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Pancreatic Neoplasms: HELP
Articles by Maurizio Cantore
Based on 14 articles published since 2010
(Why 14 articles?)
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Between 2010 and 2020, M. Cantore wrote the following 14 articles about Pancreatic Neoplasms.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Guideline Exocrine pancreatic insufficiency in adults: a shared position statement of the Italian Association for the Study of the Pancreas. 2013

Pezzilli, Raffaele / Andriulli, Angelo / Bassi, Claudio / Balzano, Gianpaolo / Cantore, Maurizio / Delle Fave, Gianfranco / Falconi, Massimo / Anonymous260778. ·Raffaele Pezzilli, Angelo Andriulli, Claudio Bassi, Gianpaolo Balzano, Maurizio Cantore, Gianfranco Delle Fave, Massimo Falconi, Luca Frulloni; the Exocrine Pancreatic Insufficiency collaborative (EPIc) Group, Department of Digestive Diseases, Internal Medicine Sant'Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, 40138 Bologna, Italy. ·World J Gastroenterol · Pubmed #24307787.

ABSTRACT: This is a medical position statement developed by the Exocrine Pancreatic Insufficiency collaborative group which is a part of the Italian Association for the Study of the Pancreas (AISP). We covered the main diseases associated with exocrine pancreatic insufficiency (EPI) which are of common interest to internists/gastroenterologists, oncologists and surgeons, fully aware that EPI may also occur together with many other diseases, but less frequently. A preliminary manuscript based on an extended literature search (Medline/PubMed, Cochrane Library and Google Scholar) of published reports was prepared, and key recommendations were proposed. The evidence was discussed at a dedicated meeting in Bologna during the National Meeting of the Association in October 2012. Each of the proposed recommendations and algorithms was discussed and an initial consensus was reached. The final draft of the manuscript was then sent to the AISP Council for approval and/or modification. All concerned parties approved the final version of the manuscript in June 2013.

2 Clinical Trial Systemic gemcitabine and capecitabine plus intra-arterial epirubicin and cisplatin as second-line chemotherapy in gemcitabine-failure pancreatic cancer. 2011

Mambrini, Andrea / Bassi, Claudio / Torri, Tito / Orlandi, Massimo / Fiorentini, Giammaria / Cantore, Maurizio. · ·Pancreas · Pubmed #21562443.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

3 Article Germline BRCA2 K3326X and CHEK2 I157T mutations increase risk for sporadic pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. 2019

Obazee, O / Archibugi, L / Andriulli, A / Soucek, P / Małecka-Panas, E / Ivanauskas, A / Johnson, T / Gazouli, M / Pausch, T / Lawlor, R T / Cavestro, G M / Milanetto, A C / Di Leo, M / Pasquali, C / Hegyi, P / Szentesi, A / Radu, C E / Gheorghe, C / Theodoropoulos, G E / Bergmann, F / Brenner, H / Vodickova, L / Katzke, V / Campa, D / Strobel, O / Kaiser, J / Pezzilli, R / Federici, F / Mohelnikova-Duchonova, B / Boggi, U / Lemstrova, R / Johansen, J S / Bojesen, S E / Chen, I / Jensen, B V / Capurso, G / Pazienza, V / Dervenis, C / Sperti, C / Mambrini, A / Hackert, T / Kaaks, R / Basso, D / Talar-Wojnarowska, R / Maiello, E / Izbicki, J R / Cuk, K / Saum, K U / Cantore, M / Kupcinskas, J / Palmieri, O / Delle Fave, G / Landi, S / Salvia, R / Fogar, P / Vashist, Y K / Scarpa, A / Vodicka, P / Tjaden, C / Iskierka-Jazdzewska, E / Canzian, F. ·Genomic Epidemiology Group, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Digestive and Liver Disease Unit, Pancreatic Disorders Clinic, S. Andrea Hospital, University of Sapienza, Rome, Italy. · Pancreatico/Biliary Endoscopy and Endosonography Division, Pancreas Translational and Clinical Research Center, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy. · Division of Gastroenterology and Research Laboratory, Department of Oncology, IRCCS Scientific Institute and Regional General Hospital "Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza", San Giovanni Rotondo, Italy. · Laboratory of Pharmacogenomics, Biomedical Centre, Faculty of Medicine in Plzen, Charles University in Prague, Plzen, Czech Republic. · Department of Digestive Tract Diseases, Medical University of Lodz, Lodz, Poland. · Department of Gastroenterology, Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, Kaunas, Lithuania. · Division of Cancer Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Department of Basic Medical Sciences, Laboratory of Biology, Medical School National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece. · Klinik für Allgemein-, Viszeral- und Transplantationschirurgie, Heidelberg, Germany. · ARC-Net, Applied Research on Cancer Centre, University of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Gastroenterology and Gastrointestinal Endoscopy Unit, Vita-Salute San Raffaele University, IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy. · Department of Surgery, Oncology and Gastroenterology -DiSCOG, University of Padova, Padova, Italy. · Institute for Translational Medicine and 1st Department of Medicine, University of Pécs, Pécs, Hungary. · Fundeni Clinical Institute, Bucharest, Romania. · First Propaedeutic Surgical Department, "Hippocratio" General Hospital Athens Medical School, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece. · Pathologisches Institut der Universität Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany. · Division of Clinical Epidemiology and Aging Research, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Division of Preventive Oncology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ) and National Center for Tumor Diseases (NCT), Heidelberg, Germany. · German Cancer Consortium (DKTK), German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Institute of Biology and Medical Genetics, 1st Medical Faculty, Charles University, Prague and Biomedical Center, Faculty of Medicine in Pilsen, Charles University, Prague, Czech Republic. · Dipartimento di Biologia, Università di Pisa, Pisa, Italy. · Pancreas Unit, Department of Digestive System, Sant'Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, Bologna, Italy. · Department of Massa Carrara Oncological, Azienda USL Toscana Nord Ovest, Carrara, Italy. · Department of Oncology, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, Palacky University Olomouc and University Hospital Olomouc, Olomouc, Czech Republic. · Division of General and Transplant Surgery, Pisa University Hospital, Pisa, Italy. · Department of Oncology, Herlev and Gentofte Hospital, Copenhagen University Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark. · Department of Clinical Biochemistry, Herlev and Gentofte Hospital, Copenhagen University Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark. · Department of Surgery, Konstantopouleion General Hospital of Athens, Athens, Greece. · Department of Laboratory Medicine, University-Hospital of Padova, Padova, Italy. · Department of General, Visceral and Thoracic Surgery, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany. · Department of Surgery, Pancreas Institute, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Section for Visceral Surgery, Department of Surgery, Kantonsspital Aarau AG, Aarau, Switzerland. · Institute of Experimental Medicine, Czech Academy of Science, Prague and Institute of Biology and Medical Genetics, 1st Medical Faculty, Charles University, Prague, Czech Republic. · Department of Hematology, Medical University of Lodz, Lodz, Poland. ·Int J Cancer · Pubmed #30672594.

