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Pancreatic Neoplasms: HELP
Articles by Y. Bao
Based on 3 articles published since 2010
(Why 3 articles?)
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Between 2010 and 2020, Y. Bao wrote the following 3 articles about Pancreatic Neoplasms.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Article [Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasia in ectopic pancreatic tissue: report of a case]. 2019

Hu, X M / Ni, X / Bao, Y / Tang, F. ·Department of Pathology, Huashan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai 200041, China. · Department of Pathology, Zhongshan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032, China. ·Zhonghua Bing Li Xue Za Zhi · Pubmed #31104688.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

2 Article Nut consumption and risk of pancreatic cancer in women. 2013

Bao, Y / Hu, F B / Giovannucci, E L / Wolpin, B M / Stampfer, M J / Willett, W C / Fuchs, C S. ·Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, 181 Longwood Avenue, Boston, MA 02115, USA. ·Br J Cancer · Pubmed #24149179.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Increasing nut intake has been associated with reduced risk of diabetes mellitus, which is a risk factor for pancreatic cancer. METHODS: We prospectively followed 75 680 women in the Nurses' Health Study, and examined the association between nut consumption and pancreatic cancer risk. Participants with a previous history of cancer were excluded. Nut consumption was assessed at baseline and updated every 2 to 4 years. Relative risks (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) were estimated using Cox proportional hazards models. RESULTS: We documented 466 incident cases of pancreatic cancer. After adjusting for age, height, smoking, physical activity, and total energy intake, women who consumed a 28-g (1 oz) serving size of nuts ≥2 times per week experienced a significantly lower risk of pancreatic cancer (RR, 0.65; 95% CI, 0.47-0.92; P for trend=0.007) when compared with those who largely abstained from nuts. The results did not appreciably change after further adjustment for body mass index (BMI) and history of diabetes mellitus (RR, 0.68; 95% CI, 0.48-0.95; P for trend=0.01). The inverse association persisted within strata defined by BMI, physical activity, smoking, and intakes of red meat, fruits, and vegetables. CONCLUSION: Frequent nut consumption is inversely associated with risk of pancreatic cancer in this large prospective cohort of women, independent of other potential risk factors for pancreatic cancer.

3 Article Predicted vitamin D status and pancreatic cancer risk in two prospective cohort studies. 2010

Bao, Y / Ng, K / Wolpin, B M / Michaud, D S / Giovannucci, E / Fuchs, C S. ·Channing Laboratory, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, 181 Longwood Avenue, Boston, MA 02115, USA. ying.bao@channing.harvard.edu ·Br J Cancer · Pubmed #20389298.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Studies evaluating vitamin D status in relation to pancreatic cancer risk have yielded inconsistent results. METHODS: We prospectively followed 118 597 participants in the Nurses' Health Study and Health Professionals Follow-up Study from 1986 to 2006. We calculated a 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) score from known predictors of vitamin D status for each individual and then examined the predicted 25(OH)D levels in relation to pancreatic cancer risk. Relative risks (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) were estimated using Cox proportional hazards models adjusted for age, sex, race, height, smoking, and diabetes. We then further adjusted for body mass index (BMI) and physical activity in a sensitivity analysis. RESULTS: During 20 years of follow-up, we identified 575 incident pancreatic cancer cases. Higher 25(OH)D score was associated with a significant reduction in pancreatic cancer risk; compared with the lowest quintile, participants in the highest quintile of 25(OH)D score had an adjusted RR of 0.65 (95% CI=0.50-0.86; P(trend)=0.001). Results were similar when we further adjusted for BMI and physical activity. CONCLUSIONS: Higher 25(OH)D score was associated with a lower risk of pancreatic cancer in these two prospective cohort studies.