Pick Topic
Review Topic
List Experts
Examine Expert
Save Expert
  Site Guide ··   
Pancreatic Neoplasms: HELP
Articles by Amy Y. M. Au
Based on 3 articles published since 2010
(Why 3 articles?)
||||

Between 2010 and 2020, Amy Au wrote the following 3 articles about Pancreatic Neoplasms.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Article Targeting the LOX/hypoxia axis reverses many of the features that make pancreatic cancer deadly: inhibition of LOX abrogates metastasis and enhances drug efficacy. 2015

Miller, Bryan W / Morton, Jennifer P / Pinese, Mark / Saturno, Grazia / Jamieson, Nigel B / McGhee, Ewan / Timpson, Paul / Leach, Joshua / McGarry, Lynn / Shanks, Emma / Bailey, Peter / Chang, David / Oien, Karin / Karim, Saadia / Au, Amy / Steele, Colin / Carter, Christopher Ross / McKay, Colin / Anderson, Kurt / Evans, Thomas R Jeffry / Marais, Richard / Springer, Caroline / Biankin, Andrew / Erler, Janine T / Sansom, Owen J. ·Cancer Research UK Beatson Institute Garscube Estate, Glasgow, UK. · The Garvan Institute of Medical Research, Sydney, NSW, Australia. · Cancer Research UK Manchester Institute, Withington Manchester, UK. · West of Scotland Pancreatic Unit, Glasgow Royal Infirmary, Glasgow, UK. · Institute of Cancer Sciences University of Glasgow Garscube Estate, Glasgow, UK. · Cancer Research UK Beatson Institute Garscube Estate, Glasgow, UK Institute of Cancer Sciences University of Glasgow Garscube Estate, Glasgow, UK. · Institute of Cancer Research, London, UK. · Biotech Research & Innovation Centre (BRIC), University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (UCPH), Denmark janine.erler@bric.ku.dk o.sansom@beatson.gla.ac.uk. · Cancer Research UK Beatson Institute Garscube Estate, Glasgow, UK janine.erler@bric.ku.dk o.sansom@beatson.gla.ac.uk. ·EMBO Mol Med · Pubmed #26077591.

ABSTRACT: Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is one of the leading causes of cancer-related mortality. Despite significant advances made in the treatment of other cancers, current chemotherapies offer little survival benefit in this disease. Pancreaticoduodenectomy offers patients the possibility of a cure, but most will die of recurrent or metastatic disease. Hence, preventing metastatic disease in these patients would be of significant benefit. Using principal component analysis (PCA), we identified a LOX/hypoxia signature associated with poor patient survival in resectable patients. We found that LOX expression is upregulated in metastatic tumors from Pdx1-Cre Kras(G12D/+) Trp53(R172H/+) (KPC) mice and that inhibition of LOX in these mice suppressed metastasis. Mechanistically, LOX inhibition suppressed both migration and invasion of KPC cells. LOX inhibition also synergized with gemcitabine to kill tumors and significantly prolonged tumor-free survival in KPC mice with early-stage tumors. This was associated with stromal alterations, including increased vasculature and decreased fibrillar collagen, and increased infiltration of macrophages and neutrophils into tumors. Therefore, LOX inhibition is able to reverse many of the features that make PDAC inherently refractory to conventional therapies and targeting LOX could improve outcome in surgically resectable disease.

