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Pancreatic Neoplasms: HELP
Articles by Melissa L. Bondy
Based on 4 articles published since 2010
(Why 4 articles?)
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Between 2010 and 2020, Melissa Bondy wrote the following 4 articles about Pancreatic Neoplasms.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Article Association of Common Susceptibility Variants of Pancreatic Cancer in Higher-Risk Patients: A PACGENE Study. 2016

Childs, Erica J / Chaffee, Kari G / Gallinger, Steven / Syngal, Sapna / Schwartz, Ann G / Cote, Michele L / Bondy, Melissa L / Hruban, Ralph H / Chanock, Stephen J / Hoover, Robert N / Fuchs, Charles S / Rider, David N / Amundadottir, Laufey T / Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael / Wolpin, Brian M / Risch, Harvey A / Goggins, Michael G / Petersen, Gloria M / Klein, Alison P. ·Department of Oncology, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland. · Department of Health Sciences Research, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, Minnesota. · Lunenfeld-Tanenbaum Research Institute of Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Population Sciences Division, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, and Gastroenterology Division, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts. · Department of Oncology, Karmanos Cancer Institute and Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan. · Baylor College of Medicine, Dan L. Duncan Cancer Center, Houston, Texas. · Department of Oncology, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland. Department of Pathology, Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland. · Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, NIH, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Bethesda, Maryland. · Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts. Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. · Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts. Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. · Department of Chronic Disease Epidemiology, Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, Connecticut. · Department of Pathology, Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland. · Department of Oncology, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland. Department of Pathology, Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland. aklein1@jhmi.edu. ·Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev · Pubmed #27197284.

ABSTRACT: Individuals from pancreatic cancer families are at increased risk, not only of pancreatic cancer, but also of melanoma, breast, ovarian, and colon cancers. While some of the increased risk may be due to mutations in high-penetrance genes (i.e., BRCA2, PALB2, ATM, p16/CDKN2A or DNA mismatch repair genes), common genetic variants may also be involved. In a high-risk population of cases with either a family history of pancreatic cancer or early-onset pancreatic cancer (diagnosis before the age of 50 years), we examined the role of genetic variants previously associated with risk of pancreatic, breast, ovarian, or prostate cancer. We genotyped 985 cases (79 early-onset cases, 906 cases with a family history of pancreatic cancer) and 877 controls for 215,389 SNPs using the iSelect Collaborative Oncological Gene-Environment Study (iCOGS) array with custom content. Logistic regression was performed using a log-linear additive model. We replicated several previously reported pancreatic cancer susceptibility loci, including recently identified variants on 2p13.3 and 7p13 (2p13.3, rs1486134: OR = 1.36; 95% CI, 1.13-1.63; P = 9.29 × 10(-4); 7p13, rs17688601: OR = 0.76; 95% CI, 0.63-0.93; P = 6.59 × 10(-3)). For the replicated loci, the magnitude of association observed in these high-risk patients was similar to that observed in studies of unselected patients. In addition to the established pancreatic cancer loci, we also found suggestive evidence of association (P < 5 × 10(-5)) to pancreatic cancer for SNPs at HDAC9 (7p21.1) and COL6A2 (21q22.3). Even in high-risk populations, common variants influence pancreatic cancer susceptibility. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 25(7); 1185-91. ©2016 AACR.

