Pick Topic
Review Topic
List Experts
Examine Expert
Save Expert
  Site Guide ··   
Pancreatic Neoplasms: HELP
Articles by H. Bas Bueno-de-Mesquita
Based on 3 articles published since 2009
(Why 3 articles?)
||||

Between 2009 and 2019, H. Bas Bueno-de-Mesquita wrote the following 3 articles about Pancreatic Neoplasms.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Article Diabetes, antidiabetic medications, and pancreatic cancer risk: an analysis from the International Pancreatic Cancer Case-Control Consortium. 2014

Bosetti, C / Rosato, V / Li, D / Silverman, D / Petersen, G M / Bracci, P M / Neale, R E / Muscat, J / Anderson, K / Gallinger, S / Olson, S H / Miller, A B / Bas Bueno-de-Mesquita, H / Scelo, G / Janout, V / Holcatova, I / Lagiou, P / Serraino, D / Lucenteforte, E / Fabianova, E / Ghadirian, P / Baghurst, P A / Zatonski, W / Foretova, L / Fontham, E / Bamlet, W R / Holly, E A / Negri, E / Hassan, M / Prizment, A / Cotterchio, M / Cleary, S / Kurtz, R C / Maisonneuve, P / Trichopoulos, D / Polesel, J / Duell, E J / Boffetta, P / La Vecchia, C. ·Department of Epidemiology, IRCCS - Istituto di Ricerche Farmacologiche 'Mario Negri', Milan, Italy cristina.bosetti@marionegri.it. · Department of Epidemiology, IRCCS - Istituto di Ricerche Farmacologiche 'Mario Negri', Milan, Italy. · M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, University of Texas, Houston. · Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda. · Department of Health Sciences Research, Medicine and Medical Genetics, Mayo Clinic, Rochester. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, USA. · Queensland Institute of Medical Research, Brisbane, Australia. · Department of Public Health Sciences, Penn State University, Penn State. · Division of Epidemiology and Community Health, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, USA. · University Health Network, Department of Surgery, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, USA. · Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada. · National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University Medical Center Utrecht (UMCU), Utrecht, The Netherlands Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, UK. · International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), Lyon, France. · Department of Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Palacky University, Olomouc. · Institute of Hygiene and Epidemiology, 1st Faculty of Medicine, Charles University in Prague, Prague, Czech Republic. · Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, USA Department of Hygiene, Epidemiology and Medical Statistics, School of Medicine, University of Athens, Athens, Greece. · Unit of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, CRO Aviano National Cancer Institute, IRCCS, Aviano. · Department of Preclinical and Clinical Pharmacology Mario Aiazzi Mancini, Università degli Studi di Firenze, Florence, Italy. · Regional Authority of Public Health in Banská Bystrica, Banská Bystrica, Slovakia. · Department of Epidemiology, IRCCS - Istituto di Ricerche Farmacologiche 'Mario Negri', Milan, Italy M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, University of Texas, Houston Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda Department of Health Sciences Research, Medicine and Medical Genetics, Mayo Clinic, Rochester Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, USA Queensland Institute of Medical Research, Brisbane, Australia Department of Public Health Sciences, Penn State University, Penn State Division of Epidemiology and Community Health, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, USA University Health Network, Department of Surgery, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, USA Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University Medical Center Utrecht (UMCU), Utrecht, The Netherlands Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, UK International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), Lyon, France Department of Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Palacky University, Olomouc Institute of Hygiene and Epidemiology, 1st Faculty of Medicine, Charles University in Prague, Prague, Czech Republic Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, USA Department of Hygiene, Epidemiology and Medical Statistics, School of Medicine, University of Athens, Athens, Greece Unit of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, CRO Aviano National Cancer Institute, IRCCS, Aviano Department of Preclinical and Clinical Pharmacology Mario Aiazzi Mancini, Università degli Studi di Firenze, Florence, Italy Regional Authority of Public Health in Banská Bystrica, Banská Bystrica, Slovakia Public Health, Women · Public Health, Women's and Children's Hospital, Adelaide, SA, Australia. · Cancer Center and Institute of Oncology, Warsaw, Poland. · Department of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, Masaryk Memorial Cancer Institute, Institute and MF MU, Brno, Czech Republic. · Louisiana State University School of Public Health, New Orleans, USA. · Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada Cancer Care Ontario, Toronto, Canada. · Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, USA. · Division of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, European Institute of Oncology, Milan, Italy. · Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, USA. · Unit of Nutrition, Environment and Cancer, Catalan Institute of Oncology (ICO-IDIBELL), L'Hospitalet de Llobregat, Barcelona, Spain. · The Tisch Cancer Institute and Institute for Translational Epidemiology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, USA. · Department of Clinical Sciences and Community Health, Università degli Studi di Milano, Milan, Italy. ·Ann Oncol · Pubmed #25057164.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Type 2 diabetes mellitus has been associated with an excess risk of pancreatic cancer, but the magnitude of the risk and the time-risk relationship are unclear, and there is limited information on the role of antidiabetic medications. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We analyzed individual-level data from 15 case-control studies within the Pancreatic Cancer Case-Control Consortium, including 8305 cases and 13 987 controls. Pooled odds ratios (ORs) were estimated from multiple logistic regression models, adjusted for relevant covariates. RESULTS: Overall, 1155 (15%) cases and 1087 (8%) controls reported a diagnosis of diabetes 2 or more years before cancer diagnosis (or interview, for controls), corresponding to an OR of 1.90 (95% confidence interval, CI, 1.72-2.09). Consistent risk estimates were observed across strata of selected covariates, including body mass index and tobacco smoking. Pancreatic cancer risk decreased with duration of diabetes, but a significant excess risk was still evident 20 or more years after diabetes diagnosis (OR 1.30, 95% CI 1.03-1.63). Among diabetics, long duration of oral antidiabetic use was associated with a decreased pancreatic cancer risk (OR 0.31, 95% CI 0.14-0.69, for ≥15 years). Conversely, insulin use was associated with a pancreatic cancer risk in the short term (OR 5.60, 95% CI 3.75-8.35, for <5 years), but not for longer duration of use (OR 0.95, 95% CI 0.53-1.70, for ≥15 years). CONCLUSION: This study provides the most definitive quantification to date of an excess risk of pancreatic cancer among diabetics. It also shows that a 30% excess risk persists for more than two decades after diabetes diagnosis, thus supporting a causal role of diabetes in pancreatic cancer. Oral antidiabetics may decrease the risk of pancreatic cancer, whereas insulin showed an inconsistent duration-risk relationship.

2 Article The association of circulating adiponectin levels with pancreatic cancer risk: a study within the prospective EPIC cohort. 2012

Grote, Verena A / Rohrmann, Sabine / Dossus, Laure / Nieters, Alexandra / Halkjaer, Jytte / Tjønneland, Anne / Overvad, Kim / Stegger, Jakob / Chabbert-Buffet, Nathalie / Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine / Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise / Teucher, Birgit / Becker, Susen / Montonen, Jukka / Boeing, Heiner / Trichopoulou, Antonia / Lagiou, Pagona / Trichopoulos, Dimitrios / Palli, Domenico / Sieri, Sabina / Tumino, Rosario / Vineis, Paolo / Mattiello, Amalia / Argüelles, Marcial / Duell, Eric J / Molina-Montes, Esther / Larrañaga, Nerea / Chirlaque, María-Dolores / Gurrea, Aurelio Barricarte / Jeurnink, Suzanne M / Peeters, Petra Hm / Ye, Weimin / Sund, Malin / Lindkvist, Björn / Johansen, Dorthe / Khaw, Kay-Tee / Wareham, Nick / Crowe, Francesca L / Romieu, Isabelle / Rinaldi, Sabina / Jenab, Mazda / Romaguera, Dora / Michaud, Dominique S / Riboli, Elio / Bas Bueno-de-Mesquita, H / Kaaks, Rudolf. ·German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg, Germany. ·Int J Cancer · Pubmed #21681743.

ABSTRACT: Excess body weight and type 2 diabetes mellitus, risk factors of pancreatic cancer, are characterized by decreased levels of adiponectin. In addition to anti-inflammatory and anti-proliferative actions, adiponectin has an important role in regulating glucose metabolism, i.e., decreasing circulating blood glucose levels. Prospectively, hyperglycemia has been associated with risk of pancreatic cancer. The aim of this study was to investigate the association of pre-diagnostic adiponectin levels with pancreatic cancer risk. We conducted a case-control study nested within European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition. Blood samples of 452 pancreatic cancer cases and 452 individually matched controls were analyzed by immunoassays. Multivariate conditional logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). Overall, adiponectin showed no association with pancreas cancer risk; however, among never smokers, higher circulating levels of adiponectin were associated with a reduction in pancreatic cancer risk (OR = 0.44 [95% CI 0.23-0.82] for highest vs. lowest quartile), whereas among current smokers there was no significant association (OR = 1.59 [95% CI 0.67-3.76] for highest vs. lowest quartile; p-trend = 0.530; p-interaction = 0.309). In our study, lower adiponectin concentrations may be associated with the development of pancreatic cancer among never smokers, whereas the only other prospective study being conducted so far showed a decrease in risk among male smokers. Therefore, further studies are needed to clarify the role of adiponectin in pancreatic cancer development.

3 Article Alcohol intake and pancreatic cancer: a pooled analysis from the pancreatic cancer cohort consortium (PanScan). 2010

Michaud, Dominique S / Vrieling, Alina / Jiao, Li / Mendelsohn, Julie B / Steplowski, Emily / Lynch, Shannon M / Wactawski-Wende, Jean / Arslan, Alan A / Bas Bueno-de-Mesquita, H / Fuchs, Charles S / Gross, Myron / Helzlsouer, Kathy / Jacobs, Eric J / Lacroix, Andrea / Petersen, Gloria / Zheng, Wei / Allen, Naomi / Ammundadottir, Laufey / Bergmann, Manuela M / Boffetta, Paolo / Buring, Julie E / Canzian, Federico / Chanock, Stephen J / Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise / Clipp, Sandra / Freiberg, Matthew S / Michael Gaziano, J / Giovannucci, Edward L / Hankinson, Susan / Hartge, Patricia / Hoover, Robert N / Allan Hubbell, F / Hunter, David J / Hutchinson, Amy / Jacobs, Kevin / Kooperberg, Charles / Kraft, Peter / Manjer, Jonas / Navarro, Carmen / Peeters, Petra H M / Shu, Xiao-Ou / Stevens, Victoria / Thomas, Gilles / Tjønneland, Anne / Tobias, Geoffrey S / Trichopoulos, Dimitrios / Tumino, Rosario / Vineis, Paolo / Virtamo, Jarmo / Wallace, Robert / Wolpin, Brian M / Yu, Kai / Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne / Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael Z. ·Division of Epidemiology, Public Health and Primary Care, Imperial College London, London, UK. d.michaud@imperial.ac.uk ·Cancer Causes Control · Pubmed #20373013.

ABSTRACT: The literature has consistently reported no association between low to moderate alcohol consumption and pancreatic cancer; however, a few studies have shown that high levels of intake may increase risk. Most single studies have limited power to detect associations even in the highest alcohol intake categories or to examine associations by alcohol type. We analyzed these associations using 1,530 pancreatic cancer cases and 1,530 controls from the Pancreatic Cancer Cohort Consortium (PanScan) nested case-control study. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were calculated using unconditional logistic regression, adjusting for potential confounders. We observed no significant overall association between total alcohol (ethanol) intake and pancreatic cancer risk (OR = 1.38, 95% CI = 0.86-2.23, for 60 or more g/day vs. >0 to <5 g/day). A statistically significant increase in risk was observed among men consuming 45 or more grams of alcohol from liquor per day (OR = 2.23, 95% CI = 1.02-4.87, compared to 0 g/day of alcohol from liquor, P-trend = 0.12), but not among women (OR = 1.35, 95% CI = 0.63-2.87, for 30 or more g/day of alcohol from liquor, compared to none). No associations were noted for wine or beer intake. Overall, no significant increase in risk was observed, but a small effect among heavy drinkers cannot be ruled out.