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Pancreatic Neoplasms: HELP
Articles by Laufey T. Amundadottir
Based on 34 articles published since 2010
(Why 34 articles?)
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Between 2010 and 2020, Laufey Amundadottir wrote the following 34 articles about Pancreatic Neoplasms.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2
1 Review Pancreatic Cancer Genetics. 2016

Amundadottir, Laufey T. ·Laboratory of Translational Genomics, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA. ·Int J Biol Sci · Pubmed #26929738.

ABSTRACT: Although relatively rare, pancreatic tumors are highly lethal [1]. In the United States, an estimated 48,960 individuals will be diagnosed with pancreatic cancer and 40,560 will die from this disease in 2015 [1]. Globally, 337,872 new pancreatic cancer cases and 330,391 deaths were estimated in 2012 [2]. In contrast to most other cancers, mortality rates for pancreatic cancer are not improving; in the US, it is predicted to become the second leading cause of cancer related deaths by 2030 [3, 4]. The vast majority of tumors arise in the exocrine pancreas, with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) accounting for approximately 95% of tumors. Tumors arising in the endocrine pancreas (pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors) represent less than 5% of all pancreatic tumors [5]. Smoking, type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D), obesity and pancreatitis are the most consistent epidemiological risk factors for pancreatic cancer [5]. Family history is also a risk factor for developing pancreatic cancer with odds ratios (OR) ranging from 1.7-2.3 for first-degree relatives in most studies, indicating that shared genetic factors may play a role in the etiology of this disease [6-9]. This review summarizes the current knowledge of germline pancreatic cancer risk variants with a special emphasis on common susceptibility alleles identified through Genome Wide Association Studies (GWAS).

2 Review Epidemiology and Inherited Predisposition for Sporadic Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma. 2015

Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael Z / Amundadottir, Laufey T. ·Nutritional Epidemiology Branch, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, 9609 Medical Center Drive, Room 6E420, Rockville, MD 20850, USA. Electronic address: rs221z@nih.gov. · Laboratory of Translational Genomics, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, 8717 Grovemont Circle, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA. Electronic address: amundadottirl@mail.nih.gov. ·Hematol Oncol Clin North Am · Pubmed #26226901.

ABSTRACT: Given the changing demographics of Western populations, the numbers of pancreatic cancer cases are projected to increase during the next decade. Diabetes, recent cigarette smoking, and excess body weight are the cancer's most consistent risk factors. The search for common and rare germline variants that influence risk of pancreatic cancer through genome-wide association studies and high-throughput-sequencing-based studies is underway and holds the promise of increasing the knowledge of variants and genes that play a role in inherited susceptibility of this disease. Research reported in this review has advanced the understanding of pancreatic cancer.

3 Article Agnostic Pathway/Gene Set Analysis of Genome-Wide Association Data Identifies Associations for Pancreatic Cancer. 2019

Walsh, Naomi / Zhang, Han / Hyland, Paula L / Yang, Qi / Mocci, Evelina / Zhang, Mingfeng / Childs, Erica J / Collins, Irene / Wang, Zhaoming / Arslan, Alan A / Beane-Freeman, Laura / Bracci, Paige M / Brennan, Paul / Canzian, Federico / Duell, Eric J / Gallinger, Steven / Giles, Graham G / Goggins, Michael / Goodman, Gary E / Goodman, Phyllis J / Hung, Rayjean J / Kooperberg, Charles / Kurtz, Robert C / Malats, Núria / LeMarchand, Loic / Neale, Rachel E / Olson, Sara H / Scelo, Ghislaine / Shu, Xiao O / Van Den Eeden, Stephen K / Visvanathan, Kala / White, Emily / Zheng, Wei / Anonymous2461116 / Albanes, Demetrius / Andreotti, Gabriella / Babic, Ana / Bamlet, William R / Berndt, Sonja I / Borgida, Ayelet / Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine / Brais, Lauren / Brennan, Paul / Bueno-de-Mesquita, Bas / Buring, Julie / Chaffee, Kari G / Chanock, Stephen / Cleary, Sean / Cotterchio, Michelle / Foretova, Lenka / Fuchs, Charles / M Gaziano, J Michael / Giovannucci, Edward / Goggins, Michael / Hackert, Thilo / Haiman, Christopher / Hartge, Patricia / Hasan, Manal / Helzlsouer, Kathy J / Herman, Joseph / Holcatova, Ivana / Holly, Elizabeth A / Hoover, Robert / Hung, Rayjean J / Janout, Vladimir / Klein, Eric A / Kurtz, Robert C / Laheru, Daniel / Lee, I-Min / Lu, Lingeng / Malats, Núria / Mannisto, Satu / Milne, Roger L / Oberg, Ann L / Orlow, Irene / Patel, Alpa V / Peters, Ulrike / Porta, Miquel / Real, Francisco X / Rothman, Nathaniel / Sesso, Howard D / Severi, Gianluca / Silverman, Debra / Strobel, Oliver / Sund, Malin / Thornquist, Mark D / Tobias, Geoffrey S / Wactawski-Wende, Jean / Wareham, Nick / Weiderpass, Elisabete / Wentzensen, Nicolas / Wheeler, William / Yu, Herbert / Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne / Kraft, Peter / Li, Donghui / Jacobs, Eric J / Petersen, Gloria M / Wolpin, Brian M / Risch, Harvey A / Amundadottir, Laufey T / Yu, Kai / Klein, Alison P / Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael Z. ·National Institute for Cellular Biotechnology, Dublin City University, Glasnevin, Dublin, Ireland. · Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD. · Division of Applied Regulatory Science, Office of Translational Science, Center for Drug Evaluation & Research, U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Silver Spring, MD. · Department of Oncology, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD. · Laboratory of Translational Genomics, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD. · Division of Epidemiology II, Office of Surveillance and Epidemiology, Center for Drug Evaluation & Research, U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Silver Spring, MD. · Department of Computational Biology, St Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee. · Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY. · Department of Environmental Medicine, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY. · Department of Population Health, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of California, San Francisco, CA. · International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), Lyon, France. · Genomic Epidemiology Group, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Unit of Nutrition and Cancer, Cancer Epidemiology Research Program, Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute (IDIBELL), Catalan Institute of Oncology (ICO), Barcelona, Spain. · Prosserman Centre for Population Health Research, Lunenfeld-Tanenbaum Research Institute, Sinai Health System, Toronto, ON, Canada. · Cancer Epidemiology and Intelligence Division, Cancer Council Victoria, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. · Centre for Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Melbourne School of Population and Global Health, The University of Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. · Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, Monash University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. · Department of Pathology, Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD. · Division of Public Health Sciences, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA. · SWOG Statistical Center, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA. · Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY. · Genetic and Molecular Epidemiology Group, Spanish National Cancer Research Center (CNIO), Madrid, Spain. · CIBERONC, Madrid, Spain. · Cancer Epidemiology Program, University of Hawaii Cancer Center, Honolulu, HI. · Population Health Department, QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY. · Division of Epidemiology, Department of Medicine, Vanderbilt Epidemiology Center, Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN. · Division of Research, Kaiser Permanente Northern California, Oakland, CA. · Department of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD. · Department of Epidemiology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA. · Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA. · Department of Health Sciences Research, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN. · Centre de Recherche en Épidémiologie et Santé des Populations (CESP, Inserm U1018), Facultés de Medicine, Université Paris-Saclay, UPS, UVSQ, Gustave Roussy, Villejuif, France. · Department for Determinants of Chronic Diseases (DCD), National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven, the Netherlands. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, UK. · Department of Social & Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. · Division of Preventive Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA. · Department of Epidemiology, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA. · Division of Hepatobiliary and Pancreas Surgery, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN. · Cancer Care Ontario, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada. · Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada. · Department of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, Masaryk Memorial Cancer Institute, Brno, Czech Republic. · Yale Cancer Center, New Haven, CT. · Division of Aging, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA. · Boston VA Healthcare System, Boston, MA. · Department of General Surgery, University Hospital Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany. · Department of Preventive Medicine, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA. · Department of Epidemiology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX. · Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD. · Department of Radiation Oncology, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD. · Institute of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, Charles University, 2nd Faculty of Medicine, Prague, Czech Republic. · Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Faculty of Medicine, University of Ostrava, Czech Republic. · Faculty of Medicine, University of Olomouc, Olomouc, Czech Republic. · Glickman Urological and Kidney Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH. · Department of Chronic Disease Epidemiology, Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, CT. · Department of Public Health Solutions, National Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland. · Epidemiology Research Program, American Cancer Society, Atlanta, GA. · CIBER Epidemiología y Salud Pública (CIBERESP), Barcelona, Spain. · Hospital del Mar Institute of Medical Research (IMIM), Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain. · Epithelial Carcinogenesis Group, Spanish National Cancer Research Centre-CNIO, Madrid, Spain. · Departament de Ciències Experimentals i de la Salut, Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain. · Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden. · Department of Epidemiology and Environmental Health, University at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY. · MRC Epidemiology Unit, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK. · Department of Research, Cancer Registry of Norway, Institute of Population-Based Cancer Research, Oslo, Norway. · Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. · Genetic Epidemiology Group, Folkhälsan Research Center and Faculty of Medicine, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland. · Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Tromsø, The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway. · Information Management Systems, Silver Spring, MD. · Perlmutter Cancer Center, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY. · Department of Biostatistics, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA. · Department of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX. ·J Natl Cancer Inst · Pubmed #30541042.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) identify associations of individual single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with cancer risk but usually only explain a fraction of the inherited variability. Pathway analysis of genetic variants is a powerful tool to identify networks of susceptibility genes. METHODS: We conducted a large agnostic pathway-based meta-analysis of GWAS data using the summary-based adaptive rank truncated product method to identify gene sets and pathways associated with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) in 9040 cases and 12 496 controls. We performed expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) analysis and functional annotation of the top SNPs in genes contributing to the top associated pathways and gene sets. All statistical tests were two-sided. RESULTS: We identified 14 pathways and gene sets associated with PDAC at a false discovery rate of less than 0.05. After Bonferroni correction (P ≤ 1.3 × 10-5), the strongest associations were detected in five pathways and gene sets, including maturity-onset diabetes of the young, regulation of beta-cell development, role of epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor transactivation by G protein-coupled receptors in cardiac hypertrophy pathways, and the Nikolsky breast cancer chr17q11-q21 amplicon and Pujana ATM Pearson correlation coefficient (PCC) network gene sets. We identified and validated rs876493 and three correlating SNPs (PGAP3) and rs3124737 (CASP7) from the Pujana ATM PCC gene set as eQTLs in two normal derived pancreas tissue datasets. CONCLUSION: Our agnostic pathway and gene set analysis integrated with functional annotation and eQTL analysis provides insight into genes and pathways that may be biologically relevant for risk of PDAC, including those not previously identified.

