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Pancreatic Neoplasms: HELP
Articles by Maarten F. Bijlsma
Based on 16 articles published since 2009
(Why 16 articles?)
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Between 2009 and 2019, M. Bijlsma wrote the following 16 articles about Pancreatic Neoplasms.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Review The hepatic pre-metastatic niche in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. 2018

Houg, Demi S / Bijlsma, Maarten F. ·Laboratory for Experimental Oncology and Radiobiology, Center of Experimental and Molecular Medicine, Cancer Center Amsterdam and Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. · Laboratory for Experimental Oncology and Radiobiology, Center of Experimental and Molecular Medicine, Cancer Center Amsterdam and Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. m.f.bijlsma@amc.uva.nl. · Oncode Institute, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. m.f.bijlsma@amc.uva.nl. ·Mol Cancer · Pubmed #29903049.

ABSTRACT: Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) remains one of the most aggressive malignancies to date, largely because it is associated with high metastatic risk. Pancreatic tumors have a characteristic tendency to metastasize preferentially to the liver. Over the past two decades, it has become evident that the otherwise hostile milieu of the liver is selectively preconditioned at an early stage to render it more conducive to the engraftment and growth of disseminated cancer cells, a concept defined as pre-metastatic niche (PMN) formation. Pancreatic cancer cells exploit components of the tumor microenvironment to facilitate their migration out of the primary tumor, which often involves conversion of pancreatic cancer cells from an epithelial to a mesenchymal phenotype via the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition. Pancreatic stellate cells and matrix stiffness have been put forward as major drivers of invasiveness in PDAC. Even before the onset of pancreatic cancer cell dissemination, soluble factors and extracellular vesicles secreted by the primary tumor, and possibly even premalignant lesions, help shape a supportive niche in the liver by providing vascular docking sites for circulating tumor cells, enhancing vascular permeability, remodeling the extracellular matrix and recruiting immunosuppressive inflammatory cells. Emerging evidence suggests that some of these tumor-derived factors may represent powerful diagnostic or prognostic biomarkers. Though our understanding of the mechanisms driving PMN formation in PDAC has expanded considerably, many outstanding questions and challenges remain. Further studies dissecting the molecular and cellular events involved in hepatic PMN formation in PDAC will likely improve diagnosis and open new avenues from a therapeutic standpoint.

2 Review Clinical value of ctDNA in upper-GI cancers: A systematic review and meta-analysis. 2017

Creemers, A / Krausz, S / Strijker, M / van der Wel, M J / Soer, E C / Reinten, R J / Besselink, M G / Wilmink, J W / van de Vijver, M J / van Noesel, C J M / Verheij, J / Meijer, S L / Dijk, F / Bijlsma, M F / van Oijen, M G H / van Laarhoven, H W M. ·Cancer Center Amsterdam, Center for Experimental and Molecular Medicine (CEMM)/Laboratory for Experimental Oncology and Radiobiology (LEXOR), AMC, The Netherlands; Cancer Center Amsterdam, Department of Medical Oncology, AMC, The Netherlands. Electronic address: a.creemers@amc.uva.nl. · Cancer Center Amsterdam, Department of Medical Oncology, AMC, The Netherlands. · Department of Surgery, AMC, The Netherlands. · Department of Pathology, AMC, The Netherlands. · Cancer Center Amsterdam, Center for Experimental and Molecular Medicine (CEMM)/Laboratory for Experimental Oncology and Radiobiology (LEXOR), AMC, The Netherlands. · Cancer Center Amsterdam, Center for Experimental and Molecular Medicine (CEMM)/Laboratory for Experimental Oncology and Radiobiology (LEXOR), AMC, The Netherlands; Cancer Center Amsterdam, Department of Medical Oncology, AMC, The Netherlands. ·Biochim Biophys Acta Rev Cancer · Pubmed #28801248.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The recent expanding technical possibilities to detect tumor derived mutations in blood, so-called circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA), has rapidly increased the interest in liquid biopsies. This review and meta-analysis explores the clinical value of ctDNA in malignancies of the upper gastro-intestinal tract. METHODS: PubMed, Cochrane and Embase databases were searched to identify studies reporting the diagnostic, prognostic or predictive value of ctDNA in patients with esophageal, gastric and pancreatic cancer, until January 2017. The diagnostic accuracy and, using random-effect pair-wise meta-analyses, the prognostic value of ctDNA was assessed. RESULTS: A total of 34 studies met the inclusion criteria. For esophageal and gastric cancer, amplification of oncogenes in blood, such as HER2 and MYC, can be relevant for diagnostic purposes, and to predict treatment response in certain patient subpopulations. Given the limited number of studies assessing the role of ctDNA in esophageal and gastric cancer, the meta-analysis estimated the diagnostic accuracy and predictive value of ctDNA in pancreatic cancer only (n=10). The pooled sensitivity and specificity of ctDNA as a diagnostic tool in pancreatic cancer were 28% and 95%, respectively. Patients with pancreatic cancer and detectable ctDNA demonstrated a worse overall survival compared to patients with undetectable ctDNA (HR 1.92, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.15-3.22, p=0.01). CONCLUSION: The presence of ctDNA is significantly associated with a poor prognosis in patients with pancreatic cancer. The use of ctDNA in clinical practice is promising, although standardization of sequencing techniques and further development of high-sensitive detection methods is needed.

3 Review Key biological processes driving metastatic spread of pancreatic cancer as identified by multi-omics studies. 2017

Le Large, T Y S / Bijlsma, M F / Kazemier, G / van Laarhoven, H W M / Giovannetti, E / Jimenez, C R. ·Department of Medical Oncology, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands; Laboratory of Experimental Oncology and Radiobiology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands; Department of Surgery, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Laboratory of Experimental Oncology and Radiobiology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Department of Surgery, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Department of Medical Oncology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Department of Medical Oncology, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands; Cancer Pharmacology Lab, AIRC Start Up Unit, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy; CNR-Nano, Institute of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Pisa, Italy. · Department of Medical Oncology, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. Electronic address: c.jimenez@vumc.nl. ·Semin Cancer Biol · Pubmed #28366542.

