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Pancreatic Neoplasms: HELP
Articles by P. G. Arcidiacono
Based on 5 articles published since 2010
(Why 5 articles?)
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Between 2010 and 2020, P. G. Arcidiacono wrote the following 5 articles about Pancreatic Neoplasms.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Review Meta-analysis of mortality in patients with high-risk intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms under observation. 2018

Vanella, G / Crippa, S / Archibugi, L / Arcidiacono, P G / Delle Fave, G / Falconi, M / Capurso, G. ·Digestive and Liver Disease Unit, Sant'Andrea Hospital, Faculty of Medicine and Psychology, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy. · Pancreatic Surgery Unit, Pancreas Translational and Clinical Research Centre, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, 'Vita-Salute' University, Milan, Italy. · Pancreato-Biliary Endoscopy Division and Endosonography Division, Pancreas Translational and Clinical Research Centre, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy. ·Br J Surg · Pubmed #29405253.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Although consensus guidelines suggest that patients with high-risk intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMNs) should have surgery, a non-operative strategy is often selected in patients who are poor surgical candidates. The aim was to determine the risk of disease-related death from IPMN in patients with worrisome features or high-risk stigmata who were kept under observation. METHODS: A PubMed literature search was undertaken of articles published from August 1992 to June 2016 (updated October 2017). The methodology was developed from PRISMA and MOOSE checklists. Incidence proportions and rates of overall and IPMN-related deaths were calculated, with subgroup analyses for main-duct/mixed-type and branch-duct IPMNs. Quality of the studies, publication bias and heterogeneity were explored. RESULTS: Six studies reported data on overall mortality and eight described disease-specific mortality for 556 patients during follow-up ranging from 24·9 to 60·0 months. Pooled rates of overall and IPMN-related mortality were 30·9 (95 per cent c.i. 19·6 to 45·1) and 11·6 (6·0 to 21·2) per cent respectively. The pooled incidence rate for overall mortality was substantially higher than that for IPMN-related mortality: 78 (95 per cent c.i. 44 to 111) and 23 (9 to 37) per 1000 patient-years respectively. The pooled incidence rate for disease-specific mortality was considerably lower for branch-duct than for main-duct or mixed-type IPMNs: 5 (0 to 10) and 32 (12 to 52) per 1000 patient-years respectively. CONCLUSION: In patients unfit for surgery, IPMN-related mortality among patients with worrisome features and high-risk stigmata is low, and the risk of death from other causes much higher.

2 Review Systematic review and meta-analysis of metal versus plastic stents for preoperative biliary drainage in resectable periampullary or pancreatic head tumors. 2016

Crippa, S / Cirocchi, R / Partelli, S / Petrone, M C / Muffatti, F / Renzi, C / Falconi, M / Arcidiacono, P G. ·Division of Pancreatic Surgery, Vita e Salute University, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy. · Department of General and Oncologic Surgery, University of Perugia, St. Maria Hospital, Terni, Italy. · Division of Pancreato-Biliary Endoscopy and Endoscopic Ultrasound, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy. · Department of General and Oncologic Surgery, University of Perugia, Perugia, Italy. · Division of Pancreatic Surgery, Vita e Salute University, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy. Electronic address: falconi.massimo@hsr.it. ·Eur J Surg Oncol · Pubmed #27296728.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Preoperative biliary drainage (PBD) with stenting increases complications compared with surgery without PBD. Metallic stents are considered superior to plastic stents when considering stent-related complications. Aim of the present systematic review and meta-analysis is to compare the rate of endoscopic re-intervention before surgery and postoperative outcomes of metal versus plastic stents in patients with resectable periampullary or pancreatic head neoplasms. METHODS: We conducted a bibliographic research using the National Library of Medicine's PubMed database, including both randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and non-RCTs. Quantitative synthesis was performed according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses statement. Statistical heterogeneity was assessed using the I(2) tests. RESULTS: One RCT and four non-RCTs were selected, including 704 patients. Of these, 202 patients (29.5%) were treated with metal stents and 502 (70.5%) with plastic stents. The majority of patients (86.4%) had pancreatic cancer. The rate of endoscopic re-intervention after preoperative biliary drainage was significantly lower in the metal stent (3.4%) than in the plastic stent (14.8%) group (p < 0.0001). The rate of postoperative pancreatic fistula was significantly lower in the meta stent group as well (5.1% versus 11.8%, p = 0.04). The rate of post-operative surgical complications and of - post-operative mortality did not differ between the two groups. CONCLUSIONS: Although the present systematic review and meta-analysis demonstrates that metal stent are more effective than plastic stents for PBD in patients with resectable periampullary tumors, randomized controlled trials are needed in order to confirm these data with a higher level of evidence.

3 Article Selecting patients for resection after primary chemotherapy for non-metastatic pancreatic adenocarcinoma. 2017

Reni, M / Zanon, S / Balzano, G / Nobile, S / Pircher, C C / Chiaravalli, M / Passoni, P / Arcidiacono, P G / Nicoletti, R / Crippa, S / Slim, N / Doglioni, C / Falconi, M / Gianni, L. ·Department of Oncology. · Pancreatic Surgery Unit, Pancreas Translational & Clinical Research Center. · Department of Radiotherapy. · Department of Pancreato-Biliary Endoscopy and Endosonography Division, Pancreas Translational and Clinical Research Center, San Raffaele Scientific Institute IRCCS. · Department of Radiology. · Department of Pathology, Pancreas Translational & Clinical Research Center, IRCCS Ospedale San Raffaele, Milan. · Department of Vita-Salute San Raffaele University, Milan, Italy. ·Ann Oncol · Pubmed #28945895.

ABSTRACT: Background: Patients with borderline (BL) or locally advanced (LA) pancreatic adenocarcinoma are usually treated with primary chemotherapy (CT), followed by resection when feasible. Scanty data are available about the criteria to candidate patients to resection after CT. Patients and methods: Between 2002 and 2016 overall 223 patients diagnosed with BL or LA pancreatic adenocarcinoma were primarily treated with Gemcitabine combination (4-drugs or nab-paclitaxel-gemcitabine) for 3-6 months followed by surgery and/or chemoradiation. Resection was carried out when radical resection could be predicted by imaging studies and intraoperative findings. The prognostic value of both pre-treatment factors and treatment response was retrospectively evaluated, searching for criteria that could improve the selection of patients for surgery. Results: Median survival (MS) for the whole population was 18.3 months. Surgical resection was carried out in 61 patients; MS in resected patients was significantly longer (30.0 months) as compared with 162 non-resected patients (16.5 months) (P < 0.00001). According to response criteria, 48% had a radiological partial response, 47% a stable disease and 5% a disease progression); CA19.9 response (reduction >50%) was obtained in 77.8% of patients. Among resected patients, neither pre-treatment factors, including BL/LA distinction, nor radiological response, were able to prognosticate survival differences. Survival of resected patients having no CA19.9 response was significantly lower as compared with responders (MS 15.0 versus 31.5 months, P = 0.04), and was similar to non-responders patients that did not undergo resection (MS 10.9 months, P= 0.25). Multivariate analysis carried out on the overall population, showed that Karnofsky performance status, T3-T4 status, resection and CA19.9 response were independent prognostic factors, while radiological response, BL/LA distinction and baseline CA19.9 had not significant influence on survival. Conclusions: CA19.9 response may allow a better selection of patients who will benefit from resection after primary CT for BL or LA pancreatic adenocarcinoma.

4 Article Serous cystic neoplasm of the pancreas: a multinational study of 2622 patients under the auspices of the International Association of Pancreatology and European Pancreatic Club (European Study Group on Cystic Tumors of the Pancreas). 2016

Jais, B / Rebours, V / Malleo, G / Salvia, R / Fontana, M / Maggino, L / Bassi, C / Manfredi, R / Moran, R / Lennon, A M / Zaheer, A / Wolfgang, C / Hruban, R / Marchegiani, G / Fernández Del Castillo, C / Brugge, W / Ha, Y / Kim, M H / Oh, D / Hirai, I / Kimura, W / Jang, J Y / Kim, S W / Jung, W / Kang, H / Song, S Y / Kang, C M / Lee, W J / Crippa, S / Falconi, M / Gomatos, I / Neoptolemos, J / Milanetto, A C / Sperti, C / Ricci, C / Casadei, R / Bissolati, M / Balzano, G / Frigerio, I / Girelli, R / Delhaye, M / Bernier, B / Wang, H / Jang, K T / Song, D H / Huggett, M T / Oppong, K W / Pererva, L / Kopchak, K V / Del Chiaro, M / Segersvard, R / Lee, L S / Conwell, D / Osvaldt, A / Campos, V / Aguero Garcete, G / Napoleon, B / Matsumoto, I / Shinzeki, M / Bolado, F / Fernandez, J M Urman / Keane, M G / Pereira, S P / Acuna, I Araujo / Vaquero, E C / Angiolini, M R / Zerbi, A / Tang, J / Leong, R W / Faccinetto, A / Morana, G / Petrone, M C / Arcidiacono, P G / Moon, J H / Choi, H J / Gill, R S / Pavey, D / Ouaïssi, M / Sastre, B / Spandre, M / De Angelis, C G / Rios-Vives, M A / Concepcion-Martin, M / Ikeura, T / Okazaki, K / Frulloni, L / Messina, O / Lévy, P. ·Department of Gastroenterology and Pancreatology, Beaujon Hospital, AP-HP, Clichy, France. · The Pancreas Institute, G.B. Rossi Hospital, University of Verona Hospital Trust, Verona, Italy. · Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA Division of Surgery, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA Department of Pathology, The Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. · Departments of Surgery and Pathology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Department of Gastroenterology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. · First Department of Surgery, Yamagata University Faculty of Medicine, Yamagata, Japan. · Department of Surgery, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. · Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Internal Medicine, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. · Department of Surgery, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Pancreaticobiliary Cancer Clinic, Yonsei Cancer Center, Severance Hospital, Seoul, Korea. · Pancreatic Surgery Unit, Department of Surgery, Polytechnic University of Marche Region, Ancona-Torrette, Italy. · NIHR Pancreas Biomedical Research Unit, Department of Molecular and Clinical Cancer Medicine, Royal Liverpool University Hospital, Institute of Translational Medicine, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK. · Department of Surgery, Oncology and Gastroenterology, 3rd Surgical Clinic, University of Padua, Padua, Italy. · Department of Medical and Surgical Sciences (DIMEC), Alma Mater Studiorum-University of Bologna, S. Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, Bologna, Italy. · Pancreatic Surgery Unit, IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy. · Hepato-Pancreato-Biliary Unit, Pederzoli Hospital, Peschiera del Garda, Italy. · Department of Gastroenterology, Hepatopancreatology and GI Oncology, Erasme University Hospital, Université Libre de Bruxelles, Brussels, Belgium. · Institute of Hepatopancreatobiliary Surgery, Southwest Hospital, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing, China. · Department of Pathology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. · Department of Pathology, Gyeongsang National University School of Medicine, Jinju, Korea. · Hepato-Pancreato-Biliary Unit, Freeman Hospital, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK. · National Institute of Surgery and Transplantology named after Shalimov, Kiev, Ukraine. · Division of Surgery, Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology (CLINTEC), Karolinska Institutet at Center for Digestive Diseases, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden. · Division of Gastroenterology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Hospital de Clínicas de Porto Alegre, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, Brazil. · Hôpital Privé Mermoz, Gastroentérologie, Lyon, France. · Division of Hepato-Biliary-Pancreatic Surgery, Department of Surgery, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe, Japan. · Gastroenterology Department, Hospital de Navarra, Pamplona, Spain. · Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University College Hospital, London, UK. · Department of Gastroenterology, Hospital Clinic, CIBEREHD, IDIBAPS, University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain. · Department of Pancreatic Surgery, Humanitas Research Hospital, Rozzano, Milan, Italy. · Gastroenterology and Liver Services, Concord Hospital, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. · Radiological Department, General Hospital Cá Foncello, Treviso, Italy. · Division of Gastroenterology and Gastrointestinal Endoscopy, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy. · Department of Internal Medicine, Digestive Disease Center and Research Institute, SoonChunHyang University School of Medicine, Bucheon, Korea. · Department of Gastroenterology, Bankstown-Lidcombe Hospital, Bankstown, New South Wales, Australia. · Department of Digestive Surgery, Timone Hospital, Marseille, France. · Gastrohepatology Department, San Giovanni Battista Molinette Hospital, University of Turin, Turin, Italy. · Gastroenterology Department, Hospital de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau, Institut de Reçerca-IIB Sant Pau, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain. · The Third Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Kansai Medical University, Osaka, Japan. · Department of Medicine, Pancreas Center, University of Verona, Verona, Italy. ·Gut · Pubmed #26045140.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: Serous cystic neoplasm (SCN) is a cystic neoplasm of the pancreas whose natural history is poorly known. The purpose of the study was to attempt to describe the natural history of SCN, including the specific mortality. DESIGN: Retrospective multinational study including SCN diagnosed between 1990 and 2014. RESULTS: 2622 patients were included. Seventy-four per cent were women, and median age at diagnosis was 58 years (16-99). Patients presented with non-specific abdominal pain (27%), pancreaticobiliary symptoms (9%), diabetes mellitus (5%), other symptoms (4%) and/or were asymptomatic (61%). Fifty-two per cent of patients were operated on during the first year after diagnosis (median size: 40 mm (2-200)), 9% had resection beyond 1 year of follow-up (3 years (1-20), size at diagnosis: 25 mm (4-140)) and 39% had no surgery (3.6 years (1-23), 25.5 mm (1-200)). Surgical indications were (not exclusive) uncertain diagnosis (60%), symptoms (23%), size increase (12%), large size (6%) and adjacent organ compression (5%). In patients followed beyond 1 year (n=1271), size increased in 37% (growth rate: 4 mm/year), was stable in 57% and decreased in 6%. Three serous cystadenocarcinomas were recorded. Postoperative mortality was 0.6% (n=10), and SCN's related mortality was 0.1% (n=1). CONCLUSIONS: After a 3-year follow-up, clinical relevant symptoms occurred in a very small proportion of patients and size slowly increased in less than half. Surgical treatment should be proposed only for diagnosis remaining uncertain after complete workup, significant and related symptoms or exceptionally when exists concern with malignancy. This study supports an initial conservative management in the majority of patients with SCN. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: IRB 00006477.

5 Article Prevalence and risk factors of extrapancreatic malignancies in a large cohort of patients with intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN) of the pancreas. 2013

Larghi, A / Panic, N / Capurso, G / Leoncini, E / Arzani, D / Salvia, R / Del Chiaro, M / Frulloni, L / Arcidiacono, P G / Zerbi, A / Manta, R / Fabbri, C / Ventrucci, M / Tarantino, I / Piciucchi, M / Carnuccio, A / Boggi, U / Costamagna, G / Delle Fave, G / Pezzilli, R / Bassi, C / Bulajic, M / Ricciardi, W / Boccia, S. ·Digestive Endoscopy Unit, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Rome, Italy. ·Ann Oncol · Pubmed #23676419.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The objectives of this study are to estimate prevalence and incidence of extrapancreatic malignancies (EPMs) among intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMNs) of the pancreas, and to identify risk factors for their occurrence. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We conducted multicentric cohort study in Italy from January 2010 to January 2011 including 390 IPMN cases. EPMs were grouped as previous, synchronous (both prevalent) and metachronous (incident). We calculated the observed/expected (O/E) ratio of prevalent EPMs, and compared the distribution of demographic, medical history and lifestyle habits. RESULTS: Ninety-seven EPMs were diagnosed in 92 patients (23.6%), among them 78 (80.4%) were previous, 14 (14.4%) were synchronous and 5 (5.2%) were metachronous. O/E ratios for prevalent EPMs were significantly increased for colorectal carcinoma (2.26; CI 95% 1.17-3.96), renal cell carcinoma (6.00; CI 95% 2.74-11.39) and thyroid carcinoma (5.56; CI 95% 1.80-12.96). Increased age, heavy cigarette smoking, alcohol consumption and first-degree family history of gastric cancer are significant risk factors for EPMs, while first-degree family history of colorectal carcinoma was borderline. CONCLUSION: We report an increased prevalence of EPMs in Italian patients with IPMN, especially for colorectal carcinoma, renal cell and thyroid cancers. A systematic surveillance of IPMN cases for such cancer types would be advised.