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Pancreatic Neoplasms: HELP
Articles by Vincenzo Cennamo
Based on 10 articles published since 2010
(Why 10 articles?)
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Between 2010 and 2020, Vincenzo Cennamo wrote the following 10 articles about Pancreatic Neoplasms.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Review Matricellular proteins and survival in patients with pancreatic cancer: A systematic review. 2018

Fiorino, Sirio / Bacchi-Reggiani, Maria Letizia / Birtolo, Chiara / Acquaviva, Giorgia / Visani, Michela / Fornelli, Adele / Masetti, Michele / Tura, Andrea / Sbrignadello, Stefano / Grizzi, Fabio / Patrinicola, Federica / Zanello, Matteo / Mastrangelo, Laura / Lombardi, Raffaele / Benini, Claudia / Di Tommaso, Luca / Bondi, Arrigo / Monetti, Francesco / Siopis, Elena / Orlandi, Paolo Emilio / Imbriani, Michele / Fabbri, Carlo / Giovanelli, Silvia / Domanico, Andrea / Accogli, Esterita / Di Saverio, Salomone / Grifoni, Daniela / Cennamo, Vincenzo / Leandri, Paolo / Jovine, Elio / de Biase, Dario. ·Internal Medicine Unit C, Azienda USL-Maggiore Hospital, Largo Nigrisoli 3, Bologna, Italy. Electronic address: sirio.fiorino@ausl.bologna.it. · Department of Medicine (Dipartimento di Medicina Specialistica, Diagnostica e Sperimentale), Cardiology Unit, Policlinico S. Orsola-Malpighi, University of Bologna, via Massarenti 9, Bologna, Italy. · Internal Medicine Unit A, Azienda USL-Maggiore Hospital, Largo Nigrisoli 3, Bologna, Italy. · Department of Medicine (Dipartimento di Medicina Specialistica, Diagnostica e Sperimentale), University of Bologna, Azienda USL di Bologna, Largo Nigrisoli 3, Bologna, Italy. · Anatomic Pathology Unit, Azienda USL-Maggiore Hospital, Largo Nigrisoli 3, Bologna, Italy. · Surgery Unit, Azienda USL-Maggiore Hospital, Largo Nigrisoli 3, Bologna, Italy. · CNR Institute of Neuroscience, Via Giuseppe Moruzzi 1, Padova, Italy. · Department of Immunology and Inflammation, Humanitas Clinical and Research Center, Via Manzoni 56, Rozzano, Milano, Italy. · Department of Pathology, Humanitas Clinical and Research Center, Via Manzoni 56, Rozzano, Milano, Italy. · Radiology Unit, Azienda USL-Maggiore Hospital, Largo Nigrisoli 3, Bologna, Italy. · Unit of Gastroenterology and Digestive Endoscopy, Azienda USL-Maggiore Hospital, Largo Nigrisoli 3, Bologna, Italy. · Surgical Emergency Unit, Azienda USL-Maggiore Hospital, Largo Nigrisoli 3, Bologna, Italy. · Department of Pharmacy and Biotechnology, University of Bologna, via San Donato 15, Bologna, Italy. · Department of Pharmacy and Biotechnology, University of Bologna, via San Donato 15, Bologna, Italy. Electronic address: dario.debiase@unibo.it. ·Pancreatology · Pubmed #29137857.

ABSTRACT: Extracellular matrix (ECM) plays a fundamental role in tissue architecture and homeostasis and modulates cell functions through a complex interaction between cell surface receptors, hormones, several bioeffector molecules, and structural proteins like collagen. These components are secreted into ECM and all together contribute to regulate several cellular activities including differentiation, apoptosis, proliferation, and migration. The so-called "matricellular" proteins (MPs) have recently emerged as important regulators of ECM functions. The aim of our review is to consider all different types of MPs family assessing the potential relationship between MPs and survival in patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). A systematic computer-based search of published articles, according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic reviews and Meta-Analysis (PRISMA) Statement issued in 2009 was conducted through Ovid interface, and literature review was performed in May 2017. The search text words were identified by means of controlled vocabulary, such as the National Library of Medicine's MESH (Medical Subject Headings) and Keywords. Collected data showed an important role of MPs in carcinogenesis and in PDAC prognosis even though the underlying mechanisms are still largely unknown and data are not univocal. Therefore, a better understanding of MPs role in regulation of ECM homeostasis and remodeling of specific organ niches may suggest potential novel extracellular targets for the development of efficacious therapeutic strategies.