4 Article CLPTM1L/CRR9 ectodomain interaction with GRP78 at the cell surface signals for survival and chemoresistance upon ER stress in pancreatic adenocarcinoma cells. 2019

Clarke, William R / Amundadottir, Laufey / James, Michael A. ·Department of Anesthesiology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, USA. · Laboratory of Translational Genomics, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Gaithersburg, Maryland, USA. · Department of Surgery, Division of Research, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, USA. ·Int J Cancer · Pubmed #30468251.

ABSTRACT: Altered regulation of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) homeostasis has been implicated in many cancers and has recently become a therapeutic and chemosensitization target of interest. We have identified Cleft Lip and Palate Transmembrane 1-Like (CLPTM1L)/Cisplatin Resistance Related Protein 9 (CRR9) as an ER stress related mediator of cytoprotection in pancreatic cancer. We recently demonstrated that CLPTM1L is highly expressed in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma and associated with poor outcome. Furthermore, we have discovered that CLPTM1L interacts with phosphoinositol-3-kinase-alpha at the tumor cell surface and causes up-regulation of Bcl-xL and pAkt mediated survival signaling. Here, we demonstrate surface relocalization and survival signaling by CLPTM1L triggered by endoplasmic reticular (ER) stress. We demonstrate the interaction of CLPTM1L with the central ER stress survival mediator, Glucose Regulated Protein 78 (GRP78)/Binding Immunoglobulin Protein (BiP) and PI3K-alpha /p110α. This interaction and surface relocalization of CLPTM1L and GRP78 is induced by ER stress, including that caused by treatment with gemcitabine. We demonstrate that the extracellular loop of CLPTM1L is required for gemcitabine resistance and interaction with GRP78. This interaction and the chemoresistance effect conferred by this pathway is targetable with our recently developed inhibitory CLPTM1L antibodies, which may represent novel modalities of chemosensitization and treatment of pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Anchorage independent growth, GRP78-mediated chemoresistance, and Akt phosphorylation were abrogated by inhibition of CLPTM1L. These findings demonstrate a novel and potentially targetable mechanism of cytoprotection and chemoresistance in pancreatic tumors.

5 Article Pancreatic cancer risk is modulated by inflammatory potential of diet and ABO genotype: a consortia-based evaluation and replication study. 2018

Antwi, Samuel O / Bamlet, William R / Pedersen, Katrina S / Chaffee, Kari G / Risch, Harvey A / Shivappa, Nitin / Steck, Susan E / Anderson, Kristin E / Bracci, Paige M / Polesel, Jerry / Serraino, Diego / La Vecchia, Carlo / Bosetti, Cristina / Li, Donghui / Oberg, Ann L / Arslan, Alan A / Albanes, Demetrius / Duell, Eric J / Huybrechts, Inge / Amundadottir, Laufey T / Hoover, Robert / Mannisto, Satu / Chanock, Stephen J / Zheng, Wei / Shu, Xiao-Ou / Stepien, Magdalena / Canzian, Federico / Bueno-de-Mesquita, Bas / Quirós, José Ramon / Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne / Bruinsma, Fiona / Milne, Roger L / Giles, Graham G / Hébert, James R / Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael Z / Petersen, Gloria M. ·Division of Epidemiology, Department of Health Sciences Research, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA. · Division of Biomedical Statistics and Informatics, Department of Health Sciences Research, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA. · Division of Oncology, Washington University, St. Louis, MO, USA. · Department of Chronic Disease Epidemiology, Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, CT, USA. · Cancer Prevention and Control Program, USA. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Arnold School of Public Health, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC, USA. · Division of Epidemiology and Community Health, School of Public Health, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, USA. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, USA. · Unit of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Centro di Riferimento Oncologico, Aviano (PN), Italy. · Department of Clinical Sciences and Community Health, University of Milan, Milan, Italy. · Department of Oncology, IRCCS-Istituto di Ricerche Farmacologiche Mario Negri, Milan, Italy. · Department of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology, The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, USA. · Department of Environmental Medicine, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY, USA. · Department of Population Health, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY, USA. · Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY, USA. · Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Department of Health and Human Services, Bethesda, MD, USA. · Unit of Nutrition and Cancer, Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute-IDIBELL, Catalan Institute of Oncology-ICO. L'Hospitalet de Llobregat, Barcelona, Spain. · International Agency for Research on Cancer, World Health Organization, France. · Department of Public Health Solutions, National Institute for Health and Welfare Helsinki, Finland. · Division of Epidemiology, Department of Medicine, Vanderbilt Epidemiology Center, and Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN, USA. · Genomic Epidemiology Group, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, St Mary's Campus, Norfolk Place, London, UK. · Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Pantai Valley, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. · Public Health Directorate, Asturias, Spain. · Perlmutter Cancer Center, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY, USA. · Cancer Epidemiology and Intelligence Division, Cancer Council Victoria, and Centre for Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Melbourne School of Global and Population Health, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia. ·Carcinogenesis · Pubmed #29800239.

