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Pancreatic Neoplasms: HELP
Articles by Joaquim Balsells
Based on 8 articles published since 2010
(Why 8 articles?)
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Between 2010 and 2020, J. Balsells wrote the following 8 articles about Pancreatic Neoplasms.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Article Pancreatic cancer and autoimmune diseases: An association sustained by computational and epidemiological case-control approaches. 2019

Gomez-Rubio, Paulina / Piñero, Janet / Molina-Montes, Esther / Gutiérrez-Sacristán, Alba / Marquez, Mirari / Rava, Marta / Michalski, Christoph W / Farré, Antoni / Molero, Xavier / Löhr, Matthias / Perea, José / Greenhalf, William / O'Rorke, Michael / Tardón, Adonina / Gress, Thomas / Barberá, Victor M / Crnogorac-Jurcevic, Tatjana / Muñoz-Bellvís, Luís / Domínguez-Muñoz, Enrique / Balsells, Joaquim / Costello, Eithne / Yu, Jingru / Iglesias, Mar / Ilzarbe, Lucas / Kleeff, Jörg / Kong, Bo / Mora, Josefina / Murray, Liam / O'Driscoll, Damian / Poves, Ignasi / Lawlor, Rita T / Ye, Weimin / Hidalgo, Manuel / Scarpa, Aldo / Sharp, Linda / Carrato, Alfredo / Real, Francisco X / Furlong, Laura I / Malats, Núria / Anonymous2240962. ·Genetic and Molecular Epidemiology Group, Spanish National Cancer Research Center CNIO, Madrid, Spain. · Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red en Oncología (CIBERONC), Enfermedades Hepáticas y Digestivas (CIBERHD), and Epidemiología y Salud Pública (CIBERESP), Barcelona, Spain. · Research Program on Biomedical Informatics (GRIB), Hospital del Mar Research Institute (IMIM), Universidad Pompeu Fabra (UPF), Barcelona, Spain. · Department of Surgery, Technical University of Munich, Munich, Germany. · Department of Surgery, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany. · Department of Gastroenterology, Hospital de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau, Barcelona, Spain. · Hospital Universitaru Vall d'Hebron, Exocrine Pancreas Research Unit and Vall d'Hebron Research Institute (VHIR), Barcelona, Spain. · Universitat Auntònoma de Barcelona, Campus de la UAB, Barcelona, Spain. · Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology (CLINTEC), Karolinska Institutet and University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden. · Department of Surgery, University Hospital 12 de Octubre, Madrid, Spain. · Department of Molecular and Clinical Cancer Medicine, The Royal Liverpool University Hospital, Liverpool, United Kingdom. · Centre for Public Health, Queen's University Belfast, Belfast, United Kingdom. · Department of Medicine, Instituto Universitario de Oncología del Principado de Asturias, Oviedo, Spain. · Department of Gastroenterology, University Hospital of Giessen and Marburg, Marburg, Germany. · Laboratorio de Genética Molecular, Hospital General Universitario de Elche, Elche, Spain. · Centre for Molecular Oncology, John Vane Science Centre, Barts Cancer Institute, Queen Mary University of London, London, United Kingdom. · General and Digestive Surgery Department, Hospital Universitario de Salamanca, Salamanca, Spain. · Department of Gastroenterology, Hospital Clínico Universitario de Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela, Spain. · Department of Gastroenterology, Hospital del Mar/Parc de Salut Mar, Barcelona, Spain. · Department of Visceral, Vascular and Endocrine Surgery, Martin-Luther-University Halle-Wittenberg, Halle, (Saale), Germany. · Cancer Data Registrars, National Cancer Registry Ireland, Cork, Ireland. · ARC-Net Centre for Applied Research on Cancer, Department of Pathology and Diagnostics, University Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet and University Hospital, Sweden. · Hospital Madrid-Norte-Sanchinarro and Spanish National Cancer Research Centre (CNIO), Madrid, Spain. · Rosenberg Clinical Cancer Center, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA. · Institute of Health and Society, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, United Kingdom. · Department of Oncology, Hospital Ramón y Cajal, Madrid, Spain. · Epithelial Carcinogenesis Group, Spanish National Cancer Research Centre (CNIO), Madrid, Spain. · Departament de Ciències Experimentals i de la Salut, Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain. · PanGenEU Study Investigators (Additional file 1: Annex S1). ·Int J Cancer · Pubmed #30229903.

