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Pancreatic Neoplasms: HELP
Articles by Ana Babic
Based on 15 articles published since 2009
(Why 15 articles?)
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Between 2009 and 2019, A. Babic wrote the following 15 articles about Pancreatic Neoplasms.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Article Altered exocrine function can drive adipose wasting in early pancreatic cancer. 2018

Danai, Laura V / Babic, Ana / Rosenthal, Michael H / Dennstedt, Emily A / Muir, Alexander / Lien, Evan C / Mayers, Jared R / Tai, Karen / Lau, Allison N / Jones-Sali, Paul / Prado, Carla M / Petersen, Gloria M / Takahashi, Naoki / Sugimoto, Motokazu / Yeh, Jen Jen / Lopez, Nicole / Bardeesy, Nabeel / Fernandez-Del Castillo, Carlos / Liss, Andrew S / Koong, Albert C / Bui, Justin / Yuan, Chen / Welch, Marisa W / Brais, Lauren K / Kulke, Matthew H / Dennis, Courtney / Clish, Clary B / Wolpin, Brian M / Vander Heiden, Matthew G. ·Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research and Department of Biology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA. · Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA, USA. · Department of Agricultural, Food and Nutritional Science, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. · Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA. · Department of Surgery, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, USA. · University of California San Diego School of Medicine, La Jolla, CA, USA. · Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA. · MD Anderson, Department of Radiation Oncology, Houston, TX, USA. · Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford, CA, USA. · David Geffen School of Medicine at University of California, Los Angeles, CA, USA. · Section of Hematology/Oncology, Boston University and Boston Medical Center, Boston, MA, USA. · Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard University, Cambridge, MA, USA. · Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA, USA. bwolpin@partners.org. · Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research and Department of Biology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA. mvh@mit.edu. · Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA, USA. mvh@mit.edu. · Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard University, Cambridge, MA, USA. mvh@mit.edu. ·Nature · Pubmed #29925948.

ABSTRACT: Malignancy is accompanied by changes in the metabolism of both cells and the organism

2 Article Real-time Genomic Characterization of Advanced Pancreatic Cancer to Enable Precision Medicine. 2018

Aguirre, Andrew J / Nowak, Jonathan A / Camarda, Nicholas D / Moffitt, Richard A / Ghazani, Arezou A / Hazar-Rethinam, Mehlika / Raghavan, Srivatsan / Kim, Jaegil / Brais, Lauren K / Ragon, Dorisanne / Welch, Marisa W / Reilly, Emma / McCabe, Devin / Marini, Lori / Anderka, Kristin / Helvie, Karla / Oliver, Nelly / Babic, Ana / Da Silva, Annacarolina / Nadres, Brandon / Van Seventer, Emily E / Shahzade, Heather A / St Pierre, Joseph P / Burke, Kelly P / Clancy, Thomas / Cleary, James M / Doyle, Leona A / Jajoo, Kunal / McCleary, Nadine J / Meyerhardt, Jeffrey A / Murphy, Janet E / Ng, Kimmie / Patel, Anuj K / Perez, Kimberly / Rosenthal, Michael H / Rubinson, Douglas A / Ryou, Marvin / Shapiro, Geoffrey I / Sicinska, Ewa / Silverman, Stuart G / Nagy, Rebecca J / Lanman, Richard B / Knoerzer, Deborah / Welsch, Dean J / Yurgelun, Matthew B / Fuchs, Charles S / Garraway, Levi A / Getz, Gad / Hornick, Jason L / Johnson, Bruce E / Kulke, Matthew H / Mayer, Robert J / Miller, Jeffrey W / Shyn, Paul B / Tuveson, David A / Wagle, Nikhil / Yeh, Jen Jen / Hahn, William C / Corcoran, Ryan B / Carter, Scott L / Wolpin, Brian M. ·Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts. andrew_aguirre@dfci.harvard.edu carter.scott@jimmy.harvard.edu brian_wolpin@dfci.harvard.edu. · Broad Institute of Harvard and MIT, Cambridge, Massachusetts. · Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts. · Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. · Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts. · Department of Pathology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts. · Joint Center for Cancer Precision Medicine, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute/Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts. · Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts. · Department of Biomedical Informatics, Department of Pathology, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, New York. · Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center, Boston, Massachusetts. · Department of Surgery, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts. · Department of Gastroenterology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts. · Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts. · Department of Medical Affairs, Guardant Health, Inc., Redwood City, California. · BioMed Valley Discoveries, Kansas City, Missouri. · Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, Cold Spring Harbor, New York; Lustgarten Foundation Pancreatic Cancer Research Laboratory, Cold Spring Harbor, New York. · Departments of Surgery and Pharmacology, Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina. ·Cancer Discov · Pubmed #29903880.

ABSTRACT: Clinically relevant subtypes exist for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), but molecular characterization is not yet standard in clinical care. We implemented a biopsy protocol to perform time-sensitive whole-exome sequencing and RNA sequencing for patients with advanced PDAC. Therapeutically relevant genomic alterations were identified in 48% (34/71) and pathogenic/likely pathogenic germline alterations in 18% (13/71) of patients. Overall, 30% (21/71) of enrolled patients experienced a change in clinical management as a result of genomic data. Twenty-six patients had germline and/or somatic alterations in DNA-damage repair genes, and 5 additional patients had mutational signatures of homologous recombination deficiency but no identified causal genomic alteration. Two patients had oncogenic in-frame