ABSTRACT: Diets with high inflammatory potential are suspected to increase risk for pancreatic cancer (PC). Using pooled analyses, we examined whether this association applies to populations from different geographic regions and population subgroups with varying risks for PC, including variation in ABO blood type. Data from six case-control studies (cases, n = 2414; controls, n = 4528) in the Pancreatic Cancer Case-Control Consortium (PanC4) were analyzed, followed by replication in five nested case-control studies (cases, n = 1268; controls, n = 4215) from the Pancreatic Cancer Cohort Consortium (PanScan). Two polymorphisms in the ABO locus (rs505922 and rs8176746) were used to infer participants' blood types. Dietary questionnaire-derived nutrient/food intake was used to compute energy-adjusted dietary inflammatory index (E-DII®) scores to assess inflammatory potential of diet. Pooled odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using multivariable-adjusted logistic regression. Higher E-DII scores, reflecting greater inflammatory potential of diet, were associated with increased PC risk in PanC4 [ORQ5 versus Q1=2.20, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.85-2.61, Ptrend < 0.0001; ORcontinuous = 1.20, 95% CI = 1.17-1.24], and PanScan (ORQ5 versus Q1 = 1.23, 95% CI = 0.92-1.66, Ptrend = 0.008; ORcontinuous = 1.09, 95% CI = 1.02-1.15). As expected, genotype-derived non-O blood type was associated with increased PC risk in both the PanC4 and PanScan studies. Stratified analyses of associations between E-DII quintiles and PC by genotype-derived ABO blood type did not show interaction by blood type (Pinteraction = 0.10 in PanC4 and Pinteraction=0.13 in PanScan). The results show that consuming a pro-inflammatory diet and carrying non-O blood type are each individually, but not interactively, associated with increased PC risk.

6 Article Genome-wide meta-analysis identifies five new susceptibility loci for pancreatic cancer. 2018

Klein, Alison P / Wolpin, Brian M / Risch, Harvey A / Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael Z / Mocci, Evelina / Zhang, Mingfeng / Canzian, Federico / Childs, Erica J / Hoskins, Jason W / Jermusyk, Ashley / Zhong, Jun / Chen, Fei / Albanes, Demetrius / Andreotti, Gabriella / Arslan, Alan A / Babic, Ana / Bamlet, William R / Beane-Freeman, Laura / Berndt, Sonja I / Blackford, Amanda / Borges, Michael / Borgida, Ayelet / Bracci, Paige M / Brais, Lauren / Brennan, Paul / Brenner, Hermann / Bueno-de-Mesquita, Bas / Buring, Julie / Campa, Daniele / Capurso, Gabriele / Cavestro, Giulia Martina / Chaffee, Kari G / Chung, Charles C / Cleary, Sean / Cotterchio, Michelle / Dijk, Frederike / Duell, Eric J / Foretova, Lenka / Fuchs, Charles / Funel, Niccola / Gallinger, Steven / M Gaziano, J Michael / Gazouli, Maria / Giles, Graham G / Giovannucci, Edward / Goggins, Michael / Goodman, Gary E / Goodman, Phyllis J / Hackert, Thilo / Haiman, Christopher / Hartge, Patricia / Hasan, Manal / Hegyi, Peter / Helzlsouer, Kathy J / Herman, Joseph / Holcatova, Ivana / Holly, Elizabeth A / Hoover, Robert / Hung, Rayjean J / Jacobs, Eric J / Jamroziak, Krzysztof / Janout, Vladimir / Kaaks, Rudolf / Khaw, Kay-Tee / Klein, Eric A / Kogevinas, Manolis / Kooperberg, Charles / Kulke, Matthew H / Kupcinskas, Juozas / Kurtz, Robert J / Laheru, Daniel / Landi, Stefano / Lawlor, Rita T / Lee, I-Min / LeMarchand, Loic / Lu, Lingeng / Malats, Núria / Mambrini, Andrea / Mannisto, Satu / Milne, Roger L / Mohelníková-Duchoňová, Beatrice / Neale, Rachel E / Neoptolemos, John P / Oberg, Ann L / Olson, Sara H / Orlow, Irene / Pasquali, Claudio / Patel, Alpa V / Peters, Ulrike / Pezzilli, Raffaele / Porta, Miquel / Real, Francisco X / Rothman, Nathaniel / Scelo, Ghislaine / Sesso, Howard D / Severi, Gianluca / Shu, Xiao-Ou / Silverman, Debra / Smith, Jill P / Soucek, Pavel / Sund, Malin / Talar-Wojnarowska, Renata / Tavano, Francesca / Thornquist, Mark D / Tobias, Geoffrey S / Van Den Eeden, Stephen K / Vashist, Yogesh / Visvanathan, Kala / Vodicka, Pavel / Wactawski-Wende, Jean / Wang, Zhaoming / Wentzensen, Nicolas / White, Emily / Yu, Herbert / Yu, Kai / Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne / Zheng, Wei / Kraft, Peter / Li, Donghui / Chanock, Stephen / Obazee, Ofure / Petersen, Gloria M / Amundadottir, Laufey T. ·Department of Oncology, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, 21231, USA. aklein1@jhmi.edu. · Department of Pathology, Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, 21287, USA. aklein1@jhmi.edu. · Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA, 02215, USA. · Department of Chronic Disease Epidemiology, Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, CT, 06520, USA. · Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, 20892, USA. · Department of Oncology, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, 21231, USA. · Laboratory of Translational Genomics, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, 20892, USA. · Genomic Epidemiology Group, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), 69120, Heidelberg, Germany. · Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY, 10016, USA. · Department of Population Health, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY, 10016, USA. · Department of Environmental Medicine, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY, 10016, USA. · Department of Health Sciences Research, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN, 55905, USA. · Department of Pathology, Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, 21287, USA. · Lunenfeld-Tanenbaum Research Institute of Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, M5G 1×5, Canada. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, 94158, USA. · International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), 69372, Lyon, France. · Division of Clinical Epidemiology and Aging Research, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), 69120, Heidelberg, Germany. · Division of Preventive Oncology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), 69120, Heidelberg, Germany. · National Center for Tumor Diseases (NCT), 69120, Heidelberg, Germany. · Department for Determinants of Chronic Diseases (DCD), National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), 3720 BA, Bilthoven, The Netherlands. · Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University Medical Centre, 3584 CX, Utrecht, The Netherlands. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, SW7 2AZ, UK. · Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, 50603, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. · Division of Preventive Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA, 02215, USA. · Department of Epidemiology, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA, 02115, USA. · Department of Biology, University of Pisa, 56126, Pisa, Italy. · Digestive and Liver Disease Unit, 'Sapienza' University of Rome, 00185, Rome, Italy. · Gastroenterology and Gastrointestinal Endoscopy Unit, Vita-Salute San Raffaele University, IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, 20132, Milan, Italy. · Cancer Genomics Research Laboratory, National Cancer Institute, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, Leidos Biomedical Research Inc., Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research, Frederick, MD, 21702, USA. · Cancer Care Ontario, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, M5G 2L7, Canada. · Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, M5T 3M7, Canada. · Department of Pathology, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, 1007 MB, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Unit of Nutrition and Cancer, Cancer Epidemiology Research Program, Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute (IDIBELL), Catalan Institute of Oncology (ICO), Barcelona, 08908, Spain. · Department of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, Masaryk Memorial Cancer Institute, 65653, Brno, Czech Republic. · Yale Cancer Center, New Haven, CT, 06510, USA. · Department of Translational Research and The New Technologies in Medicine and Surgery, University of Pisa, 56126, Pisa, Italy. · Division of Aging, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA, 02115, USA. · Boston VA Healthcare System, Boston, MA, 02132, USA. · Department of Basic Medical Sciences, Laboratory of Biology, Medical School, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, 106 79, Athens, Greece. · Cancer Epidemiology and Intelligence Division, Cancer Council Victoria, Melbourne, VIC, 3004, Australia. · Centre for Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Melbourne School of Population and Global Health, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC, 3010, Australia. · Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, Monash University, Melbourne, VIC, 3004, Australia. · Division of Public Health Sciences, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA, 98109, USA. · SWOG Statistical Center, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA, 98109, USA. · Department of General Surgery, University Hospital Heidelberg, 69120, Heidelberg, Germany. · Department of Preventive Medicine, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, 90032, USA. · Department of Epidemiology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, 77230, USA. · First Department of Medicine, University of Szeged, 6725, Szeged, Hungary. · Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, 20892, USA. · Department of Radiation Oncology, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, 21231, USA. · Institute of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, Charles University, 2nd Faculty of Medicine, 150 06, Prague 5, Czech Republic. · Epidemiology Research Program, American Cancer Society, Atlanta, GA, 30303, USA. · Department of Hematology, Institute of Hematology and Transfusion Medicine, 02-776, Warsaw, Poland. · Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Faculty of Medicine, University of Ostrava, 701 03, Ostrava, Czech Republic. · Faculty of Medicine, University of Olomouc, 771 47, Olomouc, Czech Republic. · Division of Cancer Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), 69120, Heidelberg, Germany. · School of Clinical Medicine, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, CB2 0SP, UK. · Glickman Urological and Kidney Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH, 44195, USA. · ISGlobal, Centre for Research in Environmental Epidemiology (CREAL), 08003, Barcelona, Spain. · CIBER Epidemiología y Salud Pública (CIBERESP), 08003, Barcelona, Spain. · Hospital del Mar Institute of Medical Research (IMIM), Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, 08003, Barcelona, Spain. · Universitat Pompeu Fabra (UPF), 08002, Barcelona, Spain. · Department of Gastroenterology, Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, 44307, Kaunas, Lithuania. · Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY, 10065, USA. · ARC-NET: Centre for Applied Research on Cancer, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, 37134, Verona, Italy. · Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA, 02115, USA. · Cancer Epidemiology Program, University of Hawaii Cancer Center, Honolulu, HI, 96813, USA. · Genetic and Molecular Epidemiology Group, Spanish National Cancer Research Center (CNIO), 28029, Madrid, Spain. · CIBERONC, 28029, Madrid, Spain. · Oncology Department, ASL1 Massa Carrara, Carrara, 54033, Italy. · Department of Public Health Solutions, National Institute for Health and Welfare, 00271, Helsinki, Finland. · Department of Oncology, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, Palacky University Olomouc and University Hospital, 775 20, Olomouc, Czech Republic. · Population Health Department, QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Brisbane, 4029, Australia. · Department of General Surgery, University of Heidelburg, Heidelberg, Germany. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY, 10065, USA. · Department of Surgery, Oncology and Gastroenterology (DiSCOG), University of Padua, 35124, Padua, Italy. · Pancreas Unit, Department of Digestive Diseases and Internal Medicine, Sant'Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, 40138, Bologna, Italy. · Epithelial Carcinogenesis Group, Spanish National Cancer Research Centre-CNIO, 28029, Madrid, Spain. · Departament de Ciències Experimentals i de la Salut, Universitat Pompeu Fabra, 08002, Barcelona, Spain. · Centre de Recherche en Épidémiologie et Santé des Populations (CESP, Inserm U1018), Facultés de Medicine, Université Paris-Saclay, UPS, UVSQ, Gustave Roussy, 94800, Villejuif, France. · Division of Epidemiology, Department of Medicine, Vanderbilt Epidemiology Center, Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN, 37232, USA. · Department of Medicine, Georgetown University, Washington, 20057, USA. · Laboratory for Pharmacogenomics, Biomedical Center, Faculty of Medicine in Pilsen, Charles University, 323 00, Pilsen, Czech Republic. · Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Umeå University, 901 85, Umeå, Sweden. · Department of Digestive Tract Diseases, Medical University of Łodz, 90-647, Łodz, Poland. · Division of Gastroenterology and Research Laboratory, IRCCS Scientific Institute and Regional General Hospital "Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza", 71013, San Giovanni Rotondo, FG, Italy. · Division of Research, Kaiser Permanente Northern California, Oakland, CA, 94612, USA. · Department of General, Visceral and Thoracic Surgery, University Hamburg-Eppendorf, 20246, Hamburg, Germany. · Department of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD, 21205, USA. · Department of Molecular Biology of Cancer, Institute of Experimental Medicine, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, 142 20, Prague 4, Czech Republic. · Department of Epidemiology and Environmental Health, University at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY, 14214, USA. · Department of Computational Biology, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, TN, 38105, USA. · Department of Epidemiology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, 98195, USA. · Perlmutter Cancer Center, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY, 10016, USA. · Department of Biostatistics, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA, 02115, USA. · Department of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, 77030, USA. · Laboratory of Translational Genomics, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, 20892, USA. amundadottirl@mail.nih.gov. ·Nat Commun · Pubmed #29422604.

