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Pancreatic Neoplasms: HELP
Articles by Laura N. Anderson
Based on 4 articles published since 2010
(Why 4 articles?)
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Between 2010 and 2020, L. Anderson wrote the following 4 articles about Pancreatic Neoplasms.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Article Trajectories of body mass index, from adolescence to older adulthood, and pancreatic cancer risk; a population-based case-control study in Ontario, Canada. 2019

De Rubeis, Vanessa / Cotterchio, Michelle / Smith, Brendan T / Griffith, Lauren E / Borgida, Ayelet / Gallinger, Steven / Cleary, Sean / Anderson, Laura N. ·Department of Health Research Methods, Evidence, and Impact, McMaster University, 1280 Main Street West, Hamilton, ON, L8S4L8, Canada. · Prevention and Cancer Control, Cancer Care Ontario, Toronto, ON, Canada. · Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada. · Public Health Ontario, Toronto, ON, Canada. · Division of General Surgery, Toronto General Hospital, Toronto, ON, Canada. · Lunenfeld-Tanenbaum Research Institute, Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, ON, Canada. · Department of Surgery, University Health Network, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada. · Division of Hepatobiliary and Pancreas Surgery, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA. · Department of Health Research Methods, Evidence, and Impact, McMaster University, 1280 Main Street West, Hamilton, ON, L8S4L8, Canada. ln.anderson@mcmaster.ca. · Child Health Evaluative Sciences, The Hospital for Sick Children Research Institute, Toronto, ON, Canada. ln.anderson@mcmaster.ca. ·Cancer Causes Control · Pubmed #31230151.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: Pancreatic cancer has the highest fatality rate of all cancers. Adulthood obesity is an established risk factor for pancreatic cancer; however, life-course obesity is not well understood. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between body mass index (BMI) trajectories throughout the life-course and pancreatic cancer risk. METHODS: A population-based case-control study was conducted (2011-2013) in Ontario, Canada. Cases were recruited from the Ontario pancreas cancer study (n = 310) and controls from the Ontario cancer risk factor study (n = 1258). Questionnaires captured self-reported height and weight at four timepoints (adolescence, 20 s, 30-40 s, 50-60 s). BMI trajectories were identified using latent class growth mixture modeling. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated from multivariable logistic regression. RESULTS: Five BMI trajectories were identified: stable-normal weight (38.9%), progressively overweight (42.2%), persistent overweight (12.6%), progressive obesity (4.2%), and persistent obesity (2.1%). The persistent overweight (OR = 1.55; 95% CI 1.02, 2.39) and progressive obesity trajectories (OR = 1.49; 95% CI 0.77, 2.87) compared to stable-normal weight were associated with increased odds of pancreatic cancer. When BMI was evaluated separately the strongest associations with pancreatic cancer emerged in young and mid-adulthood. CONCLUSION: BMI trajectories characterized by overweight in early adulthood were associated with increased pancreatic cancer risk suggesting a life-course approach to disease risk.

2 Article BRM polymorphisms, pancreatic cancer risk and survival. 2016

Segedi, Maja / Anderson, Laura N / Espin-Garcia, Osvaldo / Borgida, Ayelet / Bianco, Teresa / Cheng, Dangxiao / Chen, Zhuo / Patel, Devalben / Brown, M Catherine / Xu, Wei / Reisman, David / Gallinger, Steven / Cotterchio, Michelle / Hung, Rayjean / Liu, Geoffrey / Cleary, Sean P. ·Department of Surgery, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada. · Princess Margaret Cancer Centre-University Health Network-Ontario Cancer Institute, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada. · Mount Sinai Hospital-Lunenfeld Research Institute, Toronto, ON, Canada. · Medical Oncology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL. · Prevention and Cancer Control, Cancer Care Ontario, Toronto, ON, Canada. · Princess Margaret Cancer Centre-University Health Network-Ontario Cancer Institute, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada. Geoffrey.Liu@uhn.ca. ·Int J Cancer · Pubmed #27487558.