3 Article Plasma inflammatory cytokines and survival of pancreatic cancer patients. 2018

Babic, A / Schnure, N / Neupane, N P / Zaman, M M / Rifai, N / Welch, M W / Brais, L K / Rubinson, D A / Morales-Oyarvide, V / Yuan, C / Zhang, S / Poole, E M / Wolpin, B M / Kulke, M H / Barbie, D A / Wong, K / Fuchs, C S / Ng, K. ·Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, 450 Brookline Avenue, Boston, MA, 02215, USA. · Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania Philadelphia, 3400 Civic Center Boulevard, Philadelphia, PA, 19104, USA. · Thomas Jefferson University, 1020 Walnut Street, Philadelphia, PA, 19107, USA. · Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, 330 Brookline Avenue, Boston, MA, 02215, USA. · Department of Pathology, Boston Children's Hospital, 300 Longwood Avenue, Boston, MA, 02115, USA. · Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, 181 Longwood Avenue, Boston, MA, 02115, USA. · Yale Cancer Center, Yale School of Medicine, Smilow Cancer Hospital, 333 Cedar Street, New Haven, CT, 06510, USA. · Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, 450 Brookline Avenue, Boston, MA, 02215, USA. Kimmie_Ng@dfci.harvard.edu. ·Clin Transl Gastroenterol · Pubmed #29691365.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: Inflammation and inflammatory conditions have been associated with pancreatic cancer risk and progression in a number of clinical, epidemiological, and animal model studies. The goal of the present study is to identify plasma markers of inflammation associated with survival of pancreatic cancer patients, and assess their joint contribution to patient outcome. METHODS: We measured circulating levels of four established markers of inflammation (C-reactive protein (CRP), interleukin-6 (IL-6), soluble tumor necrosis factor receptor type II (sTNF-RII), and macrophage inhibitory cytokine-1 (MIC-1)) in 446 patients enrolled in an ongoing prospective clinic-based study. Hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for death were estimated using multivariate Cox proportional hazards models. RESULTS: Overall mortality was significantly increased in patients in the top quartile of CRP (HR = 2.52, 95% CI: 1.82-3.49), IL-6 (HR = 2.78, 95% CI: 2.03-3.81), sTNF-RII (HR = 2.00, 95% CI: 1.46-2.72), and MIC-1 (HR = 2.53, 95% CI: 1.83-3.50), compared to those in the bottom quartile (P-trend <0.0001 for all four comparisons). Furthermore, patients with higher circulating concentrations of all four cytokines had a median survival of 3.7 months; whereas, those with lower levels had a median survival of 19.2 months (HR = 4.55, 95% CI: 2.87-7.20, P-trend <0.0001). CONCLUSION: Individual elevated plasma inflammatory cytokines are associated with significant and dramatic reductions in pancreatic cancer patient survival. Furthermore, we observed an independent combined effect of those cytokines on patient survival, suggesting that multiple inflammatory pathways are likely involved in PDAC progression. Future research efforts to target the inflammatory state using combination strategies in pancreatic cancer patients are warranted.

4 Article Prediagnosis Use of Statins Associates With Increased Survival Times of Patients With Pancreatic Cancer. 2018

Hamada, Tsuyoshi / Khalaf, Natalia / Yuan, Chen / Morales-Oyarvide, Vicente / Babic, Ana / Nowak, Jonathan A / Qian, Zhi Rong / Ng, Kimmie / Rubinson, Douglas A / Kraft, Peter / Giovannucci, Edward L / Stampfer, Meir J / Fuchs, Charles S / Ogino, Shuji / Wolpin, Brian M. ·Department of Oncologic Pathology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. · Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Endoscopy, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. · Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts; Department of Epidemiology, Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts. · Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. · Program in MPE Molecular Pathological Epidemiology, Department of Pathology, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. · Department of Epidemiology, Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts; Department of Biostatistics, Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts. · Department of Epidemiology, Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts; Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts; Department of Nutrition, Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts. · Yale Cancer Center, New Haven, Connecticut; Department of Medicine, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut; Smilow Cancer Hospital, New Haven, Connecticut. · Department of Oncologic Pathology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts; Department of Epidemiology, Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts; Program in MPE Molecular Pathological Epidemiology, Department of Pathology, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. · Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. Electronic address: bwolpin@partners.org. ·Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol · Pubmed #29474971.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND & AIMS: Statin medications, most commonly prescribed to reduce lipid levels and prevent cardiovascular disease, may be associated with longer survival times of patients with cancer. However, the association of statins with outcomes of patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma is not clear. METHODS: We analyzed the association of statin use before a diagnosis of pancreatic cancer with survival times of 648 participants in the Nurses' Health Study and Health Professionals Follow-up Study who were diagnosed with pancreatic adenocarcinoma from 2000 through 2013. We estimated hazard ratios (HRs) for overall mortality using Cox proportional hazards models with adjustment for potential confounders. We assessed the temporal association between prediagnosis statin use and cancer survival by 2-year lag periods to account for a possible latency period between statin use and cancer survival. RESULTS: Regular statin use before diagnosis of pancreatic cancer was associated with modestly prolonged survival compared with nonregular use (adjusted HR, 0.82; 95% CI, 0.69-0.97; P = .02). A 1-month longer median survival was observed in regular statin users compared with nonregular users. Regular statin use within the 2 years prior to cancer diagnosis was most strongly associated with longer survival. We observed no statistically significant effect modification by smoking status, body mass index, diabetes, or cancer stage (all P CONCLUSIONS: Regular statin use before diagnosis of pancreatic cancer was associated with modest increases in survival times in 2 large prospective cohort studies.