2 Article Targeting mTOR dependency in pancreatic cancer. 2014

Morran, Douglas C / Wu, Jianmin / Jamieson, Nigel B / Mrowinska, Agata / Kalna, Gabriela / Karim, Saadia A / Au, Amy Y M / Scarlett, Christopher J / Chang, David K / Pajak, Malgorzata Z / Anonymous6310790 / Oien, Karin A / McKay, Colin J / Carter, C Ross / Gillen, Gerry / Champion, Sue / Pimlott, Sally L / Anderson, Kurt I / Evans, T R Jeffry / Grimmond, Sean M / Biankin, Andrew V / Sansom, Owen J / Morton, Jennifer P. ·CRUK Beatson Institute, Glasgow, UK. · The Kinghorn Cancer Centre and the Cancer Research Program, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, Darlinghurst, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. · West of Scotland Pancreatic Unit, Glasgow Royal Infirmary, Glasgow, UK. · School of Environmental & Life Sciences, University of Newcastle, Ourimbah, New South Wales, Australia. · The Kinghorn Cancer Centre and the Cancer Research Program, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, Darlinghurst, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia West of Scotland Pancreatic Unit, Glasgow Royal Infirmary, Glasgow, UK Department of Surgery, Bankstown Hospital, Bankstown, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia Faculty of Medicine, South Western Sydney Clinical School, University of NSW, Liverpool, New South Wales, Australia The Wolfson Wohl Cancer Research Centre, Institute of Cancer Sciences, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, UK. · CRUK Beatson Institute, Glasgow, UK Institute of Cancer Sciences, College of Medical, Veterinary and Life Sciences, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, UK. · West of Scotland PET Centre, Gartnavel General Hospital, Glasgow, UK. · West of Scotland Radionuclide Dispensary, NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde, Glasgow, UK. · The Wolfson Wohl Cancer Research Centre, Institute of Cancer Sciences, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, UK Queensland Centre for Medical Genomics, Institute for Molecular Bioscience, University of Queensland, St Lucia, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. ·Gut · Pubmed #24717934.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: Pancreatic cancer is a leading cause of cancer-related death in the Western world. Current chemotherapy regimens have modest survival benefit. Thus, novel, effective therapies are required for treatment of this disease. DESIGN: Activating KRAS mutation almost always drives pancreatic tumour initiation, however, deregulation of other potentially druggable pathways promotes tumour progression. PTEN loss leads to acceleration of Kras(G12D)-driven pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) in mice and these tumours have high levels of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signalling. To test whether these KRAS PTEN pancreatic tumours show mTOR dependence, we compared response to mTOR inhibition in this model, to the response in another established model of pancreatic cancer, KRAS P53. We also assessed whether there was a subset of pancreatic cancer patients who may respond to mTOR inhibition. RESULTS: We found that tumours in KRAS PTEN mice exhibit a remarkable dependence on mTOR signalling. In these tumours, mTOR inhibition leads to proliferative arrest and even tumour regression. Further, we could measure response using clinically applicable positron emission tomography imaging. Importantly, pancreatic tumours driven by activated KRAS and mutant p53 did not respond to treatment. In human tumours, approximately 20% of cases demonstrated low PTEN expression and a gene expression signature that overlaps with murine KRAS PTEN tumours. CONCLUSIONS: KRAS PTEN tumours are uniquely responsive to mTOR inhibition. Targeted anti-mTOR therapies may offer clinical benefit in subsets of human PDAC selected based on genotype, that are dependent on mTOR signalling. Thus, the genetic signatures of human tumours could be used to direct pancreatic cancer treatment in the future.

3 Article p53 status determines the role of autophagy in pancreatic tumour development. 2013

Rosenfeldt, Mathias T / O'Prey, Jim / Morton, Jennifer P / Nixon, Colin / MacKay, Gillian / Mrowinska, Agata / Au, Amy / Rai, Taranjit Singh / Zheng, Liang / Ridgway, Rachel / Adams, Peter D / Anderson, Kurt I / Gottlieb, Eyal / Sansom, Owen J / Ryan, Kevin M. ·Cancer Research UK Beatson Institute, Garscube Estate, Switchback Road, Glasgow G61 1BD, UK. · Institute of Cancer Studies, University of Glasgow, Garscube Estate, Switchback Road, Glasgow G611BD, UK. ·Nature · Pubmed #24305049.

ABSTRACT: Macroautophagy (hereafter referred to as autophagy) is a process in which organelles termed autophagosomes deliver cytoplasmic constituents to lysosomes for degradation. Autophagy has a major role in cellular homeostasis and has been implicated in various forms of human disease. The role of autophagy in cancer seems to be complex, with reports indicating both pro-tumorigenic and tumour-suppressive roles. Here we show, in a humanized genetically-modified mouse model of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), that autophagy's role in tumour development is intrinsically connected to the status of the tumour suppressor p53. Mice with pancreases containing an activated oncogenic allele of Kras (also called Ki-Ras)--the most common mutational event in PDAC--develop a small number of pre-cancerous lesions that stochastically develop into PDAC over time. However, mice also lacking the essential autophagy genes Atg5 or Atg7 accumulate low-grade, pre-malignant pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia lesions, but progression to high-grade pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasias and PDAC is blocked. In marked contrast, in mice containing oncogenic Kras and lacking p53, loss of autophagy no longer blocks tumour progression, but actually accelerates tumour onset, with metabolic analysis revealing enhanced glucose uptake and enrichment of anabolic pathways, which can fuel tumour growth. These findings provide considerable insight into the role of autophagy in cancer and have important implications for autophagy inhibition in cancer therapy. In this regard, we also show that treatment of mice with the autophagy inhibitor hydroxychloroquine, which is currently being used in several clinical trials, significantly accelerates tumour formation in mice containing oncogenic Kras but lacking p53.