ABSTRACT: Rare truncating BRCA2 K3326X (rs11571833) and pathogenic CHEK2 I157T (rs17879961) variants have previously been implicated in familial pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), but not in sporadic cases. The effect of both mutations in important DNA repair genes on sporadic PDAC risk may shed light on the genetic architecture of this disease. Both mutations were genotyped in germline DNA from 2,935 sporadic PDAC cases and 5,626 control subjects within the PANcreatic Disease ReseArch (PANDoRA) consortium. Risk estimates were evaluated using multivariate unconditional logistic regression with adjustment for possible confounders such as sex, age and country of origin. Statistical analyses were two-sided with p values <0.05 considered significant. K3326X and I157T were associated with increased risk of developing sporadic PDAC (odds ratio (OR

4 Article Do pancreatic cancer and chronic pancreatitis share the same genetic risk factors? A PANcreatic Disease ReseArch (PANDoRA) consortium investigation. 2018

Campa, Daniele / Pastore, Manuela / Capurso, Gabriele / Hackert, Thilo / Di Leo, Milena / Izbicki, Jakob R / Khaw, Kay-Tee / Gioffreda, Domenica / Kupcinskas, Juozas / Pasquali, Claudio / Macinga, Peter / Kaaks, Rudolf / Stigliano, Serena / Peeters, Petra H / Key, Timothy J / Talar-Wojnarowska, Renata / Vodicka, Pavel / Valente, Roberto / Vashist, Yogesh K / Salvia, Roberto / Papaconstantinou, Ioannis / Shimizu, Yasuhiro / Valsuani, Chiara / Zambon, Carlo Federico / Gazouli, Maria / Valantiene, Irena / Niesen, Willem / Mohelnikova-Duchonova, Beatrice / Hara, Kazuo / Soucek, Pavel / Malecka-Panas, Ewa / Bueno-de-Mesquita, H B As / Johnson, Theron / Brenner, Herman / Tavano, Francesca / Fogar, Paola / Ito, Hidemi / Sperti, Cosimo / Butterbach, Katja / Latiano, Anna / Andriulli, Angelo / Cavestro, Giulia Martina / Busch, Olivier R C / Dijk, Frederike / Greenhalf, William / Matsuo, Keitaro / Lombardo, Carlo / Strobel, Oliver / König, Anna-Katharina / Cuk, Katarina / Strothmann, Hendrik / Katzke, Verena / Cantore, Maurizio / Mambrini, Andrea / Oliverius, Martin / Pezzilli, Raffaele / Landi, Stefano / Canzian, Federico. ·Department of Biology, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. · Genomic Epidemiology Group, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Digestive and Liver Disease Unit, S. Andrea Hospital 'Sapienza' University of Rome, Rome, Italy. · Department of General Surgery, University Hospital Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany. · Gastroenterology and Gastrointestinal Endoscopy Unit, Vita-Salute San Raffaele University, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy. · Department of General, Visceral and Thoracic Surgery, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany. · Clinical Gerontology Unit, Addenbrooke's Hospital, University of Cambridge School of Clinical Medicine, Cambridge, United Kingdom. · Division of Gastroenterology and Research Laboratory, Department of Surgery, IRCCS Scientific Institute and Regional General Hospital "Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza", San Giovanni Rotondo, Italy. · Department of Gastroenterology, Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, Kaunas, Lithuania. · Department of Surgery, Oncology and Gastroenterology (DiSCOG), University of Padova, Padova, Italy. · Institute of Experimental Medicine, Czech Academy of Sciences and Institute of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Prague, Czech Republic. · Division of Cancer Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Department of Epidemiology, Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands. · MRC-PHE Centre for Environment and Health, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Imperial College, London, United Kingdom. · Cancer Epidemiology Unit, Nuffield Department of Population Health, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom. · Department of Digestive Tract Diseases, Medical University of Lodz, Lodz, Poland. · Department of Visceral Surgery, Kantonsspital Aarau AG, Aarau, Switzerland. · Department of Surgery, Pancreas Institute, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Second Department of Surgery, Aretaieion Hospital, School of Medicine, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece. · Department of Gastroenterological Surgery, Aichi Cancer Center Hospital, Nagoya, Japan. · Oncological Department, Azienda USL Toscana Nord Ovest, Oncological Unit of Massa Carrara, Carrara, Massa and Carrara, Italy. · Department of Medicine (DIMED), University of Padova, Padova, Italy. · Department of Basic Medical Sciences, Laboratory of Biology, School of Medicine, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece. · Department of Oncology, Palacky University Medical School and Teaching Hospital, Olomouc, Czech Republic. · Department of Gastroenterology, Aichi Cancer Center Hospital, Nagoya, Japan. · Biomedical Center, Faculty of Medicine in Pilsen, Charles University in Prague, Pilsen, Czech Republic. · Department for Determinants of Chronic Diseases (DCD), National Institute for Public Health and the Environment, Bilthoven, The Netherlands. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, The School of Public Health, Imperial College London, St Mary's Campus, London, United Kingdom. · Department of Social & Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. · Division of Clinical Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Division of Preventive Oncology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), and National Center for Tumor Diseases (NCT), Heidelberg, Germany. · German Cancer Consortium (DKTK), German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Department of Laboratory Medicine, University-Hospital of Padova, Padova, Italy. · Division of Molecular and Clinical Epidemiology, Aichi Cancer Center Research Institute, Nagoya, Japan. · Department of Epidemiology, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya, Japan. · Department of Surgery, Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. · Department of Pathology, Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. · Institute for Health Research, Liverpool Pancreas Biomedical Research Unit, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, United Kingdom. · Division of General and Transplant Surgery, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. · Dipartimento di Ricerca Traslazionale e delle Nuove Tecnologie in Medicina e Chirurgia, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. · Transplant Surgery Department, Institute for Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Prague, Czech Republic. · Pancreas Unit, Department of Digestive Diseases and Internal Medicine Sant'Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, Bologna, Italy. ·Int J Cancer · Pubmed #28913878.