ABSTRACT: Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is an extremely aggressive malignancy, characterized by a high metastatic burden, already at the time of diagnosis. The metastatic potential of PDAC is one of the main reasons for the poor outcome next to lack of significant improvement in effective treatments in the last decade. Key mutated driver genes, such as activating KRAS mutations, are concordantly expressed in primary and metastatic tumors. However, the biology behind the metastatic potential of PDAC is not fully understood. Recently, large-scale omic approaches have revealed new mechanisms by which PDAC cells gain their metastatic potency. In particular, genomic studies have shown that multiple heterogeneous subclones reside in the primary tumor with different metastatic potential. The development of metastases may be correlated to a more mesenchymal transcriptomic subtype. However, for cancer cells to survive in a distant organ, metastatic sites need to be modulated into pre-metastatic niches. Proteomic studies identified the influence of exosomes on the Kuppfer cells in the liver, which could function to prepare this tissue for metastatic colonization. Phosphoproteomics adds an extra layer to the established omic techniques by unravelling key functional signaling. Future studies integrating results from these large-scale omic approaches will hopefully improve PDAC prognosis through identification of new therapeutic targets and patient selection tools. In this article, we will review the current knowledge on the biology of PDAC metastasis unravelled by large scale multi-omic approaches.

4 Review Bioinformatic analysis reveals pancreatic cancer molecular subtypes specific to the tumor and the microenvironment. 2016

Le Large, Tessa Y S / Mato Prado, Mireia / Krell, Jonathan / Bijlsma, Maarten F / Meijer, Laura L / Kazemier, Geert / Frampton, Adam E / Giovannetti, Elisa. ·a Department of Surgery , VU University Medical Center , Amsterdam , The Netherlands. · b Department of Medical Oncology , VU University Medical Center , Amsterdam , The Netherlands. · c Department of Medical Oncology , Academic Medical Center , Amsterdam , The Netherlands. · d Division of Cancer, Department of Surgery & Cancer, Imperial Centre for Translational and Experimental Medicine (ICTEM) , Imperial College , London , UK. · e HPB Surgical Unit, Department of Surgery & Cancer , Imperial College , London , UK. · f Cancer Pharmacology Lab, AIRC Start-Up Unit , University of Pisa , Pisa , Italy. · g CNR-Nano , Institute of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology , Pisa , Italy. ·Expert Rev Mol Diagn · Pubmed #27118062.

ABSTRACT: Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is a lethal disease characterized by a dense desmoplastic reaction surrounding malignant epithelial cells. Interaction between the epithelial and stromal compartments is suggested to enhance its aggressive nature. Indeed, therapies targeting the stroma, as well as the tumor cells, may improve survival outcomes for patients. The evaluated study by Moffitt et al. used bioinformatic techniques to separate gene expression patterns of normal tissues from PDAC and stroma in a large cohort of samples. The researchers identified two different subtypes of PDAC ('classical' and 'basal-like') and surrounding stroma ('normal' and 'activated'). The basal-like subtype was associated with worse prognosis and a trend towards better response to adjuvant therapy. Hopefully, the molecular stratification of PDAC will potentially allow more personalized treatment strategies and guide clinical decision making.

5 Review The conflicting roles of tumor stroma in pancreatic cancer and their contribution to the failure of clinical trials: a systematic review and critical appraisal. 2015

Bijlsma, Maarten F / van Laarhoven, Hanneke W M. ·Laboratory for Experimental Oncology and Radiobiology, Center for Experimental Molecular Medicine, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Meibergdreef 9, 1105AZ, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. ·Cancer Metastasis Rev · Pubmed #25566685.

ABSTRACT: A nearly universal feature of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is an extensive presence of activated stroma. This stroma is thought to aid in various tumor-promoting processes and hampers response to therapy. Here, we aim to evaluate the evidence that supports this role of the stroma in PDAC with functional experiments in relevant models, discuss the clinical trials that have aimed to target the stroma in this disease, and examine recent work that explains why these clinical trials based on stroma-targeting strategies have thus far not achieved the expected success. We systematically searched PubMed through August 2014 with no restrictions to identify published peer-reviewed research articles assessing the effect of targeting the stroma on tumor growth or metastases in preclinical animal models. Five hundred and thirty articles were extracted of which 31 were included in the analysis. Unfortunately, due to the large variety in models and outcome measures, we could not perform a meta-analysis of our data. We find that despite an abundance of positive outcomes reported in previous studies on stroma targeting, a strong discrepancy exists with the outcomes of clinical trials and the more recent preclinical work that is in line with these trials. We explain the incongruities by the duration of stroma targeting and propose that chronic stroma targeting treatment is possibly detrimental in the treatment of this disease.

6 Clinical Trial Assessment of the stromal contribution to Sonic Hedgehog-dependent pancreatic adenocarcinoma. 2013

Damhofer, Helene / Medema, Jan Paul / Veenstra, Veronique L / Badea, Liviu / Popescu, Irinel / Roelink, Henk / Bijlsma, Maarten F. ·Laboratory for Experimental Oncology and Radiobiology, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Meibergdreef 9, 1105AZ Amsterdam, The Netherlands. Electronic address: h.damhofer@amc.uva.nl. ·Mol Oncol · Pubmed #23998958.

ABSTRACT: Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) remains one of the most lethal malignancies. It is typically detected at an advanced stage, at which the therapeutic options are very limited. One remarkable feature of PDAC that contributes to its resilience to treatment is the extreme stromal activation seen in these tumors. Often, the vast majority of tumor bulk consists of non-tumor cells that together provide a tumor-promoting environment. One of the signals that maintains and activates the stroma is the developmental protein Sonic Hedgehog (SHH). As the disease progresses, tumor cells produce increasing amounts of SHH, which activates the surrounding stroma to aid in tumor progression. To better understand this response and identify targets for inhibition, we aimed to elucidate the proteins that mediate the SHH-driven stromal response in PDAC. For this a novel mixed-species coculture model was set up in which the cancer cells are human, and the stroma is modeled by mouse fibroblasts. In conjunction with next-generation sequencing we were able to use the sequence difference between these species to genetically distinguish between the epithelial and stromal responses to SHH. The stromal SHH-dependent genes from this analysis were validated and their relevance for human disease was subsequently determined in two independent patient cohorts. In non-microdissected tissue from PDAC patients, in which a large amount of stroma is present, the targets were confirmed to associate with tumor stroma versus normal pancreatic tissue. Patient survival analysis and immunohistochemistry identified CDA, EDIL3, ITGB4, PLAUR and SPOCK1 as SHH-dependent stromal factors that are associated with poor prognosis in PDAC patients. Summarizing, the presented data provide insight into the role of the activated stroma in PDAC, and how SHH acts to mediate this response. In addition, the study has yielded several candidates that are interesting therapeutic targets for a disease for which treatment options are still inadequate.