ABSTRACT: Variant alleles of two promoter polymorphisms in the BRM gene (BRM-741, BRM-1321), create MEF2D transcription binding sites that lead to epigenetic silencing of BRM, the key catalytic component of the SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling complex. BRM suppression can be reversed pharmacologically.(1) Our group and others have reported associations with lung, head and neck, hepatocellular cancer risk,(1-3) and with lung and esophageal cancer prognosis (ASCO 2013; abstract 11057 & 4077). Herein, we assessed risk and survival associations with pancreatic cancer. A provincial population-based case-control study was conducted with 623 histologically confirmed pancreatic adenocarcinoma cases and 1,192 age/gender distribution-matched controls.(4) Survival of cases was obtained through the Ontario Cancer Registry. Logistic and Cox proportional hazard regression models were fitted, adjusting for relevant covariates. Median age was 65 y; 52% were male; Stage I (8%), II (55%), III (14%), IV (23%); 53% after curative resection, 79% after chemotherapy; and 83% had died. In the risk analysis, adjusted odds ratios (aOR) were 1.01 (95% CI: 0.1-2.0) and 0.96 (95% CI: 0.7-1.3) for the homozygotes of BRM-741 and BRM-1321, respectively; aOR of double-homozygotes was 1.11 (95% CI: 0.80-1.53), compared to the double-wildtype. For the survival analysis, adjusted hazard ratios (aHR) were 2.19 (95% CI: 1.9-2.5) for BRM-741 and 1.94 (95% CI: 1.7-2.2) for BRM-1321, per unit increase in variant alleles. Compared with the double-wildtype, aHR for carrying no, one, and two double-homozygotes were 2.14 (95% CI: 1.6-2.8), 4.17 (95% CI: 3.0-5.7), 8.03 (95% CI: 5.7-11.4), respectively. In conclusion, two functional promoter BRM polymorphisms were not associated with pancreatic adenocarcinoma risk, but are strongly associated with survival.

3 Article KRAS mutational subtype and copy number predict in vitro response of human pancreatic cancer cell lines to MEK inhibition. 2014

Hamidi, H / Lu, M / Chau, K / Anderson, L / Fejzo, M / Ginther, C / Linnartz, R / Zubel, A / Slamon, D J / Finn, R S. ·Division of Hematology-Oncology, Department of Medicine, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California at Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA. · Oncology Global Development, Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corporation, One Health Plaza, East Hanover, NJ 07936-1080, USA. ·Br J Cancer · Pubmed #25167228.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: To study the molecular mechanism regulating sensitivity to MEK inhibition in pancreatic cancer cell lines. METHODS: A growth inhibition assay determined sensitivity to MEK162 in a panel of 29 pancreatic cancer cell lines. For the same panel, KRAS mutational status and copy-number variation (CNV) was determine using PCR, array CGH and FISH. Two sensitive and two resistant cell lines were further interrogated for difference in baseline and MEK162-induced gene expression, as well as signal transduction using microarray and western blotting. Cell cycle and apoptosis analysis was measured by flow cytometry. RESULTS: We report a strong correlation between both specific KRAS mutational subtype and CNV, and sensitivity to MEK inhibition. Cell lines with a KRAS (V12) mutation and KRAS gains or loss (n=7) are ∼10 times more resistant than those having neither a KRAS (V12) mutation nor KRAS CNV (n=14). Significant differences in baseline and MEK162-induced gene expression exist between the sensitive and resistant lines, especially in genes involved in RAS, EGF receptor and PI3K pathways. This was further supported by difference in signal transduction. MEK 162 blocked ERK1/2, as well as inhibited PI3K and S6 and increased p27KIP1 levels in the sensitive lines. CONCLUSIONS: Given the potency of MEK162, it may be a promising new therapy for patients with pancreatic cancer and KRAS mutational subtypes, and CNV may serve as important biomarkers for selecting patients that benefit from MEK-targeting based on these preclinical data.

4 Article Genetic variants in vitamin d pathway genes and risk of pancreas cancer; results from a population-based case-control study in ontario, Canada. 2013

Anderson, Laura N / Cotterchio, Michelle / Knight, Julia A / Borgida, Ayelet / Gallinger, Steven / Cleary, Sean P. ·Samuel Lunenfeld Research Institute, Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. ·PLoS One · Pubmed #23826131.

ABSTRACT: Recent studies of 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) levels and pancreas cancer have suggested a potential role of the vitamin D pathway in the etiology of this fatal disease. Variants in vitamin-D related genes are known to affect 25(OH)D levels and function and it is unknown if these variants may influence pancreatic cancer risk. The association between 87 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 11 genes was evaluated within the Ontario Pancreas Cancer Study, a population-based case-control study. Pancreatic cancer cases with pathology confirmed adenocarcinoma were identified from the Ontario Cancer Registry (n = 628) and controls were identified through random digit dialing (n = 1193). Age and sex adjusted odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated by multivariate logistic regression. SNPs in the CYP24A1, CYP2R1, calcium sensing receptor (CASR), vitamin D binding protein (GC), retinoid X receptor-alpha (RXRA) and megalin (LRP2) genes were significantly associated with pancreas cancer risk. For example, pancreas cancer risk was inversely associated with CYP2R1 rs10741657 (AA versus GG, OR = 0.70; 95%CI: 0.51-0.95) and positively with CYP24A1 rs6127119 (TT versus CC. OR = 1.94; 95%CI: 1.28-2.94). None of the associations were statistically significant after adjustment for multiple comparisons. Vitamin D pathway gene variants may be associated with pancreas cancer risk and future studies are needed to understand the possible role of vitamin D in tumorigenesis and may have implications for cancer-prevention strategies.