5 Article Genome-wide meta-analysis identifies five new susceptibility loci for pancreatic cancer. 2018

Klein, Alison P / Wolpin, Brian M / Risch, Harvey A / Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael Z / Mocci, Evelina / Zhang, Mingfeng / Canzian, Federico / Childs, Erica J / Hoskins, Jason W / Jermusyk, Ashley / Zhong, Jun / Chen, Fei / Albanes, Demetrius / Andreotti, Gabriella / Arslan, Alan A / Babic, Ana / Bamlet, William R / Beane-Freeman, Laura / Berndt, Sonja I / Blackford, Amanda / Borges, Michael / Borgida, Ayelet / Bracci, Paige M / Brais, Lauren / Brennan, Paul / Brenner, Hermann / Bueno-de-Mesquita, Bas / Buring, Julie / Campa, Daniele / Capurso, Gabriele / Cavestro, Giulia Martina / Chaffee, Kari G / Chung, Charles C / Cleary, Sean / Cotterchio, Michelle / Dijk, Frederike / Duell, Eric J / Foretova, Lenka / Fuchs, Charles / Funel, Niccola / Gallinger, Steven / M Gaziano, J Michael / Gazouli, Maria / Giles, Graham G / Giovannucci, Edward / Goggins, Michael / Goodman, Gary E / Goodman, Phyllis J / Hackert, Thilo / Haiman, Christopher / Hartge, Patricia / Hasan, Manal / Hegyi, Peter / Helzlsouer, Kathy J / Herman, Joseph / Holcatova, Ivana / Holly, Elizabeth A / Hoover, Robert / Hung, Rayjean J / Jacobs, Eric J / Jamroziak, Krzysztof / Janout, Vladimir / Kaaks, Rudolf / Khaw, Kay-Tee / Klein, Eric A / Kogevinas, Manolis / Kooperberg, Charles / Kulke, Matthew H / Kupcinskas, Juozas / Kurtz, Robert J / Laheru, Daniel / Landi, Stefano / Lawlor, Rita T / Lee, I-Min / LeMarchand, Loic / Lu, Lingeng / Malats, Núria / Mambrini, Andrea / Mannisto, Satu / Milne, Roger L / Mohelníková-Duchoňová, Beatrice / Neale, Rachel E / Neoptolemos, John P / Oberg, Ann L / Olson, Sara H / Orlow, Irene / Pasquali, Claudio / Patel, Alpa V / Peters, Ulrike / Pezzilli, Raffaele / Porta, Miquel / Real, Francisco X / Rothman, Nathaniel / Scelo, Ghislaine / Sesso, Howard D / Severi, Gianluca / Shu, Xiao-Ou / Silverman, Debra / Smith, Jill P / Soucek, Pavel / Sund, Malin / Talar-Wojnarowska, Renata / Tavano, Francesca / Thornquist, Mark D / Tobias, Geoffrey S / Van Den Eeden, Stephen K / Vashist, Yogesh / Visvanathan, Kala / Vodicka, Pavel / Wactawski-Wende, Jean / Wang, Zhaoming / Wentzensen, Nicolas / White, Emily / Yu, Herbert / Yu, Kai / Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne / Zheng, Wei / Kraft, Peter / Li, Donghui / Chanock, Stephen / Obazee, Ofure / Petersen, Gloria M / Amundadottir, Laufey T. ·Department of Oncology, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, 21231, USA. aklein1@jhmi.edu. · Department of Pathology, Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, 21287, USA. aklein1@jhmi.edu. · Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA, 02215, USA. · Department of Chronic Disease Epidemiology, Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, CT, 06520, USA. · Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, 20892, USA. · Department of Oncology, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, 21231, USA. · Laboratory of Translational Genomics, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, 20892, USA. · Genomic Epidemiology Group, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), 69120, Heidelberg, Germany. · Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY, 10016, USA. · Department of Population Health, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY, 10016, USA. · Department of Environmental Medicine, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY, 10016, USA. · Department of Health Sciences Research, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN, 55905, USA. · Department of Pathology, Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, 21287, USA. · Lunenfeld-Tanenbaum Research Institute of Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, M5G 1×5, Canada. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, 94158, USA. · International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), 69372, Lyon, France. · Division of Clinical Epidemiology and Aging Research, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), 69120, Heidelberg, Germany. · Division of Preventive Oncology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), 69120, Heidelberg, Germany. · National Center for Tumor Diseases (NCT), 69120, Heidelberg, Germany. · Department for Determinants of Chronic Diseases (DCD), National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), 3720 BA, Bilthoven, The Netherlands. · Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University Medical Centre, 3584 CX, Utrecht, The Netherlands. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, SW7 2AZ, UK. · Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, 50603, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. · Division of Preventive Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA, 02215, USA. · Department of Epidemiology, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA, 02115, USA. · Department of Biology, University of Pisa, 56126, Pisa, Italy. · Digestive and Liver Disease Unit, 'Sapienza' University of Rome, 00185, Rome, Italy. · Gastroenterology and Gastrointestinal Endoscopy Unit, Vita-Salute San Raffaele University, IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, 20132, Milan, Italy. · Cancer Genomics Research Laboratory, National Cancer Institute, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, Leidos Biomedical Research Inc., Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research, Frederick, MD, 21702, USA. · Cancer Care Ontario, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, M5G 2L7, Canada. · Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, M5T 3M7, Canada. · Department of Pathology, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, 1007 MB, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Unit of Nutrition and Cancer, Cancer Epidemiology Research Program, Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute (IDIBELL), Catalan Institute of Oncology (ICO), Barcelona, 08908, Spain. · Department of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, Masaryk Memorial Cancer Institute, 65653, Brno, Czech Republic. · Yale Cancer Center, New Haven, CT, 06510, USA. · Department of Translational Research and The New Technologies in Medicine and Surgery, University of Pisa, 56126, Pisa, Italy. · Division of Aging, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA, 02115, USA. · Boston VA Healthcare System, Boston, MA, 02132, USA. · Department of Basic Medical Sciences, Laboratory of Biology, Medical School, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, 106 79, Athens, Greece. · Cancer Epidemiology and Intelligence Division, Cancer Council Victoria, Melbourne, VIC, 3004, Australia. · Centre for Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Melbourne School of Population and Global Health, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC, 3010, Australia. · Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, Monash University, Melbourne, VIC, 3004, Australia. · Division of Public Health Sciences, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA, 98109, USA. · SWOG Statistical Center, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA, 98109, USA. · Department of General Surgery, University Hospital Heidelberg, 69120, Heidelberg, Germany. · Department of Preventive Medicine, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, 90032, USA. · Department of Epidemiology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, 77230, USA. · First Department of Medicine, University of Szeged, 6725, Szeged, Hungary. · Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, 20892, USA. · Department of Radiation Oncology, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, 21231, USA. · Institute of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, Charles University, 2nd Faculty of Medicine, 150 06, Prague 5, Czech Republic. · Epidemiology Research Program, American Cancer Society, Atlanta, GA, 30303, USA. · Department of Hematology, Institute of Hematology and Transfusion Medicine, 02-776, Warsaw, Poland. · Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Faculty of Medicine, University of Ostrava, 701 03, Ostrava, Czech Republic. · Faculty of Medicine, University of Olomouc, 771 47, Olomouc, Czech Republic. · Division of Cancer Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), 69120, Heidelberg, Germany. · School of Clinical Medicine, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, CB2 0SP, UK. · Glickman Urological and Kidney Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH, 44195, USA. · ISGlobal, Centre for Research in Environmental Epidemiology (CREAL), 08003, Barcelona, Spain. · CIBER Epidemiología y Salud Pública (CIBERESP), 08003, Barcelona, Spain. · Hospital del Mar Institute of Medical Research (IMIM), Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, 08003, Barcelona, Spain. · Universitat Pompeu Fabra (UPF), 08002, Barcelona, Spain. · Department of Gastroenterology, Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, 44307, Kaunas, Lithuania. · Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY, 10065, USA. · ARC-NET: Centre for Applied Research on Cancer, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, 37134, Verona, Italy. · Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA, 02115, USA. · Cancer Epidemiology Program, University of Hawaii Cancer Center, Honolulu, HI, 96813, USA. · Genetic and Molecular Epidemiology Group, Spanish National Cancer Research Center (CNIO), 28029, Madrid, Spain. · CIBERONC, 28029, Madrid, Spain. · Oncology Department, ASL1 Massa Carrara, Carrara, 54033, Italy. · Department of Public Health Solutions, National Institute for Health and Welfare, 00271, Helsinki, Finland. · Department of Oncology, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, Palacky University Olomouc and University Hospital, 775 20, Olomouc, Czech Republic. · Population Health Department, QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Brisbane, 4029, Australia. · Department of General Surgery, University of Heidelburg, Heidelberg, Germany. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY, 10065, USA. · Department of Surgery, Oncology and Gastroenterology (DiSCOG), University of Padua, 35124, Padua, Italy. · Pancreas Unit, Department of Digestive Diseases and Internal Medicine, Sant'Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, 40138, Bologna, Italy. · Epithelial Carcinogenesis Group, Spanish National Cancer Research Centre-CNIO, 28029, Madrid, Spain. · Departament de Ciències Experimentals i de la Salut, Universitat Pompeu Fabra, 08002, Barcelona, Spain. · Centre de Recherche en Épidémiologie et Santé des Populations (CESP, Inserm U1018), Facultés de Medicine, Université Paris-Saclay, UPS, UVSQ, Gustave Roussy, 94800, Villejuif, France. · Division of Epidemiology, Department of Medicine, Vanderbilt Epidemiology Center, Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN, 37232, USA. · Department of Medicine, Georgetown University, Washington, 20057, USA. · Laboratory for Pharmacogenomics, Biomedical Center, Faculty of Medicine in Pilsen, Charles University, 323 00, Pilsen, Czech Republic. · Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Umeå University, 901 85, Umeå, Sweden. · Department of Digestive Tract Diseases, Medical University of Łodz, 90-647, Łodz, Poland. · Division of Gastroenterology and Research Laboratory, IRCCS Scientific Institute and Regional General Hospital "Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza", 71013, San Giovanni Rotondo, FG, Italy. · Division of Research, Kaiser Permanente Northern California, Oakland, CA, 94612, USA. · Department of General, Visceral and Thoracic Surgery, University Hamburg-Eppendorf, 20246, Hamburg, Germany. · Department of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD, 21205, USA. · Department of Molecular Biology of Cancer, Institute of Experimental Medicine, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, 142 20, Prague 4, Czech Republic. · Department of Epidemiology and Environmental Health, University at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY, 14214, USA. · Department of Computational Biology, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, TN, 38105, USA. · Department of Epidemiology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, 98195, USA. · Perlmutter Cancer Center, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY, 10016, USA. · Department of Biostatistics, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA, 02115, USA. · Department of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, 77030, USA. · Laboratory of Translational Genomics, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, 20892, USA. amundadottirl@mail.nih.gov. ·Nat Commun · Pubmed #29422604.