7 Article Genetic determinants of telomere length and risk of pancreatic cancer: A PANDoRA study. 2019

Campa, Daniele / Matarazzi, Martina / Greenhalf, William / Bijlsma, Maarten / Saum, Kai-Uwe / Pasquali, Claudio / van Laarhoven, Hanneke / Szentesi, Andrea / Federici, Francesca / Vodicka, Pavel / Funel, Niccola / Pezzilli, Raffaele / Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas / Vodickova, Ludmila / Basso, Daniela / Obazee, Ofure / Hackert, Thilo / Soucek, Pavel / Cuk, Katarina / Kaiser, Jörg / Sperti, Cosimo / Lovecek, Martin / Capurso, Gabriele / Mohelnikova-Duchonova, Beatrice / Khaw, Kay-Tee / König, Anna-Katharina / Kupcinskas, Juozas / Kaaks, Rudolf / Bambi, Franco / Archibugi, Livia / Mambrini, Andrea / Cavestro, Giulia Martina / Landi, Stefano / Hegyi, Péter / Izbicki, Jakob R / Gioffreda, Domenica / Zambon, Carlo Federico / Tavano, Francesca / Talar-Wojnarowska, Renata / Jamroziak, Krzysztof / Key, Timothy J / Fave, Gianfranco Delle / Strobel, Oliver / Jonaitis, Laimas / Andriulli, Angelo / Lawlor, Rita T / Pirozzi, Felice / Katzke, Verena / Valsuani, Chiara / Vashist, Yogesh K / Brenner, Hermann / Canzian, Federico. ·Department of Biology, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. · Genomic Epidemiology Group, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Institute for Health Research Liverpool Pancreas Biomedical Research Unit, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, United Kingdom. · Medical Oncology, Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Division of Clinical Epidemiology and Aging Research, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Pancreatic and Digestive Endocrine Surgery - Department of Surgery, Oncology and Gastroenterology (DiSCOG), University of Padova, Padova, Italy. · Institute for Translational Medicine, University of Pécs, Pécs, Hungary. · First Department of Medicine, University of Szeged, Szeged, Hungary. · Oncological Department, Azienda USL Toscana Nord Ovest, Oncological Unit of Massa Carrara, Carrara, Italy. · Department of Molecular Biology of Cancer, Institute of Experimental Medicine, Academy of Science of Czech Republic, Prague, Czech Republic. · Institute of Biology and Medical Genetics, 1st Medical Faculty, Charles University, Prague, Czech Republic. · Biomedical Center, Faculty of Medicine in Pilsen, Charles University, Pilsen, Czech Republic. · Department of Surgery, Unit of Experimental Surgical Pathology, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. · Pancreas Unit, Department of Digestive System, Sant'Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, Bologna, Italy. · Department for Determinants of Chronic Diseases (DCD), National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven, The Netherlands. · Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University Medical Centre, Utrecht, The Netherlands. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, The School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom. · Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. · Department of Laboratory Medicine, University-Hospital of Padova, Padua, Italy. · Department of General, Visceral and Transplantation Surgery, University Hospital Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany. · Third Surgical Clinic - Department of Surgery, Oncology and Gastroenterology (DiSCOG), University of Padova, Padova, Italy. · Department of Surgery I, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, Palacky University Olomouc and University Hospital Olomouc, Olomouc, Czech Republic. · Digestive and Liver Disease Unit, S. Andrea Hospital, 'Sapienza' University, Rome, Italy. · PancreatoBiliary Endoscopy and EUS Division, Pancreas Translational and Clinical Research Center, IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Vita Salute San Raffaele University, Milan, Italy. · Department of Oncology, Institute of Molecular and Translational Medicine, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, Palacky University, Olomouc, Czech Republic. · University of Cambridge School of Clinical Medicine Clinical Gerontology Unit, Addenbrooke's Hospital, Cambridge, United Kingdom. · Department of Gastroenterology, Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, Kaunas, Lithuania. · Division of Cancer Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Blood Transfusion Service, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria Meyer, Florence, Italy. · Gastroenterology and Gastrointestinal Endoscopy Unit, Vita-Salute San Raffaele University, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy. · MTA-SZTE Momentum Translational Gastroenterology Research Group, Szeged, Hungary. · Department of General, Visceral and Thoracic Surgery, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany. · Division of Gastroenterology and Molecular Biology Lab, IRCCS Ospedale Casa Sollievo Sofferenza, San Giovanni Rotondo, Italy. · Department of Digestive Tract Diseases, Medical University of Lodz, Lodz, Poland. · Institute of Hematology and Transfusion Medicine, Warsaw, Poland. · Cancer Epidemiology Unit, Nuffield Department of Population Health, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom. · ARC-NET, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Division of Abdominal Surgery, IRCCS Ospedale Casa Sollievo Sofferenza, San Giovanni Rotondo, Italy. · Division of Preventive Oncology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ) and National Center for Tumor Diseases (NCT), Heidelberg, Germany. · German Cancer Consortium (DKTK), German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. ·Int J Cancer · Pubmed #30325019.

ABSTRACT: Telomere deregulation is a hallmark of cancer. Telomere length measured in lymphocytes (LTL) has been shown to be a risk marker for several cancers. For pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) consensus is lacking whether risk is associated with long or short telomeres. Mendelian randomization approaches have shown that a score built from SNPs associated with LTL could be used as a robust risk marker. We explored this approach in a large scale study within the PANcreatic Disease ReseArch (PANDoRA) consortium. We analyzed 10 SNPs (ZNF676-rs409627, TERT-rs2736100, CTC1-rs3027234, DHX35-rs6028466, PXK-rs6772228, NAF1-rs7675998, ZNF208-rs8105767, OBFC1-rs9420907, ACYP2-rs11125529 and TERC-rs10936599) alone and combined in a LTL genetic score ("teloscore", which explains 2.2% of the telomere variability) in relation to PDAC risk in 2,374 cases and 4,326 controls. We identified several associations with PDAC risk, among which the strongest were with the TERT-rs2736100 SNP (OR = 1.54; 95%CI 1.35-1.76; p = 1.54 × 10

8 Article The Dutch Pancreas Biobank Within the Parelsnoer Institute: A Nationwide Biobank of Pancreatic and Periampullary Diseases. 2018