ABSTRACT: In 2020, 146,063 deaths due to pancreatic cancer are estimated to occur in Europe and the United States combined. To identify common susceptibility alleles, we performed the largest pancreatic cancer GWAS to date, including 9040 patients and 12,496 controls of European ancestry from the Pancreatic Cancer Cohort Consortium (PanScan) and the Pancreatic Cancer Case-Control Consortium (PanC4). Here, we find significant evidence of a novel association at rs78417682 (7p12/TNS3, P = 4.35 × 10

7 Article Characterising 2018

Zhang, Mingfeng / Lykke-Andersen, Soren / Zhu, Bin / Xiao, Wenming / Hoskins, Jason W / Zhang, Xijun / Rost, Lauren M / Collins, Irene / Bunt, Martijn van de / Jia, Jinping / Parikh, Hemang / Zhang, Tongwu / Song, Lei / Jermusyk, Ashley / Chung, Charles C / Zhu, Bin / Zhou, Weiyin / Matters, Gail L / Kurtz, Robert C / Yeager, Meredith / Jensen, Torben Heick / Brown, Kevin M / Ongen, Halit / Bamlet, William R / Murray, Bradley A / McCarthy, Mark I / Chanock, Stephen J / Chatterjee, Nilanjan / Wolpin, Brian M / Smith, Jill P / Olson, Sara H / Petersen, Gloria M / Shi, Jianxin / Amundadottir, Laufey. ·Laboratory of Translational Genomics, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, NIH, Bethesda, Maryland, USA. · Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark. · Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, NIH, Bethesda, Maryland, USA. · Biostatistics Branch, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, NIH, Bethesda, Maryland, USA. · Division of Bioinformatics and Biostatistics, National Center for Toxicological Research, FDA, Jefferson, Missouri, USA. · Cancer Genomics Research Laboratory, Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research, Leidos Biomedical Research, Inc, Frederick, Maryland, USA. · Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK. · Oxford Centre for Diabetes, Endocrinology & Metabolism, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK. · Health Informatics Institute, Morsani College of Medicine, University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida, USA. · Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, The Pennsylvania State University College of Medicine, Hershey, Pennsylvania, USA. · Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York City, New York, USA. · Department of Genetic Medicine and Development, University of Geneva Medical School, Geneva, Switzerland. · Department of Health Sciences Research, Division of Epidemiology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, USA. · The Eli and Edythe L Broad Institute of Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Harvard University Cambridge, Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA. · Oxford NIHR Biomedical Research Centre, Churchill Hospital, Headington, Oxford, UK. · Department of Biostatistics, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. · Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Georgetown University Hospital, Washington, D.C., USA. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York City, New York, USA. ·Gut · Pubmed #28634199.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To elucidate the genetic architecture of gene expression in pancreatic tissues. DESIGN: We performed expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL) analysis in histologically normal pancreatic tissue samples (n=95) using RNA sequencing and the corresponding 1000 genomes imputed germline genotypes. Data from pancreatic tumour-derived tissue samples (n=115) from The Cancer Genome Atlas were included for comparison. RESULTS: We identified 38 615 CONCLUSIONS: We have identified

8 Article Impact of Sixteen Established Pancreatic Cancer Susceptibility Loci in American Jews. 2017

Streicher, Samantha A / Klein, Alison P / Olson, Sara H / Amundadottir, Laufey T / DeWan, Andrew T / Zhao, Hongyu / Risch, Harvey A. ·Department of Chronic Disease Epidemiology, Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, Connecticut. · Department of Oncology, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland. · Department of Pathology, Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York. · Laboratory of Translational Genomics, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland. · Department of Biostatistics, Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, Connecticut. · Program of Computational Biology and Bioinformatics, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut. · Department of Chronic Disease Epidemiology, Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, Connecticut. harvey.risch@yale.edu. ·Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev · Pubmed #28754795.