ABSTRACT: Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is a very aggressive tumor with a five-year survival of less than 6%. Chronic pancreatitis (CP), an inflammatory process in of the pancreas, is a strong risk factor for PDAC. Several genetic polymorphisms have been discovered as susceptibility loci for both CP and PDAC. Since CP and PDAC share a consistent number of epidemiologic risk factors, the aim of this study was to investigate whether specific CP risk loci also contribute to PDAC susceptibility. We selected five common SNPs (rs11988997, rs379742, rs10273639, rs2995271 and rs12688220) that were identified as susceptibility markers for CP and analyzed them in 2,914 PDAC cases, 356 CP cases and 5,596 controls retrospectively collected in the context of the international PANDoRA consortium. We found a weak association between the minor allele of the PRSS1-PRSS2-rs10273639 and an increased risk of developing PDAC (OR

5 Article SLC22A3 polymorphisms do not modify pancreatic cancer risk, but may influence overall patient survival. 2017

Mohelnikova-Duchonova, Beatrice / Strouhal, Ondrej / Hughes, David J / Holcatova, Ivana / Oliverius, Martin / Kala, Zdenek / Campa, Daniele / Rizzato, Cosmeri / Canzian, Federico / Pezzilli, Raffaele / Talar-Wojnarowska, Renata / Malecka-Panas, Ewa / Sperti, Cosimo / Federico Zambon, Carlo / Pedrazzoli, Sergio / Fogar, Paola / Milanetto, Anna Caterina / Capurso, Gabriele / Delle Fave, Gianfranco / Valente, Roberto / Gazouli, Maria / Malleo, Giuseppe / Teresa Lawlor, Rita / Strobel, Oliver / Hackert, Thilo / Giese, Nathalia / Vodicka, Pavel / Vodickova, Ludmila / Landi, Stefano / Tavano, Francesca / Gioffreda, Domenica / Piepoli, Ada / Pazienza, Valerio / Mambrini, Andrea / Pedata, Mariangela / Cantore, Maurizio / Bambi, Franco / Ermini, Stefano / Funel, Niccola / Lemstrova, Radmila / Soucek, Pavel. ·Department of Toxicogenomics, National Institute of Public Health, Prague, Czech Republic. · Department of Oncology, Palacky University Medical School and Teaching Hospital, Olomouc, Czech Republic. · Department of Physiology &Centre for Systems Medicine, Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland, Dublin 2, Ireland. · Institute of Hygiene and Epidemiology, First Faculty of Medicine, Charles University in Prague, Prague, Czech Republic. · Department of Transplantation Surgery, Institute of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Prague, Czech Republic. · Department of Surgery, The University Hospital and Faculty of Medicine, Brno Bohunice, Czech Republic. · Genomic Epidemiology Group, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Department of Biology, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. · Department of Translational Research and New Technologies in Medicine and Surgery, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. · Department of Digestive Diseases, Sant'Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, Bologna, Italy. · Department of Digestive Tract Diseases, Medical University of Lodz, Lodz, Poland. · Department of Surgery, Oncology and Gastroenterology -DiSCOG, University of Padova, Italy. · Department of Medicine - DIMED, University of Padova, Italy. · Clinica Chirurgica 4, University of Padova, Italy. · Department of Laboratory Medicine, University-Hospital of Padova, Italy. · Digestive and Liver Disease Unit, S. Andrea Hospital, 'Sapienza' University of Rome, Rome, Italy. · Department of Basic Medical Sciences, Laboratory of Biology, School of Medicine, University of Athens, Athens, Greece. · Department of Surgery and Oncology, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona, Italy. · ARC-NET Applied research on Cancer Centre, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Department of General, Visceral and Transplantation Surgery, Heidelberg University Hospital, Heidelberg, Germany. · Department of Molecular Biology of Cancer, Institute of Experimental Medicine, Academy of Science of Czech Republic, Prague, Czech Republic and First Faculty of Medicine, Charles University in Prague, Czech Republic. · Biomedical Centre, Faculty of Medicine in Pilsen, Charles University in Prague, Pilsen, Czech Republic. · Division of Gastroenterology and Research Laboratory, IRCCS Scientific Institute and Regional General Hospital "Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza", San Giovanni Rotondo, Italy. · Department of Oncology, Azienda USL 1 Massa Carrara, Massa Carrara, Italy. · Blood Transfusion Service, Children's Hospital Meyer, Azienda Ospedaliero Universitaria, Florence, Italy. ·Sci Rep · Pubmed #28272475.

ABSTRACT: Expression of the solute carrier (SLC) transporter SLC22A3 gene is associated with overall survival of pancreatic cancer patients. This study tested whether genetic variability in SLC22A3 associates with pancreatic cancer risk and prognosis. Twenty four single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) tagging the SLC22A3 gene sequence and regulatory elements were selected for analysis. Of these, 22 were successfully evaluated in the discovery phase while six significant or suggestive variants entered the validation phase, comprising a total study number of 1,518 cases and 3,908 controls. In the discovery phase, rs2504938, rs9364554, and rs2457571 SNPs were significantly associated with pancreatic cancer risk. Moreover, rs7758229 associated with the presence of distant metastases, while rs512077 and rs2504956 correlated with overall survival of patients. Although replicated, the association for rs9364554 did not pass multiple testing corrections in the validation phase. Contrary to the discovery stage, rs2504938 associated with survival in the validation cohort, which was more pronounced in stage IV patients. In conclusion, common variation in the SLC22A3 gene is unlikely to significantly contribute to pancreatic cancer risk. The rs2504938 SNP in SLC22A3 significantly associates with an unfavorable prognosis of pancreatic cancer patients. Further investigation of this SNP effect on the molecular and clinical phenotype is warranted.

6 Article Association of genetic polymorphisms with survival of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma patients. 2016

Rizzato, Cosmeri / Campa, Daniele / Talar-Wojnarowska, Renata / Halloran, Christopher / Kupcinskas, Juozas / Butturini, Giovanni / Mohelníková-Duchoňová, Beatrice / Sperti, Cosimo / Tjaden, Christine / Ghaneh, Paula / Hackert, Thilo / Funel, Niccola / Giese, Nathalia / Tavano, Francesca / Pezzilli, Raffaele / Pedata, Mariangela / Pasquali, Claudio / Gazouli, Maria / Mambrini, Andrea / Souček, Pavel / di Sebastiano, Pierluigi / Capurso, Gabriele / Cantore, Maurizio / Oliverius, Martin / Offringa, Rienk / Małecka-Panas, Ewa / Strobel, Oliver / Scarpa, Aldo / Canzian, Federico. ·Genomic Epidemiology Group, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany, Department of Translational Research and New Technologies in Medicine and Surgery and. · Genomic Epidemiology Group, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany, Department of Biology, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. · Department of Digestive Tract Diseases, Medical University of Łódź, Łódź, Poland. · Department of Molecular and Clinical Cancer Medicine, NIHR Liverpool Pancreas Biomedical Research Unit, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK. · Department of Gastroenterology, Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, Kaunas, Lithuania. · Unit of Surgery B, The Pancreas Institute, Department of Surgery and Oncology, G.B. Rossi Hospital, University of Verona Hospital Trust, Verona, Italy. · Department of Oncology, Palacky University Medical School and Teaching Hospital, Olomouc, Czech Republic. · Department of Surgery, Gastroenterology and Oncology, University of Padua, Padua, Italy. · Department of General, Visceral and Transplantation Surgery, University Hospital Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany. · Department of Translational Research and New Technologies in Medicine and Surgery and. · Division of Gastroenterology and Research Laboratory, IRCCS Scientific Institute and Regional General Hospital "Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza", S. Giovanni Rotondo (FG), Italy. · Pancreas Unit, Department of Digestive Disease, Sant'Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, Bologna, Italy. · Oncological Department, ASL 1 Massa Carrara, Massa Carrara, Italy. · Department of Basic Medical Science, Laboratory of Biology, School of Medicine, University of Athens, Athens, Greece. · Department of Surgery, IRCCS Scientific Institute and Regional General Hospital "Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza", San Giovanni Rotondo (FG), Italy. · Digestive and Liver Disease Unit, 'Sapienza' University of Rome, Rome, Italy. · Transplant Surgery Department, Institute for Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Prague, Czech Republic. · Division of Molecular Oncology of Gastrointestinal Tumors, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany and. · ARC-NET, Centre for Applied Research on Cancer, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Genomic Epidemiology Group, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany, f.canzian@dkfz.de. ·Carcinogenesis · Pubmed #27497070.

