip1 can't be identified by crm-1 or RanBP2 in p27kip1 translocation process, suggesting sumoylation of p27kip1 via K73 site is necessary in this process by RanBP2 and crm-1. Phenotypically, the overexpression of either RanBP2 or crm-1 can partially rescue the anti-proliferative effect brought by p27kip1 overexpression in both the MTS and EdU assay. For the first time, we identified and validated the K73 sumoylation site in p27kip1, which is critical to RanBP2 and crm-1 in p27kip1 nuclear-cytoplasmic translocation process. CONCLUSION: Taken together, targeted inhibition of sumoylation of p27kip1 may serve as a potentially potent therapeutic target in the eradication of cholangiocarcinoma development and relapses.

8 Article Preliminary evaluation of [18F]AlF-NOTA-MAL-Cys39-exendin-4 in insulinoma with PET. 2015

Xu, Qing / Zhu, Chen / Xu, Yuping / Pan, Donghui / Liu, Ping / Yang, Runlin / Wang, Lizhen / Chen, Fei / Sun, Xinchen / Luo, Shineng / Yang, Min. ·a Department of Radiation Oncology , The First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University , Nanjing , China . · b Key Laboratory of Nuclear Medicine, Ministry of Health, Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Molecular Nuclear Medicine , Jiangsu Institute of Nuclear Medicine , Wuxi , China , and. · c School of Pharmaceutical Science, Zhengzhou University , Zhengzhou , China. ·J Drug Target · Pubmed #25758750.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: High expression of glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) in insulinoma supplies a potential drug target for tumor imaging. Exendin-4 can specifically bind to GLP-1R as an agonist and its analogs are extensively used in receptor imaging studies. PURPOSE: A new GLP-1R imaging agent, [(18)F]AlF-NOTA-MAL-Cys(39)-exendin-4, was designed and prepared for insulinoma imaging. METHODS: Cys(39)-exendin-4 was conjugated with NOTA-MAL, then the compound was radiolabeled with [(18)F]AlF complex to obtained [(18)F]AlF-NOTA-MAL-Cys(39)-exendin-4. The tumor-targeting characters of the tracer were evaluated in INS-1 cells and BALB/c nude mice models. RESULTS: [(18)F]AlF-NOTA-MAL-Cys(39)-exendin-4 can be efficiently produced with a yield of 17.5 ± 3.2% (non-decay corrected) and radiochemical purity of >95%. The IC50 value of displacement [(18)F]AlF-NOTA-MAL-Cys(39)-exendin-4 with Cys(39)-exendin-4 was 13.52 ± 1.36 nM. PET images showed excellent tumor visualization with high uptake (9.15 ± 1.6%ID/g at 30 min and 7.74 ± 0.87%ID/g at 60 min). The tumor to muscle, pancreas and liver ratios were 63.25, 3.85 and 7.29 at 60 min after injection. GLP-1R binding specificity was demonstrated by co-injection with an excess of unlabeled Cys(39)-exendin-4 and the tumor uptake was found to be reduced significantly. CONCLUSION: [(18)F]AlF-NOTA-MAL-Cys(39)-exendin-4 shows favorable characteristics for insulinoma imaging and may be translated to clinical studies.

9 Article Nerve fibers in breast cancer tissues indicate aggressive tumor progression. 2014

Huang, Di / Su, Shicheng / Cui, Xiuying / Shen, Ximing / Zeng, Yunjie / Wu, Wei / Chen, Jianing / Chen, Fei / He, Chonghua / Liu, Jiang / Huang, Wei / Liu, Qiang / Su, Fengxi / Song, Erwei / Ouyang, Nengtai. ·From the Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Malignant Tumor Epigenetics and Gene Regulation (DH, SS, XC, YZ, WW, JC, FC, CH, JL, WH, QL, FS, ES, NO), Medical Research Center, Sun Yat-Sen Memorial Hospital, Sun Yat-Sen University · Breast Tumor Center (DH, SS, WW, JC, FC, CH, JL, WH, QL, FS, ES) · and Department of Pathology (XS, YZ, NO), Sun Yat-Sen Memorial Hospital, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou, China. ·Medicine (Baltimore) · Pubmed #25501061.