Strijker, Marin / Gerritsen, Arja / van Hilst, Jony / Bijlsma, Maarten F / Bonsing, Bert A / Brosens, Lodewijk A / Bruno, Marco J / van Dam, Ronald M / Dijk, Frederike / van Eijck, Casper H / Farina Sarasqueta, Arantza / Fockens, Paul / Gerhards, Michael F / Groot Koerkamp, Bas / van der Harst, Erwin / de Hingh, Ignace H / van Hooft, Jeanin E / Huysentruyt, Clément J / Kazemier, Geert / Klaase, Joost M / van Laarhoven, Cornelis J / van Laarhoven, Hanneke W / Liem, Mike S / de Meijer, Vincent E / van Rijssen, L Bengt / van Santvoort, Hjalmar C / Suker, Mustafa / Verhagen, Judith H / Verheij, Joanne / Verspaget, Hein W / Wennink, Roos A / Wilmink, Johanna W / Molenaar, I Quintus / Boermeester, Marja A / Busch, Olivier R / Besselink, Marc G / Anonymous5040939. · ·Pancreas · Pubmed #29521943.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: Large biobanks with uniform collection of biomaterials and associated clinical data are essential for translational research. The Netherlands has traditionally been well organized in multicenter clinical research on pancreatic diseases, including the nationwide multidisciplinary Dutch Pancreatic Cancer Group and Dutch Pancreatitis Study Group. To enable high-quality translational research on pancreatic and periampullary diseases, these groups established the Dutch Pancreas Biobank. METHODS: The Dutch Pancreas Biobank is part of the Parelsnoer Institute and involves all 8 Dutch university medical centers and 5 nonacademic hospitals. Adult patients undergoing pancreatic surgery (all indications) are eligible for inclusion. Preoperative blood samples, tumor tissue from resected specimens, pancreatic cyst fluid, and follow-up blood samples are collected. Clinical parameters are collected in conjunction with the mandatory Dutch Pancreatic Cancer Audit. RESULTS: Between January 2015 and May 2017, 488 patients were included in the first 5 participating centers: 4 university medical centers and 1 nonacademic hospital. Over 2500 samples were collected: 1308 preoperative blood samples, 864 tissue samples, and 366 follow-up blood samples. CONCLUSIONS: Prospective collection of biomaterials and associated clinical data has started in the Dutch Pancreas Biobank. Subsequent translational research will aim to improve treatment decisions based on disease characteristics.

9 Article The clinical benefit of hyperthermia in pancreatic cancer: a systematic review. 2018

van der Horst, Astrid / Versteijne, Eva / Besselink, Marc G H / Daams, Joost G / Bulle, Esther B / Bijlsma, Maarten F / Wilmink, Johanna W / van Delden, Otto M / van Hooft, Jeanin E / Franken, Nicolaas A P / van Laarhoven, Hanneke W M / Crezee, Johannes / van Tienhoven, Geertjan. ·a Department of Radiation Oncology and Hyperthermia , Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam , Amsterdam , The Netherlands. · b Department of Surgery , Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam , Amsterdam , The Netherlands. · c Medical Library , Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam , Amsterdam , The Netherlands. · d Laboratory for Experimental Oncology and Radiobiology (LEXOR) , Center for Experimental and Molecular Medicine (CEMM), Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam , Amsterdam , The Netherlands. · e Department of Medical Oncology , Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam , Amsterdam , The Netherlands. · f Department of Radiology , Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam , Amsterdam , The Netherlands. · g Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology , Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam , Amsterdam , The Netherlands. ·Int J Hyperthermia · Pubmed #29168401.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: In pancreatic cancer, which is therapy resistant due to its hypoxic microenvironment, hyperthermia may enhance the effect of radio(chemo)therapy. The aim of this systematic review is to investigate the validity of the hypothesis that hyperthermia added to radiotherapy and/or chemotherapy improves treatment outcome for pancreatic cancer patients. METHODS AND MATERIALS: We searched MEDLINE and Embase, supplemented by handsearching, for clinical studies involving hyperthermia in pancreatic cancer patients. The quality of studies was evaluated using the Oxford Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine levels of evidence. Primary outcome was treatment efficacy; we calculated overall response rate and the weighted estimate of the population median overall survival (m RESULTS: Overall, 14 studies were included, with 395 patients with locally advanced and/or metastatic pancreatic cancer of whom 248 received hyperthermia. Patients were treated with regional (n = 189), intraoperative (n = 39) or whole-body hyperthermia (n = 20), combined with chemotherapy, radiotherapy or both. Quality of the studies was low, with level of evidence 3 (five studies) and 4. The six studies including a control group showed a longer m CONCLUSIONS: Hyperthermia, when added to chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy, may positively affect treatment outcome for patients with pancreatic cancer. However, the quality of the reviewed studies was limited and future randomised controlled trials are needed to establish efficacy.

10 Article Stromal SPOCK1 supports invasive pancreatic cancer growth. 2017

Veenstra, Veronique L / Damhofer, Helene / Waasdorp, Cynthia / Steins, Anne / Kocher, Hemant M / Medema, Jan P / van Laarhoven, Hanneke W / Bijlsma, Maarten F. ·Laboratory for Experimental Oncology and Radiobiology, Center for Experimental and Molecular Medicine, Academic Medical Center and Cancer Center Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Centre for Tumour Biology, Barts Cancer Institute, Queen Mary University of London, UK. · Department of Medical Oncology, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, the Netherlands. ·Mol Oncol · Pubmed #28486750.

ABSTRACT: Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is marked by an abundant stromal deposition. This stroma is suspected to harbor both tumor-promoting and tumor-suppressing properties. This is underscored by the disappointing results of stroma targeting in clinical studies. Given the complexity of tumor-stroma interaction in PDAC, there is a need to identify the stromal proteins that are predominantly tumor-promoting. One possible candidate is SPOCK1 that we previously identified in a screening effort in PDAC. We extensively mined PDAC gene expression datasets, and used species-specific transcript analysis in mixed-species models for PDAC to study the patterns and driver mechanisms of SPOCK1 expression in PDAC. Advanced organotypic coculture models with primary patient-derived tumor cells were used to further characterize the function of this protein. We found SPOCK1 expression to be predominantly stromal. Expression of SPOCK1 was associated with poor disease outcome. Coculture and ligand stimulation experiments revealed that SPOCK1 is expressed in response to tumor cell-derived transforming growth factor-beta. Functional assessment in cocultures demonstrated that SPOCK1 strongly affects the composition of the extracellular collagen matrix and by doing so, enables invasive tumor cell growth in PDAC. By defining the expression pattern and functional properties of SPOCK1 in pancreatic cancer, we have identified a stromal mediator of extracellular matrix remodeling that indirectly affects the aggressive behavior of PDAC cells. The recognition that stromal proteins actively contribute to the protumorigenic remodeling of the tumor microenvironment should aid the design of future clinical studies to target specific stromal targets.