ABSTRACT: Germline genetic variability might contribute, at least partially, to the survival of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) patients. Two recently performed genome-wide association studies (GWAS) on PDAC overall survival (OS) suggested (P < 10(-5)) the association between 30 genomic regions and PDAC OS. With the aim to highlight the true associations within these regions, we analyzed 44 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the 30 candidate regions in 1722 PDAC patients within the PANcreatic Disease ReseArch (PANDoRA) consortium. We observed statistically significant associations for five of the selected regions. One association in the CTNNA2 gene on chromosome 2p12 [rs1567532, hazard ratio (HR) = 1.75, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.19-2.58, P = 0.005 for homozygotes for the minor allele] and one in the last intron of the RUNX2 gene on chromosome 6p21 (rs12209785, HR = 0.88, 95% CI 0.80-0.98, P = 0.014 for heterozygotes) are of particular relevance. These loci do not coincide with those that showed the strongest associations in the previous GWAS. In silico analysis strongly suggested a possible mechanistic link between these two SNPs and pancreatic cancer survival. Functional studies are warranted to confirm the link between these genes (or other genes mapping in those regions) and PDAC prognosis in order to understand whether these variants may have the potential to impact treatment decisions and design of clinical trials.

7 Article TERT gene harbors multiple variants associated with pancreatic cancer susceptibility. 2015

Campa, Daniele / Rizzato, Cosmeri / Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael / Pacetti, Paola / Vodicka, Pavel / Cleary, Sean P / Capurso, Gabriele / Bueno-de-Mesquita, H B As / Werner, Jens / Gazouli, Maria / Butterbach, Katja / Ivanauskas, Audrius / Giese, Nathalia / Petersen, Gloria M / Fogar, Paola / Wang, Zhaoming / Bassi, Claudio / Ryska, Miroslav / Theodoropoulos, George E / Kooperberg, Charles / Li, Donghui / Greenhalf, William / Pasquali, Claudio / Hackert, Thilo / Fuchs, Charles S / Mohelnikova-Duchonova, Beatrice / Sperti, Cosimo / Funel, Niccola / Dieffenbach, Aida Karina / Wareham, Nicholas J / Buring, Julie / Holcátová, Ivana / Costello, Eithne / Zambon, Carlo-Federico / Kupcinskas, Juozas / Risch, Harvey A / Kraft, Peter / Bracci, Paige M / Pezzilli, Raffaele / Olson, Sara H / Sesso, Howard D / Hartge, Patricia / Strobel, Oliver / Małecka-Panas, Ewa / Visvanathan, Kala / Arslan, Alan A / Pedrazzoli, Sergio / Souček, Pavel / Gioffreda, Domenica / Key, Timothy J / Talar-Wojnarowska, Renata / Scarpa, Aldo / Mambrini, Andrea / Jacobs, Eric J / Jamroziak, Krzysztof / Klein, Alison / Tavano, Francesca / Bambi, Franco / Landi, Stefano / Austin, Melissa A / Vodickova, Ludmila / Brenner, Hermann / Chanock, Stephen J / Delle Fave, Gianfranco / Piepoli, Ada / Cantore, Maurizio / Zheng, Wei / Wolpin, Brian M / Amundadottir, Laufey T / Canzian, Federico. ·Division of Cancer Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Genomic Epidemiology Group, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD. · Oncology Department, ASL1 Massa Carrara, Massa Carrara, Italy. · Department of Molecular Biology of Cancer, Institute of Experimental Medicine, Academy of Science of Czech Republic, Prague, Czech Republic. · Department of Surgery, University Health Network, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada. · Digestive and Liver Disease Unit, S. Andrea Hospital, 'Sapienza' University of Rome, Rome, Italy. · Department of Determinants of Chronic Diseases (DCD), National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven, The Netherlands. · Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University Medical Centre, Utrecht, The Netherlands. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom. · Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. · Department of General Surgery, University Hospital Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany. · Department of Basic Medical Science, Laboratory of Biology, School of Medicine, University of Athens, Athens, Greece. · Division of Clinical Epidemiology and Aging Research, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Department of Gastroenterology, Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, Kaunas, Lithuania. · Department of Health Sciences Research, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN. · Department of Laboratory Medicine, University Hospital of Padua, Padua, Italy. · Surgical and Oncological Department, Pancreas Institute - University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Department of Surgery, Second Faculty of Medicine, Charles University in Prague and Central Military Hospital, Prague, Czech Republic. · 1st Department of Propaedeutic Surgery, School of Medicine, University of Athens, Athens, Greece. · Division of Public Health Sciences, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA. · Department of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX. · National Institute for Health Research Liverpool Pancreas Biomedical Research Unit, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, United Kingdom. · Department of Surgery, Gastroenterology and Oncology (DISCOG), University of Padua, Padua, Italy. · Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA. · Department of Oncology, Palacky University Medical School and Teaching Hospital in Olomouc, Olomouc, Czech Republic. · Department of Surgery, Unit of Experimental Surgical Pathology, University Hospital of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. · German Cancer Consortium (DKTK), Heidelberg, Germany. · MRC Epidemiology Unit, Institute of Metabolic Science, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom. · Divisions of Preventive Medicine and Aging, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA. · Institute of Hygiene and Epidemiology, First Faculty of Medicine, Charles University in Prague, Prague, Czech Republic. · Department of Medicine - DIMED, University of Padua, Padua, Italy. · Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, CT. · Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA. · Pancreas Unit, Department of Digestive Diseases and Internal Medicine, Sant'Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, Bologna, Italy. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY. · Department of Digestive Tract Diseases, Medical University of Łodz, Łodz, Poland. · Department of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD. · Division of Epidemiology, Departments of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Environmental Medicine, and Population Health, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY. · Surgical Clinic 4, University of Padua, Padua, Italy. · Department of Toxicogenomics, National Institute of Public Health, Prague, Czech Republic. · Division of Gastroenterology and Research Laboratory, IRCCS Scientific Institute and Regional General Hospital "Casa Sollievo Della Sofferenza,", San Giovanni Rotondo, Italy. · Cancer Epidemiology Unit, Nuffield Department of Population Health, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom. · ARC-NET: Centre for Applied Research on Cancer, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Epidemiology Research Program, American Cancer Society, Atlanta, GA. · Department of Hematology, Institute of Hematology and Transfusion Medicine, Warsaw, Poland. · Department of Oncology, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD. · Blood Transfusion Service, Azienda Ospedaliero Universitaria Meyer, Florence, Italy. · Department of Biology, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. · Department of Epidemiology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA. · Department of Medicine and Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN. ·Int J Cancer · Pubmed #25940397.

ABSTRACT: A small number of common susceptibility loci have been identified for pancreatic cancer, one of which is marked by rs401681 in the TERT-CLPTM1L gene region on chromosome 5p15.33. Because this region is characterized by low linkage disequilibrium, we sought to identify whether additional single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) could be related to pancreatic cancer risk, independently of rs401681. We performed an in-depth analysis of genetic variability of the telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) and the telomerase RNA component (TERC) genes, in 5,550 subjects with pancreatic cancer and 7,585 controls from the PANcreatic Disease ReseArch (PANDoRA) and the PanScan consortia. We identified a significant association between a variant in TERT and pancreatic cancer risk (rs2853677, odds ratio = 0.85; 95% confidence interval = 0.80-0.90, p = 8.3 × 10(-8)). Additional analysis adjusting rs2853677 for rs401681 indicated that the two SNPs are independently associated with pancreatic cancer risk, as suggested by the low linkage disequilibrium between them (r(2) = 0.07, D' = 0.28). Three additional SNPs in TERT reached statistical significance after correction for multiple testing: rs2736100 (p = 3.0 × 10(-5) ), rs4583925 (p = 4.0 × 10(-5) ) and rs2735948 (p = 5.0 × 10(-5) ). In conclusion, we confirmed that the TERT locus is associated with pancreatic cancer risk, possibly through several independent variants.

8 Article AKT1 and SELP polymorphisms predict the risk of developing cachexia in pancreatic cancer patients. 2014

Avan, Abolfazl / Avan, Amir / Le Large, Tessa Y S / Mambrini, Andrea / Funel, Niccola / Maftouh, Mina / Ghayour-Mobarhan, Majid / Cantore, Maurizio / Boggi, Ugo / Peters, Godefridus J / Pacetti, Paola / Giovannetti, Elisa. ·Department of Medical Oncology, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Department of Medical Oncology, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands; Biochemistry of Nutrition Research Center, and Department of New Sciences and Technology, School of Medicine, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad, Iran. · Department of Medical Oncology, Carrara Civic Hospital, Carrara, Italy. · Start-Up Unit, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. · Biochemistry of Nutrition Research Center, and Department of New Sciences and Technology, School of Medicine, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad, Iran. · Department of Medical Oncology, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands; Start-Up Unit, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. ·PLoS One · Pubmed #25238546.

ABSTRACT: Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) patients have the highest risk of developing cachexia, which is a direct cause of reduced quality of life and shorter survival. Novel biomarkers to identify patients at risk of cachexia are needed and might have a substantial impact on clinical management. Here we investigated the prognostic value and association of SELP-rs6136, IL6-rs1800796 and AKT1-rs1130233 polymorphisms with cachexia in PDAC. Genotyping was performed in DNA from blood samples of a test and validation cohorts of 151 and 152 chemo-naive locally-advanced/metastatic PDAC patients, respectively. The association of SELP-rs6136, IL6-rs1800796 and AKT1-rs1130233 polymorphisms with cachexia as well as the correlation between cachexia and the candidate polymorphisms and overall survival were analyzed. Akt expression and phosphorylation in muscle biopsies were evaluated by specific ELISA assays. SELP-rs6136-AA and AKT1-rs1130233-AA/GA genotypes were associated with increased risk of developing cachexia in both cohorts (SELP: p = 0.011 and p = 0.045; AKT1: p = 0.004 and p = 0.019 for the first and second cohorts, respectively), while patients carrying AKT1-rs1130233-GG survived significantly longer (p = 0.002 and p = 0.004 for the first and second cohorts, respectively). In the multivariate analysis AKT1-rs1130233-AA/GA genotypes were significant predictors for shorter survival, with an increased risk of death of 1.7 (p = 0.002) and 1.6 (p = 0.004), in the first and second cohorts, respectively. This might be explained by the reduced phosphorylation of Akt1 in muscle biopsies from patients harboring AKT1-rs1130233-AA/GA (p = 0.003), favoring apoptosis induction. In conclusion, SELP and AKT1 polymorphisms may play a role in the risk of cachexia and death in PDAC patients, and should be further evaluated in larger prospective studies.

9 Article A polymorphism in the promoter is associated with EZH2 expression but not with outcome in advanced pancreatic cancer patients. 2014

Maftouh, Mina / Avan, Amir / Funel, Niccola / Paolicchi, Elisa / Vasile, Enrico / Pacetti, Paola / Vaccaro, Vanja / Faviana, Pinuccia / Campani, Daniela / Caponi, Sara / Mambrini, Andrea / Boggi, Ugo / Cantore, Maurizio / Milella, Michele / Peters, Godefridus J / Reni, Michele / Giovannetti, Elisa. ·Department of Medical Oncology, VU University Medical Center, Cancer Center Amsterdam, CCA room 1.52, De Boelelaan 1117, 1081 HV Amsterdam, The Netherlands. ·Pharmacogenomics · Pubmed #24798718.

ABSTRACT: AIM: EZH2 expression is a prognostic marker in radically resected pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) patients. Here we investigated its role in locally advanced/metastatic patients, as well as candidate polymorphisms. MATERIALS & METHODS: EZH2 expression and polymorphisms were evaluated by quantitative reverse transcription PCR in 32 laser microdissected tumors, while polymorphisms were also studied in blood samples from two additional cohorts treated with gemcitabine monotherapy (n = 93) or polychemotherapeutic regimens (n = 247). RESULTS: EZH2 expression correlated with survival and with the rs6958683 polymorphism in the first cohort of patients, but this polymorphism was not associated with survival in our larger cohorts. CONCLUSION: EZH2 is a prognostic factor for locally advanced/metastatic PDACs, while candidate polymorphisms cannot predict clinical outcome. Other factors involved in EZH2 regulation, such as miR-101, should be investigated in accessible samples in order to improve the clinical management of advanced PDAC.

10 Article Triple approach strategy for patients with locally advanced pancreatic carcinoma. 2013

Giardino, Alessandro / Girelli, Roberto / Frigerio, Isabella / Regi, Paolo / Cantore, Maurizio / Alessandra, Auriemma / Lusenti, Annita / Salvia, Roberto / Bassi, Claudio / Pederzoli, Paolo. ·Pancreatic Unit, Casa di Cura Pederzoli, Peschiera del Garda (VR), Italy. giardinoalessandro@gmail.com ·HPB (Oxford) · Pubmed #23458679.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is a relatively new technique, applied to metastatic solid tumours which, in recent studies, has been shown to be feasible and safe on locally advanced pancreatic carcinoma (LAPC). RFA can be combined with radio-chemotherapy (RCT) and intra-arterial plus systemic chemotherapy (IASC). The aim of this study was to investigate the impact on the prognosis of a multimodal approach to LAPC and define the best timing of RFA. METHODS: This is a retrospective observational study of patients who have consecutively undergone RFA associated with multiple adjuvant approaches. RESULTS: Between February 2007 and December 2011, 168 consecutive patients were treated by RFA, of which 107 were eligible for at least 18 months of follow-up. Forty-seven patients (group 1) underwent RFA as an up-front treatment and 60 patients as second treatment (group 2) depending on clinician choice. The median overall survival (OS) of the whole series was 25.6 months: 14.7 months in the group 1 and 25.6 months in the group 2 (P = 0.004). Those patients who received the multimodal treatment (RFA, RCT and IASC-triple approach strategy) had an OS of 34.0 months. CONCLUSIONS: The multimodal approach seems to be feasible and associated with an improved longer survival rate.

11 Article Prognostic factors in gemcitabine-cisplatin polychemotherapy regimens in pancreatic cancer: XPD-Lys751Gln polymorphism strikes back. 2013

Avan, Amir / Pacetti, Paola / Reni, Michele / Milella, Michele / Vasile, Enrico / Mambrini, Andrea / Vaccaro, Vanja / Caponi, Sara / Cereda, Stefano / Peters, Godefridus J / Cantore, Maurizio / Giovannetti, Elisa. ·Department of Medical Oncology, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. ·Int J Cancer · Pubmed #23390054.

ABSTRACT: The use of platinated agents in combination chemotherapy regimens for advanced pancreatic cancer is controversial owing to the lack of an outstanding impact on the outcome and a substantial increase in hematologic and extra-hematologic toxicities. Pharmacogenetic studies to identify patients who could benefit most from such therapies are urgently needed. The Xeroderma-Pigmentosum group-D polymorphism at codon-751 (XPD-Lys751Gln) emerged as the most significant independent predictor for death- and progression-risk in our previous study on functional polymorphisms in 122 advanced pancreatic cancer patients treated with cisplatin-docetaxel-capecitabine-gemcitabine and cisplatin-epirubicin-capecitabine-gemcitabine (or EC-GemCap). To confirm the prognostic role of this variable, we further evaluated the correlation of XPD-Lys751Gln with outcome in another 125 patients treated with the same regimens, and 90 treated with gemcitabine monotherapy. Genotyping was successfully carried out in the vast majority of DNA samples. Genotype frequencies followed Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium, and XPD-Lys751Gln was associated with differential progression-free and overall-survival. Multivariate analysis confirmed its prognostic significance in platinum-based regimens. In particular, XPD-Gln751Gln was significantly associated with risk of death (hazard ratio, HR = 1.7, 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.1-2.6, p = 0.011) and risk of progression (HR = 1.7, 95% CI, 1.1-2.5, p = 0.013). No correlation was observed in gemcitabine monotherapy-treated patients. The analysis of DNA damage using extra-long-PCR in lymphocytes supported the association of XPD-Gln751Gln with greater resistance to cisplatin-induced damage. The increasing evidence of XPD-Lys751Gln impact on the outcome of gemcitabine-cisplatin-based polychemotherapy leads to plan prospective studies to validate the role of this polymorphism as a new tool for optimization of the currently available treatments in pancreatic cancer.

