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Pancreatic Neoplasms: HELP
Articles by Dianne Chadwick
Based on 4 articles published since 2009
(Why 4 articles?)
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Between 2009 and 2019, Dianne Chadwick wrote the following 4 articles about Pancreatic Neoplasms.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Article Whole genomes define concordance of matched primary, xenograft, and organoid models of pancreas cancer. 2019

Gendoo, Deena M A / Denroche, Robert E / Zhang, Amy / Radulovich, Nikolina / Jang, Gun Ho / Lemire, Mathieu / Fischer, Sandra / Chadwick, Dianne / Lungu, Ilinca M / Ibrahimov, Emin / Cao, Ping-Jiang / Stein, Lincoln D / Wilson, Julie M / Bartlett, John M S / Tsao, Ming-Sound / Dhani, Neesha / Hedley, David / Gallinger, Steven / Haibe-Kains, Benjamin. ·Centre for Computational Biology, Institute of Cancer and Genomic Sciences, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, United Kingdom. · School of Science and Technology, Nottingham Trent University, Nottingham, United Kingdom. · PanCuRx Translational Research Initiative, Ontario Institute of Cancer Research (OICR), Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Informatics and Bio-computing Program, Ontario Institute for Cancer Research, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Princess Margaret Living Biobank Core, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Department of Statistical Science, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Department of Pathology, University Health Network, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · UHN Program in BioSpecimen Sciences, Department of Pathology, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Transformative Pathology, Ontario Institute for Cancer Research, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Division of Medical Oncology, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Molecular Genetics Department, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Lunenfeld-Tanenbaum Research Institute, Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Hepatobiliary/Pancreatic Surgical Oncology Program, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Vector Institute, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. ·PLoS Comput Biol · Pubmed #30629588.

ABSTRACT: Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) has the worst prognosis among solid malignancies and improved therapeutic strategies are needed to improve outcomes. Patient-derived xenografts (PDX) and patient-derived organoids (PDO) serve as promising tools to identify new drugs with therapeutic potential in PDAC. For these preclinical disease models to be effective, they should both recapitulate the molecular heterogeneity of PDAC and validate patient-specific therapeutic sensitivities. To date however, deep characterization of the molecular heterogeneity of PDAC PDX and PDO models and comparison with matched human tumour remains largely unaddressed at the whole genome level. We conducted a comprehensive assessment of the genetic landscape of 16 whole-genome pairs of tumours and matched PDX, from primary PDAC and liver metastasis, including a unique cohort of 5 'trios' of matched primary tumour, PDX, and PDO. We developed a pipeline to score concordance between PDAC models and their paired human tumours for genomic events, including mutations, structural variations, and copy number variations. Tumour-model comparisons of mutations displayed single-gene concordance across major PDAC driver genes, but relatively poor agreement across the greater mutational load. Genome-wide and chromosome-centric analysis of structural variation (SV) events highlights previously unrecognized concordance across chromosomes that demonstrate clustered SV events. We found that polyploidy presented a major challenge when assessing copy number changes; however, ploidy-corrected copy number states suggest good agreement between donor-model pairs. Collectively, our investigations highlight that while PDXs and PDOs may serve as tractable and transplantable systems for probing the molecular properties of PDAC, these models may best serve selective analyses across different levels of genomic complexity.

2 Article Sensitive tumour detection and classification using plasma cell-free DNA methylomes. 2018

Shen, Shu Yi / Singhania, Rajat / Fehringer, Gordon / Chakravarthy, Ankur / Roehrl, Michael H A / Chadwick, Dianne / Zuzarte, Philip C / Borgida, Ayelet / Wang, Ting Ting / Li, Tiantian / Kis, Olena / Zhao, Zhen / Spreafico, Anna / Medina, Tiago da Silva / Wang, Yadon / Roulois, David / Ettayebi, Ilias / Chen, Zhuo / Chow, Signy / Murphy, Tracy / Arruda, Andrea / O'Kane, Grainne M / Liu, Jessica / Mansour, Mark / McPherson, John D / O'Brien, Catherine / Leighl, Natasha / Bedard, Philippe L / Fleshner, Neil / Liu, Geoffrey / Minden, Mark D / Gallinger, Steven / Goldenberg, Anna / Pugh, Trevor J / Hoffman, Michael M / Bratman, Scott V / Hung, Rayjean J / De Carvalho, Daniel D. ·Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Lunenfeld-Tanenbaum Research Institute, Sinai Health System, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY, USA. · Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Genome Technologies, Ontario Institute for Cancer Research, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · UMR_S 1236, Univ Rennes 1, Inserm, Etablissement Français du sang Bretagne, Rennes, France. · Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Medicine, UC Davis Comprehensive Cancer Center, Sacramento, CA, USA. · Division of Epidemiology, Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Fred Litwin Centre for Cancer Genetics, Lunenfeld-Tanenbaum Research Institute, Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Department of Surgery, Toronto General Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Department of Computer Science, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Lunenfeld-Tanenbaum Research Institute, Sinai Health System, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. rayjean.hung@lunenfeld.ca. · Division of Epidemiology, Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. rayjean.hung@lunenfeld.ca. · Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. ddecarv@uhnresearch.ca. · Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. ddecarv@uhnresearch.ca. ·Nature · Pubmed #30429608.