2 Article Whole Genome Sequencing Defines the Genetic Heterogeneity of Familial Pancreatic Cancer. 2016

Roberts, Nicholas J / Norris, Alexis L / Petersen, Gloria M / Bondy, Melissa L / Brand, Randall / Gallinger, Steven / Kurtz, Robert C / Olson, Sara H / Rustgi, Anil K / Schwartz, Ann G / Stoffel, Elena / Syngal, Sapna / Zogopoulos, George / Ali, Syed Z / Axilbund, Jennifer / Chaffee, Kari G / Chen, Yun-Ching / Cote, Michele L / Childs, Erica J / Douville, Christopher / Goes, Fernando S / Herman, Joseph M / Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine / Kramer, Melissa / Makohon-Moore, Alvin / McCombie, Richard W / McMahon, K Wyatt / Niknafs, Noushin / Parla, Jennifer / Pirooznia, Mehdi / Potash, James B / Rhim, Andrew D / Smith, Alyssa L / Wang, Yuxuan / Wolfgang, Christopher L / Wood, Laura D / Zandi, Peter P / Goggins, Michael / Karchin, Rachel / Eshleman, James R / Papadopoulos, Nickolas / Kinzler, Kenneth W / Vogelstein, Bert / Hruban, Ralph H / Klein, Alison P. ·Department of Pathology, Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, Maryland. Ludwig Center and the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, Maryland. vogelbe@jhmi.edu nrobert8@jhmi.edu kinzlke@jhmi.edu rhruban@jhmi.edu aklein1@jhmi.edu. · Department of Pathology, Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, Maryland. · Department of Health Sciences Research, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota. · Dan L. Duncan Cancer Center, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas. · Department of Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. · Samuel Lunenfeld Research Institute, Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York. · Division of Gastroenterology, Departments of Medicine and Genetics, Pancreatic Cancer Translational Center of Excellence, Abramson Cancer Center, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. · Karmanos Cancer Institute, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, Michigan. · Department of Internal Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan. · Population Sciences Division, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, and Gastroenterology Division, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts. · The Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. Goodman Cancer Research Centre, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. · Department of Biomedical Engineering, Institute for Computational Medicine, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland. · Department of Epidemiology, Bloomberg School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland. · Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, Maryland. · Department of Oncology, Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, Maryland. · Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York. · Stanley Institute for Cognitive Genomics, Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, Cold Spring Harbor, New York. · Ludwig Center and the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, Maryland. · Stanley Institute for Cognitive Genomics, Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, Cold Spring Harbor, New York. inGenious Targeting Laboratory, Ronkonkoma, New York. · Department of Psychiatry, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa. · Division of Gastroenterology, Departments of Medicine and Genetics, Pancreatic Cancer Translational Center of Excellence, Abramson Cancer Center, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Department of Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan. · Department of Surgery, Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, Maryland. · Department of Pathology, Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, Maryland. Department of Oncology, Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, Maryland. · Department of Pathology, Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, Maryland. Department of Oncology, Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, Maryland. Department of Medicine, Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, Maryland. · Ludwig Center and the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, Maryland. vogelbe@jhmi.edu nrobert8@jhmi.edu kinzlke@jhmi.edu rhruban@jhmi.edu aklein1@jhmi.edu. · Department of Pathology, Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, Maryland. Department of Oncology, Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, Maryland. vogelbe@jhmi.edu nrobert8@jhmi.edu kinzlke@jhmi.edu rhruban@jhmi.edu aklein1@jhmi.edu. · Department of Pathology, Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, Maryland. Department of Epidemiology, Bloomberg School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland. Department of Oncology, Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, Maryland. vogelbe@jhmi.edu nrobert8@jhmi.edu kinzlke@jhmi.edu rhruban@jhmi.edu aklein1@jhmi.edu. ·Cancer Discov · Pubmed #26658419.

ABSTRACT: SIGNIFICANCE: The genetic basis of disease susceptibility in the majority of patients with familial pancreatic cancer is unknown. We whole genome sequenced 638 patients with familial pancreatic cancer and demonstrate that the genetic underpinning of inherited pancreatic cancer is highly heterogeneous. This has significant implications for the management of patients with familial pancreatic cancer.

3 Article Identification of germline genomic copy number variation in familial pancreatic cancer. 2012

Al-Sukhni, Wigdan / Joe, Sarah / Lionel, Anath C / Zwingerman, Nora / Zogopoulos, George / Marshall, Christian R / Borgida, Ayelet / Holter, Spring / Gropper, Aaron / Moore, Sara / Bondy, Melissa / Klein, Alison P / Petersen, Gloria M / Rabe, Kari G / Schwartz, Ann G / Syngal, Sapna / Scherer, Stephen W / Gallinger, Steven. ·Samuel Lunenfeld Research Institute, Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, ON, Canada. wigdan.al.sukhni@utoronto.ca ·Hum Genet · Pubmed #22665139.

ABSTRACT: Adenocarcinoma of the pancreas is a significant cause of cancer mortality, and up to 10 % of cases appear to be familial. Heritable genomic copy number variants (CNVs) can modulate gene expression and predispose to disease. Here, we identify candidate predisposition genes for familial pancreatic cancer (FPC) by analyzing germline losses or gains present in one or more high-risk patients and absent in a large control group. A total of 120 FPC cases and 1,194 controls were genotyped on the Affymetrix 500K array, and 36 cases and 2,357 controls were genotyped on the Affymetrix 6.0 array. Detection of CNVs was performed by multiple computational algorithms and partially validated by quantitative PCR. We found no significant difference in the germline CNV profiles of cases and controls. A total of 93 non-redundant FPC-specific CNVs (53 losses and 40 gains) were identified in 50 cases, each CNV present in a single individual. FPC-specific CNVs overlapped the coding region of 88 RefSeq genes. Several of these genes have been reported to be differentially expressed and/or affected by copy number alterations in pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Further investigation in high-risk subjects may elucidate the role of one or more of these genes in genetic predisposition to pancreatic cancer.

4 Article ATM mutations in patients with hereditary pancreatic cancer. 2012

Roberts, Nicholas J / Jiao, Yuchen / Yu, Jun / Kopelovich, Levy / Petersen, Gloria M / Bondy, Melissa L / Gallinger, Steven / Schwartz, Ann G / Syngal, Sapna / Cote, Michele L / Axilbund, Jennifer / Schulick, Richard / Ali, Syed Z / Eshleman, James R / Velculescu, Victor E / Goggins, Michael / Vogelstein, Bert / Papadopoulos, Nickolas / Hruban, Ralph H / Kinzler, Kenneth W / Klein, Alison P. ·Ludwig Center for Cancer Genetics and Howard Hughes Medical Institutions, Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. ·Cancer Discov · Pubmed #22585167.

ABSTRACT: SIGNIFICANCE: The genes responsible for the majority of cases of familial pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma are unknown. We here identify ATM as a predisposition gene for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. Our results have important implications for the management of patients in affected families and illustrate the power of genome-wide sequencing to identify the basis of familial cancer syndromes.