ABSTRACT: Deciphering the underlying genetic basis behind pancreatic cancer (PC) and its associated multimorbidities will enhance our knowledge toward PC control. The study investigated the common genetic background of PC and different morbidities through a computational approach and further evaluated the less explored association between PC and autoimmune diseases (AIDs) through an epidemiological analysis. Gene-disease associations (GDAs) of 26 morbidities of interest and PC were obtained using the DisGeNET public discovery platform. The association between AIDs and PC pointed by the computational analysis was confirmed through multivariable logistic regression models in the PanGen European case-control study population of 1,705 PC cases and 1,084 controls. Fifteen morbidities shared at least one gene with PC in the DisGeNET database. Based on common genes, several AIDs were genetically associated with PC pointing to a potential link between them. An epidemiologic analysis confirmed that having any of the nine AIDs studied was significantly associated with a reduced risk of PC (Odds Ratio (OR) = 0.74, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.58-0.93) which decreased in subjects having ≥2 AIDs (OR = 0.39, 95%CI 0.21-0.73). In independent analyses, polymyalgia rheumatica, and rheumatoid arthritis were significantly associated with low PC risk (OR = 0.40, 95%CI 0.19-0.89, and OR = 0.73, 95%CI 0.53-1.00, respectively). Several inflammatory-related morbidities shared a common genetic component with PC based on public databases. These molecular links could shed light into the molecular mechanisms underlying PC development and simultaneously generate novel hypotheses. In our study, we report sound findings pointing to an association between AIDs and a reduced risk of PC.

2 Article Risk of pancreatic cancer associated with family history of cancer and other medical conditions by accounting for smoking among relatives. 2018

Molina-Montes, E / Gomez-Rubio, P / Márquez, M / Rava, M / Löhr, M / Michalski, C W / Molero, X / Farré, A / Perea, J / Greenhalf, W / Ilzarbe, L / O'Rorke, M / Tardón, A / Gress, T / Barberà, V M / Crnogorac-Jurcevic, T / Domínguez-Muñoz, E / Muñoz-Bellvís, L / Balsells, J / Costello, E / Huang, J / Iglesias, M / Kleeff, J / Kong, Bo / Mora, J / Murray, L / O'Driscoll, D / Poves, I / Scarpa, A / Ye, W / Hidalgo, M / Sharp, L / Carrato, A / Real, F X / Malats, N / Anonymous1210933. ·Spanish National Cancer Research Center (CNIO), Genetic and Molecular Epidemiology Group, Madrid, and CIBERONC, Spain. · Karolinska Institutet and University Hospital, Gastrocentrum, Stockholm, Sweden. · Technical University of Munich, Department of Surgery, Munich, Germany. · University of Heidelberg, Department of Surgery, Heidelberg, Germany. · Hospital Universitari Vall d'Hebron, Vall d'Hebron Research Institute (VHIR), Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Barcelona, and CIBEREHD, Spain. · Hospital de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau, Department of Gastroenterology, Barcelona, Spain. · University Hospital 12 de Octubre, Department of Surgery, Madrid, Spain. · Royal Liverpool University Hospital, Department of Molecular and Clinical Cancer Medicine, Liverpool, UK. · Hospital del Mar-Parc de Salut Mar, Barcelona, Spain. · Queen's University Belfast, Centre for Public Health, Belfast, UK. · Instituto Universitario de Oncología del Principado de Asturias, Department of Medicine, Oviedo, and CIBERESP, Spain. · University Hospital of Giessen and Marburg, Department of Gastroenterology, Marburg, Germany. · General University Hospital of Elche, Molecular Genetics Laboratory, Elche, Spain. · Barts Cancer Institute, Centre for Molecular Oncology, Queen Mary University of London, London, UK. · University Clinical Hospital of Santiago de Compostela, Department of Gastroenterology, Santiago de Compostela, Spain. · Salamanca University Hospital, General and Digestive Surgery Department, Salamanca, Spain. · Martin-Luther-University Halle-Wittenberg, Department of Visceral, Vascular and Endocrine Surgery, Halle (Saale), Germany. · National Cancer Registry Ireland and HRB Clinical Research Facility, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. · ARC-Net Centre for Applied Research on Cancer and Department of Pathology and Diagnostics, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Madrid-Norte-Sanchinarro Hospital, Madrid, Spain. · Newcastle University, Institute of Health and Society, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK. · Ramón y Cajal University Hospital, Department of Oncology, IRYCIS, Alcala University, Madrid, and CIBERONC, Spain. · Spanish National Cancer Research Centre (CNIO), Epithelial Carcinogenesis Group, Madrid, Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Departament de Ciències Experimentals i de la Salut, Barcelona, and CIBERONC, Spain. ·Int J Epidemiol · Pubmed #29329392.