ABSTRACT: The use of liquid biopsies for cancer detection and management is rapidly gaining prominence

3 Article Genomics-Driven Precision Medicine for Advanced Pancreatic Cancer: Early Results from the COMPASS Trial. 2018

Aung, Kyaw L / Fischer, Sandra E / Denroche, Robert E / Jang, Gun-Ho / Dodd, Anna / Creighton, Sean / Southwood, Bernadette / Liang, Sheng-Ben / Chadwick, Dianne / Zhang, Amy / O'Kane, Grainne M / Albaba, Hamzeh / Moura, Shari / Grant, Robert C / Miller, Jessica K / Mbabaali, Faridah / Pasternack, Danielle / Lungu, Ilinca M / Bartlett, John M S / Ghai, Sangeet / Lemire, Mathieu / Holter, Spring / Connor, Ashton A / Moffitt, Richard A / Yeh, Jen Jen / Timms, Lee / Krzyzanowski, Paul M / Dhani, Neesha / Hedley, David / Notta, Faiyaz / Wilson, Julie M / Moore, Malcolm J / Gallinger, Steven / Knox, Jennifer J. ·Wallace McCain Centre for Pancreatic Cancer, Department of Medical Oncology, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University Health Network, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Department of Pathology, University Health Network, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathobiology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · PanCuRx Translational Research Initiative, Ontario, Institute for Cancer Research, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · UHN Biobank, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Genomics, Ontario Institute for Cancer Research, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Diagnostic Development, Ontario Institute for Cancer Research, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Joint Department of Medical Imaging, University Health Network, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Lunenfeld-Tanenbaum Research Institute, Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Department of Pharmacology and Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina. · Department of Biomedical Informatics, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, New York. · Department of Surgery, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina. · British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. · Hepatobiliary/Pancreatic Surgical Oncology Program, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Wallace McCain Centre for Pancreatic Cancer, Department of Medical Oncology, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University Health Network, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Jennifer.Knox@uhn.ca. ·Clin Cancer Res · Pubmed #29288237.

ABSTRACT:

4 Article A renewed model of pancreatic cancer evolution based on genomic rearrangement patterns. 2016

Notta, Faiyaz / Chan-Seng-Yue, Michelle / Lemire, Mathieu / Li, Yilong / Wilson, Gavin W / Connor, Ashton A / Denroche, Robert E / Liang, Sheng-Ben / Brown, Andrew M K / Kim, Jaeseung C / Wang, Tao / Simpson, Jared T / Beck, Timothy / Borgida, Ayelet / Buchner, Nicholas / Chadwick, Dianne / Hafezi-Bakhtiari, Sara / Dick, John E / Heisler, Lawrence / Hollingsworth, Michael A / Ibrahimov, Emin / Jang, Gun Ho / Johns, Jeremy / Jorgensen, Lars G T / Law, Calvin / Ludkovski, Olga / Lungu, Ilinca / Ng, Karen / Pasternack, Danielle / Petersen, Gloria M / Shlush, Liran I / Timms, Lee / Tsao, Ming-Sound / Wilson, Julie M / Yung, Christina K / Zogopoulos, George / Bartlett, John M S / Alexandrov, Ludmil B / Real, Francisco X / Cleary, Sean P / Roehrl, Michael H / McPherson, John D / Stein, Lincoln D / Hudson, Thomas J / Campbell, Peter J / Gallinger, Steven. ·Ontario Institute for Cancer Research, Toronto, Ontario M5G 0A3, Canada. · Cancer Genome Project, Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, Hinxton CB10 1SA, UK. · UHN Program in BioSpecimen Sciences, Department of Pathology, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2C4, Canada. · Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5G 1L7, Canada. · Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathobiology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5S 1A8, Canada. · Department of Computer Science, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3G4, Canada. · Eppley Institute for Research in Cancer, Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, Nebraska 68198, USA. · Department of Molecular Genetics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5S 1A8, Canada. · Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University Health Network (UHN), Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9, Canada. · Division of Surgical Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Odette Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5, Canada. · Department of Health Sciences Research, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota 55905, USA. · Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Québec, Canada, H3H 2L9. · Theoretical Biology and Biophysics (T-6) and Center for Nonlinear Studies, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico, USA, 87545. · Epithelial Carcinogenesis Group, Spanish National Cancer Research Centre (CNIO), Madrid 28029, Spain. · Lunenfeld-Tanenbaum Research Institute, Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, Ontario M5G 1X5, Canada. · Department of Surgery, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2C4, Canada. · Department of Haematology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 0XY, UK. ·Nature · Pubmed #27732578.

ABSTRACT: Pancreatic cancer, a highly aggressive tumour type with uniformly poor prognosis, exemplifies the classically held view of stepwise cancer development. The current model of tumorigenesis, based on analyses of precursor lesions, termed pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasm (PanINs) lesions, makes two predictions: first, that pancreatic cancer develops through a particular sequence of genetic alterations (KRAS, followed by CDKN2A, then TP53 and SMAD4); and second, that the evolutionary trajectory of pancreatic cancer progression is gradual because each alteration is acquired independently. A shortcoming of this model is that clonally expanded precursor lesions do not always belong to the tumour lineage, indicating that the evolutionary trajectory of the tumour lineage and precursor lesions can be divergent. This prevailing model of tumorigenesis has contributed to the clinical notion that pancreatic cancer evolves slowly and presents at a late stage. However, the propensity for this disease to rapidly metastasize and the inability to improve patient outcomes, despite efforts aimed at early detection, suggest that pancreatic cancer progression is not gradual. Here, using newly developed informatics tools, we tracked changes in DNA copy number and their associated rearrangements in tumour-enriched genomes and found that pancreatic cancer tumorigenesis is neither gradual nor follows the accepted mutation order. Two-thirds of tumours harbour complex rearrangement patterns associated with mitotic errors, consistent with punctuated equilibrium as the principal evolutionary trajectory. In a subset of cases, the consequence of such errors is the simultaneous, rather than sequential, knockout of canonical preneoplastic genetic drivers that are likely to set-off invasive cancer growth. These findings challenge the current progression model of pancreatic cancer and provide insights into the mutational processes that give rise to these aggressive tumours.