11 Article Three new pancreatic cancer susceptibility signals identified on chromosomes 1q32.1, 5p15.33 and 8q24.21. 2016

Zhang, Mingfeng / Wang, Zhaoming / Obazee, Ofure / Jia, Jinping / Childs, Erica J / Hoskins, Jason / Figlioli, Gisella / Mocci, Evelina / Collins, Irene / Chung, Charles C / Hautman, Christopher / Arslan, Alan A / Beane-Freeman, Laura / Bracci, Paige M / Buring, Julie / Duell, Eric J / Gallinger, Steven / Giles, Graham G / Goodman, Gary E / Goodman, Phyllis J / Kamineni, Aruna / Kolonel, Laurence N / Kulke, Matthew H / Malats, Núria / Olson, Sara H / Sesso, Howard D / Visvanathan, Kala / White, Emily / Zheng, Wei / Abnet, Christian C / Albanes, Demetrius / Andreotti, Gabriella / Brais, Lauren / Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas / Basso, Daniela / Berndt, Sonja I / Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine / Bijlsma, Maarten F / Brenner, Hermann / Burdette, Laurie / Campa, Daniele / Caporaso, Neil E / Capurso, Gabriele / Cavestro, Giulia Martina / Cotterchio, Michelle / Costello, Eithne / Elena, Joanne / Boggi, Ugo / Gaziano, J Michael / Gazouli, Maria / Giovannucci, Edward L / Goggins, Michael / Gross, Myron / Haiman, Christopher A / Hassan, Manal / Helzlsouer, Kathy J / Hu, Nan / Hunter, David J / Iskierka-Jazdzewska, Elzbieta / Jenab, Mazda / Kaaks, Rudolf / Key, Timothy J / Khaw, Kay-Tee / Klein, Eric A / Kogevinas, Manolis / Krogh, Vittorio / Kupcinskas, Juozas / Kurtz, Robert C / Landi, Maria T / Landi, Stefano / Le Marchand, Loic / Mambrini, Andrea / Mannisto, Satu / Milne, Roger L / Neale, Rachel E / Oberg, Ann L / Panico, Salvatore / Patel, Alpa V / Peeters, Petra H M / Peters, Ulrike / Pezzilli, Raffaele / Porta, Miquel / Purdue, Mark / Quiros, J Ramón / Riboli, Elio / Rothman, Nathaniel / Scarpa, Aldo / Scelo, Ghislaine / Shu, Xiao-Ou / Silverman, Debra T / Soucek, Pavel / Strobel, Oliver / Sund, Malin / Małecka-Panas, Ewa / Taylor, Philip R / Tavano, Francesca / Travis, Ruth C / Thornquist, Mark / Tjønneland, Anne / Tobias, Geoffrey S / Trichopoulos, Dimitrios / Vashist, Yogesh / Vodicka, Pavel / Wactawski-Wende, Jean / Wentzensen, Nicolas / Yu, Herbert / Yu, Kai / Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne / Kooperberg, Charles / Risch, Harvey A / Jacobs, Eric J / Li, Donghui / Fuchs, Charles / Hoover, Robert / Hartge, Patricia / Chanock, Stephen J / Petersen, Gloria M / Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael S / Wolpin, Brian M / Kraft, Peter / Klein, Alison P / Canzian, Federico / Amundadottir, Laufey T. ·Laboratory of Translational Genomics, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA. · Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA. · Cancer Genomics Research Laboratory, National Cancer Institute, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, Leidos Biomedical Research, Inc., Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research, Frederick, Maryland, USA. · Department of Computational Biology, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee, USA. · Genomic Epidemiology Group, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Department of Oncology, the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. · Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York, USA. · Department of Environmental Medicine, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York, USA. · New York University Cancer Institute, New York, New York, USA,. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California, USA. · Division of Preventive Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Division of Aging, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Unit of Nutrition and Cancer, Cancer Epidemiology Research Program, Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute (IDIBELL), Catalan Institute of Oncology (ICO), Barcelona, Spain. · Lunenfeld Tanenbaum Research Institute, Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Cancer Epidemiology Centre, Cancer Council Victoria, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. · Centre for Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Melbourne School of Population and Global Health, The University of Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. · Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, Monash University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. · Division of Public Health Sciences, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, Washington, USA. · Southwest Oncology Group Statistical Center, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, Washington, USA. · Group Health Research Institute, Seattle, Washington, USA,. · Cancer Epidemiology Program, University of Hawaii Cancer Center, Honolulu, Hawaii, USA. · Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Genetic and Molecular Epidemiology Group, CNIO-Spanish National Cancer Research Centre, Madrid, Spain. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York, USA. · Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. · Department of Epidemiology, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USA. · Division of Epidemiology, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee, USA. · Vanderbilt Epidemiology Center, Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee, USA. · Department for Determinants of Chronic Diseases (DCD), National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven, The Netherlands. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom. · Department of Social & Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. · Department of Laboratory Medicine, University Hospital of Padova, Padua, Italy,. · Inserm, Centre for Research in Epidemiology and Population Health (CESP), U1018, Nutrition, Hormones and Women's Health Team, F-94805, Villejuif, France. · University Paris Sud, UMRS 1018, F-94805, Villejuif, France. · IGR, F-94805, Villejuif, France. · Laboratory for Experimental Oncology and Radiobiology, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Division of Clinical Epidemiology and Aging Research, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Division of Preventive Oncology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ) and National Center for Tumor Diseases (NCT), Heidelberg, Germany. · German Cancer Consortium (DKTK), German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Department of Biology, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. · Digestive and Liver Disease Unit, 'Sapienza' University of Rome, Rome, Italy. · Gastroenterology and Gastrointestinal Endoscopy Unit, Vita-Salute San Raffaele University, IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy. · Prevention and Cancer Control, Cancer Care Ontario, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · National Institute for Health Research Liverpool Pancreas Biomedical Research Unit, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, United Kingdom. · Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA. · Department of Surgery, Unit of Experimental Surgical Pathology, University Hospital of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. · Massachusetts Veteran's Epidemiology, Research, and Information Center, Geriatric Research Education and Clinical Center, Veterans Affairs Boston Healthcare System, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Department of Basic Medical Sciences, Laboratory of Biology, Medical School, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece. · Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Department of Nutrition, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Department of Pathology, Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center and Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. · Department of Medicine, Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center and Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. · Department of Oncology, Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center and Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. · Laboratory of Medicine and Pathology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA. · Preventive Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California, USA. · Department of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas, USA. · Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Department of Hematology, Medical University of Łodz, Łodz, Poland. · International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), Lyon, France. · Division of Cancer Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Cancer Epidemiology Unit, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom. · School of Clinical Medicine, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom. · Glickman Urological and Kidney Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio, USA. · Centre de Recerca en Epidemiologia Ambiental (CREAL), CIBER Epidemiología y Salud Pública (CIBERESP), Spain. · Hospital del Mar Institute of Medical Research (IMIM), Barcelona, Spain. · National School of Public Health, Athens, Greece. · Epidemiology and Prevention Unit, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan, Italy. · Department of Gastroenterology, Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, Kaunas, Lithuania. · Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York, USA. · Oncology Department, ASL1 Massa Carrara, Massa Carrara, Italy. · National Institute for Health and Welfare, Department of Chronic Disease Prevention, Helsinki, Finland. · Department of Population Health, QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. · Division of Biomedical Statistics and Informatics, Department of Health Sciences Research, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, USA. · Dipartimento di Medicina Clinica E Chirurgia, Federico II Univeristy, Naples, Italy. · Epidemiology Research Program, American Cancer Society, Atlanta, Georgia, USA. · Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands. · Pancreas Unit, Department of Digestive Diseases and Internal Medicine, Sant'Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, Bologna, Italy. · School of Medicine, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain. · CIBER de Epidemiología y Salud Pública (CIBERESP), Madrid, Spain. · Public Health and Participation Directorate, Asturias, Spain. · ARC-NET: Centre for Applied Research on Cancer, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Laboratory of Pharmacogenomics, Biomedical Center, Faculty of Medicine in Pilsen, Charles University in Prague, Pilsen, Czech Republic. · Department of General Surgery, University Hospital Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany. · Department of Surgical and Peroperative Sciences, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden. · Department of Digestive Tract Diseases, Medical University of Łodz, Łodz, Poland. · Division of Gastroenterology and Research Laboratory, IRCCS Scientific Institute and Regional General Hospital "Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza", San Giovanni Rotondo, Italy. · Institute of Cancer Epidemiology, Danish Cancer Society, Copenhagen, Denmark. · Bureau of Epidemiologic Research, Academy of Athens, Athens, Greece. · Hellenic Health Foundation, Athens, Greece. · Department of General, Visceral and Thoracic Surgery, University Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany. · Department of Molecular Biology of Cancer, Institute of Experimental Medicine, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Prague, Czech Republic. · Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, University at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York, USA. · New York University Cancer Institute, New York, New York, USA. · Division of Public Health Sciences, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, Washington, USA,. · Department of Chronic Disease Epidemiology, Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, Connecticut, USA. · Division of Epidemiology, Department of Health Sciences Research, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, USA. · Department of Biostatistics, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Department of Epidemiology, the Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. ·Oncotarget · Pubmed #27579533.

ABSTRACT: Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified common pancreatic cancer susceptibility variants at 13 chromosomal loci in individuals of European descent. To identify new susceptibility variants, we performed imputation based on 1000 Genomes (1000G) Project data and association analysis using 5,107 case and 8,845 control subjects from 27 cohort and case-control studies that participated in the PanScan I-III GWAS. This analysis, in combination with a two-staged replication in an additional 6,076 case and 7,555 control subjects from the PANcreatic Disease ReseArch (PANDoRA) and Pancreatic Cancer Case-Control (PanC4) Consortia uncovered 3 new pancreatic cancer risk signals marked by single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) rs2816938 at chromosome 1q32.1 (per allele odds ratio (OR) = 1.20, P = 4.88x10 -15), rs10094872 at 8q24.21 (OR = 1.15, P = 3.22x10 -9) and rs35226131 at 5p15.33 (OR = 0.71, P = 1.70x10 -8). These SNPs represent independent risk variants at previously identified pancreatic cancer risk loci on chr1q32.1 ( NR5A2), chr8q24.21 ( MYC) and chr5p15.33 ( CLPTM1L- TERT) as per analyses conditioned on previously reported susceptibility variants. We assessed expression of candidate genes at the three risk loci in histologically normal ( n = 10) and tumor ( n = 8) derived pancreatic tissue samples and observed a marked reduction of NR5A2 expression (chr1q32.1) in the tumors (fold change -7.6, P = 5.7x10 -8). This finding was validated in a second set of paired ( n = 20) histologically normal and tumor derived pancreatic tissue samples (average fold change for three NR5A2 isoforms -31.3 to -95.7, P = 7.5x10 -4-2.0x10 -3). Our study has identified new susceptibility variants independently conferring pancreatic cancer risk that merit functional follow-up to identify target genes and explain the underlying biology.

12 Article BAG3 promotes pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma growth by activating stromal macrophages. 2015

Rosati, Alessandra / Basile, Anna / D'Auria, Raffaella / d'Avenia, Morena / De Marco, Margot / Falco, Antonia / Festa, Michelina / Guerriero, Luana / Iorio, Vittoria / Parente, Roberto / Pascale, Maria / Marzullo, Liberato / Franco, Renato / Arra, Claudio / Barbieri, Antonio / Rea, Domenica / Menichini, Giulio / Hahne, Michael / Bijlsma, Maarten / Barcaroli, Daniela / Sala, Gianluca / di Mola, Fabio Francesco / di Sebastiano, Pierluigi / Todoric, Jelena / Antonucci, Laura / Corvest, Vincent / Jawhari, Anass / Firpo, Matthew A / Tuveson, David A / Capunzo, Mario / Karin, Michael / De Laurenzi, Vincenzo / Turco, Maria Caterina. ·BIOUNIVERSA s.r.l., Fisciano, Salerno 84084, Italy. · Department of Medicine and Surgery, University of Salerno, Baronissi, Salerno 84081, Italy. · Department of Pharmacy, Division of Biomedicine "A. Leone", University of Salerno, Fisciano, Salerno 84084, Italy. · Pathology Unit, Istituto Nazionale Tumouri Fondazione "G. Pascale", Naples 81100, Italy. · Animal facility, Istituto Nazionale Tumouri Fondazione "G. Pascale", Naples 81100, Italy. · Reconstructive Microsurgery, Department of Oncology, Careggi University Hospital, Florence 50139, Italy. · Institut de Génétique Moléculaire de Montpellier, CNRS UMR5535, Montpellier 34293, France. · Laboratory for Experimental Oncology and Radiobiology, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam 1105AZ, The Netherlands. · Dipartimento di Scienze Mediche, Orali e Biotecnologiche, University "G. d'Annunzio" di Chieti-Pescara, Centro Studi sull'Invecchiamento, CeSI-MeT, Chieti 66100, Italy. · Division of Surgical Oncology, "S.S. Annunziata"Hospital, Chieti 66100, Italy. · Laboratory of Gene Regulation and Signal Transduction, Departments of Pharmacology and Pathology, UCSD, School of Medicine, San Diego, California 92093-0723, USA. · CALIXAR, Bioparc, Bâtiment Laënnec, Lyon 69008, France. · Department of Surgery, Huntsman Cancer Institute, University of Utah School of Medicine, Salt Lake City, Utah 84132, USA. · Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, Cold Spring Harbor, New York 11724, USA. ·Nat Commun · Pubmed #26522614.

