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Pancreatic Neoplasms: HELP
Articles by Renato Castoldi
Based on 6 articles published since 2009
(Why 6 articles?)
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Between 2009 and 2019, Renato Castoldi wrote the following 6 articles about Pancreatic Neoplasms.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Clinical Trial A randomised phase 2 trial of nab-paclitaxel plus gemcitabine with or without capecitabine and cisplatin in locally advanced or borderline resectable pancreatic adenocarcinoma. 2018

Reni, Michele / Zanon, Silvia / Balzano, Gianpaolo / Passoni, Paolo / Pircher, Chiara / Chiaravalli, Marta / Fugazza, Clara / Ceraulo, Domenica / Nicoletti, Roberto / Arcidiacono, Paolo Giorgio / Macchini, Marina / Peretti, Umberto / Castoldi, Renato / Doglioni, Claudio / Falconi, Massimo / Partelli, Stefano / Gianni, Luca. ·Department of Medical Oncology, IRCCS Ospedale San Raffaele, Via Olgettina 60, 20132 Milan, Italy. Electronic address: reni.michele@hsr.it. · Department of Medical Oncology, IRCCS Ospedale San Raffaele, Via Olgettina 60, 20132 Milan, Italy. · Pancreatic Surgery Unit, Pancreas Translational & Clinical Research Center, IRCCS Ospedale San Raffaele, Via Olgettina 60, 20132 Milan, Italy. · Department of Radiotherapy, IRCCS Ospedale San Raffaele, Via Olgettina 60, 20132 Milan, Italy. · Department of Radiology, IRCCS Ospedale San Raffaele, Via Olgettina 60, 20132 Milan, Italy. · Pancreato-Biliary Endoscopy and Endosonography Division, IRCCS Ospedale San Raffaele, Via Olgettina 60, 20132 Milan, Italy. · Pathology Unit, IRCCS Ospedale San Raffaele, Via Olgettina 60, 20132 Milan, Italy; Università Vita e Salute, Milan, Italy. · Pancreatic Surgery Unit, Pancreas Translational & Clinical Research Center, IRCCS Ospedale San Raffaele, Via Olgettina 60, 20132 Milan, Italy; Università Vita e Salute, Milan, Italy. ·Eur J Cancer · Pubmed #30149366.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The current trial assessed whether the addition of cisplatin and capecitabine to the nab-paclitaxel-gemcitabine backbone is feasible and active against borderline and locally advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PDAC). METHOD: Fifty-four chemo-naive patients, aged between 18 and 75 years, with a pathological diagnosis of locally advanced or borderline resectable PDAC were randomised to receive either nab-paclitaxel, gemcitabine, cisplatin and oral capecitabine (PAXG; arm A; N = 26) or nab-paclitaxel followed by gemcitabine (AG; arm B; N = 28). The primary end-point was the tumour resection rate. If at least four such resections were performed, the treatment was considered as active. The secondary end-points were progression-free survival (PFS), overall survival (OS), Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumours response rate, Hartman's pathologic response, carbohydrate antigen 19.9 response rate and toxicity. RESULTS: Eight patients (31%) in the PAXG arm and nine (32%) in the AG arm underwent resection. PFS at 1-year was 58% in arm A and 39% in arm B. OS at 18-month was 69% in arm A and 54% in arm B. CONCLUSIONS: In this phase II study, the addition of cisplatin and capecitabine to the AG backbone was feasible and yielded promising results in terms of disease control without detrimental impact on tolerability. The approach warrants further investigation in a phase III study. TRIAL REGISTRATION: NCT01730222.

2 Clinical Trial Safety and efficacy of preoperative or postoperative chemotherapy for resectable pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PACT-15): a randomised, open-label, phase 2-3 trial. 2018

Reni, Michele / Balzano, Gianpaolo / Zanon, Silvia / Zerbi, Alessandro / Rimassa, Lorenza / Castoldi, Renato / Pinelli, Domenico / Mosconi, Stefania / Doglioni, Claudio / Chiaravalli, Marta / Pircher, Chiara / Arcidiacono, Paolo Giorgio / Torri, Valter / Maggiora, Paola / Ceraulo, Domenica / Falconi, Massimo / Gianni, Luca. ·Department of Medical Oncology, IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy. Electronic address: reni.michele@hsr.it. · Department of Pancreatic Surgery, IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy. · Department of Medical Oncology, IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy. · Pancreatic Surgery, Humanitas University, Humanitas Clinical and Research Center, Milan, Italy. · Medical Oncology and Hematology Unit, Humanitas Cancer Center, Humanitas Clinical and Research Center, Milan, Italy. · Department of Surgery, Papa Giovanni XXIII Hospital, Bergamo, Italy. · Onco-Hematology Department, Oncology Unit, Papa Giovanni XXIII Hospital, Bergamo, Italy. · Pathology Unit, IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy; Pathology Unit, Vita-Salute San Raffaele University, Milan, Italy. · Pancreato-Biliary Endoscopy and Endosonography Division, IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy. · IRCCS Mario Negri Institute for Pharmacological Research, Milan, Italy. · Department of Pancreatic Surgery, IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy; Department of Pancreatic Surgery, Vita-Salute San Raffaele University, Milan, Italy. ·Lancet Gastroenterol Hepatol · Pubmed #29625841.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma are known to metastasise early and a rationale exists for the investigation of preoperative chemotherapy in patients with resectable disease. We aimed to assess the role of combination chemotherapy in this setting in the PACT-15 trial. METHODS: We did this randomised, open-label, phase 2-3 trial in ten hospitals in Italy. We report the phase 2 part here. Patients aged 18-75 years who were previously untreated for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, with Karnofsky performance status of more than 60, and pathologically confirmed stage I-II resectable disease were enrolled. Patients were randomly assigned (1:1:1), with a minimisation algorithm that stratified treatment allocation by centre and concentrations of carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA19-9 ≤5 × upper limit of normal [ULN] vs >5 × ULN), to receive surgery followed by adjuvant gemcitabine 1000 mg/m FINDINGS: Between Oct 5, 2010, and May 30, 2015, 93 patients were randomly allocated to treatment. One centre was found to be non-compliant with the protocol, and all five patients at this centre were excluded from the study. Thus, 88 patients were included in the final study population: 26 in group A, 30 in group B, and 32 in group C. In the per-protocol population, six (23%, 95% CI 7-39) of 30 patients in group A were event-free at 1 year, as were 15 (50%, 32-68) of 30 in group B and 19 (66%, 49-83) of 29 in group C. The main grade 3 toxicities were neutropenia (five [28%] of 18 in group A, eight [38%] of 21 in group B, eight [28%] of 29 in group C before surgery, and ten [48%] of 21 in group C after surgery), anaemia (one [6%] in group A, four [19%] in group B, eight [28%] in group C before surgery, and five [24%] in group C after surgery), and fatigue (one [6%] in group A, three [14%] in group B, two [7%] in group C before surgery, and one [5%] in group C after surgery). The main grade 4 toxicity reported was neutropenia (two [11%] in group A, four [19%] in group B, none in group C). Febrile neutropenia was observed in one patient (3%) before surgery in group C. No treatment-related deaths were observed. INTERPRETATION: Our results provide evidence of the efficacy of neoadjuvant chemotherapy in resectable pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. Since the trial began, the standard of care for adjuvant therapy has altered, and other chemotherapy regimens developed. Thus, we decided to not continue with the phase 3 part of the PACT-15. We are planning a phase 3 trial of this approach with different chemotherapy regimens. FUNDING: PERLAVITA ONLUS and MyEverest ONLUS.

3 Clinical Trial Hypofractionated image-guided IMRT in advanced pancreatic cancer with simultaneous integrated boost to infiltrated vessels concomitant with capecitabine: a phase I study. 2013

Passoni, Paolo / Reni, Michele / Cattaneo, Giovanni M / Slim, Najla / Cereda, Stefano / Balzano, Gianpaolo / Castoldi, Renato / Longobardi, Barbara / Bettinardi, Valentino / Gianolli, Luigi / Gusmini, Simone / Staudacher, Carlo / Calandrino, Riccardo / Di Muzio, Nadia. ·Department of Radiation Oncology, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy. Electronic address: passoni.paolo@hsr.it. ·Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys · Pubmed #24267968.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: To determine the maximum tolerated radiation dose (MTD) of an integrated boost to the tumor subvolume infiltrating vessels, delivered simultaneously with radical dose to the whole tumor and concomitant capecitabine in patients with pretreated advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma. METHODS AND MATERIALS: Patients with stage III or IV pancreatic adenocarcinoma without progressive disease after induction chemotherapy were eligible. Patients underwent simulated contrast-enhanced four-dimensional computed tomography and fluorodeoxyglucose-labeled positron emission tomography. Gross tumor volume 1 (GTV1), the tumor, and GTV2, the tumor subvolume 1 cm around the infiltrated vessels, were contoured. GTVs were fused to generate Internal Target Volume (ITV)1 and ITV2. Biological tumor volume (BTV) was fused with ITV1 to create the BTV+Internal Target Volume (ITV) 1. A margin of 5/5/7 mm (7 mm in cranium-caudal) was added to BTV+ITV1 and to ITV2 to create Planning Target Volume (PTV) 1 and PTV2, respectively. Radiation therapy was delivered with tomotherapy. PTV1 received a fixed dose of 44.25 Gy in 15 fractions, and PTV2 received a dose escalation from 48 to 58 Gy as simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) in consecutive groups of at least 3 patients. Concomitant chemotherapy was capecitabine, 1250 mg/m(2) daily. Dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) was defined as any treatment-related G3 nonhematological or G4 hematological toxicity occurring during the treatment or within 90 days from its completion. RESULTS: From June 2005 to February 2010, 25 patients were enrolled. The dose escalation on the SIB was stopped at 58 Gy without reaching the MTD. One patient in the 2(nd) dose level (50 Gy) had a DLT: G3 acute gastric ulcer. Three patients had G3 late adverse effects associated with gastric and/or duodenal mucosal damage. All patients received the planned dose of radiation. CONCLUSIONS: A dose of 44.25 Gy in 15 fractions to the whole tumor with an SIB of 58 Gy to small tumor subvolumes concomitant with capecitabine is feasible in chemotherapy-pretreated patients with advanced pancreatic cancer.

4 Article Results of 100 consecutive laparoscopic distal pancreatectomies: postoperative outcome, cost-benefit analysis, and quality of life assessment. 2015

Braga, Marco / Pecorelli, Nicolò / Ferrari, Denise / Balzano, Gianpaolo / Zuliani, Walter / Castoldi, Renato. ·Department of Surgery, San Raffaele Hospital, Vita-Salute San Raffaele University, Via Olgettina 60, 20132, Milan, Italy, braga.marco@hsr.it. ·Surg Endosc · Pubmed #25294551.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy (LDP) has been recently proposed as the procedure of choice for lesions of the pancreatic body and tail in experienced centres. The purpose of this study is to assess the potential advantages of LDP in a consecutive series of 100 patients. METHODS: Propensity score matching was used to identify patients for comparison between LDP and control open group. Match criteria were: age, gender, ASA score, BMI, lesion site and size, and malignancy. All patients were treated according to an early feeding recovery policy. Primary endpoint was postoperative morbidity rate. Secondary endpoints were operative time, blood transfusion, length of hospital stay (LOS), hospital costs, and quality of life. RESULTS: Thirty patients of the LDP group had pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Conversion to open surgery was necessary in 23 patients. Mean operative time was 29 min shorter in the open group (p = 0.002). No significant difference between groups was found in blood transfusion rate and postoperative morbidity rate. LDP was associated with an early postoperative rehabilitation and a shorter LOS in uneventful patients. Economic analysis showed 775 extra cost per patient of the LDP group. General health perception and vitality were better in the LDP group one month after surgery. CONCLUSION: Laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy improved short-term postoperative recovery and quality of life in a consecutive series of both cancer and non-cancer patients. Despite the extra cost, the laparoscopic approach should be considered the first option in patients undergoing distal pancreatectomy.

