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Pancreatic Neoplasms: HELP
Articles by Livia Archibugi
Based on 16 articles published since 2009
(Why 16 articles?)
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Between 2009 and 2019, L. Archibugi wrote the following 16 articles about Pancreatic Neoplasms.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Review Statin use is associated to a reduced risk of pancreatic cancer: A meta-analysis. 2019

Archibugi, Livia / Arcidiacono, Paolo Giorgio / Capurso, Gabriele. ·Pancreato-Biliary Endoscopy and Endosonography Division, Pancreas Translational & Clinical Research Center, San Raffaele Scientific Institute IRCCS, Vita-Salute San Raffaele University, Milan, Italy. · Pancreato-Biliary Endoscopy and Endosonography Division, Pancreas Translational & Clinical Research Center, San Raffaele Scientific Institute IRCCS, Vita-Salute San Raffaele University, Milan, Italy. Electronic address: capurso.gabriele@hsr.it. ·Dig Liver Dis · Pubmed #30314951.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Previous studies investigating the association between statin use and pancreatic cancer (PDAC) risk for a possible chemopreventive effect gathered heterogeneous results. AIMS: To conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis to clarify this association. METHODS: Comprehensive literature search of articles published up to February 2018, including case-control (CC),cohort studies (C), randomized controlled trials (RCTs) assessing association between statin use and PDAC risk. Studies had to report odds ratio (OR)/relative risk (RR), estimates with 95% confidence interval (CI), or provide data for their calculation. Pooled ORs with 95%CIs were calculated using random effects model, publication bias through Begg and Mazumdar test and heterogeneity by I RESULTS: 27 studies(13 CC, 9C, 5 RCTs) for a total population of 11,975 PDAC/3,433,175 controls contributed to the analysis. The overall pooled result demonstrated a reduced PDAC risk among statin users (OR 0.70; 95% CI 0.60-0.82; p < 0.0001), compared to non-users. Sensitivity analyses suggested the risk reduction to be more important in CC studies, studies conducted in Asia and Europe, in males and atorvastatin users. No publication bias found. CONCLUSIONS: The present meta-analysis suggests that statin use is associated with an overall PDAC risk reduction of 30%. Further studies are needed to clarify the association.

2 Review Meta-analysis of mortality in patients with high-risk intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms under observation. 2018

Vanella, G / Crippa, S / Archibugi, L / Arcidiacono, P G / Delle Fave, G / Falconi, M / Capurso, G. ·Digestive and Liver Disease Unit, Sant'Andrea Hospital, Faculty of Medicine and Psychology, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy. · Pancreatic Surgery Unit, Pancreas Translational and Clinical Research Centre, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, 'Vita-Salute' University, Milan, Italy. · Pancreato-Biliary Endoscopy Division and Endosonography Division, Pancreas Translational and Clinical Research Centre, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy. ·Br J Surg · Pubmed #29405253.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Although consensus guidelines suggest that patients with high-risk intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMNs) should have surgery, a non-operative strategy is often selected in patients who are poor surgical candidates. The aim was to determine the risk of disease-related death from IPMN in patients with worrisome features or high-risk stigmata who were kept under observation. METHODS: A PubMed literature search was undertaken of articles published from August 1992 to June 2016 (updated October 2017). The methodology was developed from PRISMA and MOOSE checklists. Incidence proportions and rates of overall and IPMN-related deaths were calculated, with subgroup analyses for main-duct/mixed-type and branch-duct IPMNs. Quality of the studies, publication bias and heterogeneity were explored. RESULTS: Six studies reported data on overall mortality and eight described disease-specific mortality for 556 patients during follow-up ranging from 24·9 to 60·0 months. Pooled rates of overall and IPMN-related mortality were 30·9 (95 per cent c.i. 19·6 to 45·1) and 11·6 (6·0 to 21·2) per cent respectively. The pooled incidence rate for overall mortality was substantially higher than that for IPMN-related mortality: 78 (95 per cent c.i. 44 to 111) and 23 (9 to 37) per 1000 patient-years respectively. The pooled incidence rate for disease-specific mortality was considerably lower for branch-duct than for main-duct or mixed-type IPMNs: 5 (0 to 10) and 32 (12 to 52) per 1000 patient-years respectively. CONCLUSION: In patients unfit for surgery, IPMN-related mortality among patients with worrisome features and high-risk stigmata is low, and the risk of death from other causes much higher.

3 Review Molecular pathogenesis and targeted therapy of sporadic pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. 2015

Capurso, Gabriele / Archibugi, Livia / Delle Fave, Gianfranco. ·Digestive and Liver Disease Unit, Faculty of Medicine and Psychology, Sapienza University of Rome at S. Andrea Hospital, Rome, Italy. ·J Hepatobiliary Pancreat Sci · Pubmed #25619712.