ABSTRACT: The incidence and death rate of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) have increased in recent years, therefore the identification of novel targets for treatment is extremely important. Interactions between cancer and stromal cells are critically involved in tumour formation and development of metastasis. Here we report that PDAC cells secrete BAG3, which binds and activates macrophages, inducing their activation and the secretion of PDAC supporting factors. We also identify IFITM-2 as a BAG3 receptor and show that it signals through PI3K and the p38 MAPK pathways. Finally, we show that the use of an anti-BAG3 antibody results in reduced tumour growth and prevents metastasis formation in three different mouse models. In conclusion, we identify a paracrine loop involved in PDAC growth and metastatic spreading, and show that an anti-BAG3 antibody has therapeutic potential.

13 Article Common variation at 2p13.3, 3q29, 7p13 and 17q25.1 associated with susceptibility to pancreatic cancer. 2015

Childs, Erica J / Mocci, Evelina / Campa, Daniele / Bracci, Paige M / Gallinger, Steven / Goggins, Michael / Li, Donghui / Neale, Rachel E / Olson, Sara H / Scelo, Ghislaine / Amundadottir, Laufey T / Bamlet, William R / Bijlsma, Maarten F / Blackford, Amanda / Borges, Michael / Brennan, Paul / Brenner, Hermann / Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas / Canzian, Federico / Capurso, Gabriele / Cavestro, Giulia M / Chaffee, Kari G / Chanock, Stephen J / Cleary, Sean P / Cotterchio, Michelle / Foretova, Lenka / Fuchs, Charles / Funel, Niccola / Gazouli, Maria / Hassan, Manal / Herman, Joseph M / Holcatova, Ivana / Holly, Elizabeth A / Hoover, Robert N / Hung, Rayjean J / Janout, Vladimir / Key, Timothy J / Kupcinskas, Juozas / Kurtz, Robert C / Landi, Stefano / Lu, Lingeng / Malecka-Panas, Ewa / Mambrini, Andrea / Mohelnikova-Duchonova, Beatrice / Neoptolemos, John P / Oberg, Ann L / Orlow, Irene / Pasquali, Claudio / Pezzilli, Raffaele / Rizzato, Cosmeri / Saldia, Amethyst / Scarpa, Aldo / Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael Z / Strobel, Oliver / Tavano, Francesca / Vashist, Yogesh K / Vodicka, Pavel / Wolpin, Brian M / Yu, Herbert / Petersen, Gloria M / Risch, Harvey A / Klein, Alison P. ·Department of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. · Department of Oncology, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. · 1] Division of Cancer Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. [2] Department of Biology, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California, USA. · Lunenfeld-Tanenbaum Research Institute of Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Department of Pathology, Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. · Department of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas, USA. · Department of Population Health, QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Kelvin Grove,Queensland, Australia. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York, USA. · International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), Lyon, France. · Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, US National Institutes of Health, US Department of Health and Human Services, Bethesda, Maryland, USA. · Department of Health Sciences Research, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, Minnesota, USA. · Laboratory for Experimental Oncology and Radiobiology, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. · Division of Clinical Epidemiology and Aging Research, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), German Cancer Consortium (DKTK), Heidelberg, Germany. · 1] Department for Determinants of Chronic Diseases (DCD), National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven, the Netherlands. [2] Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University Medical Centre, Utrecht, the Netherlands. [3] Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, UK. [4] Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. · Genomic Epidemiology Group, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Digestive and Liver Disease Unit, 'Sapienza' University of Rome, Rome, Italy. · Università Vita Salute San Raffaele and Istituto di Ricovero e Cura a Carattere Scientifico (IRCCS) Ospedale San Raffaele, Milan, Italy. · 1] Department of Surgery, University Health Network, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. [2] Princess Margaret Cancer Center, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · 1] Cancer Care Ontario, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. [2] Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Department of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, Masaryk Memorial Cancer Institute and Medical Faculty Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic. · 1] Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. [2] Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Department of Surgery, Unit of Experimental Surgical Pathology, University Hospital of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. · Department of Medical Sciences, Laboratory of Biology, School of Medicine, University of Athens, Athens, Greece. · Department of Radiation Oncology, Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. · Institute of Hygiene and Epidemiology, 1st Faculty of Medicine, Charles University in Prague, Prague, Czech Republic. · Department of Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Palacky University, Olomouc, Czech Republic. · Cancer Epidemiology Unit, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK. · Department of Gastroenterology, Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, Kaunas, Lithuania. · Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York, USA. · Department of Biology, Section of Genetics, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. · Department of Chronic Disease Epidemiology, Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, Connecticut, USA. · Department of Digestive Tract Diseases, Medical University of Lodz, Lodz, Poland. · Department of Oncology, Azienda USL 1 Massa Carrara, Massa Carrara, Italy. · Laboratory of Toxicogenomics, Institute of Public Health, Prague, Czech Republic. · National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Pancreas Biomedical Research Unit, Liverpool Clinical Trials Unit and Cancer Research UK Clinical Trials Unit, Department of Molecular and Clinical Cancer Medicine, Institute of Translational Medicine, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK. · Department of Surgery, Gastroenterology and Oncology, University of Padua, Padua, Italy. · Pancreas Unit, Department of Digestive Diseases, Sant'Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, Bologna, Italy. · ARC-NET-Centre for Applied Research on Cancer, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Nutritional Epidemiology Branch, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, US National Institutes of Health, Rockville, Maryland, USA. · Department of General Surgery, University Hospital Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany. · Division of Gastroenterology and Research Laboratory, IRCCS Scientific Institute and Regional General Hospital 'Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza', San Giovanni Rotondo, Italy. · Department of General, Visceral and Thoracic Surgery, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany. · Department of Molecular Biology of Cancer, Institute of Experimental Medicine, Academy of Sciences, Prague, Czech Republic. · 1] Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. [2] Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Epidemiology Program, University of Hawaii Cancer Center, Honolulu, Hawaii, USA. · 1] Department of Oncology, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. [2] Department of Pathology, Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. ·Nat Genet · Pubmed #26098869.