ABSTRACT: In 2020, 146,063 deaths due to pancreatic cancer are estimated to occur in Europe and the United States combined. To identify common susceptibility alleles, we performed the largest pancreatic cancer GWAS to date, including 9040 patients and 12,496 controls of European ancestry from the Pancreatic Cancer Cohort Consortium (PanScan) and the Pancreatic Cancer Case-Control Consortium (PanC4). Here, we find significant evidence of a novel association at rs78417682 (7p12/TNS3, P = 4.35 × 10

6 Article Statin use and pancreatic cancer risk in two prospective cohort studies. 2018

Hamada, Tsuyoshi / Khalaf, Natalia / Yuan, Chen / Babic, Ana / Morales-Oyarvide, Vicente / Qian, Zhi Rong / Nowak, Jonathan Andrew / Ng, Kimmie / Kraft, Peter / Rubinson, Douglas Adam / Stampfer, Meir Jonathan / Giovannucci, Edward Luciano / Fuchs, Charles Stewart / Ogino, Shuji / Wolpin, Brian Matthew. ·Department of Oncologic Pathology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA. · Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Endoscopy, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA. · Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard Medical School, 450 Brookline Avenue, Boston, MA, 02215, USA. · Department of Epidemiology, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA. · Program in MPE Molecular Pathological Epidemiology, Department of Patholog, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA. · Department of Biostatistics, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA. · Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA. · Department of Nutrition, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA. · Yale Cancer Center, New Haven, CT, USA. · Department of Medicine, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA. · Smilow Cancer Hospital, New Haven, CT, USA. · Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard Medical School, 450 Brookline Avenue, Boston, MA, 02215, USA. bwolpin@partners.org. ·J Gastroenterol · Pubmed #29362938.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Statins, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitors, are common lipid-lowering agents and may reduce the risk of several cancer types including pancreatic cancer. However, the association between statin use and pancreatic cancer risk has not been fully evaluated in prospective studies. METHODS: We studied the association between statin use and incident pancreatic cancer in 113,059 participants from the prospective Nurses' Health Study and Health Professionals Follow-up Study. Statin use was self-reported via study questionnaires and updated biennially. Hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for incidence of pancreatic cancer were estimated using multivariable Cox proportional hazards models with adjustment for potential confounders. RESULTS: In total, 583 participants developed incident pancreatic cancer during 1.4 million person-years of follow-up. No difference was identified in pancreatic cancer risk for regular versus non-regular statin users (multivariable-adjusted HR 0.98; 95% CI 0.82-1.16). There was no significant heterogeneity in the association of statin use with pancreatic cancer risk between the cohorts. Similarly, longer duration of regular statin use was not associated with decreased risk of pancreatic cancer (P CONCLUSIONS: Regular statin use was not associated with pancreatic cancer risk in two large prospective cohort studies in the U.S.

7 Article Regular Use of Aspirin or Non-Aspirin Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs Is Not Associated With Risk of Incident Pancreatic Cancer in Two Large Cohort Studies. 2018

Khalaf, Natalia / Yuan, Chen / Hamada, Tsuyoshi / Cao, Yin / Babic, Ana / Morales-Oyarvide, Vicente / Kraft, Peter / Ng, Kimmie / Giovannucci, Edward / Ogino, Shuji / Stampfer, Meir / Cochrane, Barbara B / Manson, JoAnn E / Clish, Clary B / Chan, Andrew T / Fuchs, Charles S / Wolpin, Brian M. ·Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Endoscopy, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts. · Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts; Department of Epidemiology, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts. · Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. · Clinical and Translational Epidemiology Unit, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts; Division of Gastroenterology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts; Department of Nutrition, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts. · Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts; Department of Epidemiology, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts; Program of MPE Molecular Pathological Epidemiology, Department of Pathology, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. · School of Nursing, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington. · Department of Epidemiology, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts; Division of Preventive Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. · Broad Institute of Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts. · Clinical and Translational Epidemiology Unit, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts; Division of Gastroenterology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts; Broad Institute of Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts; Channing Division of Network Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. · Yale Cancer Center at Yale School of Medicine and Smilow Cancer Hospital, New Haven, Connecticut. · Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. Electronic address: bwolpin@partners.org. ·Gastroenterology · Pubmed #29229401.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND & AIMS: Use of aspirin and/or non-aspirin nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) reduces the risk of several cancers, but it is not clear if use of these drugs is associated with risk of pancreatic cancer. METHODS: We evaluated aspirin and non-aspirin NSAID use and risk of pancreatic adenocarcinoma in 141,940 participants from the Health Professionals Follow-up Study and Nurses' Health Study using multivariable-adjusted Cox proportional hazards regression. We considered several exposure classifications to model differing lag times between NSAID exposure and cancer development. We also conducted a nested case-control study of participants from 3 prospective cohorts using conditional logistic regression to evaluate pre-diagnosis levels of plasma salicylurate, a major metabolite of aspirin, in 396 pancreatic cancer cases and 784 matched individuals without pancreatic cancer (controls). RESULTS: In the prospective cohort study, 1122 participants developed pancreatic adenocarcinoma over 4.2 million person-years. Use of aspirin or non-aspirin NSAIDs was not associated with pancreatic cancer risk, even after considering several latency exposure classifications. In a pre-planned subgroup analysis, regular aspirin use was associated with reduced pancreatic cancer risk among participants with diabetes (relative risk, 0.71; 95% CI, 0.54-0.94). In the nested case-control study, pre-diagnosis levels of salicylurate were not associated with pancreatic cancer risk (odds ratio, 1.08; 95% CI, 0.72-1.61; P CONCLUSIONS: Regular aspirin or non-aspirin NSAID use was not associated with future risk of pancreatic cancer in participants from several large prospective cohort studies. A possible reduction in risk for pancreatic cancer among people with diabetes who regularly use aspirin should be further examined in preclinical and human studies.

8 Article Association of Alterations in Main Driver Genes With Outcomes of Patients With Resected Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma. 2018

Qian, Zhi Rong / Rubinson, Douglas A / Nowak, Jonathan A / Morales-Oyarvide, Vicente / Dunne, Richard F / Kozak, Margaret M / Welch, Marisa W / Brais, Lauren K / Da Silva, Annacarolina / Li, Tingting / Li, Wanwan / Masuda, Atsuhiro / Yang, Juhong / Shi, Yan / Gu, Mancang / Masugi, Yohei / Bui, Justin / Zellers, Caitlin L / Yuan, Chen / Babic, Ana / Khalaf, Natalia / Aguirre, Andrew / Ng, Kimmie / Miksad, Rebecca A / Bullock, Andrea J / Chang, Daniel T / Tseng, Jennifer F / Clancy, Thomas E / Linehan, David C / Findeis-Hosey, Jennifer J / Doyle, Leona A / Thorner, Aaron R / Ducar, Matthew / Wollison, Bruce / Laing, Angelica / Hahn, William C / Meyerson, Matthew / Fuchs, Charles S / Ogino, Shuji / Hornick, Jason L / Hezel, Aram F / Koong, Albert C / Wolpin, Brian M. ·Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. · Department of Oncologic Pathology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts. · Department of Pathology, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. · Division of Hematology and Oncology, Department of Medicine, Wilmot Cancer Institute, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, New York. · Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford, California. · Department of Epidemiology, Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts. · Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Endoscopy, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts. · Department of Hematology and Oncology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. · Department of Surgery, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. · Department of Surgery, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. · Department of Surgery, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, New York. · Department of Pathology, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, New York. · Center for Cancer Genome Discovery, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts. · Broad Institute of Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Harvard, Cambridge, Massachusetts. · Division of Molecular Pathological Epidemiology, Department of Pathology, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. · Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston. ·JAMA Oncol · Pubmed #29098284.