ABSTRACT: Over the past few years, knowledge regarding the molecular pathology of sporadic pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PNETs) has increased substantially, and a number of targeted agents have been tested in clinical trials in this tumor type. For some of these agents there is a strong biological rationale. Among them, the mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitor Everolimus and the antiangiogenic agent Sunitinib have both been approved for the treatment of PNETs. However, there is lack of knowledge regarding biomarkers able to predict their efficacy, and mechanisms of resistance. Other angiogenesis inhibitors, such as Pazopanib, inhibitors of Src, Hedgehog or of PI3K might all be useful in association or sequence with approved agents. On the other hand, the clinical significance, and potential for treatment of the most common mutations occurring in sporadic PNETs, in the MEN-1 gene and in ATRX and DAXX, remains uncertain. The present paper reviews the main molecular changes occurring in PNETs and how they might be linked with treatment options.

4 Article Impact of intensified chemotherapy in metastatic pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) in clinical routine in Europe. 2019

Javed, Muhammad Ahsan / Beyer, Georg / Le, Nha / Vinci, Alessio / Wong, Helen / Palmer, Daniel / Morgan, Robert D / Lamarca, Angela / Hubner, Richard A / Valle, Juan W / Alam, Salma / Chowdhury, Sumsur / Ma, Yuk Ting / Archibugi, Livia / Capurso, Gabriele / Maisonneuve, Patrick / Neesse, Albrecht / Sund, Malin / Schober, Marvin / Krug, Sebastian. ·NIHR Liverpool Pancreas Biomedical Research Unit, Institute of Translational Medicine, Royal Liverpool University Hospital, United Kingdom. · Department of Medicine A, University Medicine Greifswald, Greifswald, Germany; Medical Department II, University Hospital, LMU, Munich, Germany. · Gastroenterology Division, Second Internal Medicine Department, Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary. · University of Pavia, Department of Surgery, S. Matteo University Hospital Foundation, Pavia, Italy. · Department of Quality and Information Intelligence, The Clatterbridge Cancer Centre NHS Foundation Trust, Wirral, United Kingdom. · Molecular and Clinical Cancer Medicine, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, United Kingdom. · Department of Medical Oncology, The Christie NHS Foundation Trust, Manchester, United Kingdom. · Department of Medical Oncology, The Christie NHS Foundation Trust, Manchester, United Kingdom; Institute of Cancer Sciences, University of Manchester, Manchester, United Kingdom. · Department of Hepatobiliary Oncology, New Queen Elizabeth Hospital Birmingham, Birmingham, United Kingdom. · Digestive and Liver Disease Unit, S. Andrea Hospital, University Sapienza, Rome, Italy. · Division of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, European Institute of Oncology, Milan, Italy. · University Medical Centre Göttingen, Department of Gastroenterology and Gastrointestinal Oncology, Göttingen, Germany. · University of Umea, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Umea, Sweden. Electronic address: malin.sund@surgery.umu.se. · Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Martin-Luther-University Halle-Wittenberg, Halle, Germany. ·Pancreatology · Pubmed #30529068.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is associated with poor prognosis. Gemcitabine is the standard chemotherapy for patients with metastatic pancreatic adenocarcinoma (MPA). Randomized clinical trials evaluating intensified chemotherapies including FOLFIRINOX and nab-paclitaxel plus gemcitabine (NAB+GEM) have shown improvement in survival. Here, we have evaluated the efficacy of intensified chemotherapy versus gemcitabine monotherapy in real-life settings across Europe. METHODS: A retrospective multi-center study including 1056 MPA patients, between 2012 and 2015, from nine centers in UK, Germany, Italy, Hungary and the Swedish registry was performed. Follow-up was at least 12 months. Cox proportional Harzards regression was used for uni- and multivariable evaluation of prognostic factors. RESULTS: Of 1056 MPA patients, 1030 (98.7%) were assessable for survival analysis. Gemcitabine monotherapy was the most commonly used regimen (41.3%), compared to FOLFIRINOX (n = 204, 19.3%), NAB+GEM (n = 81, 7.7%) and other gemcitabine- or 5-FU-based regimens (n = 335, 31.7%). The median overall survival (OS) was: FOLFIRINOX 9.9 months (95%CI 8.4-12.6), NAB+GEM 7.9 months (95%CI 6.2-10.0), other combinations 8.5 months (95%CI 7.7-9.3) and gemcitabine monotherapy 4.9 months (95%CI 4.4-5.6). Compared to gemcitabine monotherapy, any combination of chemotherapeutics improved the survival with no significant difference between the intensified regimens. Multivariable analysis showed an association between treatment center, male gender, inoperability at diagnosis and performance status (ECOG 1-3) with poor prognosis. CONCLUSION: Gemcitabine monotherapy was predominantly used in 2012-2015. Intensified chemotherapy improved OS in comparison to gemcitabine monotherapy. In real-life settings, the OS rates of different treatment approaches are lower than shown in randomized phase III trials.