ABSTRACT: Background: Family history (FH) of pancreatic cancer (PC) has been associated with an increased risk of PC, but little is known regarding the role of inherited/environmental factors or that of FH of other comorbidities in PC risk. We aimed to address these issues using multiple methodological approaches. Methods: Case-control study including 1431 PC cases and 1090 controls and a reconstructed-cohort study (N = 16 747) made up of their first-degree relatives (FDR). Logistic regression was used to evaluate PC risk associated with FH of cancer, diabetes, allergies, asthma, cystic fibrosis and chronic pancreatitis by relative type and number of affected relatives, by smoking status and other potential effect modifiers, and by tumour stage and location. Familial aggregation of cancer was assessed within the cohort using Cox proportional hazard regression. Results: FH of PC was associated with an increased PC risk [odds ratio (OR) = 2.68; 95% confidence interval (CI): 2.27-4.06] when compared with cancer-free FH, the risk being greater when ≥ 2 FDRs suffered PC (OR = 3.88; 95% CI: 2.96-9.73) and among current smokers (OR = 3.16; 95% CI: 2.56-5.78, interaction FHPC*smoking P-value = 0.04). PC cumulative risk by age 75 was 2.2% among FDRs of cases and 0.7% in those of controls [hazard ratio (HR) = 2.42; 95% CI: 2.16-2.71]. PC risk was significantly associated with FH of cancer (OR = 1.30; 95% CI: 1.13-1.54) and diabetes (OR = 1.24; 95% CI: 1.01-1.52), but not with FH of other diseases. Conclusions: The concordant findings using both approaches strengthen the notion that FH of cancer, PC or diabetes confers a higher PC risk. Smoking notably increases PC risk associated with FH of PC. Further evaluation of these associations should be undertaken to guide PC prevention strategies.

3 Article Overexpression of Yes Associated Protein 1, an Independent Prognostic Marker in Patients With Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma, Correlated With Liver Metastasis and Poor Prognosis. 2017

Salcedo Allende, Maria Teresa / Zeron-Medina, Jorge / Hernandez, Javier / Macarulla, Teresa / Balsells, Joaquim / Merino, Xavier / Allende, Helena / Tabernero, Josep / Ramon Y Cajal, Santiago. ·From the *Pathology, †Oncology, ‡Surgery, and §Radiology Departments, Vall d'Hebron University Hospital, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain. ·Pancreas · Pubmed #28697132.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is a lethal cancer. Overexpression of Yes associated protein 1 (YAP1), a downstream target of Hippo pathway, implicated in regulation of cell growth and apoptosis, has been reported in several human tumor types. The objective of this study was to investigate YAP1 expression in patients with PDAC and its prognostic values. METHODS: We evaluated YAP1 expression in 64 PDAC and 15 chronic pancreatitis (CP) cases and its related pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN) lesions and in 5 control subjects. Yes associated protein 1 expression was determined by immunohistochemistry. Association of YAP1 with clinicopathologic features in PDAC, disease-free survival, and overall survival was analyzed. RESULTS: We found a higher positive rate of nuclear expression of YAP1 in PDAC than in CP (P = 0.000) and lower expression of YAP1 in PanIN lesions in CP in contrast with expression in PanIN lesions in PDAC. Nuclear overexpression of YAP1 in PDAC is associated with hepatic metastasis (P = 0.0280) and is a prognostic factor (P = 0.0320), as well as surgical margin involvement (P = 0.0013) and tumoral stage (P = 0.0109). CONCLUSIONS: Overexpression of YAP1 may occur as a part of tumorigenesis of PDAC. Yes associated protein 1 is an independent prognostic marker for overall survival of PDAC and associated with liver metastasis, being a potential therapeutic target.