ABSTRACT:

9 Article Functional characterization of a multi-cancer risk locus on chr5p15.33 reveals regulation of TERT by ZNF148. 2017

Fang, Jun / Jia, Jinping / Makowski, Matthew / Xu, Mai / Wang, Zhaoming / Zhang, Tongwu / Hoskins, Jason W / Choi, Jiyeon / Han, Younghun / Zhang, Mingfeng / Thomas, Janelle / Kovacs, Michael / Collins, Irene / Dzyadyk, Marta / Thompson, Abbey / O'Neill, Maura / Das, Sudipto / Lan, Qi / Koster, Roelof / Anonymous1181133 / Anonymous1191133 / Anonymous1201133 / Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael S / Kraft, Peter / Wolpin, Brian M / Jansen, Pascal W T C / Olson, Sara / McGlynn, Katherine A / Kanetsky, Peter A / Chatterjee, Nilanjan / Barrett, Jennifer H / Dunning, Alison M / Taylor, John C / Newton-Bishop, Julia A / Bishop, D Timothy / Andresson, Thorkell / Petersen, Gloria M / Amos, Christopher I / Iles, Mark M / Nathanson, Katherine L / Landi, Maria Teresa / Vermeulen, Michiel / Brown, Kevin M / Amundadottir, Laufey T. ·Laboratory of Translational Genomics, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland 20892, USA. · Department of Molecular Biology, Radboud Institute for Molecular Life Sciences, Radboud University, Nijmegen 6500 HB, The Netherlands. · Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland 20892, USA. · Cancer Genomics Research Laboratory, National Cancer Institute, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, Leidos Biomedical Research, Inc., Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research, Frederick, Maryland 21702, USA. · Department of Community and Family Medicine, Geisel School of Medicine, Dartmouth College, Lebanon, New Hampshire 03756, USA. · Protein Characterization Laboratory, Cancer Research Technology Program, Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research, Frederick, Maryland 21701, USA. · Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA. · Department of Biostatistics, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA. · Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts 02215, USA. · Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02215, USA. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York City, New York 10065, USA. · Department of Cancer Epidemiology, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, Florida 33612, USA. · Section of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Leeds Institute of Cancer and Pathology, University of Leeds, Leeds LS9 7TF, UK. · Department of Oncology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 0XZ, UK. · Department of Health Sciences Research, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota 55905, USA. · Translational Medicine and Human Genetics, Department of Medicine and Abramson Cancer Center, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104, USA. ·Nat Commun · Pubmed #28447668.

ABSTRACT: Genome wide association studies (GWAS) have mapped multiple independent cancer susceptibility loci to chr5p15.33. Here, we show that fine-mapping of pancreatic and testicular cancer GWAS within one of these loci (Region 2 in CLPTM1L) focuses the signal to nine highly correlated SNPs. Of these, rs36115365-C associated with increased pancreatic and testicular but decreased lung cancer and melanoma risk, and exhibited preferred protein-binding and enhanced regulatory activity. Transcriptional gene silencing of this regulatory element repressed TERT expression in an allele-specific manner. Proteomic analysis identifies allele-preferred binding of Zinc finger protein 148 (ZNF148) to rs36115365-C, further supported by binding of purified recombinant ZNF148. Knockdown of ZNF148 results in reduced TERT expression, telomerase activity and telomere length. Our results indicate that the association with chr5p15.33-Region 2 may be explained by rs36115365, a variant influencing TERT expression via ZNF148 in a manner consistent with elevated TERT in carriers of the C allele.

10 Article Leucocyte telomere length, genetic variants at the 2017

Bao, Ying / Prescott, Jennifer / Yuan, Chen / Zhang, Mingfeng / Kraft, Peter / Babic, Ana / Morales-Oyarvide, Vicente / Qian, Zhi Rong / Buring, Julie E / Cochrane, Barbara B / Gaziano, J Michael / Giovannucci, Edward L / Manson, JoAnn E / Ng, Kimmie / Ogino, Shuji / Rohan, Thomas E / Sesso, Howard D / Stampfer, Meir J / Fuchs, Charles S / De Vivo, Immaculata / Amundadottir, Laufey T / Wolpin, Brian M. ·Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Department of Epidemiology, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Laboratory of Translational Genomics, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA. · Department of Biostatistics, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Division of Preventive Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Department of Ambulatory Care and Prevention, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · University of Washington School of Nursing, Seattle, Washington, USA. · Massachusetts Veterans Epidemiology Research and Information Center (MAVERIC), VA Boston Healthcare System. · Department of Nutrition, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Division of MPE Molecular Pathological Epidemiology, Department of Pathology, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Department of Epidemiology and Population Health, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York, USA. · Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. ·Gut · Pubmed #27797938.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: Telomere shortening occurs as an early event in pancreatic tumorigenesis, and genetic variants at the telomerase reverse transcriptase ( DESIGN: We measured prediagnostic leucocyte telomere length in 386 pancreatic cancer cases and 896 matched controls from five prospective US cohorts. ORs and 95% CIs were calculated using conditional logistic regression. Matching factors included year of birth, cohort (which also matches on sex), smoking status, fasting status and month/year of blood collection. We additionally examined single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at the RESULTS: Shorter prediagnostic leucocyte telomere length was associated with higher risk of pancreatic cancer (comparing extreme quintiles of telomere length, OR 1.72; 95% CI 1.07 to 2.78; p CONCLUSIONS: Prediagnostic leucocyte telomere length and genetic variants at the

11 Article Functional characterization of a chr13q22.1 pancreatic cancer risk locus reveals long-range interaction and allele-specific effects on DIS3 expression. 2016

Hoskins, Jason W / Ibrahim, Abdisamad / Emmanuel, Mickey A / Manmiller, Sarah M / Wu, Yinglun / O'Neill, Maura / Jia, Jinping / Collins, Irene / Zhang, Mingfeng / Thomas, Janelle V / Rost, Lauren M / Das, Sudipto / Parikh, Hemang / Haake, Jefferson M / Matters, Gail L / Kurtz, Robert C / Bamlet, William R / Klein, Alison / Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael / Wolpin, Brian M / Yarden, Ronit / Wang, Zhaoming / Smith, Jill / Olson, Sara H / Andresson, Thorkell / Petersen, Gloria M / Amundadottir, Laufey T. ·Laboratory of Translational Genomics, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA. · Protein Characterization Laboratory, Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research, Frederick, MD, USA. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY, USA. · Department of Human Science, NHS, Georgetown University Medical Center, NW, Washington DC, USA. · Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, The Pennsylvania State University College of Medicine, Hershey, PA, USA. · Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York, USA. · Department of Health Sciences Research, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, USA. · Department of Oncology, the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA · Department of Epidemiology, the Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland, USA · Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA. · Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Department of Computational Biology, St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, Memphis, TN, USA · Department of Medicine, Georgetown University Hospital, Washington, DC, and Department of Medicine, Penn State University College of Medicine, Hershey PA, USA. ·Hum Mol Genet · Pubmed #28172817.

ABSTRACT: Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified multiple common susceptibility loci for pancreatic cancer. Here we report fine-mapping and functional analysis of one such locus residing in a 610 kb gene desert on chr13q22.1 (marked by rs9543325). The closest candidate genes, KLF5, KLF12, PIBF1, DIS3 and BORA, range in distance from 265-586 kb. Sequencing three sub-regions containing the top ranked SNPs by imputation P-value revealed a 30 bp insertion/deletion (indel) variant that was significantly associated with pancreatic cancer risk (rs386772267, P = 2.30 × 10

12 Article Pancreatic Cancer Risk Associated with Prediagnostic Plasma Levels of Leptin and Leptin Receptor Genetic Polymorphisms. 2016

Babic, Ana / Bao, Ying / Qian, Zhi Rong / Yuan, Chen / Giovannucci, Edward L / Aschard, Hugues / Kraft, Peter / Amundadottir, Laufey T / Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael / Morales-Oyarvide, Vicente / Ng, Kimmie / Stampfer, Meir J / Ogino, Shuji / Buring, Julie E / Sesso, Howard D / Gaziano, John Michael / Rifai, Nader / Pollak, Michael N / Anderson, Matthew L / Cochrane, Barbara B / Luo, Juhua / Manson, JoAnn E / Fuchs, Charles S / Wolpin, Brian M. ·Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts. · Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. · Department of Epidemiology, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts. · Department of Nutrition, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts. · Department of Biostatistics, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts. · Laboratory of Translational Genomics, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, NIH, Bethesda, Maryland. · Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, NIH, DHHS, Bethesda, Maryland. · Division of MPE Molecular Pathological Epidemiology, Department of Pathology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts. · Division of Preventive Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. · Department of Ambulatory Care and Prevention, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. · Massachusetts Veterans Epidemiology Research and Information Center (MAVERIC), VA Boston Healthcare System, Boston, Massachusetts. · Department of Laboratory Medicine, Children's Hospital Boston, Boston, Massachusetts. · Cancer Prevention Research Unit, Department of Oncology, Faculty of Medicine, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. · Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas. · University of Washington School of Nursing, Seattle, Washington. · Department of Community Medicine, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia. · Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts. bwolpin@partners.org. ·Cancer Res · Pubmed #27780823.

