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Pancreatic Neoplasms: HELP
Articles by Chiara Alessandra Cella
Based on 8 articles published since 2010
(Why 8 articles?)
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Between 2010 and 2020, Chiara Cella wrote the following 8 articles about Pancreatic Neoplasms.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Review Pharmacodynamics, clinical findings and approval status of current and emerging tyrosine-kinase inhibitors for pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. 2019

Fazio, Nicola / Cella, Chiara A / Del Re, Marzia / Laffi, Alice / Rubino, Manila / Zagami, Paola / Spada, Francesca. ·Division of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology and Neuroendocrine Tumors, European Institute of Oncology, IEO, IRCCS, Milan, Italy. · Unit of Clinical Pharmacology and Pharmacogenetics, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, University Hospital of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. ·Expert Opin Drug Metab Toxicol · Pubmed #31794273.

ABSTRACT:

2 Review Systemic therapies in patients with advanced well-differentiated pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PanNETs): When cytoreduction is the aim. A critical review with meta-analysis. 2018

Pozzari, Marta / Maisonneuve, Patrick / Spada, Francesca / Berruti, Alfredo / Amoroso, Vito / Cella, Chiara Alessandra / Laffi, Alice / Pellicori, Stefania / Bertani, Emilio / Fazio, Nicola. ·Division of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology and Neuroendocrine Tumors, IEO, European Institute of Oncology IRCCS, Milan, Italy. · Division of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, IEO, European Institute of Oncology IRCCS, Milan, Italy. · Medical Oncology Unit, Department of Medical and Surgical Specialties, Radiological Sciences and Public Health, University of Brescia at ASST Spedali Civili, Brescia, Italy. · Division of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology and Neuroendocrine Tumors, IEO, European Institute of Oncology IRCCS, Milan, Italy; Department of Molecular and Translational Medicine, University of Brescia, Brescia, Italy. · Division of Gastrointestinal Surgery, IEO, European Institute of Oncology IRCCS, Milan, Italy. · Division of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology and Neuroendocrine Tumors, IEO, European Institute of Oncology IRCCS, Milan, Italy. Electronic address: nicola.fazio@ieo.it. ·Cancer Treat Rev · Pubmed #30352319.

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: Cytoreduction is sometimes an important aim of systemic anti-tumor therapies in well-differentiated pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PanNETs). As there is not a gold standard treatment for these tumors in this field, we conducted a literature review in order to identify objective criteria for treatment choice. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We critically reviewed and performed a meta-analysis of all published clinical studies of systemic therapies in patients with well-differentiated unresectable PanNETs, selecting only those articles which reported tumor shrinkage (TS) with a waterfall plot (WP). Tumor downsizing of ≥10% was considered as objective response. RESULTS: We selected 17 out of 2758 studies, comprising 1118 patients with tumor response reported as WP. Proliferation index, tumor burden and anti-tumor therapies were heterogeneous. Chemotherapy alone (mainly, capecitabine/temozolomide) or in combination showed the best results, with ≥10% TS ranging from 65% to 93%. Peptide receptor radionuclide therapy combined with chemotherapy (Chemo-PRRT) and sunitinib appeared promising by inducing objective response in a significant proportion of patients (93% and 60%, respectively). Time to tumor response was reported in only two trials. No clear clinical and/or biological predictive factors emerged. CONCLUSION: Based on response criteria used in our retrospective analysis, systemic chemotherapy alone or in combination appeared to have the main cytoreductive impact. However no conclusions regarding either a specific regimen or combination can be drawn. Furthermore, tumor population selection and/or choice of regimen may have a significant influence. Further analysis should be also conducted to identify potential predictive biomarkers of responses, in order to design future prospective interventional clinical trials enrolling more homogenous populations of advanced well-differentiated PanNETs.