4 Article Pancreatic cancer heterogeneity and response to Mek inhibition. 2017

Pedersen, K / Bilal, F / Bernadó Morales, C / Salcedo, M T / Macarulla, T / Massó-Vallés, D / Mohan, V / Vivancos, A / Carreras, M-J / Serres, X / Abu-Suboh, M / Balsells, J / Allende, E / Sagi, I / Soucek, L / Tabernero, J / Arribas, J. ·Preclinical Research Program, Vall d'Hebron Institute of Oncology (VHIO), Barcelona, Spain. · CIBER-ONC, Barcelona, Spain. · Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Universitat Autónoma de Barcelona, Campus de la UAB, Bellaterra, Spain. · Vall d'Hebron University Hospital (HUVH), Barcelona, Spain. · Universitat Autónoma de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain. · Department of Biological Regulation, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot, Israel. · Clinical Research Program, Vall d'Hebron Institute of Oncology (VHIO), Barcelona, Spain. · Institució Catalana de Recerca i Estudis Avançats (ICREA), Barcelona, Spain. ·Oncogene · Pubmed #28581516.

ABSTRACT: Our increasing knowledge of the mechanisms behind the progression of pancreatic cancer (PC) has not yet translated into effective treatments. Many promising drugs have failed in the clinic, highlighting the need for better preclinical models to assess drug efficacy and characterize mechanisms of resistance. Using different experimental models, including patient-derived xenografts (PDXs), we gauged the efficacy of therapies aimed at two hallmark lesions of PCs: activation of signaling pathways by oncogenic KRAS and inactivation of tumor-suppressor genes. Although the drug targeting inactivation of tumor suppressors by DNA methylation had little effect, the inhibition of Mek, a K-Ras effector, in combination with the standard of care (chemotherapy consisting of gemcitabine/Nab-paclitaxel), reduced the growth of three out of five PC-PDXs and impaired metastasis. The two least responding PC-PDXs were composed of genetically diverse cells, which displayed sensitivities to the Mek inhibitor differing by >10-fold. Unexpectedly, our analysis of this genetic diversity unveiled different KRAS mutations. As mutation in KRAS occurs early during progression, this heterogeneity may reflect the simultaneous appearance of different malignant cellular clones or, alternatively, that cells containing two mutations of KRAS are selected during tumor evolution. In vitro and in vivo analyses indicated that the intratumoral heterogeneity, along with the selective pressure imposed by the Mek inhibitor, resulted in rapid selection of resistant cells. Together with the gemcitabine/Nab-paclitaxel backbone, Mek inhibition could be effective in treatment of PC. However, resistance because of intratumoral heterogeneity is likely to develop frequently, pointing to the necessity of identifying the factors and mechanisms of resistance to further develop this therapy.

5 Article A systems approach identifies time-dependent associations of multimorbidities with pancreatic cancer risk. 2017