12 Article Genetic susceptibility to pancreatic cancer and its functional characterisation: the PANcreatic Disease ReseArch (PANDoRA) consortium. 2013

Campa, Daniele / Rizzato, Cosmeri / Capurso, Gabriele / Giese, Nathalia / Funel, Niccola / Greenhalf, William / Soucek, Pavel / Gazouli, Maria / Pezzilli, Raffaele / Pasquali, Claudio / Talar-Wojnarowska, Renata / Cantore, Maurizio / Andriulli, Angelo / Scarpa, Aldo / Jamroziak, Krzysztof / Delle Fave, Gianfranco / Costello, Eithne / Khaw, Kay-Tee / Heller, Anette / Key, Tim J / Theodoropoulos, George / Malecka-Panas, Ewa / Mambrini, Andrea / Bambi, Franco / Landi, Stefano / Pedrazzoli, Sergio / Bassi, Claudio / Pacetti, Paola / Piepoli, Ada / Tavano, Francesca / di Sebastiano, Pierluigi / Vodickova, Ludmila / Basso, Daniela / Plebani, Mario / Fogar, Paola / Büchler, Markus W / Bugert, Peter / Vodicka, Pavel / Boggi, Ugo / Neoptolemos, John P / Werner, Jens / Canzian, Federico. ·German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. d.campa@dkfz.de ·Dig Liver Dis · Pubmed #23206934.

ABSTRACT: Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer deaths in the European Union and in the USA, but little is known about its genetic susceptibility. The PANcreatic Disease ReseArch (PANDoRA) consortium was established to unite the efforts of different research groups; its aim is to create a large bio-database to uncover new genetic factors for pancreatic cancer risk, response to treatment, and patient survival. So far 2220 cases of pancreatic adenocarcinoma, a smaller number of cases of endocrine pancreatic tumours (n=86), chronic pancreatitis (n=272) and 3847 healthy controls have been collected. As a collective effort of the consortium, SNPs associated with pancreatic adenocarcinoma risk from a genome-wide association study performed in Caucasians were replicated. The possibility that the same genetic polymorphisms may influence patient survival as well was also addressed. This collective effort is particularly important for pancreatic cancer because it is a relatively rare disease for which little is known about aetiopathogenesis and risk factors. The recruitment of additional collaborators and partner institutions is continuously on-going.

13 Article Combined modality treatment for patients with locally advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma. 2012

Cantore, M / Girelli, R / Mambrini, A / Frigerio, I / Boz, G / Salvia, R / Giardino, A / Orlandi, M / Auriemma, A / Bassi, C. ·Oncological Department, Carrara Hospital, Carrara, Italy. maurizio.cantore@usl1.toscana.it ·Br J Surg · Pubmed #22648697.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is an emerging treatment for patients with locally advanced pancreatic carcinoma, and can be combined with radiochemotherapy and intra-arterial plus systemic chemotherapy. METHODS: This observational study compared two groups of patients with locally advanced pancreatic carcinoma treated with either primary RFA (group 1) or RFA following any other primary treatment (group 2). RESULTS: Between February 2007 and May 2010, 107 consecutive patients were treated with RFA. There were 47 patients in group 1 and 60 in group 2. Median overall survival was 25·6 months. Median overall survival was significantly shorter in group 1 than in group 2 (14·7 versus 25·6 months; P = 0·004) Patients treated with RFA, radiochemotherapy and intra-arterial plus systemic chemotherapy (triple-approach strategy) had a median overall survival of 34·0 months. CONCLUSION: RFA after alternative primary treatment was associated with prolonged survival. This was further extended by use of a triple-approach strategy in selected patients. Further evaluation of this approach seems warranted.

14 Article Association between DNA-repair polymorphisms and survival in pancreatic cancer patients treated with combination chemotherapy. 2011

Giovannetti, Elisa / Pacetti, Paola / Reni, Michele / Leon, Leticia G / Mambrini, Andrea / Vasile, Enrico / Ghidini, Michele / Funel, Niccola / Lucchesi, Matteo / Cereda, Stefano / Peters, Godefridus J / Cantore, Maurizio. ·Department of Medical Oncology, VU University Medical Center, Cancer Center Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. elisa.giovannetti@gmail.com ·Pharmacogenomics · Pubmed #22026922.

ABSTRACT: AIM: This multicenter study evaluated the association of 11 candidate polymorphisms in eight genes with outcome of pancreatic cancer patients treated with the equivalent polychemotherapeutic regimens: cisplatin/epirubicin/capecitabine/gemcitabine, cisplatin/docetaxel/capecitabine/gemcitabine and gemcitabine/capecitabine plus epirubicin/cisplatin intra-arterial infusion. PATIENTS & METHODS: Towards this end, polymorphisms were assessed in DNA from 122 pancreatic cancer stage-III/IV patients, and their associations with toxicity/response and progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival were evaluated using Pearson-χ(2) and log-rank test. RESULTS: Patients harboring XPD Gln751Gln, XPD Asp312Asn + Asn312Asn or XRCC1 Arg399Gln + Gln399Gln genotypes had a worse prognosis. XPD Gln751Gln (hazard ratio: 1.9; p = 0.003), as well as a combination of over two risk genotypes (hazard ratio: 2.7; p < 0.001), emerged as independent predictors for death risk at multivariate analysis. No correlations were observed with toxicity. Conversely, XPD Gln751Gln was associated with shorter PFS, while the lack of association with overall survival/PFS in gemcitabine monotherapy-treated patients suggested its role only for platinum-based regimens. CONCLUSION: Polymorphisms of DNA-repair genes appear to be candidate biomarkers of primary resistance to gemcitabine/cisplatin-based polychemotherapeutic regimens. The relatively small sample size, coupled with the retrospective and exploratory design of the present study, imply that these results should be considered as hypothesis generators, and should be further evaluated in larger and adequately designed retrospective/prospective studies.