ABSTRACT: Leptin is an adipokine involved in regulating energy balance, which has been identified as a potential biologic link in the development of obesity-associated cancers, such as pancreatic cancer. In this prospective, nested case-control study of 470 cases and 1,094 controls from five U.S. cohorts, we used conditional logistic regression to evaluate pancreatic cancer risk by prediagnostic plasma leptin, adjusting for race/ethnicity, diabetes, body mass index, physical activity, plasma C-peptide, adiponectin, and 25-hydroxyvitamin D. Because of known differences in leptin levels by gender, analyses were conducted separately for men and women. We also evaluated associations between 32 tagging SNPs in the leptin receptor (LEPR) gene and pancreatic cancer risk. Leptin levels were higher in female versus male control participants (median, 20.8 vs. 6.7 ng/mL; P < 0.0001). Among men, plasma leptin was positively associated with pancreatic cancer risk and those in the top quintile had a multivariable-adjusted OR of 3.02 [95% confidence interval (CI), 1.27-7.16; P

13 Article Three new pancreatic cancer susceptibility signals identified on chromosomes 1q32.1, 5p15.33 and 8q24.21. 2016

Zhang, Mingfeng / Wang, Zhaoming / Obazee, Ofure / Jia, Jinping / Childs, Erica J / Hoskins, Jason / Figlioli, Gisella / Mocci, Evelina / Collins, Irene / Chung, Charles C / Hautman, Christopher / Arslan, Alan A / Beane-Freeman, Laura / Bracci, Paige M / Buring, Julie / Duell, Eric J / Gallinger, Steven / Giles, Graham G / Goodman, Gary E / Goodman, Phyllis J / Kamineni, Aruna / Kolonel, Laurence N / Kulke, Matthew H / Malats, Núria / Olson, Sara H / Sesso, Howard D / Visvanathan, Kala / White, Emily / Zheng, Wei / Abnet, Christian C / Albanes, Demetrius / Andreotti, Gabriella / Brais, Lauren / Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas / Basso, Daniela / Berndt, Sonja I / Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine / Bijlsma, Maarten F / Brenner, Hermann / Burdette, Laurie / Campa, Daniele / Caporaso, Neil E / Capurso, Gabriele / Cavestro, Giulia Martina / Cotterchio, Michelle / Costello, Eithne / Elena, Joanne / Boggi, Ugo / Gaziano, J Michael / Gazouli, Maria / Giovannucci, Edward L / Goggins, Michael / Gross, Myron / Haiman, Christopher A / Hassan, Manal / Helzlsouer, Kathy J / Hu, Nan / Hunter, David J / Iskierka-Jazdzewska, Elzbieta / Jenab, Mazda / Kaaks, Rudolf / Key, Timothy J / Khaw, Kay-Tee / Klein, Eric A / Kogevinas, Manolis / Krogh, Vittorio / Kupcinskas, Juozas / Kurtz, Robert C / Landi, Maria T / Landi, Stefano / Le Marchand, Loic / Mambrini, Andrea / Mannisto, Satu / Milne, Roger L / Neale, Rachel E / Oberg, Ann L / Panico, Salvatore / Patel, Alpa V / Peeters, Petra H M / Peters, Ulrike / Pezzilli, Raffaele / Porta, Miquel / Purdue, Mark / Quiros, J Ramón / Riboli, Elio / Rothman, Nathaniel / Scarpa, Aldo / Scelo, Ghislaine / Shu, Xiao-Ou / Silverman, Debra T / Soucek, Pavel / Strobel, Oliver / Sund, Malin / Małecka-Panas, Ewa / Taylor, Philip R / Tavano, Francesca / Travis, Ruth C / Thornquist, Mark / Tjønneland, Anne / Tobias, Geoffrey S / Trichopoulos, Dimitrios / Vashist, Yogesh / Vodicka, Pavel / Wactawski-Wende, Jean / Wentzensen, Nicolas / Yu, Herbert / Yu, Kai / Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne / Kooperberg, Charles / Risch, Harvey A / Jacobs, Eric J / Li, Donghui / Fuchs, Charles / Hoover, Robert / Hartge, Patricia / Chanock, Stephen J / Petersen, Gloria M / Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael S / Wolpin, Brian M / Kraft, Peter / Klein, Alison P / Canzian, Federico / Amundadottir, Laufey T. ·Laboratory of Translational Genomics, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA. · Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA. · Cancer Genomics Research Laboratory, National Cancer Institute, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, Leidos Biomedical Research, Inc., Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research, Frederick, Maryland, USA. · Department of Computational Biology, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee, USA. · Genomic Epidemiology Group, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Department of Oncology, the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. · Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York, USA. · Department of Environmental Medicine, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York, USA. · New York University Cancer Institute, New York, New York, USA,. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California, USA. · Division of Preventive Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Division of Aging, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Unit of Nutrition and Cancer, Cancer Epidemiology Research Program, Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute (IDIBELL), Catalan Institute of Oncology (ICO), Barcelona, Spain. · Lunenfeld Tanenbaum Research Institute, Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Cancer Epidemiology Centre, Cancer Council Victoria, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. · Centre for Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Melbourne School of Population and Global Health, The University of Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. · Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, Monash University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. · Division of Public Health Sciences, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, Washington, USA. · Southwest Oncology Group Statistical Center, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, Washington, USA. · Group Health Research Institute, Seattle, Washington, USA,. · Cancer Epidemiology Program, University of Hawaii Cancer Center, Honolulu, Hawaii, USA. · Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Genetic and Molecular Epidemiology Group, CNIO-Spanish National Cancer Research Centre, Madrid, Spain. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York, USA. · Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. · Department of Epidemiology, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USA. · Division of Epidemiology, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee, USA. · Vanderbilt Epidemiology Center, Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee, USA. · Department for Determinants of Chronic Diseases (DCD), National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven, The Netherlands. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom. · Department of Social & Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. · Department of Laboratory Medicine, University Hospital of Padova, Padua, Italy,. · Inserm, Centre for Research in Epidemiology and Population Health (CESP), U1018, Nutrition, Hormones and Women's Health Team, F-94805, Villejuif, France. · University Paris Sud, UMRS 1018, F-94805, Villejuif, France. · IGR, F-94805, Villejuif, France. · Laboratory for Experimental Oncology and Radiobiology, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Division of Clinical Epidemiology and Aging Research, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Division of Preventive Oncology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ) and National Center for Tumor Diseases (NCT), Heidelberg, Germany. · German Cancer Consortium (DKTK), German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Department of Biology, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. · Digestive and Liver Disease Unit, 'Sapienza' University of Rome, Rome, Italy. · Gastroenterology and Gastrointestinal Endoscopy Unit, Vita-Salute San Raffaele University, IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy. · Prevention and Cancer Control, Cancer Care Ontario, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · National Institute for Health Research Liverpool Pancreas Biomedical Research Unit, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, United Kingdom. · Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA. · Department of Surgery, Unit of Experimental Surgical Pathology, University Hospital of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. · Massachusetts Veteran's Epidemiology, Research, and Information Center, Geriatric Research Education and Clinical Center, Veterans Affairs Boston Healthcare System, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Department of Basic Medical Sciences, Laboratory of Biology, Medical School, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece. · Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Department of Nutrition, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Department of Pathology, Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center and Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. · Department of Medicine, Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center and Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. · Department of Oncology, Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center and Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. · Laboratory of Medicine and Pathology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA. · Preventive Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California, USA. · Department of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas, USA. · Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Department of Hematology, Medical University of Łodz, Łodz, Poland. · International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), Lyon, France. · Division of Cancer Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Cancer Epidemiology Unit, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom. · School of Clinical Medicine, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom. · Glickman Urological and Kidney Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio, USA. · Centre de Recerca en Epidemiologia Ambiental (CREAL), CIBER Epidemiología y Salud Pública (CIBERESP), Spain. · Hospital del Mar Institute of Medical Research (IMIM), Barcelona, Spain. · National School of Public Health, Athens, Greece. · Epidemiology and Prevention Unit, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan, Italy. · Department of Gastroenterology, Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, Kaunas, Lithuania. · Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York, USA. · Oncology Department, ASL1 Massa Carrara, Massa Carrara, Italy. · National Institute for Health and Welfare, Department of Chronic Disease Prevention, Helsinki, Finland. · Department of Population Health, QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. · Division of Biomedical Statistics and Informatics, Department of Health Sciences Research, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, USA. · Dipartimento di Medicina Clinica E Chirurgia, Federico II Univeristy, Naples, Italy. · Epidemiology Research Program, American Cancer Society, Atlanta, Georgia, USA. · Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands. · Pancreas Unit, Department of Digestive Diseases and Internal Medicine, Sant'Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, Bologna, Italy. · School of Medicine, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain. · CIBER de Epidemiología y Salud Pública (CIBERESP), Madrid, Spain. · Public Health and Participation Directorate, Asturias, Spain. · ARC-NET: Centre for Applied Research on Cancer, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Laboratory of Pharmacogenomics, Biomedical Center, Faculty of Medicine in Pilsen, Charles University in Prague, Pilsen, Czech Republic. · Department of General Surgery, University Hospital Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany. · Department of Surgical and Peroperative Sciences, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden. · Department of Digestive Tract Diseases, Medical University of Łodz, Łodz, Poland. · Division of Gastroenterology and Research Laboratory, IRCCS Scientific Institute and Regional General Hospital "Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza", San Giovanni Rotondo, Italy. · Institute of Cancer Epidemiology, Danish Cancer Society, Copenhagen, Denmark. · Bureau of Epidemiologic Research, Academy of Athens, Athens, Greece. · Hellenic Health Foundation, Athens, Greece. · Department of General, Visceral and Thoracic Surgery, University Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany. · Department of Molecular Biology of Cancer, Institute of Experimental Medicine, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Prague, Czech Republic. · Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, University at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York, USA. · New York University Cancer Institute, New York, New York, USA. · Division of Public Health Sciences, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, Washington, USA,. · Department of Chronic Disease Epidemiology, Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, Connecticut, USA. · Division of Epidemiology, Department of Health Sciences Research, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, USA. · Department of Biostatistics, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Department of Epidemiology, the Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. ·Oncotarget · Pubmed #27579533.

ABSTRACT: Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified common pancreatic cancer susceptibility variants at 13 chromosomal loci in individuals of European descent. To identify new susceptibility variants, we performed imputation based on 1000 Genomes (1000G) Project data and association analysis using 5,107 case and 8,845 control subjects from 27 cohort and case-control studies that participated in the PanScan I-III GWAS. This analysis, in combination with a two-staged replication in an additional 6,076 case and 7,555 control subjects from the PANcreatic Disease ReseArch (PANDoRA) and Pancreatic Cancer Case-Control (PanC4) Consortia uncovered 3 new pancreatic cancer risk signals marked by single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) rs2816938 at chromosome 1q32.1 (per allele odds ratio (OR) = 1.20, P = 4.88x10 -15), rs10094872 at 8q24.21 (OR = 1.15, P = 3.22x10 -9) and rs35226131 at 5p15.33 (OR = 0.71, P = 1.70x10 -8). These SNPs represent independent risk variants at previously identified pancreatic cancer risk loci on chr1q32.1 ( NR5A2), chr8q24.21 ( MYC) and chr5p15.33 ( CLPTM1L- TERT) as per analyses conditioned on previously reported susceptibility variants. We assessed expression of candidate genes at the three risk loci in histologically normal ( n = 10) and tumor ( n = 8) derived pancreatic tissue samples and observed a marked reduction of NR5A2 expression (chr1q32.1) in the tumors (fold change -7.6, P = 5.7x10 -8). This finding was validated in a second set of paired ( n = 20) histologically normal and tumor derived pancreatic tissue samples (average fold change for three NR5A2 isoforms -31.3 to -95.7, P = 7.5x10 -4-2.0x10 -3). Our study has identified new susceptibility variants independently conferring pancreatic cancer risk that merit functional follow-up to identify target genes and explain the underlying biology.

14 Article Association of Common Susceptibility Variants of Pancreatic Cancer in Higher-Risk Patients: A PACGENE Study. 2016

Childs, Erica J / Chaffee, Kari G / Gallinger, Steven / Syngal, Sapna / Schwartz, Ann G / Cote, Michele L / Bondy, Melissa L / Hruban, Ralph H / Chanock, Stephen J / Hoover, Robert N / Fuchs, Charles S / Rider, David N / Amundadottir, Laufey T / Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael / Wolpin, Brian M / Risch, Harvey A / Goggins, Michael G / Petersen, Gloria M / Klein, Alison P. ·Department of Oncology, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland. · Department of Health Sciences Research, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, Minnesota. · Lunenfeld-Tanenbaum Research Institute of Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Population Sciences Division, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, and Gastroenterology Division, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts. · Department of Oncology, Karmanos Cancer Institute and Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan. · Baylor College of Medicine, Dan L. Duncan Cancer Center, Houston, Texas. · Department of Oncology, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland. Department of Pathology, Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland. · Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, NIH, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Bethesda, Maryland. · Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts. Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. · Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts. Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. · Department of Chronic Disease Epidemiology, Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, Connecticut. · Department of Pathology, Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland. · Department of Oncology, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland. Department of Pathology, Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland. aklein1@jhmi.edu. ·Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev · Pubmed #27197284.

ABSTRACT: Individuals from pancreatic cancer families are at increased risk, not only of pancreatic cancer, but also of melanoma, breast, ovarian, and colon cancers. While some of the increased risk may be due to mutations in high-penetrance genes (i.e., BRCA2, PALB2, ATM, p16/CDKN2A or DNA mismatch repair genes), common genetic variants may also be involved. In a high-risk population of cases with either a family history of pancreatic cancer or early-onset pancreatic cancer (diagnosis before the age of 50 years), we examined the role of genetic variants previously associated with risk of pancreatic, breast, ovarian, or prostate cancer. We genotyped 985 cases (79 early-onset cases, 906 cases with a family history of pancreatic cancer) and 877 controls for 215,389 SNPs using the iSelect Collaborative Oncological Gene-Environment Study (iCOGS) array with custom content. Logistic regression was performed using a log-linear additive model. We replicated several previously reported pancreatic cancer susceptibility loci, including recently identified variants on 2p13.3 and 7p13 (2p13.3, rs1486134: OR = 1.36; 95% CI, 1.13-1.63; P = 9.29 × 10(-4); 7p13, rs17688601: OR = 0.76; 95% CI, 0.63-0.93; P = 6.59 × 10(-3)). For the replicated loci, the magnitude of association observed in these high-risk patients was similar to that observed in studies of unselected patients. In addition to the established pancreatic cancer loci, we also found suggestive evidence of association (P < 5 × 10(-5)) to pancreatic cancer for SNPs at HDAC9 (7p21.1) and COL6A2 (21q22.3). Even in high-risk populations, common variants influence pancreatic cancer susceptibility. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 25(7); 1185-91. ©2016 AACR.