Gomez-Rubio, P / Rosato, V / Márquez, M / Bosetti, C / Molina-Montes, E / Rava, M / Piñero, J / Michalski, C W / Farré, A / Molero, X / Löhr, M / Ilzarbe, L / Perea, J / Greenhalf, W / O'Rorke, M / Tardón, A / Gress, T / Barberá, V M / Crnogorac-Jurcevic, T / Muñoz-Bellvís, L / Domínguez-Muñoz, E / Gutiérrez-Sacristán, A / Balsells, J / Costello, E / Guillén-Ponce, C / Huang, J / Iglesias, M / Kleeff, J / Kong, B / Mora, J / Murray, L / O'Driscoll, D / Peláez, P / Poves, I / Lawlor, R T / Carrato, A / Hidalgo, M / Scarpa, A / Sharp, L / Furlong, L I / Real, F X / La Vecchia, C / Malats, N / Anonymous3520902. ·Genetic and Molecular Epidemiology Group, Spanish National Cancer Research Center (CNIO), Madrid, and CIBERONC, Spain. · Branch of Medical Statistics, Biometry and Epidemiology "G.A. Maccacaro," Department of Clinical Sciences and Community Health, University of Milan, Milan. · Unit of Medical Statistics, Biometry and Bioinformatics, National Cancer Institute, IRCCS Foundation, Milan. · Department of Epidemiology, Mario Negri Institute for Pharmacological Research-IRCCS, Milan, Italy. · Research Programme on Biomedical Informatics (GRIB), Hospital del Mar Research Institute (IMIM), Pompeu Fabra Univeristy (UPF), Barcelona, Spain. · Department of Surgery, Technical University of Munich, Munich. · Department of Surgery, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany. · Department of Gastroenterology, Santa Creu i Sant Pau Hospital, Barcelona. · Exocrine Pancreas Research Unit and Vall d'Hebron Research Institute (VHIR), Vall d'Hebron University Hospital, Barcelona. · Department of Medicine, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Barcelona. · Network of Biomedical Research Centres (CIBER), Hepatic and Digestive Diseases and Epidemiology and Public Health, Madrid, Spain. · Gastrocentrum, Karolinska Institutet and University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden. · Department of Gastroenterology, Parc de Salut Mar University Hospital, Barcelona. · Department of Surgery, 12 de Octubre University Hospital, Madrid, Spain. · Department of Molecular and Clinical Cancer Medicine, The Royal Liverpool University Hospital, Liverpool. · Centre for Public Health, Queen's University Belfast, Belfast, UK. · Department of Medicine, University Institute of Oncology of Asturias, Oviedo, Spain. · Department of Gastroenterology, University Hospital of Giessen and Marburg, Marburg, Germany. · Molecular Genetics Laboratory, General University Hospital of Elche, Elche, Spain. · Centre for Molecular Oncology, Barts Cancer Institute, Queen Mary University of London, John Vane Science Centre, London, UK. · General and Digestive Surgery Department, Salamanca University Hospital, Salamanca. · Department of Gastroenterology, Clinical University Hospital of Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela. · Department of Oncology, Ramón y Cajal Hospital, Madrid, and CIBERONC, Spain. · Research Programme, National Cancer Registry Ireland. · ARC-Net Centre for Applied Research on Cancer and Department of Pathology and Diagnostics, University and Hospital trust of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Clara Campal Integrated Oncological Centre, Sanchinarro Hospital, Madrid, Spain. · Institute of Health & Society, Newcastle University, UK. · Epithelial Carcinogenesis Group, Spanish National Cancer Research Centre (CNIO), Madrid, and CIBERONC. · Department of Experimental and Health Sciences, Pompeu Fabra University, Barcelona, Spain. ·Ann Oncol · Pubmed #28383714.

ABSTRACT: Background: Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is usually diagnosed in late adulthood; therefore, many patients suffer or have suffered from other diseases. Identifying disease patterns associated with PDAC risk may enable a better characterization of high-risk patients. Methods: Multimorbidity patterns (MPs) were assessed from 17 self-reported conditions using hierarchical clustering, principal component, and factor analyses in 1705 PDAC cases and 1084 controls from a European population. Their association with PDAC was evaluated using adjusted logistic regression models. Time since diagnosis of morbidities to PDAC diagnosis/recruitment was stratified into recent (<3 years) and long term (≥3 years). The MPs and PDAC genetic networks were explored with DisGeNET bioinformatics-tool which focuses on gene-diseases associations available in curated databases. Results: Three MPs were observed: gastric (heartburn, acid regurgitation, Helicobacter pylori infection, and ulcer), metabolic syndrome (obesity, type-2 diabetes, hypercholesterolemia, and hypertension), and atopic (nasal allergies, skin allergies, and asthma). Strong associations with PDAC were observed for ≥2 recently diagnosed gastric conditions [odds ratio (OR), 6.13; 95% confidence interval CI 3.01-12.5)] and for ≥3 recently diagnosed metabolic syndrome conditions (OR, 1.61; 95% CI 1.11-2.35). Atopic conditions were negatively associated with PDAC (high adherence score OR for tertile III, 0.45; 95% CI, 0.36-0.55). Combining type-2 diabetes with gastric MP resulted in higher PDAC risk for recent (OR, 7.89; 95% CI 3.9-16.1) and long-term diagnosed conditions (OR, 1.86; 95% CI 1.29-2.67). A common genetic basis between MPs and PDAC was observed in the bioinformatics analysis. Conclusions: Specific multimorbidities aggregate and associate with PDAC in a time-dependent manner. A better characterization of a high-risk population for PDAC may help in the early diagnosis of this cancer. The common genetic basis between MP and PDAC points to a mechanistic link between these conditions.

6 Article Initial experience in sentinel lymph node detection in pancreatic cancer. 2016

Beisani, M / Roca, I / Cardenas, R / Blanco, L / Abu-Suboh, M / Dot, J / Armengol, J R / Olsina, J J / Balsells, J / Charco, R / Castell, J. ·Department of HPB Surgery, Hospital Vall d'Hebron, Autonomous University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain. Electronic address: mbeisani@gmail.com. · Department of Nuclear Medicine, Hospital Vall d'Hebron, Autonomous University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain. Electronic address: isaroca@gmail.com. · Department of Nuclear Medicine, Hospital Vall d'Hebron, Autonomous University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain. · Department of HPB Surgery, Hospital Vall d'Hebron, Autonomous University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain. · Department of Digestive Endoscopy, Hospital Vall d'Hebron, Autonomous University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain. · Department of Surgery, Hospital Arnau de Vilanova, University of Lleida, Lleida, Spain. ·Rev Esp Med Nucl Imagen Mol · Pubmed #26670326.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The local recurrence of pancreatic cancer is around 30% when complete resection can be achieved. Extended lymphatic resections may improve survival, but increases severe morbidity. As accurate patient selection should be mandatory, a new method is presented for pancreatic sentinel lymph node (SLN) detection with lymphoscintigraphy and gamma probe. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Seven patients with cT2N0M0 pancreatic head cancer were enrolled between 2009 and 2012 in this prospective study. One day prior to surgery, preoperative lymphoscintigraphy with echoendoscopic intratumoural administration of Tc(99m)-labelled nanocolloid was performed, with planar and SPECT-CT images obtained 2h later. Gamma probe detection of SLN was also carried out during surgery. RESULTS: Radiotracer administration was feasible in all patients. Scintigraphy images showed inter-aortocaval lymph nodes in 2 patients, hepatoduodenal ligament lymph nodes in 1, intravascular injection in 3, intestinal transit in 5, and main pancreatic duct visualisation in 1. Surgical resection could only be achieved in 4 patients owing to locally advanced disease. Intraoperative SLN detection was accomplished in 2 patients, both with negative results. Only in one patient could SLN be confirmed as truly negative by final histopathological analysis. CONCLUSIONS: This new method of pancreatic SLN detection is technically feasible, but challenging. Our preliminary results with 7 patients are not sufficient for clinical validation.

7 Article Long-term results of pancreaticoduodenectomy with superior mesenteric and portal vein resection for ductal adenocarcinoma in the head of the pancreas. 2015

Landi, Filippo / Dopazo, Cristina / Sapisochin, Gonzalo / Beisani, Marc / Blanco, Laia / Caralt, Mireia / Balsells, Joaquim / Charco, Ramón. ·Servicio de Cirugía Hepato-bilio-pancreática y Trasplantes, Hospital Universitario Vall d'Hebron, Universidad Autónoma de Barcelona, Barcelona, España. Electronic address: pippo.landi@gmail.com. · Servicio de Cirugía Hepato-bilio-pancreática y Trasplantes, Hospital Universitario Vall d'Hebron, Universidad Autónoma de Barcelona, Barcelona, España. ·Cir Esp · Pubmed #25981612.

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: The benefit of pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD) with superior mesenteric-portal vein resection (PVR) for pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PA) is still controversial in terms of morbidity, mortality and survival. We conducted a retrospective study to analyze outcomes of PD with PVR in a Spanish tertiary centre. METHODS: Between 2002 and 2012, 10 patients underwent PVR (PVR+ group) and 68 standard PD (PVR- group). Morbidity, mortality, overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) were compared between PVR+ and PVR- group. Prognostic factors were identified by a Cox regression model. RESULTS: Postoperative mortality was 5% (4/78), all patients in PVR- group. Morbidity was higher in the PVR- group compared to PVR+ (63 vs. 30%, P=.004). OS at 3 and 5 years was 43 and 43% in PVR+ group, 35 and 29% in PVR- group (P=.07). DFS at 3 and 5 years DFS were 28 and 15% in PVR+ group, 25 and 20% in PVR- group (P=.84). Median survival was 23.1 months in PVR- group, and 22.8 months in PVR+ group (P=.73). Factors related with OS were absence of adjuvant treatment (OR 2.9, 95%IC: 1.39-6.14, P=.003), R1 resection (OR 2.3, 95%IC: 1.2-4.43, P=.006), preoperative CA 19.9 level ≥ 170 UI/mL (OR 2.3, 95%IC: 1.22-4.32, P=.01). DFS risk factors were R1 resection (OR 2.6, 95%IC: 1.41-4.95, P=.002); moderate or poor tumor differentiation grade (OR 2.7, 95%IC: 1.23-6.17, P=.01); N1 lymph node status (OR 1.8, 95%IC: 1.02-3.19, P=.04); CA 19.9 level ≥ 170 UI/mL (OR 2.4, 95%IC: 1.30-4.54, P=.005). CONCLUSIONS: PVR for PA can be performed safely. Patients with PVR have a comparable survival to patients undergoing standard PD if disease-free margins can be obtained.

8 Article Autoimmune pancreatitis type-1 associated with intraduct papillary mucinous neoplasm: report of two cases. 2014

Vaquero, Eva C / Salcedo, Maria T / Cuatrecasas, Míriam / De León, Hannah / Merino, Xavier / Navarro, Salvador / Ginès, Angels / Abu-Suboh, Monder / Balsells, Joaquim / Fernández-Cruz, Laureano / Molero, Xavier. ·Department of Gastroenterology, Institut de Malalties Digestives i Metabòliques, Hospital Clínic, CIBEREHD, IDIBAPS, Barcelona, Spain. · Department of Pathology, Hospital Universitari Vall d'Hebron, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain. · Department of Pathology, Centre de Diagnòstic Biomèdic (CDB), Hospital Clínic, University of Barcelona and Banc de Tumors-Biobanc Clinic-IDIBAPS-XBTC, Barcelona, Spain. · Exocrine Pancreatic Diseases Research Group, Hospital Universitari Vall d'Hebron, Institut de Recerca (VHIR), Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, CIBEREHD, Barcelona, Spain. · Department of Radiology, Hospital Universitari Vall d'Hebron, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain. · Department of Endoscopy, Hospital Universitari Vall d'Hebron, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain. · Department of Surgery, Hospital Universitari Vall d'Hebron, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain. · Department of Surgery, Institut de Malalties Digestives i Metabòliques, Hospital Clínic, CIBEREHD, IDIBAPS, Barcelona, Spain. · Exocrine Pancreatic Diseases Research Group, Hospital Universitari Vall d'Hebron, Institut de Recerca (VHIR), Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, CIBEREHD, Barcelona, Spain. Electronic address: xavier.molero@vhir.org. ·Pancreatology · Pubmed #25062884.

ABSTRACT: Chronic pancreatitis lesions usually embrace both intraduct papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN) and pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). Patients at genetically-determined high risk of PDAC often harbor IPMN and/or chronic pancreatitis, suggesting IPMN, chronic pancreatitis and PDAC may share pathogenetic mechanisms. Chronic autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) may also herald PDAC. Concurrent IPMN and AIP have been reported in few patients. Here we describe two patients with IPMN who developed type-1 AIP fulfilling the Honolulu and Boston diagnostic criteria. AIP diffusively affected the whole pancreas, as well as peripancreatic lymph nodes and the gallbladder. Previous pancreatic resection of focal IPMN did not show features of AIP. One of the patients carried a CFTR class-I mutation. Of notice, serum IgG4 levels gradually decreased to normal values after IPMN excision. Common risk factors to IPMN and AIP may facilitate its coincidental generation.