3 Review Predictive Markers of Response to Everolimus and Sunitinib in Neuroendocrine Tumors. 2017

Martins, Diana / Spada, Francesca / Lambrescu, Ioana / Rubino, Manila / Cella, Chiara / Gibelli, Bianca / Grana, Chiara / Ribero, Dario / Bertani, Emilio / Ravizza, Davide / Bonomo, Guido / Funicelli, Luigi / Pisa, Eleonora / Zerini, Dario / Fazio, Nicola / Anonymous4080910. ·Unit of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology and Neuroendocrine Tumors, European Institute of Oncology, IEO, 20141 via Ripamonti, 435, Milan, Italy. · Division of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, European Institute of Oncology, IEO, Milan, Italy. · Division of Nuclear Medicine, European Institute of Oncology, IEO, Milan, Italy. · Division of Hepatobiliopancreatic Surgery, European Institute of Oncology, IEO, Milan, Italy. · Division of Endoscopy, European Institute of Oncology, IEO, Milan, Italy. · Division of Interventional Radiology, European Institute of Oncology, IEO, Milan, Italy. · Division of Radiology, European Institute of Oncology, IEO, Milan, Italy. · Division of Pathology, European Institute of Oncology, IEO, Milan, Italy. · Division of Radiotherapy, European Institute of Oncology, IEO, Milan, Italy. · Unit of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology and Neuroendocrine Tumors, European Institute of Oncology, IEO, 20141 via Ripamonti, 435, Milan, Italy. nicola.fazio@ieo.it. ·Target Oncol · Pubmed #28634872.

ABSTRACT: Neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) represent a large and heterogeneous group of malignancies with various biological and clinical characteristics, depending on the site of origin and the grade of tumor proliferation. In NETs, as in other cancer types, molecularly targeted therapies have radically changed the therapeutic landscape. Recently two targeted agents, the mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitor everolimus and the tyrosine kinase inhibitor sunitinib, have both demonstrated significantly prolonged progression free survival in patients with advanced pancreatic NETs. Despite these important therapeutic developments, there are still significant limitations to the use of these agents due to the lack of accurate biomarkers for predicting tumor response and efficacy of therapy. In this review, we provide an overview of the current clinical data for the evaluation of predictive factors of response to/efficacy of everolimus and sunitinib in advanced pancreatic NETs. Surrogate indicators discussed include circulating and tissue markers, as well as non-invasive imaging techniques.

4 Article Should platinum-based chemotherapy be preferred for germline BReast CAncer genes (BRCA) 1 and 2-mutated pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) patients? A systematic review and meta-analysis. 2019

Rebelatto, Taiane F / Falavigna, Maicon / Pozzari, Marta / Spada, Francesca / Cella, Chiara A / Laffi, Alice / Pellicori, Stefania / Fazio, Nicola. ·Department of Medical Oncology, Hospital de Clínicas de Porto Alegre, Porto Alegre, Brazil. · National Institute for Heath Technology Assessment, Postgraduate Program in Epidemiology, Porto Alegre, Brazil. · Division of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology and Neuroendocrine Tumors, European Institute of Oncology, IEO, IRCCS, Milan, Italy. · Division of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology and Neuroendocrine Tumors, European Institute of Oncology, IEO, IRCCS, Milan, Italy. Electronic address: nicola.fazio@ieo.it. ·Cancer Treat Rev · Pubmed #31542591.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is one of the most lethal cancers worldwide. Recent studies have shown that 4-20% of patients with PDAC have a germline BReast CAncer (gBRCA) genes 1 and 2 mutation (m). Because homologous recombination is impaired in patients with gBRCAm, some reports suggested that these tumors may be more sensitive to platinum compounds. Therefore, this systematic review and meta-analysis focused on benefit of patients with gBRCAm receiving a platinum-based chemotherapy (PtCh) compared with those treated with a non-platinum-based chemotherapy (NPtCh). MATERIAL AND METHODS: The following electronic databases were searched from inception to May 12, 2018: PubMed (MEDLINE), EMBASE, and Cochrane Library. Abstracts from conferences were also reviewed for inclusion. Cohort, case-control and randomized studies of patients with PDAC and gBRCAm were eligible for inclusion if they provided data to compare patients receiving PtCh vs NPtCh. The primary endpoint was overall survival (OS) in the PtCh group vs the NPtCh group in patients with clinical stage III (locally advanced) or IV (metastatic) (CS III-IV) PDAC. RESULTS: Of 112 studies identified, 6 were included (total of 108 patients); of these, 4 provided sufficient data for meta-analysis. Half of the patients were males, with a mean age ranging from 58 to 63 years. The OS in the 85 patients with CS III-IV PDAC was higher in the PtCh group (23.7 vs 12.2 months; mean difference of 10.21 months, 95% confidence interval [CI] 5.05-15.37; P < 0.001; very low quality of evidence). PtCh was associated with a lower mortality (62.3 vs 87.5%; relative risk of 0.80, 95%CI 0.66-0.97; P = 0.021; very low quality of evidence). CONCLUSION: Our study confirmed the hypothesis that patients with CS III-IV gBRCAm preferably benefit from a PtCh compared with NPtCh. However the very low quality of evidence should induce to be careful about the risk of potential biases. The generated hypothesis should be prospectively investigated in homogenous clinical settings.

5 Article The Italian Rare Pancreatic Exocrine Cancer Initiative. 2019

Brunetti, Oronzo / Luchini, Claudio / Argentiero, Antonella / Tommasi, Stefania / Mangia, Anita / Aprile, Giuseppe / Marchetti, Paolo / Vasile, Enrico / Casadei Gardini, Andrea / Scartozzi, Mario / Barni, Sandro / Delfanti, Sara / De Vita, Fernando / Di Costanzo, Francesco / Milella, Michele / Cella, Chiara Alessandra / Berardi, Rossana / Cataldo, Ivana / Santini, Daniele / Doglioni, Claudio / Maiello, Evaristo / Lawlor, Rita T / Mazzaferro, Vincenzo / Lonardi, Sara / Giuliante, Felice / Brandi, Giovanni / Scarpa, Aldo / Cascinu, Stefano / Silvestris, Nicola. ·1 Medical Oncology Unit, IRCCS Cancer Institute "Giovanni Paolo II" of Bari, Bari, Italy. · 2 Department of Diagnostics and Public Health, Section of Pathology, University of Verona, Verona, Italy. · 3 Molecular Diagnostics and Pharmacogenetics Unit, IRCCS Istituto Tumori "Giovanni Paolo II", Bari, Italy. · 4 Functional Biomorphology Laboratory, IRCCS-Istituto Tumori, Bari, Italy. · 5 Medical Oncology Unit, Hospital of Vicenza, Vicenza, Italy. · 6 Medical Oncology Unit, Sant'Andrea Hospital, University of Rome La Sapienza, Rome, Italy. · 7 Medical Oncology Unit, University Hospital of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. · 8 Medical Oncology Unit, Scientific Institute of Romagna for the Study and Treatment of Cancer (IRST), Meldola, Italy. · 9 Medical Oncology Unit, University of Cagliari, Cagliari, Italy. · 10 Medical Oncology Unit, ASST Bergamo Ovest, Treviglio, Italy. · 11 Medical Oncology Unit, IRCCS Foundation Polyclinic San Matteo, Pavia, Italy. · 12 Medical Oncology Unit, II University of Naples, Naples, Italy. · 13 Medical Oncology Unit, Careggi University Hospital, Florence, Italy. · 14 Medical Oncology Unit, "Regina Elena" National Cancer Institute, Rome, Italy. · 15 Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology and Neuroendocrine Tumors, European Institute of Oncology (IEO), Milan, Italy. · 16 Medical Oncology Unit, Polytechnic University of the Marche, "Ospedali Riuniti Ancona," Ancona, Italy. · 17 Department of Pathology and Diagnostics, University of Verona Hospital Trust, Policlinico GB Rossi, Verona, Italy. · 18 Medical Oncology Unit, University Campus Biomedico, Rome, Italy. · 19 Department of Medical Oncology, IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy. · 20 Medical Oncology Unit, IRCCS "Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza" Foundation, San Giovanni Rotondo, Italy. · 21 Arc-Net Centre for Applied Research on Cancer, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona, Italy. · 22 Hepato-Biliary-Pancreatic Surgery, University of Milan, Istituto Nazionale Tumori, Fondazione IRCCS, Milan, Italy. · 23 Medical Oncology Unit, IRCCS Veneto Institute of Oncology (IOV), Padua, Italy. · 24 Hepatobiliary Surgery Unit, IRCCS A. Gemelli Polyclinic Foundation, Catholic University of the Sacred Heart, Rome, Italy. · 25 Oncology Unit, Department of Experimental, Diagnostic and Specialty Medicine, Sant'Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, University of Bologna, Bologna, Italy. · 26 Medical Oncology Unit, Modena Cancer Center, University Hospital of Modena, Modena, Italy. · 27 Scientific Direction, IRCCS Cancer Institute "Giovanni Paolo II" of Bari, Bari, Italy. ·Tumori · Pubmed #30967031.

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: Exocrine pancreatic cancers include common type pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma and cystic neoplasms, which account for 85% and 10% of cases, respectively. The remaining 5% are rare histotypes, comprising adenosquamous carcinoma, acinar cell carcinoma, signet ring cell carcinoma, medullary carcinoma, pancreatoblastoma, hepatoid carcinoma, undifferentiated carcinoma and its variant with osteoclast-like giant cells, solid pseudopapillary carcinoma, and carcinosarcoma. Due to their low incidence, little knowledge is available on their clinical and molecular features as well as on treatment choices. The national initiative presented here aims at the molecular characterization of series of rare histotypes for which therapeutic and follow-up data are available. METHODS: A nationwide Italian Rare Pancreatic Cancer (IRaPaCa) task force whose first initiative is a multicentric retrospective study involving 21 Italian cancer centers to retrieve histologic material and clinical and treatment data of at least 100 patients with rare exocrine pancreatic cancers has been created. After histologic revision by a panel of expert pathologists, DNA and RNA from paraffin tissues will be investigated by next-generation sequencing using molecular pathway-oriented and immune-oriented mutational and expression profiling panels constructed availing of the information from the International Cancer Genome Consortium. Bioinformatic analysis of data will drive validation studies by immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization, as well as nanostring assays. CONCLUSIONS: We expect to gather novel data on rare pancreatic cancer types that will be useful to inform the design of therapeutic choices.

6 Article Systemic Chemotherapy for Advanced Rare Pancreatic Histotype Tumors: A Retrospective Multicenter Analysis. 2018

Brunetti, Oronzo / Aprile, Giuseppe / Marchetti, Paolo / Vasile, Enrico / Casadei Gardini, Andrea / Scartozzi, Mario / Barni, Sandro / Delfanti, Sara / De Vita, Fernando / Di Costanzo, Francesco / Milella, Michele / Cella, Chiara Alessandra / Berardi, Rossana / Cataldo, Ivana / Scarpa, Aldo / Basile, Debora / Mazzuca, Federica / Graziano, Giusi / Argentiero, Antonella / Santini, Daniele / Reni, Michele / Cascinu, Stefano / Silvestris, Nicola. ·Medical Oncology Unit, Sant'Andrea Hospital, University of Rome La Sapienza, Rome. · Medical Oncology Unit, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria Pisana, Pisa. · Department of MedicalOncology, Istituto Scientifico Romagnolo per lo Studio e Cura dei Tumori (IRST) IRCCS, Meldola. · Medical Oncology Unit, University of Cagliari, Cagliari. · Medical Oncology Unit, ASST Bergamo Ovest, Treviglio. · Medical Oncology Unit, Fondazione IRCCS Policlinico San Matteo, Pavia. · Medical Oncology Unit, II University of Naples, Naples. · Medical OncologyUnit, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria Careggi, Florence. · Medical Oncology 1, IRCCS Regina Elena National Cancer Institute, Rome. · Division of Gastrointestinal and Neuroendocrine Tumors, IEO, Milan. · Medical Oncology Unit, Università Politecnica Marche - Ospedali Riuniti Ancona, Ancona. · Department of Pathology and Diagnostics, University of Verona, ARCNET, Verona. · Department of Medical Oncology, University and General Hospital, Udine. · Scientific Direction, Cancer Institute "Giovanni Paolo II," Bari. · Medical Oncology Unit, University Campus Biomedico, Rome. · Department of Medical Oncology, IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan. · Modena Cancer Center, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Azienda Ospedaliera-Universitaria di Modena, Modena, Italy. ·Pancreas · Pubmed #29771769.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: Two issues were put forth by clinicians in the management of the advanced stages of rare variants of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma and other exocrine histotypes with peculiar clinical and pathological features: Do chemotherapy regimens recommended in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma patients have a clinical activity in rare pancreatic tumors? Or should other chemotherapy combinations be considered in this subset of patients? METHODS: We conducted a multicenter retrospective study that collected data from 2005 to 2016 at 14 Italian cancer centers with the aim to evaluate tumor response and time to progression for first- and second-line and overall survival. RESULTS: Of approximately 4300 exocrine pancreatic cancer patients, 79 advanced cases affected by rare histological types were identified, with pancreatic acinar cell cancer (n = 23), pancreatic adenosquamous cancer (n = 16), and mucinous cystic neoplasm with an associated invasive mucinous cystadenocarcinoma (n = 15) most represented. Survival analyses for each subgroup in relation with the different chemotherapy regimens showed the lack of statistical significance correlations. CONCLUSIONS: Because of the lack of clinical trials in patients affected by these rare pancreatic histotypes, only their molecular classification would help clinicians in future therapeutic choice.

7 Article Oxaliplatin-Based Chemotherapy in Advanced Neuroendocrine Tumors: Clinical Outcomes and Preliminary Correlation with Biological Factors. 2016

Spada, Francesca / Antonuzzo, Lorenzo / Marconcini, Riccardo / Radice, Davide / Antonuzzo, Andrea / Ricci, Sergio / Di Costanzo, Francesco / Fontana, Annalisa / Gelsomino, Fabio / Luppi, Gabriele / Nobili, Elisabetta / Galdy, Salvatore / Cella, Chiara Alessandra / Sonzogni, Angelica / Pisa, Eleonora / Barberis, Massimo / Fazio, Nicola. ·Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology and Neuroendocrine Tumors Unit, European Institute of Oncology, Milan, Italy. ·Neuroendocrinology · Pubmed #26789262.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: The role of chemotherapy in low-/intermediate-grade neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) is still debated. We present the results of an Italian multicenter retrospective study evaluating activity and toxicity of oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy in patients with advanced NETs. METHODS: Clinical records from 5 referral centers were reviewed. Disease control rate (DCR) corresponding to PR + SD (partial response + stable disease) at 6 months, progression-free survival (PFS), overall survival (OS) and toxicity were calculated. Ki67 labeling index, grade of differentiation and excision- repair-cross-complementing group 1 (ERCC-1) were analyzed in tissue tumor samples. RESULTS: Seventy-eight patients entered the study. Primary sites were: pancreas in 46, gastrointestinal in 24, lung in 19 and unknown in 10% of patients. The vast majority were G2 (2010 WHO classification). Eighty-six percent of the patients were metastatic, and 87% were pretreated and progressive to previous therapies. Sixty-five percent of the patients received capecitabine/oxaliplatin (CAPOX), 6% gemcitabine/oxaliplatin (GEMOX), and 29% leucovorin/fluorouracil/oxaliplatin (FOLFOX-6). PR occurred in 26% of the patients, half of them with pancreatic NETs, and SD in 54%. With a median follow-up of 21 months, the median PFS and OS were 8 and 32 months with 70 and 45 events, respectively. The most frequent G3 toxicities were neurological and gastrointestinal. ERCC-1 immunohistochemical overexpression was positive in 4/28 evaluated samples, with no significant correlation with clinical outcome. CONCLUSION: This analysis suggests that oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy can be active with a manageable safety profile in advanced NETs irrespective of the primary sites and tumor grade. The 80% DCR and 8-month PFS could justify a prospective study in NETs with intermediate biological characteristics, especially with pancreatic primary tumors.

8 Article FOLFIRI in patients with locally advanced or metastatic pancreatic or biliary tract carcinoma: a monoinstitutional experience. 2013

Moretto, Roberto / Raimondo, Lucia / De Stefano, Alfonso / Cella, Chiara A / Matano, Elide / De Placido, Sabino / Carlomagno, Chiara. ·Department of Clinical Medicine and Surgery, Division of Medical Oncology, University 'Federico II' of Naples, Italy. robertomoretto84@libero.it ·Anticancer Drugs · Pubmed #23928570.

ABSTRACT: Pancreatic and biliary tract carcinomas are very chemoresistant. After a first-line treatment with a gemcitabine-based regimen, no second-line scheme is consolidated in clinical practice. The aim of this study was to evaluate the toxicity and the activity of the FOLFIRI regimen as first-line or second-line chemotherapy in patients with pancreatic or biliary tract tumors. Fifty-four patients (30 with pancreatic tumor, nine with gallbladder tumor, and 15 with biliary tract tumor) were treated with FOLFIRI (irinotecan 180 mg/m², day 1; leucovorin 100 mg/m² intravenously, days 1 and 2; 5-fluorouracil 400 mg/m² intravenous bolus, days 1 and 2; and 600 mg/m² in 22 h intravenously, continuous infusion days 1 and 2; every 14 days). Toxicity was recorded at each cycle according to the NCI-CTC V3.0 criteria, the response rate was verified each four cycles according to the RECIST criteria, and the progression-free survival rates as well as the overall survival rates were calculated according to the Kaplan-Meier method. Overall, the toxicity was mild. Grade 3-4 neutropenia occurred in 42.6% of patients. Grade 3-4 gastrointestinal toxicity was rare. FOLFIRI as a first-line treatment produced a response rate of 25%. In the second-line group, 9/21 patients (42.9%) obtained a stable disease as best response. In the entire population, the median progression-free survival rates were 3.1 months [95% confidence interval (CI), 1.9-4.4] and 3.5 months (95% CI, 2.6-4.4), respectively, in the first-line and the second-line cohort of patients. The median overall survival rates were 14.5 months (95% CI, 7.0-22.1) and 6.2 months (95% CI, 5.4-7.0), respectively, in the first-line and the second-line cohort of patients. FOLFIRI is feasible and well tolerated in patients with pancreatic or biliary tract tumors; it has a good activity in first line and mostly in patients with pancreatic cancer.