15 Article Circulating Metabolites and Survival Among Patients With Pancreatic Cancer. 2016

Yuan, Chen / Clish, Clary B / Wu, Chen / Mayers, Jared R / Kraft, Peter / Townsend, Mary K / Zhang, Mingfeng / Tworoger, Shelley S / Bao, Ying / Qian, Zhi Rong / Rubinson, Douglas A / Ng, Kimmie / Giovannucci, Edward L / Ogino, Shuji / Stampfer, Meir J / Gaziano, John Michael / Ma, Jing / Sesso, Howard D / Anderson, Garnet L / Cochrane, Barbara B / Manson, JoAnn E / Torrence, Margaret E / Kimmelman, Alec C / Amundadottir, Laufey T / Vander Heiden, Matthew G / Fuchs, Charles S / Wolpin, Brian M. ·Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (CY, ZRQ, DAR, KN, SO, MGVH, CSF, BMW) · Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard University, Cambridge, MA (CBC, MGVH) · Department of Etiology and Carcinogenesis, Cancer Institute and Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Science and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing, China (CW) · Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research and Department of Biology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (JRM, MET, MGVH) · Department of Epidemiology (PK, SST, ELG, SO, MJS, JM, HDS, JEM), Department of Biostatistics (PK), and Department of Nutrition (ELG, MJS), Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA · Department of Pathology (SO), and Channing Division of Network Medicine (MKT, SST, YB, ELG, MJS, JM, JEM, CSF) and Division of Preventive Medicine (JMG, HDS, JEM), Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA · Laboratory of Translational Genomics, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (MZ, LTA) · Massachusetts Veterans Epidemiology Research and Information Center (MAVERIC), VA Boston Healthcare System, Boston, MA (JMG) · Public Health Sciences Division, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA (GLA) · University of Washington School of Nursing, Seattle, WA (BBC) · Division of Genomic Stability and DNA repair, Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (ACK). ·J Natl Cancer Inst · Pubmed #26755275.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Pancreatic tumors cause changes in whole-body metabolism, but whether prediagnostic circulating metabolites predict survival is unknown. METHODS: We measured 82 metabolites by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry in prediagnostic plasma from 484 pancreatic cancer case patients enrolled in four prospective cohort studies. Association of metabolites with survival was evaluated using Cox proportional hazards models adjusted for age, cohort, race/ethnicity, cancer stage, fasting time, and diagnosis year. After multiple-hypothesis testing correction, a P value of .0006 or less (.05/82) was considered statistically significant. Based on the results, we evaluated 33 tagging single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the ACO1 gene, requiring a P value of less than .002 (.05/33) for statistical significance. All statistical tests were two-sided. RESULTS: Two metabolites in the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle--isocitrate and aconitate--were statistically significantly associated with survival. Participants in the highest vs lowest quintile had hazard ratios (HRs) for death of 1.89 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.06 to 3.35, Ptrend < .001) for isocitrate and 2.54 (95% CI = 1.42 to 4.54, Ptrend < .001) for aconitate. Isocitrate is interconverted with citrate via the intermediate aconitate in a reaction catalyzed by the enzyme aconitase 1 (ACO1). Therefore, we investigated the citrate to aconitate plus isocitrate ratio and SNPs in the ACO1 gene. The ratio was strongly associated with survival (P trend < .001) as was the SNP rs7874815 in the ACO1 gene (hazard ratio for death per minor allele = 1.37, 95% CI = 1.16 to 1.61, P < .001). Patients had an approximately three-fold hazard for death when possessing one or more minor alleles at rs7874851 and high aconitate or isocitrate. CONCLUSIONS: Prediagnostic circulating levels of TCA cycle intermediates and inherited ACO1 genotypes were associated with survival among patients with pancreatic cancer.

16 Article Common variation at 2p13.3, 3q29, 7p13 and 17q25.1 associated with susceptibility to pancreatic cancer. 2015

Childs, Erica J / Mocci, Evelina / Campa, Daniele / Bracci, Paige M / Gallinger, Steven / Goggins, Michael / Li, Donghui / Neale, Rachel E / Olson, Sara H / Scelo, Ghislaine / Amundadottir, Laufey T / Bamlet, William R / Bijlsma, Maarten F / Blackford, Amanda / Borges, Michael / Brennan, Paul / Brenner, Hermann / Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas / Canzian, Federico / Capurso, Gabriele / Cavestro, Giulia M / Chaffee, Kari G / Chanock, Stephen J / Cleary, Sean P / Cotterchio, Michelle / Foretova, Lenka / Fuchs, Charles / Funel, Niccola / Gazouli, Maria / Hassan, Manal / Herman, Joseph M / Holcatova, Ivana / Holly, Elizabeth A / Hoover, Robert N / Hung, Rayjean J / Janout, Vladimir / Key, Timothy J / Kupcinskas, Juozas / Kurtz, Robert C / Landi, Stefano / Lu, Lingeng / Malecka-Panas, Ewa / Mambrini, Andrea / Mohelnikova-Duchonova, Beatrice / Neoptolemos, John P / Oberg, Ann L / Orlow, Irene / Pasquali, Claudio / Pezzilli, Raffaele / Rizzato, Cosmeri / Saldia, Amethyst / Scarpa, Aldo / Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael Z / Strobel, Oliver / Tavano, Francesca / Vashist, Yogesh K / Vodicka, Pavel / Wolpin, Brian M / Yu, Herbert / Petersen, Gloria M / Risch, Harvey A / Klein, Alison P. ·Department of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. · Department of Oncology, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. · 1] Division of Cancer Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. [2] Department of Biology, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California, USA. · Lunenfeld-Tanenbaum Research Institute of Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Department of Pathology, Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. · Department of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas, USA. · Department of Population Health, QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Kelvin Grove,Queensland, Australia. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York, USA. · International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), Lyon, France. · Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, US National Institutes of Health, US Department of Health and Human Services, Bethesda, Maryland, USA. · Department of Health Sciences Research, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, Minnesota, USA. · Laboratory for Experimental Oncology and Radiobiology, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. · Division of Clinical Epidemiology and Aging Research, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), German Cancer Consortium (DKTK), Heidelberg, Germany. · 1] Department for Determinants of Chronic Diseases (DCD), National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven, the Netherlands. [2] Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University Medical Centre, Utrecht, the Netherlands. [3] Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, UK. [4] Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. · Genomic Epidemiology Group, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Digestive and Liver Disease Unit, 'Sapienza' University of Rome, Rome, Italy. · Università Vita Salute San Raffaele and Istituto di Ricovero e Cura a Carattere Scientifico (IRCCS) Ospedale San Raffaele, Milan, Italy. · 1] Department of Surgery, University Health Network, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. [2] Princess Margaret Cancer Center, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · 1] Cancer Care Ontario, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. [2] Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Department of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, Masaryk Memorial Cancer Institute and Medical Faculty Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic. · 1] Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. [2] Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Department of Surgery, Unit of Experimental Surgical Pathology, University Hospital of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. · Department of Medical Sciences, Laboratory of Biology, School of Medicine, University of Athens, Athens, Greece. · Department of Radiation Oncology, Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. · Institute of Hygiene and Epidemiology, 1st Faculty of Medicine, Charles University in Prague, Prague, Czech Republic. · Department of Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Palacky University, Olomouc, Czech Republic. · Cancer Epidemiology Unit, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK. · Department of Gastroenterology, Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, Kaunas, Lithuania. · Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York, USA. · Department of Biology, Section of Genetics, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. · Department of Chronic Disease Epidemiology, Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, Connecticut, USA. · Department of Digestive Tract Diseases, Medical University of Lodz, Lodz, Poland. · Department of Oncology, Azienda USL 1 Massa Carrara, Massa Carrara, Italy. · Laboratory of Toxicogenomics, Institute of Public Health, Prague, Czech Republic. · National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Pancreas Biomedical Research Unit, Liverpool Clinical Trials Unit and Cancer Research UK Clinical Trials Unit, Department of Molecular and Clinical Cancer Medicine, Institute of Translational Medicine, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK. · Department of Surgery, Gastroenterology and Oncology, University of Padua, Padua, Italy. · Pancreas Unit, Department of Digestive Diseases, Sant'Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, Bologna, Italy. · ARC-NET-Centre for Applied Research on Cancer, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Nutritional Epidemiology Branch, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, US National Institutes of Health, Rockville, Maryland, USA. · Department of General Surgery, University Hospital Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany. · