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Pancreatic Neoplasms: HELP
Articles by Nilofer Azad
Based on 4 articles published since 2010
(Why 4 articles?)
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Between 2010 and 2020, Nilofer Azad wrote the following 4 articles about Pancreatic Neoplasms.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Review ACR Appropriateness Criteria® Resectable Pancreatic Cancer. 2017

Jones, William E / Suh, W Waren / Abdel-Wahab, May / Abrams, Ross A / Azad, Nilofer / Das, Prajnan / Dragovic, Jadranka / Goodman, Karyn A / Jabbour, Salma K / Konski, Andre A / Koong, Albert C / Kumar, Rachit / Lee, Percy / Pawlik, Timothy M / Small, William / Herman, Joseph M / Anonymous4490897. ·*University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio ¶University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX †Cancer Center of Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara §§Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford ¶¶University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA ‡Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH ***Stritch School of Medicine Loyola University Chicago, Maywood §Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL ∥Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins University, American Society of Clinical Oncology †††Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins University ##Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, American College of Surgeons #Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, MI **University of Colorado School of Medicine Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, CO ††Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ ‡‡University of Pennsylvania, The Chester County Hospital, West Chester, PA ∥∥Banner MD Anderson Cancer Center, Gilbert, AZ. ·Am J Clin Oncol · Pubmed #28230650.

ABSTRACT: Management of resectable pancreatic adenocarcinoma continues to present a challenge due to a paucity of high-quality randomized studies. Administration of adjuvant chemotherapy is widely accepted due to the high risk of systemic spread associated with pancreatic adenocarcinoma, but the role of radiation therapy is less clear. This paper reviews literature associated with resectable pancreatic cancer to include prognostic factors to aid in the selection of patients appropriate for adjuvant therapies. The American College of Radiology Appropriateness Criteria are evidence-based guidelines for specific clinical conditions that are reviewed annually by a multidisciplinary expert panel. The guideline development and revision include an extensive analysis of current medical literature from peer reviewed journals and the application of well-established methodologies (RAND/UCLA Appropriateness Method and Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation or GRADE) to rate the appropriateness of imaging and treatment procedures for specific clinical scenarios. In those instances where evidence is lacking or equivocal, expert opinion may supplement the available evidence to recommend imaging or treatment.

2 Review ACR Appropriateness Criteria® Borderline and Unresectable Pancreas Cancer. 2016

Anonymous19880874 / Small, William / Hayes, John P / Suh, W Warren / Abdel-Wahab, May / Abrams, Ross A / Azad, Nilofer / Das, Prajnan / Dragovic, Jadranka / Goodman, Karyn A / Jabbour, Salma K / Jones, William E / Konski, Andre A / Koong, Albert C / Kumar, Rachit / Lee, Percy / Pawlik, Timothy M / Herman, Joseph M. · ·Oncology (Williston Park) · Pubmed #27422109.

ABSTRACT: The American College of Radiology Appropriateness Criteria® are evidence-based guidelines for specific clinical conditions that are reviewed every 3 years by a multidisciplinary expert panel. The guideline development and review include an extensive analysis of current medical literature from peer-reviewed journals and the application of a well-established consensus methodology (modified Delphi) to rate the appropriateness of imaging and treatment procedures by the panel. In those instances where evidence is lacking or not definitive, expert opinion may be used to recommend imaging or treatment. The panel reviewed the pertinent literature and voted on five variants to establish appropriate recommended treatment of borderline and unresectable pancreatic cancer. The guidelines reviewed the use of radiation, chemotherapy, and surgery. Radiation technique, dose, and targets were evaluated, as was the recommended chemotherapy, administered either alone or concurrently with radiation. This report will aid clinicians in determining guidelines for the optimal treatment of borderline and unresectable pancreatic cancer.

3 Article Longer Course of Induction Chemotherapy Followed by Chemoradiation Favors Better Survival Outcomes for Patients With Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer. 2016

Faisal, Farzana / Tsai, Hua-Ling / Blackford, Amanda / Olino, Kelly / Xia, Chang / De Jesus-Acosta, Ana / Le, Dung T / Cosgrove, David / Azad, Nilofer / Rasheed, Zeshaan / Diaz, Luis A / Donehower, Ross / Laheru, Daniel / Hruban, Ralph H / Fishman, Elliot K / Edil, Barish H / Schulick, Richard / Wolfgang, Christopher / Herman, Joseph / Zheng, Lei. ·*Departments of Oncology, Surgery, and Radiation Oncology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD †Department of Surgery, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Denver, CO. ·Am J Clin Oncol · Pubmed #24351782.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: At diagnosis, 30% of patients with pancreatic cancer are unresectable stage 3 locally advanced. The standard treatment for locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC) is not defined. The current study was conducted to assess the roles of chemotherapy and chemoradiation for LAPC treatment. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Between June 2006 and March 2011, 100 patients with LAPC were treated at the Johns Hopkins Hospital. Retrospective analysis was performed to compare cumulative incidence of progression (CIP) and overall survival (OS) among different subgroups. RESULTS: For the 100 patients, the median OS was 15.8 months and the median CIP was 8.4 months. The combination of chemotherapy and chemoradiation before disease progression was significantly associated with improved CIP (P=0.001) and improved OS when compared with chemoradiation alone (median OS: 16.4 vs. 11.1 mo, P=0.03). Among patients receiving combination treatment, patients who received chemotherapy first followed by chemoradiation had a trend toward lower CIP (P=0.09) and improved OS (median OS: 18.1 vs. 11.0 mo, P=0.09). Patients who received >2 cycles of chemotherapy before chemoradiation had a significantly decreased CIP (P=0.008) and a trend toward better OS (median OS: 19.4 vs. 15.7 mo, P=0.10). On multivariate analysis, receiving >2 cycles of chemotherapy before chemoradiation was associated with improved CIP. CONCLUSIONS: Although combination chemotherapy and chemoradiation is favored in the treatment of LAPC, longer induction chemotherapy may play a more important role in sensitization of tumors to subsequent chemoradiation. Our results support treating patients with induction chemotherapy for at least 3 cycles followed by consolidative chemoradiation. These results merit further validation by a prospective study.

4 Article Combined Inhibition of Cyclin-Dependent Kinases (Dinaciclib) and AKT (MK-2206) Blocks Pancreatic Tumor Growth and Metastases in Patient-Derived Xenograft Models. 2015

Hu, Chaoxin / Dadon, Tikva / Chenna, Venugopal / Yabuuchi, Shinichi / Bannerji, Rajat / Booher, Robert / Strack, Peter / Azad, Nilofer / Nelkin, Barry D / Maitra, Anirban. ·Department of Pathology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland. Department of Pathology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas. · Department of Oncology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland. · Department of Pathology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland. · Merck and Co., Boston, Massachusetts. · Department of Oncology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland. bnelkin@jhmi.edu amaitra@mdanderson.org. · Department of Pathology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland. Department of Pathology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas. Department of Oncology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland. The Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland. bnelkin@jhmi.edu amaitra@mdanderson.org. ·Mol Cancer Ther · Pubmed #25931518.

ABSTRACT: KRAS is activated by mutation in the vast majority of cases of pancreatic cancer; unfortunately, therapeutic attempts to inhibit KRAS directly have been unsuccessful. Our previous studies showed that inhibition of cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (CDK5) reduces pancreatic cancer growth and progression, through blockage of the centrally important RAL effector pathway, downstream of KRAS. In the current study, the therapeutic effects of combining the CDK inhibitor dinaciclib (SCH727965; MK-7965) with the pan-AKT inhibitor MK-2206 were evaluated using orthotopic and subcutaneous patient-derived human pancreatic cancer xenograft models. The combination of dinaciclib (20 mg/kg, i.p., three times a week) and MK-2206 (60 mg/kg, orally, three times a week) dramatically blocked tumor growth and metastasis in all eight pancreatic cancer models examined. Remarkably, several complete responses were induced by the combination treatment of dinaciclib and MK-2206. The striking results obtained in these models demonstrate that the combination of dinaciclib with the pan-AKT inhibitor MK-2206 is promising for therapeutic evaluation in pancreatic cancer, and strongly suggest that blocking RAL in combination with other effector pathways downstream from KRAS may provide increased efficacy in pancreatic cancer. Based on these data, an NCI-CTEP-approved multicenter phase I clinical trial for pancreatic cancer of the combination of dinaciclib and MK-2206 (NCT01783171) has now been opened.