2 Review Team work and cytopathology molecular diagnosis of solid pancreatic lesions. 2017

Fabbri, Carlo / Gibiino, Giulia / Fornelli, Adele / Cennamo, Vincenzo / Grifoni, Daniela / Visani, Michela / Acquaviva, Giorgia / Fassan, Matteo / Fiorino, Sirio / Giovanelli, Silvia / Bassi, Marco / Ghersi, Stefania / Tallini, Giovanni / Jovine, Elio / Gasbarrini, Antonio / de Biase, Dario. ·Unit of Gastroenterology and Digestive Endoscopy, AUSL Bologna Bellaria-Maggiore Hospital, Italy. · Medical Pathology, Department of Internal Medicine, Gastroenterology Division, Policlinico Universitario A. Gemelli, Catholic University of Sacred Heart, Rome, Italy. · Anatomic Pathology Unit, AUSL of Bologna, Maggiore Hospital, Italy. · Department of Pharmacy and Biotechnology (FaBiT), University of Bologna, Italy. · Department of Medicine (DIMES), Molecular Diagnostic Unit AUSL of Bologna, University of Bologna School of Medicine, Italy. · Department of Medicine, Anatomic Pathology, University of Padua, Padova, Italy. · Internal Medicine Unit, Maggiore Hospital, Bologna, Italy. ·Dig Endosc · Pubmed #28190274.

ABSTRACT: Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is expected to become the second leading cause of cancer-associated death in the next decade or so. It is widely accepted that tumorigenesis is linked to specific alterations in key genes and pancreatic neoplasms are some of the best characterized at the genomic level. Recent whole-exome and whole-genome sequencing analyses confirmed that PDAC is frequently characterized by mutations in a set of four genes among others: KRAS, TP53, CDKN2A/p16, and SMAD4. Sequencing, for example, is the preferable technique available for detecting KRAS mutations, whereas in situ immunochemistry is the main approach for detecting TP53 gene alteration. Nevertheless, the diagnosis of PDAC is still a clinical challenge, involving adequate acquisition of endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided fine-needle aspiration (FNA) and specific pathological assessment from tissue architecture to specific biomolecular tests. The aim of the present review is to provide a complete overview of the current knowledge of the biology of pancreatic cancer as detected by the latest biomolecular techniques and, moreover, to propose a paradigm for strict teamwork collaboration in order to improve the correct use of diagnostic sources.

3 Review Endoscopic tattooing of gastrointestinal and pancreatic lesions. 2012

Luigiano, Carmelo / Ferrara, Francesco / Morace, Carmela / Mangiavillano, Benedetto / Fabbri, Carlo / Cennamo, Vincenzo / Bassi, Marco / Virgilio, Clara / Consolo, Pierluigi. ·Unit of Gastroenterology and Digestive Endoscopy, ARNAS Garibaldi Nesima Hospital, Via Palermo 636, 95122, Catania, Italy. carmeluigiano@libero.it ·Adv Ther · Pubmed #23054693.

ABSTRACT: The intraoperative identification of the lesions found at endoscopic examination is often difficult, especially during laparoscopic surgery. At present, the most used technique for the intraoperative detection of pathological lesions is endoscopic tattooing. The large majority of studies carried out concern colorectal lesions; however, endoscopic tattooing has also been described for esophageal, gastric, small bowel and, more recently, pancreatic lesions. In this review, the authors evaluated indications, substances used, injection techniques, accuracy, safety and, finally, the risk of complications related to this procedure.