ABSTRACT: Emerging evidence has indicated nerve fibers as a marker in the progression of various types of cancers, such as pancreatic cancer and prostate cancer. However, whether nerve fibers are associated with breast cancer progression remains unclear. In this study, we evaluated the presence of nerve fibers in 352 breast cancer specimens and 83 benign breast tissue specimens including 43 cases of cystic fibrosis and 40 cases of fibroadenoma from 2 independent breast tumor center using immunohistochemical staining for specific peripheral nerve fiber markers.In all, nerve fibers were present in 130 out of 352 breast cancer tissue specimens, while none were detected in normal breast tissue specimens. Among 352 cases, we defined 239 cases from Sun Yat-Sen Memorial Hospital, Guangzhou, China, as the training set, and 113 cases from the First Affiliated Hospital of Shantou University, Guangdong, China, as the validation set. The thickness of tumor-involving nerve fibers is significantly correlated with poor differentiation, lymph node metastasis, high clinical staging, and triple negative subtype in breast cancer. More importantly, Cox multifactor analysis indicates that the thickness of tumor-involving nerve fibers is a previously unappreciated independent prognostic factors associated with shorter disease-free survival of breast cancer patients. Our findings are further validated by online Oncomine database. In conclusion, our results show that nerve fiber involvement in breast cancer is associated with progression of the malignancy and warrant further studies in the future.

10 Article Insulinoma imaging with glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor targeting probe (18)F-FBEM-Cys (39)-exendin-4. 2014

Xu, Yuping / Pan, Donghui / Xu, Qing / Zhu, Chen / Wang, Lizhen / Chen, Fei / Yang, Runlin / Luo, Shineng / Yang, Min. ·Key Laboratory of Nuclear Medicine, Ministry of Health, Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Molecular Nuclear Medicine, Jiangsu Institute of Nuclear Medicine, Wuxi, 214063, Jiangsu, China, xuyuping@jsinm.org. ·J Cancer Res Clin Oncol · Pubmed #24838847.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) is a specific target for insulinomas imaging since it is overexpressed in the tumor. Exendin-4 exhibits high affinity for the GLP-1R. In this study, a novel (18)F-labeled exendin-4 analog, (18)F-FBEM-Cys(39)-exendin-4, was synthesized and its potentials for GLP-1R imaging were also evaluated. METHODS: (18)F-FBEM was synthesized by coupling (18)F-fluorobenzoic acid ((18)F-FBA) with N-(2-aminoethyl) maleimide, and the reaction conditions were optimized. Cys(39)-exendin-4 was then conjugated with (18)F-FBEM to obtain (18)F-FBEM-Cys(39)-exendin-4. The GLP-1R targeting potential and pharmacokinetic profile of the tracer were analyzed in INS-1 insulinoma and MDA-MB-435 breast tumor model, respectively. RESULTS: Under the optimal conditions, the yield of radiolabeled (18)F-FBEM was 49.1 ± 2.0 % (based on (18)F-FBA, non-decay corrected). The yield of (18)F-FBEM-Cys(39)-exendin-4 was 35.1 ± 2.6 % (based on the starting (18)F-FBEM, non-decay corrected). The radiochemical purity of (18)F-FBEM-Cys(39)-exendin-4 is >95 %, and the specific activity was at least 35 GBq/μmol. The GLP-1R-positive INS-1 insulinoma xenograft was clearly visible with good contrast to background, whereas GLP-1R-negative MDA-MB435 breast tumor was barely visible. Low levels of radioactivity were also detected at pancreas and lungs due to few GLP-1R expressions. GLP-1R binding specificity was demonstrated by reduced INS-1 tumor uptake of the tracer after coinjection with an excess of unlabeled Cys(39)-exendin-4 at 1 h postinjection. CONCLUSION: The thiol-reactive reagent, (18)F-FBEM, was prepared with high yield and successfully conjugated to Cys(39)-exendin-4. Favorable preclinical data showing specific and effective tumor targeting by (18)F-FBEM-Cys(39)-exendin-4 suggest that the tracer may be a potential probe for insulinomas imaging.