ABSTRACT: Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer death in the developed world. Both inherited high-penetrance mutations in BRCA2 (ref. 2), ATM, PALB2 (ref. 4), BRCA1 (ref. 5), STK11 (ref. 6), CDKN2A and mismatch-repair genes and low-penetrance loci are associated with increased risk. To identify new risk loci, we performed a genome-wide association study on 9,925 pancreatic cancer cases and 11,569 controls, including 4,164 newly genotyped cases and 3,792 controls in 9 studies from North America, Central Europe and Australia. We identified three newly associated regions: 17q25.1 (LINC00673, rs11655237, odds ratio (OR) = 1.26, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.19-1.34, P = 1.42 × 10(-14)), 7p13 (SUGCT, rs17688601, OR = 0.88, 95% CI = 0.84-0.92, P = 1.41 × 10(-8)) and 3q29 (TP63, rs9854771, OR = 0.89, 95% CI = 0.85-0.93, P = 2.35 × 10(-8)). We detected significant association at 2p13.3 (ETAA1, rs1486134, OR = 1.14, 95% CI = 1.09-1.19, P = 3.36 × 10(-9)), a region with previous suggestive evidence in Han Chinese. We replicated previously reported associations at 9q34.2 (ABO), 13q22.1 (KLF5), 5p15.33 (TERT and CLPTM1), 13q12.2 (PDX1), 1q32.1 (NR5A2), 7q32.3 (LINC-PINT), 16q23.1 (BCAR1) and 22q12.1 (ZNRF3). Our study identifies new loci associated with pancreatic cancer risk.

14 Article Feasibility and repeatability of PET with the hypoxia tracer [(18)F]HX4 in oesophageal and pancreatic cancer. 2015

Klaassen, Remy / Bennink, Roelof J / van Tienhoven, Geertjan / Bijlsma, Maarten F / Besselink, Marc G H / van Berge Henegouwen, Mark I / Wilmink, Johanna W / Nederveen, Aart J / Windhorst, Albert D / Hulshof, Maarten C C M / van Laarhoven, Hanneke W M. ·Department of Medical Oncology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands; LEXOR (Laboratory for Experimental Oncology and Radiobiology), Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. Electronic address: r.klaassen@amc.uva.nl. · Department of Nuclear Medicine, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Department of Radiation Oncology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · LEXOR (Laboratory for Experimental Oncology and Radiobiology), Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Department of Surgery, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Department of Medical Oncology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Department of Radiology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Department of Radiology & Nuclear Medicine, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. ·Radiother Oncol · Pubmed #26049919.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: To investigate the feasibility and to determine the repeatability of recurrent [(18)F]HX4 PET scans in patients with oesophageal (EC) and pancreatic (PC) cancer. MATERIALS AND METHODS: 32 patients were scanned in total; seven patients (4 EC/3 PC) were scanned 2, 3 and 4h post injection (PI) of [(18)F]HX4 and 25 patients (15 EC/10 PC) were scanned twice 3.5h PI, on two separate days (median 4, range 1-9days). Maximum tumour to background ratio (TBRmax) and the tumour hypoxic volume (HV) (TBR>1.0) were calculated. Repeatability was assessed using Bland-Altman analysis. Agreement in localization was calculated as the distance between the centres of mass in the HVs. RESULTS: For EC, the TBRmax in the tumour (mean±SD) was 1.87±0.46 with a coefficient of repeatability (CoR) of 0.53 (28% of mean). The HV ranged from 3.4 to 98.8ml with a CoR of 5.1ml. For PC, the TBRmax was 1.72±0.23 with a CoR of 0.27 (16% of mean). The HV ranged from 4.6 to 104.0ml with a CoR of 7.8ml. The distance between the centres of mass in the HV was 2.2±1.3mm for EC and 2.1±1.5mm for PC. CONCLUSIONS: PET scanning with [(18)F]HX4 was feasible in both EC and PC patients. Amount and location of elevated [(18)F]HX4 uptake showed good repeatability, suggesting [(18)F]HX4 PET could be a promising tool for radiation therapy planning and treatment response monitoring in EC and PC patients.

15 Article Blocking Hedgehog release from pancreatic cancer cells increases paracrine signaling potency. 2015

Damhofer, Helene / Veenstra, Veronique L / Tol, Johanna A M G / van Laarhoven, Hanneke W M / Medema, Jan Paul / Bijlsma, Maarten F. ·Laboratory for Experimental Oncology and Radiobiology, Center for Experimental Molecular Medicine, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Meibergdreef 9, 1105AZ Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Department of Surgery, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Meibergdreef 9, 1105AZ Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Laboratory for Experimental Oncology and Radiobiology, Center for Experimental Molecular Medicine, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Meibergdreef 9, 1105AZ Amsterdam, The Netherlands Department of Medical Oncology, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Meibergdreef 9, 1105AZ Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Laboratory for Experimental Oncology and Radiobiology, Center for Experimental Molecular Medicine, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Meibergdreef 9, 1105AZ Amsterdam, The Netherlands m.f.bijlsma@amc.uva.nl. ·J Cell Sci · Pubmed #25359882.

ABSTRACT: Members of the Hedgehog (Hh) family of morphogens play crucial roles in development but are also involved in the progression of certain types of cancer. Despite being synthesized as hydrophobic dually lipid-modified molecules, and thus being strongly membrane-associated, Hh ligands are able to spread through tissues and act on target cells several cell diameters away. Various mechanisms that mediate Hh release have been discussed in recent years; however, little is known about dispersion of this ligand from cancer cells. Using co-culture models in conjunction with a newly developed reporter system, we were able to show that different members of the ADAM family of metalloproteinases strongly contribute to the release of endogenous bioactive Hh from pancreatic cancer cells, but that this solubilization decreases the potency of cancer cells to signal to adjacent stromal cells in direct co-culture models. These findings imply that under certain conditions, cancer-cell-tethered Hh molecules are the more potent signaling activators and that retaining Hh on the surface of cancer cells can unexpectedly increase the effective signaling range of this ligand, depending on tissue context.

16 Article Assessing the efficacy of the hedgehog pathway inhibitor vitamin D3 in a murine xenograft model for pancreatic cancer. 2010

Brüggemann, Lois W / Queiroz, Karla C S / Zamani, Khatera / van Straaten, Amber / Spek, C Arnold / Bijlsma, Maarten F. ·Center for Experimental and Molecular Medicine, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. ·Cancer Biol Ther · Pubmed #20495364.

ABSTRACT: The developmental Hedgehog (Hh) pathway has been shown to cause malignancies in the adult organism, specifically in the proximal gastrointestinal tract. Previous studies have used the Hh-inhibitory alkaloid cyclopamine to treat Hh-dependent tumor growth. The present study aimed to determine the efficacy and specificity of the recently discovered endogenous inhibitor of the Hh pathway, vitamin D3, on inhibition of pancreatic adenocarcinoma cell growth in vitro and in vivo. Vitamin D3 was found to inhibit cell growth specifically through inactivation of Smo and the downstream Hh pathway, rather than activation of the vitamin D3 receptor. However, in in vivo models vitamin D3 was not found to be effective against tumor cell growth.