5 Article Genetic determinants of telomere length and risk of pancreatic cancer: A PANDoRA study. 2019

Campa, Daniele / Matarazzi, Martina / Greenhalf, William / Bijlsma, Maarten / Saum, Kai-Uwe / Pasquali, Claudio / van Laarhoven, Hanneke / Szentesi, Andrea / Federici, Francesca / Vodicka, Pavel / Funel, Niccola / Pezzilli, Raffaele / Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas / Vodickova, Ludmila / Basso, Daniela / Obazee, Ofure / Hackert, Thilo / Soucek, Pavel / Cuk, Katarina / Kaiser, Jörg / Sperti, Cosimo / Lovecek, Martin / Capurso, Gabriele / Mohelnikova-Duchonova, Beatrice / Khaw, Kay-Tee / König, Anna-Katharina / Kupcinskas, Juozas / Kaaks, Rudolf / Bambi, Franco / Archibugi, Livia / Mambrini, Andrea / Cavestro, Giulia Martina / Landi, Stefano / Hegyi, Péter / Izbicki, Jakob R / Gioffreda, Domenica / Zambon, Carlo Federico / Tavano, Francesca / Talar-Wojnarowska, Renata / Jamroziak, Krzysztof / Key, Timothy J / Fave, Gianfranco Delle / Strobel, Oliver / Jonaitis, Laimas / Andriulli, Angelo / Lawlor, Rita T / Pirozzi, Felice / Katzke, Verena / Valsuani, Chiara / Vashist, Yogesh K / Brenner, Hermann / Canzian, Federico. ·Department of Biology, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. · Genomic Epidemiology Group, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Institute for Health Research Liverpool Pancreas Biomedical Research Unit, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, United Kingdom. · Medical Oncology, Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Division of Clinical Epidemiology and Aging Research, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Pancreatic and Digestive Endocrine Surgery - Department of Surgery, Oncology and Gastroenterology (DiSCOG), University of Padova, Padova, Italy. · Institute for Translational Medicine, University of Pécs, Pécs, Hungary. · First Department of Medicine, University of Szeged, Szeged, Hungary. · Oncological Department, Azienda USL Toscana Nord Ovest, Oncological Unit of Massa Carrara, Carrara, Italy. · Department of Molecular Biology of Cancer, Institute of Experimental Medicine, Academy of Science of Czech Republic, Prague, Czech Republic. · Institute of Biology and Medical Genetics, 1st Medical Faculty, Charles University, Prague, Czech Republic. · Biomedical Center, Faculty of Medicine in Pilsen, Charles University, Pilsen, Czech Republic. · Department of Surgery, Unit of Experimental Surgical Pathology, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. · Pancreas Unit, Department of Digestive System, Sant'Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, Bologna, Italy. · Department for Determinants of Chronic Diseases (DCD), National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven, The Netherlands. · Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University Medical Centre, Utrecht, The Netherlands. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, The School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom. · Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. · Department of Laboratory Medicine, University-Hospital of Padova, Padua, Italy. · Department of General, Visceral and Transplantation Surgery, University Hospital Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany. · Third Surgical Clinic - Department of Surgery, Oncology and Gastroenterology (DiSCOG), University of Padova, Padova, Italy. · Department of Surgery I, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, Palacky University Olomouc and University Hospital Olomouc, Olomouc, Czech Republic. · Digestive and Liver Disease Unit, S. Andrea Hospital, 'Sapienza' University, Rome, Italy. · PancreatoBiliary Endoscopy and EUS Division, Pancreas Translational and Clinical Research Center, IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Vita Salute San Raffaele University, Milan, Italy. · Department of Oncology, Institute of Molecular and Translational Medicine, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, Palacky University, Olomouc, Czech Republic. · University of Cambridge School of Clinical Medicine Clinical Gerontology Unit, Addenbrooke's Hospital, Cambridge, United Kingdom. · Department of Gastroenterology, Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, Kaunas, Lithuania. · Division of Cancer Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Blood Transfusion Service, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria Meyer, Florence, Italy. · Gastroenterology and Gastrointestinal Endoscopy Unit, Vita-Salute San Raffaele University, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy. · MTA-SZTE Momentum Translational Gastroenterology Research Group, Szeged, Hungary. · Department of General, Visceral and Thoracic Surgery, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany. · Division of Gastroenterology and Molecular Biology Lab, IRCCS Ospedale Casa Sollievo Sofferenza, San Giovanni Rotondo, Italy. · Department of Digestive Tract Diseases, Medical University of Lodz, Lodz, Poland. · Institute of Hematology and Transfusion Medicine, Warsaw, Poland. · Cancer Epidemiology Unit, Nuffield Department of Population Health, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom. · ARC-NET, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Division of Abdominal Surgery, IRCCS Ospedale Casa Sollievo Sofferenza, San Giovanni Rotondo, Italy. · Division of Preventive Oncology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ) and National Center for Tumor Diseases (NCT), Heidelberg, Germany. · German Cancer Consortium (DKTK), German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. ·Int J Cancer · Pubmed #30325019.

ABSTRACT: Telomere deregulation is a hallmark of cancer. Telomere length measured in lymphocytes (LTL) has been shown to be a risk marker for several cancers. For pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) consensus is lacking whether risk is associated with long or short telomeres. Mendelian randomization approaches have shown that a score built from SNPs associated with LTL could be used as a robust risk marker. We explored this approach in a large scale study within the PANcreatic Disease ReseArch (PANDoRA) consortium. We analyzed 10 SNPs (ZNF676-rs409627, TERT-rs2736100, CTC1-rs3027234, DHX35-rs6028466, PXK-rs6772228, NAF1-rs7675998, ZNF208-rs8105767, OBFC1-rs9420907, ACYP2-rs11125529 and TERC-rs10936599) alone and combined in a LTL genetic score ("teloscore", which explains 2.2% of the telomere variability) in relation to PDAC risk in 2,374 cases and 4,326 controls. We identified several associations with PDAC risk, among which the strongest were with the TERT-rs2736100 SNP (OR = 1.54; 95%CI 1.35-1.76; p = 1.54 × 10

6 Article Common genetic variants associated with pancreatic adenocarcinoma may also modify risk of pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms. 2018

Obazee, Ofure / Capurso, Gabriele / Tavano, Francesca / Archibugi, Livia / De Bonis, Antonio / Greenhalf, William / Key, Tim / Pasquali, Claudio / Milanetto, Anna Caterina / Hackert, Thilo / Fogar, Paola / Lico, Valbona / Dervenis, Christos / Lawlor, Rita T / Landoni, Luca / Gazouli, Maria / Zambon, Carlo Federico / Funel, Niccola / Strobel, Oliver / Jamroziak, Krzysztof / Cantu, Cinzia / Malecka-Panas, Ewa / Landi, Stefano / Neoptolemos, John P / Basso, Daniela / Talar-Wojnarowska, Renata / Rinzivillo, Maria / Andriulli, Angelo / Canzian, Federico / Campa, Daniele. ·Genomic Epidemiology Group, German Cancer Research Centre (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Digestive and Liver Disease Unit, S. Andrea Hospital, 'Sapienza' University of Rome, Rome, Italy. · Division of Gastroenterology and Research Laboratory, San Giovanni Rotondo, Italy. · Department of Surgery, IRCCS Scientific Institute and Regional General Hospital "Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza", San Giovanni Rotondo, Italy. · Department of Molecular and Clinical Cancer Medicine, Institute of Translational Medicine, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK. · Cancer Epidemiology Unit, Nuffield Department of Population Health, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK. · Pancreatic and Digestive Endocrine Surgery - Department of Surgery, Oncology and Gastroenterology -DiSCOG, University of Padova, Padova, Italy. · Klinik für Allgemein-, Viszeral- und Transplantationschirurgie, Im Neuenheimer Feld, Heidelberg, Germany. · Department of Laboratory Medicine, University-Hospital of Padova, Padova, Italy. · Department of Surgical Oncology and Hepatobiliary Surgery, Metropolitan General Hospital, Pireas, Greece. · ARC-NET Center for Applied Research on Cancer, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Department of Surgery, Pancreas Institute, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Department of Basic Medical Sciences, Laboratory of Biology, School of Medicine, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece. · Department of Medicine - DIMED, University of Padova, Padova, Italy. · Department of Translational Research and New Technologies in Medicine and Surgery, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. · Department of Hematology, Medical University of Lodz, Lodz, Poland. · Department of Digestive Tract Diseases, Medical University of Lodz, Lodz, Poland. · Department of Biology, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. ·Carcinogenesis · Pubmed #29868886.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

7 Article Common genetic variants associated with pancreatic adenocarcinoma may also modify risk of pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms. 2018

Obazee, Ofure / Capurso, Gabriele / Tavano, Francesca / Archibugi, Livia / De Bonis, Antonio / Greenhalf, William / Key, Tim / Pasquali, Claudio / Milanetto, Anna Caterina / Hackert, Thilo / Fogar, Paola / Liço, Valbona / Dervenis, Christos / Lawlor, Rita T / Landoni, Luca / Gazouli, Maria / Zambon, Carlo Federico / Funel, Niccola / Strobel, Oliver / Jamroziak, Krzysztof / Cantù, Cinzia / Malecka-Panas, Ewa / Landi, Stefano / Neoptolemos, John P / Basso, Daniela / Talar-Wojnarowska, Renata / Rinzivillo, Maria / Andriulli, Angelo / Canzian, Federico / Campa, Daniele. ·Digestive and Liver Disease Unit, S. Andrea Hospital, 'Sapienza' University of Rome, Rome, Italy. · Division of Gastroenterology and Research Laboratory, San Giovanni Rotondo, Italy. · Department of Surgery, IRCCS Scientific Institute and Regional General Hospital "Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza", San Giovanni Rotondo, Italy. · Department of Molecular and Clinical Cancer Medicine, Institute of Translational Medicine, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK. · Cancer Epidemiology Unit, Nuffield Department of Population Health, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK. · Pancreatic and Digestive Endocrine Surgery - Department of Surgery, Oncology and Gastroenterology -DiSCOG, University of Padova, Padova, Italy. · Klinik für Allgemein-, Viszeral- und Transplantationschirurgie, Im Neuenheimer Feld, Heidelberg, Germany. · Department of Laboratory Medicine, University Hospital of Padova, Padova, Italy. · Department of Surgical Oncology and Hepatobiliary Surgery, Metropolitan General Hospital, Pireas, Greece. · ARC-NET Center for Applied Research on Cancer, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Department of Surgery, Pancreas Institute, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Department of Basic Medical Sciences, Laboratory of Biology, School of Medicine, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece. · Department of Medicine - DIMED, University of Padova, Padova, Italy. · Department of Translational Research and New Technologies in Medicine and Surgery, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. · Department of Hematology, Medical University of Lodz, Lodz, Poland. · Department of Digestive Tract Diseases, Medical University of Lodz, Lodz, Poland. · Department of Biology, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. · Genomic Epidemiology Group, German Cancer Research Centre (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany ·Carcinogenesis · Pubmed #29309705.

ABSTRACT: Pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms (pNEN) account for less than 5% of all pancreatic neoplasms and genetic association studies on susceptibility to the disease are limited. We sought to identify possible overlap of genetic susceptibility loci between pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) and pNEN; therefore, PDAC susceptibility variants (n = 23) from Caucasian genome-wide association studies (GWAS) were genotyped in 369 pNEN cases and 3277 controls from the PANcreatic Disease ReseArch (PANDoRA) consortium to evaluate the odds associated with pNEN risk, disease onset and tumor characteristics. Main effect analyses showed four PDAC susceptibility variants-rs9854771, rs1561927, rs9543325 and rs10919791 to be associated with pNEN risk. Subsequently, only associations with rs9543325, rs10919791 and rs1561927 were noteworthy with false positive report probability (FPRP) tests. Stratified analyses considering age at onset (50-year threshold), showed rs2736098, rs16986825 and rs9854771 to be associated with risk of developing pNEN at a younger age. Stratified analyses also showed some single nucleotide polymorphisms to be associated with different degrees of tumor grade, metastatic potential and functionality. Our results identify known GWAS PDAC susceptibility loci, which may also be involved in sporadic pNEN etiology and suggest that some genetic mechanisms governing pathogenesis of these two entities may be similar, with few of these loci being more influential in younger cases or tumor subtypes.

8 Article Exclusive and Combined Use of Statins and Aspirin and the Risk of Pancreatic Cancer: a Case-Control Study. 2017

Archibugi, Livia / Piciucchi, Matteo / Stigliano, Serena / Valente, Roberto / Zerboni, Giulia / Barucca, Viola / Milella, Michele / Maisonneuve, Patrick / Delle Fave, Gianfranco / Capurso, Gabriele. ·Digestive and Liver Disease Unit, S. Andrea Hospital, Faculty of Medicine and Psychology, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy. · Medical Oncology Unit, Istituto Nazionale Tumori Regina Elena (IFO), Rome, Italy. · Division of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, European Institute of Oncology, Milan, Italy. · Digestive and Liver Disease Unit, S. Andrea Hospital, Faculty of Medicine and Psychology, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy. gabriele.capurso@gmail.com. ·Sci Rep · Pubmed #29026148.

ABSTRACT: Data on the association between aspirin and statin use and Pancreatic Ductal AdenoCarcinoma (PDAC) risk are conflicting. These drugs are often co-prescribed, but no studies evaluated the potential combined or confounding effect of the two at the same time. We aimed to investigate the association between aspirin and statin exclusive and combined use and PDAC occurrence. Data on environmental factors, family and medical history were screened in a case-control study. PDAC cases were matched to controls for age and gender. Power calculation performed ahead. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals(CI) were obtained from multivariable logistic regression analysis. In 408 PDAC patients and 816 matched controls, overall statin (OR 0.61; 95%CI,0.43-0.88), but not aspirin use was associated to reduced PDAC risk. Compared to non-users, exclusive statin (OR 0.51; 95%CI,0.32-0.80) and exclusive aspirin users (OR 0.64; 95%CI,0.40-1.01) had reduced PDAC risk. Concomitant statin and aspirin use did not further reduce the risk compared with statin use alone and no interaction was evident. Statin protective association was dose-dependent, and consistent in most subgroups, being stronger in smokers, elderly, obese and non-diabetic patients. The present study suggests that statin use is associated to reduced PDAC risk, supporting a chemopreventive action of statins on PDAC.

9 Article An unusual cause of biliary metal stent obstruction. 2017

Mariani, Alberto / Archibugi, Livia / Petrone, Maria Chiara / Arcidiacono, Paolo Giorgio. ·Pancreato-Biliary Endoscopy and Endosonography Division, Pancreas Translational & Clinical Research Center, San Raffaele Scientific Institute IRCCS, Vita-Salute San Raffaele University, Milan, Italy. · Digestive and Liver Disease Unit, Sant'Andrea Hospital, University "La Sapienza", Rome, Italy. Electronic address: livia.archibugi@hotmail.it. ·Dig Liver Dis · Pubmed #28610904.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

10 Article The Neutrophil/Lymphocyte Ratio at Diagnosis Is Significantly Associated with Survival in Metastatic Pancreatic Cancer Patients. 2017

Piciucchi, Matteo / Stigliano, Serena / Archibugi, Livia / Zerboni, Giulia / Signoretti, Marianna / Barucca, Viola / Valente, Roberto / Fave, Gianfranco Delle / Capurso, Gabriele. ·Digestive and Liver Disease Unit, Sant'Andrea Hospital, Faculty of Medicine and Psychology,"Sapienza" University of Rome, 00189 Rome, Italy. matteopiciucchi@libero.it. · Digestive and Liver Disease Unit, Sant'Andrea Hospital, Faculty of Medicine and Psychology,"Sapienza" University of Rome, 00189 Rome, Italy. seri_stigliano@yahoo.it. · Digestive and Liver Disease Unit, Sant'Andrea Hospital, Faculty of Medicine and Psychology,"Sapienza" University of Rome, 00189 Rome, Italy. livia.archibugi@hotmail.it. · Digestive and Liver Disease Unit, Sant'Andrea Hospital, Faculty of Medicine and Psychology,"Sapienza" University of Rome, 00189 Rome, Italy. giulia.zerboni@gmail.com. · Digestive and Liver Disease Unit, Sant'Andrea Hospital, Faculty of Medicine and Psychology,"Sapienza" University of Rome, 00189 Rome, Italy. mariannasignoretti@gmail.com. · Digestive and Liver Disease Unit, Sant'Andrea Hospital, Faculty of Medicine and Psychology,"Sapienza" University of Rome, 00189 Rome, Italy. viola.barucca@gmail.com. · Digestive and Liver Disease Unit, Sant'Andrea Hospital, Faculty of Medicine and Psychology,"Sapienza" University of Rome, 00189 Rome, Italy. robbie.valente@gmail.com. · Digestive and Liver Disease Unit, Sant'Andrea Hospital, Faculty of Medicine and Psychology,"Sapienza" University of Rome, 00189 Rome, Italy. gianfranco.dellefave@gmail.com. · Digestive and Liver Disease Unit, Sant'Andrea Hospital, Faculty of Medicine and Psychology,"Sapienza" University of Rome, 00189 Rome, Italy. gabriele.capurso@gmail.com. ·Int J Mol Sci · Pubmed #28353661.

ABSTRACT: Different inflammation-based scores such as the neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio (NLR), the Odonera Prognostic Nutritional Index (PNI), the Glasgow Prognostic Score, the platelet/lymphocyte ratio, and the C-reactive protein/albumin ratio have been found to be significantly associated with pancreatic cancer (PDAC) prognosis. However, most studies have investigated patients undergoing surgery, and few of them have compared these scores. We aimed at evaluating the association between inflammatory-based scores and PDAC prognosis. In a single center cohort study, inflammatory-based scores were assessed at diagnosis and their prognostic relevance as well as that of clinic-pathological variables were evaluated through multiple logistic regression and survival probability analysis. In 206 patients, age, male sex, tumor size, presence of distant metastasis, access to chemotherapy, and an NLR > 5 but not other scores were associated with overall survival (OS) at multivariate analysis. Patients with an NLR < 5 had a median survival of 12 months compared to 4 months in those with an NLR > 5. In the 81 patients with distant metastasis at diagnosis, an NLR > 5 resulted in the only variable significantly associated with survival. Among patients with metastatic disease who received chemotherapy, the median survival was 3 months in patients with an NLR > 5 and 7 months in those with an NLR < 5. The NLR might drive therapeutic options in PDAC patients, especially in the setting of metastatic disease.

11 Article Common germline variants within the CDKN2A/2B region affect risk of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. 2016