ABSTRACT: Importance: Although patients with resected pancreatic adenocarcinoma are at high risk for disease recurrence, few biomarkers are available to inform patient outcomes. Objective: To evaluate the alterations of the 4 main driver genes in pancreatic adenocarcinoma and patient outcomes after cancer resection. Design, Setting, and Participants: This study analyzed protein expression and DNA alterations for the KRAS, CDKN2A, SMAD4, and TP53 genes by immunohistochemistry and next-generation sequencing in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tumors in 356 patients with resected pancreatic adenocarcinoma who were treated at the Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women's Cancer Center (October 26, 2002, to May 21, 2012), University of Rochester Medical Center (March 1, 2006, to November 1, 2013), or Stanford Cancer Institute (September 26, 1995, to May 22, 2013). Associations of driver gene alterations with disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) were evaluated using Cox proportional hazards regression with estimation of hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% CIs and adjustment for age, sex, tumor characteristics, institution, and perioperative treatment. Data were collected September 9, 2012, to June 28, 2016, and analyzed December 17, 2016, to March 14, 2017. Main Outcomes and Measures: The DFS and OS among patients with resected pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Results: Of the 356 patients studied, 191 (53.7%) were men and 165 (46.3%) were women, with a median (interquartile range [IQR]) age of 67 (59.0-73.5) years. Patients with KRAS mutant tumors had worse DFS (median [IQR], 12.3 [6.7 -27.2] months) and OS (20.3 [11.3-38.3] months) compared with patients with KRAS wild-type tumors (DFS, 16.2 [8.9-30.5] months; OS, 38.6 [16.6-63.1] months) and had 5-year OS of 13.0% vs 30.2%. Particularly poor outcomes were identified in patients with KRAS G12D-mutant tumors, who had a median (IQR) OS of 15.3 (9.8-32.7) months. Patients whose tumors lacked CDKN2A expression had worse DFS (median, 11.5 [IQR, 6.2-24.5] months) and OS (19.7 [10.9-37.1] months) compared with patients who had intact CDKN2A (DFS, 14.8 [8.2-30.5] months; OS, 24.6 [14.1-44.6] months). The molecular status of SMAD4 was not associated with DFS or OS, whereas TP53 status was associated only with shorter DFS (HR, 1.33; 95% CI, 1.02-1.75; P = .04). Patients had worse DFS and OS if they had a greater number of altered driver genes. Compared with patients with 0 to 2 altered genes, those with 4 altered genes had worse DFS (HR, 1.79 [95% CI, 1.24-2.59; P = .002]) and OS (HR, 1.38 [95% CI, 0.98-1.94; P = .06]). Five-year OS was 18.4% for patients with 0 to 2 gene alterations, 14.1% for those with 3 alterations, and 8.2% for those with 4 alterations. Conclusions and Relevance: Patient outcomes are associated with alterations of the 4 main driver genes in resected pancreatic adenocarcinoma.

9 Article Lymph node metastases in resected pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma: predictors of disease recurrence and survival. 2017

Morales-Oyarvide, Vicente / Rubinson, Douglas A / Dunne, Richard F / Kozak, Margaret M / Bui, Justin L / Yuan, Chen / Qian, Zhi Rong / Babic, Ana / Da Silva, Annacarolina / Nowak, Jonathan A / Khalaf, Natalia / Brais, Lauren K / Welch, Marisa W / Zellers, Caitlin L / Ng, Kimmie / Chang, Daniel T / Miksad, Rebecca A / Bullock, Andrea J / Tseng, Jennifer F / Swanson, Richard S / Clancy, Thomas E / Linehan, David C / Findeis-Hosey, Jennifer J / Doyle, Leona A / Hornick, Jason L / Ogino, Shuji / Fuchs, Charles S / Hezel, Aram F / Koong, Albert C / Wolpin, Brian M. ·Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard Medical School, 450 Brookline Avenue, Boston, MA 02215, USA. · Department of Medicine, Division of Hematology and Oncology, Wilmot Cancer Institute, University of Rochester Medical Center, 601 Elmwood Avenue, Rochester, NY 14642, USA. · Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford Cancer Institute, 269 Campus Drive West, Stanford, CA 94305-5152, USA. · Department of Epidemiology, Harvard TH Chan School of Public Health, 677 Huntington Avenue, Boston, MA 02115, USA. · Department of Pathology, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, 75 Francis Street, Boston, MA 02115, USA. · Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Endoscopy, Brigham and Women's Hospital, 75 Francis Street, Boston, MA 02115, USA. · Department of Hematology and Oncology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and Harvard Medical School, 330 Brookline Avenue, Boston, MA 02215, USA. · Department of Surgery, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and Harvard Medical School, 330 Brookline Avenue, Boston, MA 02215, USA. · Department of Surgery, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, 75 Francis Street, Boston, MA 02115, USA. · Department of Surgery, University of Rochester Medical Center, 601 Elmwood Avenue, Rochester, NY 14642, USA. · Department of Pathology, University of Rochester Medical Center, 601 Elmwood Avenue, Rochester, NY 14642, USA. · Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, 1840 Old Spanish Trail, Houston, TX 77054, USA. ·Br J Cancer · Pubmed #28982112.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Few studies have simultaneously assessed the prognostic value of the multiple classification systems for lymph node (LN) metastases in resected pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). METHODS: In 600 patients with resected PDAC, we examined the association of LN parameters (AJCC 7th and 8th editions, LN ratio (LNR), and log odds of metastatic LN (LODDS)) with pattern of recurrence and patient survival using logistic regression and Cox proportional hazards regression, respectively. Regression models adjusted for age, sex, margin status, tumour grade, and perioperative therapy. RESULTS: Lymph node metastases classified by AJCC 7th and 8th editions, LNR, and LODDS were associated with worse disease free-survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) (all P CONCLUSIONS: American Joint Committee on Cancer 8th edition LN classification is an effective and practical tool to predict outcomes in patients with resected PDAC. However, the prognostic value of LN metastases is attenuated in patients with positive resection margins and distal pancreatectomies.

10 Article Cigarette Smoking and Pancreatic Cancer Survival. 2017

Yuan, Chen / Morales-Oyarvide, Vicente / Babic, Ana / Clish, Clary B / Kraft, Peter / Bao, Ying / Qian, Zhi Rong / Rubinson, Douglas A / Ng, Kimmie / Giovannucci, Edward L / Ogino, Shuji / Stampfer, Meir J / Gaziano, John Michael / Sesso, Howard D / Cochrane, Barbara B / Manson, JoAnn E / Fuchs, Charles S / Wolpin, Brian M. ·Chen Yuan, Vicente Morales-Oyarvide, Ana Babic, Zhi Rong Qian, Douglas A. Rubinson, Kimmie Ng, Shuji Ogino, Charles S. Fuchs, and Brian M. Wolpin, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard Medical School · Chen Yuan, Peter Kraft, Edward L. Giovannucci, Shuji Ogino, Meir J. Stampfer, Howard D. Sesso, and JoAnn E. Manson, Harvard School of Public Health · Ying Bao, Edward L. Giovannucci, Shuji Ogino, Meir J. Stampfer, John Michael Gaziano, Howard D. Sesso, JoAnn E. Manson, and Charles S. Fuchs, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School · John Michael Gaziano, Massachusetts Veterans Epidemiology Research and Information Center, VA Boston Healthcare System, Boston · Clary B. Clish, Broad Institute of Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Harvard University, Cambridge, MA · and Barbara B. Cochrane, University of Washington School of Nursing, Seattle, WA. ·J Clin Oncol · Pubmed #28358654.

ABSTRACT: Purpose Cigarette smoking is associated with increased incidence of pancreatic cancer. However, few studies have prospectively evaluated the association of smoking with patient survival. Patients and Methods We analyzed survival by smoking status among 1,037 patients from two large US prospective cohort studies diagnosed from 1986 to 2013. Among 485 patients from four prospective US cohorts, we also evaluated survival by prediagnostic circulating levels of cotinine, a metabolite of nicotine that is proportional to tobacco smoke exposure. On the basis of prediagnosis cotinine levels, we classified patients as nonsmokers (< 3.1 ng/mL), light smokers (3.1-20.9 ng/mL), or heavy smokers (≥ 21.0 ng/mL). We estimated hazard ratios (HRs) for death by using Cox proportional hazards models, with adjustment for age, sex, race/ethnicity, body mass index, diabetes status, diagnosis year, and cancer stage. Results The multivariable-adjusted HR for death was 1.37 (95% CI, 1.11 to 1.69) comparing current smokers with never smokers ( P = .003). A statistically significant negative trend in survival was observed for increasing pack-years of smoking ( P

11 Article Leucocyte telomere length, genetic variants at the 2017

Bao, Ying / Prescott, Jennifer / Yuan, Chen / Zhang, Mingfeng / Kraft, Peter / Babic, Ana / Morales-Oyarvide, Vicente / Qian, Zhi Rong / Buring, Julie E / Cochrane, Barbara B / Gaziano, J Michael / Giovannucci, Edward L / Manson, JoAnn E / Ng, Kimmie / Ogino, Shuji / Rohan, Thomas E / Sesso, Howard D / Stampfer, Meir J / Fuchs, Charles S / De Vivo, Immaculata / Amundadottir, Laufey T / Wolpin, Brian M. ·Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Department of Epidemiology, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Laboratory of Translational Genomics, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA. · Department of Biostatistics, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Division of Preventive Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Department of Ambulatory Care and Prevention, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · University of Washington School of Nursing, Seattle, Washington, USA. · Massachusetts Veterans Epidemiology Research and Information Center (MAVERIC), VA Boston Healthcare System. · Department of Nutrition, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Division of MPE Molecular Pathological Epidemiology, Department of Pathology, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Department of Epidemiology and Population Health, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York, USA. · Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. ·Gut · Pubmed #27797938.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: Telomere shortening occurs as an early event in pancreatic tumorigenesis, and genetic variants at the telomerase reverse transcriptase ( DESIGN: We measured prediagnostic leucocyte telomere length in 386 pancreatic cancer cases and 896 matched controls from five prospective US cohorts. ORs and 95% CIs were calculated using conditional logistic regression. Matching factors included year of birth, cohort (which also matches on sex), smoking status, fasting status and month/year of blood collection. We additionally examined single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at the RESULTS: Shorter prediagnostic leucocyte telomere length was associated with higher risk of pancreatic cancer (comparing extreme quintiles of telomere length, OR 1.72; 95% CI 1.07 to 2.78; p CONCLUSIONS: Prediagnostic leucocyte telomere length and genetic variants at the

12 Article Pancreatic Cancer Risk Associated with Prediagnostic Plasma Levels of Leptin and Leptin Receptor Genetic Polymorphisms. 2016

Babic, Ana / Bao, Ying / Qian, Zhi Rong / Yuan, Chen / Giovannucci, Edward L / Aschard, Hugues / Kraft, Peter / Amundadottir, Laufey T / Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael / Morales-Oyarvide, Vicente / Ng, Kimmie / Stampfer, Meir J / Ogino, Shuji / Buring, Julie E / Sesso, Howard D / Gaziano, John Michael / Rifai, Nader / Pollak, Michael N / Anderson, Matthew L / Cochrane, Barbara B / Luo, Juhua / Manson, JoAnn E / Fuchs, Charles S / Wolpin, Brian M. ·Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts. · Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. · Department of Epidemiology, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts. · Department of Nutrition, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts. · Department of Biostatistics, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts. · Laboratory of Translational Genomics, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, NIH, Bethesda, Maryland. · Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, NIH, DHHS, Bethesda, Maryland. · Division of MPE Molecular Pathological Epidemiology, Department of Pathology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts. · Division of Preventive Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. · Department of Ambulatory Care and Prevention, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. · Massachusetts Veterans Epidemiology Research and Information Center (MAVERIC), VA Boston Healthcare System, Boston, Massachusetts. · Department of Laboratory Medicine, Children's Hospital Boston, Boston, Massachusetts. · Cancer Prevention Research Unit, Department of Oncology, Faculty of Medicine, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. · Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas. · University of Washington School of Nursing, Seattle, Washington. · Department of Community Medicine, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia. · Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts. bwolpin@partners.org. ·Cancer Res · Pubmed #27780823.

ABSTRACT: Leptin is an adipokine involved in regulating energy balance, which has been identified as a potential biologic link in the development of obesity-associated cancers, such as pancreatic cancer. In this prospective, nested case-control study of 470 cases and 1,094 controls from five U.S. cohorts, we used conditional logistic regression to evaluate pancreatic cancer risk by prediagnostic plasma leptin, adjusting for race/ethnicity, diabetes, body mass index, physical activity, plasma C-peptide, adiponectin, and 25-hydroxyvitamin D. Because of known differences in leptin levels by gender, analyses were conducted separately for men and women. We also evaluated associations between 32 tagging SNPs in the leptin receptor (LEPR) gene and pancreatic cancer risk. Leptin levels were higher in female versus male control participants (median, 20.8 vs. 6.7 ng/mL; P < 0.0001). Among men, plasma leptin was positively associated with pancreatic cancer risk and those in the top quintile had a multivariable-adjusted OR of 3.02 [95% confidence interval (CI), 1.27-7.16; P

13 Article Prediagnostic Plasma 25-Hydroxyvitamin D and Pancreatic Cancer Survival. 2016

Yuan, Chen / Qian, Zhi Rong / Babic, Ana / Morales-Oyarvide, Vicente / Rubinson, Douglas A / Kraft, Peter / Ng, Kimmie / Bao, Ying / Giovannucci, Edward L / Ogino, Shuji / Stampfer, Meir J / Gaziano, John Michael / Sesso, Howard D / Buring, Julie E / Cochrane, Barbara B / Chlebowski, Rowan T / Snetselaar, Linda G / Manson, JoAnn E / Fuchs, Charles S / Wolpin, Brian M. ·Chen Yuan, Zhi Rong Qian, Ana Babic, Vicente Morales-Oyarvide, Douglas A. Rubinson, Kimmie Ng, Shuji Ogino, Charles S. Fuchs, and Brian M. Wolpin, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard Medical School · Peter Kraft, Edward L. Giovannucci, Shuji Ogino, Meir J. Stampfer, Howard D. Sesso, Julie E. Buring, and JoAnn E. Manson, Harvard School of Public Health · Ying Bao, Edward L. Giovannucci, Shuji Ogino, Meir J. Stampfer, John Michael Gaziano, Howard D. Sesso, JoAnn E. Manson, and Charles S. Fuchs, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School · John Michael Gaziano, Massachusetts Veterans Epidemiology Research and Information Center, VA Boston Healthcare System, Boston, MA · Barbara B. Cochrane, University of Washington School of Nursing, Seattle, WA · Rowan T. Chlebowski, Los Angeles Biomedical Research Institute at Harbor-University of California, Los Angeles Medical Center, Torrance, CA · and Linda G. Snetselaar, University of Iowa College of Public Health, Iowa City, IA. ·J Clin Oncol · Pubmed #27325858.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: Although vitamin D inhibits pancreatic cancer proliferation in laboratory models, the association of plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] with patient survival is largely unexplored. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We analyzed survival among 493 patients from five prospective US cohorts who were diagnosed with pancreatic cancer from 1984 to 2008. We estimated hazard ratios (HRs) for death by plasma level of 25(OH)D (insufficient, < 20 ng/mL; relative insufficiency, 20 to < 30 ng/mL; sufficient ≥ 30 ng/mL) by using Cox proportional hazards regression models adjusted for age, cohort, race and ethnicity, smoking, diagnosis year, stage, and blood collection month. We also evaluated 30 tagging single-nucleotide polymorphisms in the vitamin D receptor gene, requiring P < .002 (0.05 divided by 30 genotyped variants) for statistical significance. RESULTS: Mean prediagnostic plasma level of 25(OH)D was 24.6 ng/mL, and 165 patients (33%) were vitamin D insufficient. Compared with patients with insufficient levels, multivariable-adjusted HRs for death were 0.79 (95% CI, 0.48 to 1.29) for patients with relative insufficiency and 0.66 (95% CI, 0.49 to 0.90) for patients with sufficient levels (P trend = .01). These results were unchanged after further adjustment for body mass index and history of diabetes (P trend = .02). The association was strongest among patients with blood collected within 5 years of diagnosis, with an HR of 0.58 (95% CI, 0.35 to 0.98) comparing patients with sufficient to patients with insufficient 25(OH)D levels. No single-nucleotide polymorphism at the vitamin D receptor gene met our corrected significance threshold of P < .002; rs7299460 was most strongly associated with survival (HR per minor allele, 0.80; 95% CI, 0.68 to 0.95; P = .01). CONCLUSION: We observed longer overall survival in patients with pancreatic cancer who had sufficient prediagnostic plasma levels of 25(OH)D.

14 Article Circulating Exosomes in Pancreatic Cancer: Will They Succeed on the Long, Littered Road to Early Detection Marker? 2016

Babic, Ana / Wolpin, Brian M. ·Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Department of Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA. · Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Department of Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA. bwolpin@partners.org. ·Clin Chem · Pubmed #26721295.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

15 Article Periodontal bone loss and risk of epithelial ovarian cancer. 2015

Babic, Ana / Poole, Elizabeth M / Terry, Kathryn L / Cramer, Daniel W / Teles, Ricardo P / Tworoger, Shelley S. ·Department of Epidemiology, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, 677 Huntington Avenue, Boston, MA, 02115, USA, hpanb@channing.harvard.edu. ·Cancer Causes Control · Pubmed #25837263.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: Periodontitis, a chronic inflammatory response to pathogenic bacteria in the oral microbiome, is common among adults. It is associated with several medical conditions, including cardiovascular diseases, and potentially with esophageal, lung, oral, and pancreatic cancer. One of the proposed mechanisms behind these associations is systemic inflammation, which has also been implicated in ovarian cancer etiology. The aim of this study was to evaluate association between ovarian cancer and periodontal bone loss. METHODS: The association between periodontal bone loss, a marker of periodontitis, and risk of epithelial ovarian cancer was estimated among 60,560 participants of the prospective Nurses' Health Study using Cox proportional hazards analysis. Competing risks analysis was used to estimate association by histologic subtype. RESULTS: We did not observe an increased risk of ovarian cancer among participants with periodontal bone loss (HR 0.86, 95% CI 0.64-1.15). Among women younger than 69 years, periodontal bone loss was associated with a 40 % (HR 0.60, 95% CI 0.36-0.98) decreased ovarian cancer risk, while there was no association in women older than 69 (HR 1.09, 95% CI 0.75-1.58), although this difference did not reach statistical significance (p-heterogeneity = 0.06). We observed a suggestive decreased risk for serous tumors (HR 0.76, 95% CI 0.53-1.09). The number of natural teeth and root canals, other metrics of oral health, were not associated with ovarian cancer risk. CONCLUSION: Our results do not support an increased ovarian cancer risk in women with periodontal bone loss; however, there was a significant decrease in risk in women younger than 69. Given the unexpected association between periodontal bone loss and ovarian cancer risk in younger women, further research is warranted.