4 Article The presence of rapid on-site evaluation did not increase the adequacy and diagnostic accuracy of endoscopic ultrasound-guided tissue acquisition of solid pancreatic lesions with core needle. 2017

Fabbri, Carlo / Fuccio, Lorenzo / Fornelli, Adele / Antonini, Filippo / Liotta, Rosa / Frazzoni, Leonardo / Larghi, Alberto / Maimone, Antonella / Paggi, Silvia / Gusella, Paolo / Barresi, Luca / Polifemo, Anna Maria / Iovine, Elio / Macarri, Giampiero / Cennamo, Vincenzo / Tarantino, Ilaria. ·Unit of Gastroenterology and Digestive Endoscopy, AUSL Bologna, Bellaria-Maggiore Hospital, 40133, Bologna, Italy. carlo.fabbri@ausl.bologna.it. · Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Medical and Surgical Sciences, S. Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, University of Bologna, Bologna, Italy. · Pathology Service, AUSL Bologna, Bellaria-Maggiore Hospital, Bologna, Italy. · Department of Gastroenterology, A. Murri Hospital, Fermo, Italy. · Pathology Service, Department of Diagnostic and Therapeutic Services, Mediterranean Institute for Transplantation and Advanced Specialized Therapies (ISMETT), Palermo, Italy. · Digestive Endoscopy Unit, Catholic University, Rome, Italy. · Unit of Gastroenterology and Digestive Endoscopy, AUSL Bologna, Bellaria-Maggiore Hospital, 40133, Bologna, Italy. · Gastroenterology Unit, Valduce Hospital, Como, Italy. · Pathology Service, A. Murri Hospital, Polytechnic University of Marche, Fermo, Italy. · Endoscopy Service, Department of Diagnostic and Therapeutic Services, Mediterranean Institute for Transplantation and Advanced Specialized Therapies (ISMETT), Palermo, Italy. · Emergency and General Surgery Department, AUSL Bologna, Bellaria-Maggiore Hospital, Bologna, Italy. ·Surg Endosc · Pubmed #27194261.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Rapid on-site evaluation (ROSE) improves the adequacy and accuracy of EUS-guided tissue acquisition, although it is not routinely widely available. Evidence suggested that core needles might overcome the absence of ROSE. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of ROSE on the adequacy and accuracy of EUS-guided tissue acquisition with core needles in patients with pancreatic solid lesions. METHODS: Patients who underwent EUS-guided tissue acquisition of pancreatic mass lesions were retrospectively identified at three tertiary referral centers and those performed with the core needle were included. Adequacy, defined as the rate of cases in which a tissue specimen for proper examination was achieved, with and without ROSE was the primary outcome measure. The diagnostic accuracy and tissue core acquisition were the secondary outcome measures. RESULTS: A total of 333 patients with pancreatic solid mass lesions were included in the study; 140 cases sampled with ROSE and 193 cases without ROSE. The adequacy was 92.1 % in the group sampled with ROSE and 88.1 % in the group without ROSE (p = 0.227). In the ROSE group sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were 90.7, 100 and 92.1 %, respectively. In the group without ROSE, sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were 87.2, 100, and 88.1 %, respectively. No difference for all these figures was observed between the two groups. The tissue core was available in 61.4 and 53.4 % of cases with and without ROSE, respectively (p = 0.143). CONCLUSION: In the absence of ROSE, EUS-based tissue acquisition with Core needle should be considered since it achieves comparable tissue sampling adequacy and accuracy.

5 Article Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle biopsy of small solid pancreatic lesions using a 22-gauge needle with side fenestration. 2015