5 Article Extending indications for islet autotransplantation in pancreatic surgery. 2013

Balzano, Gianpaolo / Maffi, Paola / Nano, Rita / Zerbi, Alessandro / Venturini, Massimo / Melzi, Raffaella / Mercalli, Alessia / Magistretti, Paola / Scavini, Marina / Castoldi, Renato / Carvello, Michele / Braga, Marco / Del Maschio, Alessandro / Secchi, Antonio / Staudacher, Carlo / Piemonti, Lorenzo. ·Department of Surgery, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy. ·Ann Surg · Pubmed #23751451.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To assess metabolic and oncologic outcomes of islet autotransplantation (IAT) in patients undergoing pancreatic surgery for either benign or malignant disease. BACKGROUND: IAT is performed to improve glycemic control after extended pancreatectomy, almost exclusively in patients with chronic pancreatitis. Limited experience is available for other indications or in patients with pancreatic malignancy. METHODS: In addition to chronic pancreatitis, indications for IAT were grade C pancreatic fistula (treated with completion or left pancreatectomy, as indicated); total pancreatectomy as an alternative to high-risk anastomosis during pancreaticoduodenectomy; and distal pancreatectomy for benign/borderline neoplasm of pancreatic body-neck. Malignancy was not an exclusion criterion. Metabolic and oncologic follow-up is presented. RESULTS: From November 2008 to June 2012, 41 patients were candidates to IAT (accounting for 7.5% of all pancreatic resections). Seven of 41 did not receive transplantation for inadequate islet mass (4 pts), patient instability (2 pts), or contamination of islet culture (1 pt). IAT-related complications occurred in 8 pts (23.5%): 4 bleeding, 3 portal thromboses (1 complete, 2 partial), and 1 sepsis. Median follow-up was 546 days. Fifteen of 34 patients (44%) reached insulin independence, 16 patients (47%) had partial graft function, 2 patients (6%) had primary graft nonfunction, and 1 patient (3%) had early graft loss. Seventeen IAT recipients had malignancy (pancreatic or periampullary adenocarcinoma in 14). Two of them had already liver metastases at surgery, 13 were disease-free at last follow-up, and none of 2 patients with tumor recurrence developed metastases in the transplantation site. CONCLUSIONS: Although larger data are needed to definitely exclude the risk of disease dissemination, the present study suggests that IAT indications can be extended to selected patients with neoplasm.

6 Article Preoperative chemotherapy does not adversely affect pancreatic structure and short-term outcome after pancreatectomy. 2013

Pecorelli, Nicolò / Braga, Marco / Doglioni, Claudio / Balzano, Gianpaolo / Reni, Michele / Cereda, Stefano / Albarello, Luca / Castoldi, Renato / Capretti, Giovanni / Di Carlo, Valerio. ·Department of Surgery, Vita-Salute San Raffaele University, Via Olgettina 60, 20132, Milan, Italy. ·J Gastrointest Surg · Pubmed #23132627.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Preoperative chemotherapy (PCHT) has recently been proposed also in patients with resectable pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Few data are currently available on the impact of PCHT on short-term postoperative outcome after pancreatic resection. The objective of this study is to assess the impact of PCHT on pancreatic structure and short-term outcome after surgical resection. METHODS: Fifty consecutive patients successfully underwent resection after PCHT. Each patient was matched with two control patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma selected from our prospective electronic database. Match criteria were age (±3 years), gender, American Society of Anesthesiologist score, type of resection, pancreatic duct diameter (±1 mm), and tumor size (±5 mm). Primary endpoint was morbidity rate. Secondary endpoints were pancreatic parenchymal structure, mortality rate, and length of hospital stay (LOS). RESULTS: Both degree of fibrosis and fatty infiltration of the pancreas were similar in the two groups. Overall morbidity rate was 48.0 % in the PCHT group vs. 54.0 % in the control group (p = 0.37). Pancreatic fistula rate was 18.0 % in the PCHT group vs. 25.0 % in the control group (p = 0.41). Mortality was 4.0 % in the PCHT group vs. 2.0 % in the control group (p = 0.60). Mean LOS (days) was 12.7 in the PCHT group vs. 12.4 in the control group (p = 0.74). There was no difference in resection margin status, while the rate of patients without nodal involvement was higher in the PCHT group (46.0 vs. 23.0 %, p = 0.004). CONCLUSION: PCHT did not induce significant structural changes in pancreatic parenchyma and did not adversely affect short-term outcome after surgery.