Campa, Daniele / Capurso, Gabriele / Pastore, Manuela / Talar-Wojnarowska, Renata / Milanetto, Anna Caterina / Landoni, Luca / Maiello, Evaristo / Lawlor, Rita T / Malecka-Panas, Ewa / Funel, Niccola / Gazouli, Maria / De Bonis, Antonio / Klüter, Harald / Rinzivillo, Maria / Delle Fave, Gianfranco / Hackert, Thilo / Landi, Stefano / Bugert, Peter / Bambi, Franco / Archibugi, Livia / Scarpa, Aldo / Katzke, Verena / Dervenis, Christos / Liço, Valbona / Furlanello, Sara / Strobel, Oliver / Tavano, Francesca / Basso, Daniela / Kaaks, Rudolf / Pasquali, Claudio / Gentiluomo, Manuel / Rizzato, Cosmeri / Canzian, Federico. ·Department of Biology, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. · Digestive and Liver Disease Unit, S. Andrea Hospital, 'Sapienza' University of Rome, Rome, Italy. · Genomic Epidemiology Group, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Dept of Digestive Tract Diseases, Medical University of Lodz, Poland. · Department of Surgery, Oncology and Gastroenterology (DISCOG), Pancreatic and Digestive Endocrine Surgery, University of Padova, Padova, Italy. · Department of Surgery, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Department of Oncology, IRCCS Scientific Institute and Regional General Hospital "Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza", San Giovanni Rotondo, Italy. · ARC-NET: Centre for Applied Research on Cancer, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Department of Translational Research and New Technologies in Medicine and Surgery, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. · Department of Basic Medical Sciences, Laboratory of Biology, Medical School National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Greece. · Department of Surgery, IRCCS Scientific Institute and Regional General Hospital "Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza", San Giovanni Rotondo, Italy. · Mannheim Institute of Transfusion Medicine and Immunology, Heidelberg University, Medical Faculty Mannheim, German Red Cross Blood Service Baden-Württemberg - Hessen, Mannheim, Germany. · Department of General Surgery, University Hospital Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany. · Blood Transfusion Service, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria Meyer, Florence, Italy. · Division of Cancer Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Department of Surgery, Konstantopouleion General Hospital Nea Ionia, Greece. · Department of Medicine (DIMED), Laboratory Medicine, University of Padova, Padova, Italy. · Division of Gastroenterology and Research Laboratory, IRCCS Scientific Institute and Regional General Hospital "Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza", San Giovanni Rotondo, Italy. ·Sci Rep · Pubmed #28008994.

ABSTRACT: Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PNETs) are heterogeneous neoplasms which represent only 2% of all pancreatic neoplasms by incidence, but 10% by prevalence. Genetic risk factors could have an important role in the disease aetiology, however only a small number of case control studies have been performed yet. To further our knowledge, we genotyped 13 SNPs belonging to the pleiotropic CDKN2A/B gene region in 320 PNET cases and 4436 controls, the largest study on the disease so far. We observed a statistically significant association between the homozygotes for the minor allele of the rs2518719 SNP and an increased risk of developing PNET (OR

12 Article Early onset pancreatic cancer: risk factors, presentation and outcome. 2015

Piciucchi, Matteo / Capurso, Gabriele / Valente, Roberto / Larghi, Alberto / Archibugi, Livia / Signoretti, Marianna / Stigliano, Serena / Zerboni, Giulia / Barucca, Viola / La Torre, Marco / Cavallini, Marco / Costamagna, Guido / Marchetti, Paolo / Ziparo, Vincenzo / Delle Fave, Gianfranco. ·Digestive and Liver Disease Unit, S. Andrea Hospital, Faculty of Medicine and Psychology, Sapienza University of Rome, Italy. · Endoscopy Division, Gemelli Hospital, Faculty of Medicine and Surgery, Catholic University of Rome, Italy. · Oncology Department, S. Andrea Hospital, Faculty of Medicine and Psychology, Sapienza University of Rome, Italy. · General Surgery Unit, S. Andrea Hospital, Faculty of Medicine and Psychology, Sapienza University of Rome, Italy. · Digestive and Liver Disease Unit, S. Andrea Hospital, Faculty of Medicine and Psychology, Sapienza University of Rome, Italy. Electronic address: gianfranco.dellefave@uniroma1.it. ·Pancreatology · Pubmed #25708929.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: About 10% of pancreatic cancer patients are aged ≤50 at diagnosis and defined as Early Onset Pancreatic Cancer (EOPC). There is limited information regarding risk factors for EOPC occurrence and their outcome. AIM: To investigate risk factors, presentation features and outcome of EOPC patients. METHODS: Consecutive, histologically confirmed, pancreatic cancer patients enrolled. Data regarding environmental and genetic risk factors, clinical and pathological information, treatment and survival were recorded. EOPC patients (aged ≤50 at diagnosis) were compared to older subjects. RESULTS: Twenty-five of 293 patients (8.5%) had EOPC. There was no difference regarding sex distribution, medical conditions and alcohol intake between EOPC and older subjects. EOPC patients were more frequently current smokers (56% vs 28% p = 0.001) and started smoking at a significantly lower mean age (19.8 years, 95%CI 16.7-22.9) as compared to older patients (26.1, 95%CI 24.2-28) (p = 0.001). Current smoking (OR 7.5; 95%CI 1.8-30; p = 0.004) and age at smoking initiation (OR 0.8 for every increasing year; 95%CI 0.7-0.9; p = 0.01) were significant and independent risk factors for diagnosis of EOPC. There were no differences regarding genetic syndromes and pancreatic cancer family history. EOCP presented less frequently with jaundice (16% vs 44%, p = 0.006) and had a higher rate of unresectable disease, albeit not significantly (84% vs 68%, p = 0.1). EOPC patients were more frequently fit for surgery or chemotherapy than their counterpart, resulting in similar stage-specific survival probability. CONCLUSION: EOPC seems related to active and early smoking but not to familial syndromes. Young patients display aggressive disease but not worse outcome.