Fabbri, Carlo / Luigiano, Carmelo / Maimone, Antonella / Tarantino, Ilaria / Baccarini, Paola / Fornelli, Adele / Liotta, Rosa / Polifemo, Annamaria / Barresi, Luca / Traina, Mario / Virgilio, Clara / Cennamo, Vincenzo. ·Unit of Gastroenterology and Digestive Endoscopy, AUSL Bologna Bellaria-Maggiore Hospital, Via Altura, 40139, Bologna, Italy, carlo.fabbri@ausl.bologna.it. ·Surg Endosc · Pubmed #25303907.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Early detection of small pancreatic cancer is important because expected survival is markedly better for tumors ≤ 2 cm. A new endoscopic ultrasound-(EUS) guided biopsy needle with side fenestration has been recently developed to enable fine-needle biopsy (FNB) under EUS guidance. The aim of this study was to evaluate the outcome of EUS-FNB using a 22-gauge ProCore needle in solid pancreatic lesions ≤ 2 cm, in terms of diagnostic accuracy and yield. METHODS: From January 2011 to December 2012, all consecutive EUS-guided tissue sampling of small pancreatic lesions (≤ 2 cm) were performed using 22-gauge ProCore needles; the data of these patients were analyzed retrospectively. RESULTS: Sixty-eight patients with a mean age of 65.7 years were included. The mean lesion size was 16.5 mm (range 5-20). None of the patients developed complications. On pathological examination, the tissue retrieved was judged adequate in 58 out of 68 cases (85.3 %) and the presence of a tissue core was recorded in 36 out of 68 cases (52.9 %). The overall sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and accuracy were 80, 100, 100, 40, and 82 %, respectively. CONCLUSION: Our results suggested that EUS-FNB of small pancreatic lesions using a 22-gauge ProCore needle is effective and safe, and supports our hypothesis that EUS-FNB is highly useful in establishing the nature of small pancreatic lesions.

6 Article Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration and biopsy using a 22-gauge needle with side fenestration in pancreatic cystic lesions. 2014

Barresi, Luca / Tarantino, Ilaria / Traina, Mario / Granata, Antonino / Curcio, Gabriele / Azzopardi, Neville / Baccarini, Paola / Liotta, Rosa / Fornelli, Adele / Maimone, Antonella / Jovine, Elio / Cennamo, Vincenzo / Fabbri, Carlo. ·Gastroenterology and Endoscopy Unit, ISMETT, Palermo, Italy. Electronic address: lbarresi@ismett.edu. · Gastroenterology and Endoscopy Unit, ISMETT, Palermo, Italy. · Pathology Unit, AUSL Bologna Bellaria-Maggiore Hospital, Bologna, Italy. · Pathology Unit, ISMETT, Palermo, Italy. · Unit of Gastroenterology and Digestive Endoscopy, AUSL Bologna Bellaria-Maggiore Hospital, Bologna, Italy. · Department of General Surgery, AUSL Bologna Bellaria-Maggiore Hospital, Bologna, Italy. ·Dig Liver Dis · Pubmed #23916241.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Cytologic diagnosis by endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration is associated with low sensitivity and adequacy. A newly designed endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle biopsy device, endowed with a side fenestration, is now available. AIMS: We carried out a study with the aim of evaluating the feasibility, safety, and diagnostic yield of the 22-gauge needle with side fenestration for endoscopic ultrasound fine needle aspiration and biopsy of pancreatic cystic lesions. METHODS: 58 patients with 60 pancreatic cystic lesions consecutively referred for endoscopic ultrasound guided-fine needle aspiration were enrolled in a prospective, dual centre study, and underwent fine needle aspiration and biopsy with the 22-gauge needle with side fenestration. RESULTS: Fine needle aspiration and biopsy was technically feasible in all cases. In 39/60 (65%) pancreatic cystic lesions, the specimens were adequate for cyto-histologic assessment. In lesions with solid components, and in malignant lesions, adequacy was 94.4% (p = 0.0149) and 100% (p = 0.0069), respectively. Samples were adequate for histologic evaluation in 18/39 (46.1%) cases. There were only 2 (3.3%) mild complications. CONCLUSIONS: Fine needle aspiration and biopsy with the 22-gauge needle with side fenestration is feasible, and superior to conventional endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration cytology from cystic fluid, particularly in pancreatic cystic lesions with solid component or malignancy, with a higher diagnostic yield and with no increase in complication rate.

7 Article Preoperative diagnosis of a solid pseudopapillary tumour of the pancreas by Endoscopic Ultrasound Fine Needle Biopsy: A retrospective case series. 2013

Maimone, Antonella / Luigiano, Carmelo / Baccarini, Paola / Fornelli, Adele / Cennamo, Vincenzo / Polifemo, Annamaria / Fiscaletti, Marta / de Biase, Dario / Jaboli, Francesca / Virgilio, Clara / Stelitano, Liliana / Zanini, Nicola / Masetti, Michele / Jovine, Elio / Fabbri, Carlo. ·Unit of Gastroenterology, AUSL Bologna Bellaria-Maggiore Hospital, Bologna, Italy. ·Dig Liver Dis · Pubmed #23876743.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: A solid pseudopapillary tumour of the pancreas (SPTP) is a rare neoplasm. AIM: We herein present five cases of SPTP diagnosed using endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) guided fine-needle biopsy (FNB) using a needle with side fenestration (ProCore-needle). METHODS: From January 2011 to June 2012 in five patients with SPTP tissue acquisition was carried out with a 19-gauge (4 patients) or a 22-gauge (one patient) needle. RESULTS: The mean age of the patients was 30.8 years, the mean lesion size was 49mm and the most common location was the tail of the pancreas (3 cases). When the samples were evaluated macroscopically, small core fragments were observed in all cases. A preoperative diagnosis of SPTP was made in all patients on the basis of the histocytological and characteristic immunophenotypic patterns and was confirmed at final surgical histology. CONCLUSIONS: In our experience, EUS-FNB is an effective and secure method for a preoperative diagnosis of SPTP.

8 Article The role of K-ras gene mutation analysis in EUS-guided FNA cytology specimens for the differential diagnosis of pancreatic solid masses: a meta-analysis of prospective studies. 2013

Fuccio, Lorenzo / Hassan, Cesare / Laterza, Liboria / Correale, Loredana / Pagano, Nico / Bocus, Paolo / Fabbri, Carlo / Maimone, Antonella / Cennamo, Vincenzo / Repici, Alessandro / Costamagna, Guido / Bazzoli, Franco / Larghi, Alberto. ·Department of Medical and Surgical Sciences, S. Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, University of Bologna, Bologna, Italy. ·Gastrointest Endosc · Pubmed #23660563.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Differential diagnosis of pancreatic solid masses with EUS-guided FNA (EUS-FNA) is still challenging in about 15% of cases. Mutation of the K-ras gene is present in over 75% of pancreatic adenocarcinomas (PADC). OBJECTIVE: To assess the accuracy of K-ras gene mutation analysis for diagnosing PADC. DESIGN: We systematically searched the electronic databases for relevant studies published. Data from selected studies underwent meta-analysis by use of a bivariate model providing a pooled value for sensitivity, specificity, diagnostic odds ratio, and summary receiver operating characteristic curve. SETTING: Meta-analysis of 8 prospective studies. PATIENTS: Total of 931 patients undergoing EUS-FNA for diagnosis of pancreatic solid masses. INTERVENTION: K-ras mutation analysis. MAIN OUTCOME MEASUREMENTS: Diagnostic accuracy of K-ras mutation analysis and of combined diagnostic strategy by using EUS-FNA and K-ras mutation analysis in the diagnosis of PADC. RESULTS: The pooled sensitivity of EUS-FNA for the differential diagnosis of PADC was 80.6%, and the specificity was 97%. Estimated sensitivity and specificity were 76.8% and 93.3% for K-ras gene analysis, respectively, and 88.7% and 92% for combined EUS-FNA plus K-ras mutation analysis. Overall, K-ras mutation testing applied to cases that were inconclusive by EUS-FNA reduced the false-negative rate by 55.6%, with a false-positive rate of 10.7%. Not repeating EUS-FNA in cases in which mutation testing of the K-ras gene is inconclusive would reduce the repeat-biopsy rate from 12.5% to 6.8%. LIMITATIONS: Small number of studies and between-study heterogeneity. CONCLUSION: K-ras mutation analysis can be useful in the diagnostic work-up of pancreatic masses, in particular when tissue obtained by EUS-FNA is insufficient, and the diagnosis inconclusive.

9 Article A comparison of uncovered metal stents for the palliation of patients with malignant biliary obstruction: nitinol vs. stainless steel. 2012

Luigiano, Carmelo / Ferrara, Francesco / Cennamo, Vincenzo / Fabbri, Carlo / Bassi, Marco / Ghersi, Stefania / Consolo, Pierluigi / Morace, Carmela / Polifemo, Anna Maria / Billi, Paola / Ceroni, Liza / Alibrandi, Angela / D'Imperio, Nicola. ·Unit of Gastroenterology and Digestive Endoscopy, AUSL Bologna Bellaria-Maggiore Hospital, Bologna, Italy. carmeluigiano@libero.it ·Dig Liver Dis · Pubmed #21924691.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Various types of self-expandable metal stents have been introduced for the palliation of malignant biliary obstruction. AIMS: To compare the outcomes of WallFlex™ and Wallstent™ uncovered biliary self-expandable metal stents (SEMSs) for the palliation of patients with malignant biliary obstruction. METHODS: Between October 2008 and December 2009, all SEMSs placed for malignant biliary obstruction were WallFlex™: all patients palliated were included in the study. Before October 2008, all the SEMSs placed for malignant biliary obstruction were Wallstent™, and the patients palliated from July 2007 to September 2008 were the comparative group. RESULTS: A total of 58 WallFlex™ and 54 Wallstent™ SEMSs were placed, and efficacious biliary decompression was achieved in all patients. Early complications occurred in 5 patients in the WallFlex™ group and in 3 in the Wallstent™ group (p=ns). Late complications occurred in 6 patients in the WallFlex™ group and in 16 in the Wallstent™ group (p<0.01). The overall patency of the self-expandable metal stent in the WallFlex™ and the Wallstent™ groups was similar (227 days vs. 215 days, p=ns). Mean patient survival was 242 days in the WallFlex™ group and 257 days in the Wallstent™ group (p=ns). CONCLUSIONS: We found no difference in terms of overall patency between the two types of SEMSs, but there was an increased rate of late adverse events in the Wallstent™ group.

10 Article Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration with 22- and 25-gauge needles in solid pancreatic masses: a prospective comparative study with randomisation of needle sequence. 2011

Fabbri, Carlo / Polifemo, Anna Maria / Luigiano, Carmelo / Cennamo, Vincenzo / Baccarini, Paola / Collina, Guido / Fornelli, Adele / Macchia, Sandro / Zanini, Nicola / Jovine, Elio / Fiscaletti, Marta / Alibrandi, Angela / D'Imperio, Nicola. ·Unit of Gastroenterology and Digestive Endoscopy, AUSL Bologna Bellaria-Maggiore Hospital, Bologna, Italy. carlo.fabbri@ausl.bologna.it ·Dig Liver Dis · Pubmed #21592873.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The difference in the diagnostic accuracy of 22- versus 25-gauge needles in EUS-FNA is not clear. AIMS: To compare the rates of technical success, diagnostic accuracy and complications of EUS-FNA performed with 22-gauge and 25-gauge needles on the same solid pancreatic mass. METHODS: All patients with solid pancreatic masses evaluated from September 2007 to December 2008 were enrolled and underwent EUS-FNA with both 22- and 25-gauge needles with randomisation of needle sequence. The accuracy of the EUS-FNA was determined by comparing the cytological results with the final surgical pathological diagnoses or with the results of a clinical follow-up. A cytological score with different qualitative parameters was created, and a comparison between these parameters was carried out for each needle. RESULTS: Fifty patients with 50 pancreatic masses were recruited. Technical success was 100% and no complications occurred. Diagnostic accuracy was 94% and 86% for the 25- and 22-gauge needles, respectively. Analysis of the cytological score showed a tendency towards the 25-gauge needle, although the difference was not statistically significant. CONCLUSIONS: EUS-FNA performed with 22- or 25-gauge needles had the same diagnostic accuracy. Our study results confirm a significant trend towards a better cytological diagnosis for the 25-gauge needle.