13 Article Combined therapy with RAD001 e BEZ235 overcomes resistance of PET immortalized cell lines to mTOR inhibition. 2014

Passacantilli, Ilaria / Capurso, Gabriele / Archibugi, Livia / Calabretta, Sara / Caldarola, Sara / Loreni, Fabrizio / Delle Fave, Gianfranco / Sette, Claudio. ·Department of Biomedicine and Prevention, University of Rome Tor Vergata, Rome, Italy; Digestive & Liver Disease Unit, University of La Sapienza, Rome, Italy. · Digestive & Liver Disease Unit, University of La Sapienza, Rome, Italy. · Department of Biology, University of Rome Tor Vergata, Rome, Italy. · Department of Biomedicine and Prevention, University of Rome Tor Vergata, Rome, Italy; Laboratory of Neuroembryology, Fondazione Santa Lucia, Rome, Italy. ·Oncotarget · Pubmed #25026292.

ABSTRACT: Pancreatic endocrine tumors (PETs) are characterised by an indolent behaviour in terms of tumor growth. However, most patients display metastasis at diagnosis and no cure is currently available. Since the PI3K/AKT/mTOR axis is deregulated in PETs, the mTOR inhibitor RAD001 represents the first line treatment. Nevertheless, some patients do not respond to treatments and most acquire resistance. Inhibition of mTOR leads to feedback re-activation of PI3K activity, which may promote resistance to RAD001. Thus, PI3K represents a novel potential target for PETs. We tested the impact of three novel PI3K inhibitors (BEZ235, BKM120 and BYL719) on proliferation of PET cells that are responsive (BON-1) or unresponsive (QGP-1) to RAD001. BEZ235 was the most efficient in inhibiting proliferation in PET cells. Furthermore, combined treatment with BEZ235 and RAD001 exhibited synergic effects and was also effective in BON-1 that acquired resistance to RAD001 (BON-1 RR). Analysis of PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway showed that RAD001 and BEZ235 only partially inhibited mTOR-dependent phosphorylation of 4EBP1. By contrast, combined therapy with the two inhibitors strongly inhibited phosphorylation of 4EBP1, assembly of the translational initiation complex and protein synthesis. Thus, combined treatment with BEZ235 may represent suitable therapy to counteract primary and acquired resistance to RAD001 in PETs.

14 Minor Statin use and pancreatic cancer: a risk assessment. Authors? reply. 2019

Archibugi, Livia / Arcidiacono, Paolo Giorgio / Capurso, Gabriele. ·Pancreato-Biliary Endoscopy and Endosonography Division, Pancreas Translational & Clinical Research Center, San Raffaele Scientific Institute IRCCS, Vita-Salute San Raffaele University, Milan, Italy. · Pancreato-Biliary Endoscopy and Endosonography Division, Pancreas Translational & Clinical Research Center, San Raffaele Scientific Institute IRCCS, Vita-Salute San Raffaele University, Milan, Italy. Electronic address: capurso.gabriele@hsr.it. ·Dig Liver Dis · Pubmed #30926285.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

15 Unspecified The Microbiome and Pancreatic Cancer: An Evidence-based Association? 2018

Archibugi, Livia / Signoretti, Marianna / Capurso, Gabriele. ·Digestive and Liver Disease Unit, S. Andrea Hospital, University "Sapienza," Rome. · Pancreato-Biliary Endoscopy Division and Endosonography Division, Pancreas Translational and Clinical Research Centre, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy. ·J Clin Gastroenterol · Pubmed #30001289.

ABSTRACT: Many risk factors for pancreatic cancer are related with microbiome alteration. In the past few years, the human microbiome and its relation with the immune system have been linked with carcinogenesis of different organs distant from the gut, including the pancreas. Patterns of oral microbiome associated with periodontitis are associated with an increased risk of pancreatic cancer, possibly because of the increased systemic inflammatory response, or to the capacity of some specific bacteria to alter the host immune response, making it more favorable to cancer cells. Helicobacter pylori infection when affecting the gastric body mucosa with subsequent hypochlorhydria also seems associated with an increased risk of pancreatic cancer. The composition of the intestinal microbiome is different in animal models and in humans with pancreatic cancer who have a distinct microbiome population compared with controls. Some specific bacteria can migrate from the intestine to the pancreas, and their ablation restores the immune system activity through its reprogramming with a switch toward a Th1 response and displays a protective effect toward tumor growth. More research in this area might lead to progress in terms of pancreatic cancer prevention and treatment, possibly in association with immunotherapy.

16 Minor Statin Use and Survival in Resectable Pancreatic Cancer: Confounders and Mechanisms. 2016

Archibugi, Livia / Capurso, Gabriele / Delle Fave, Gianfranco. ·Department of Medicine and Psychology, Digestive and Liver Disease Unit, Sant'Andrea Hospital, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy. ·Am J Gastroenterol · Pubmed #27018118.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --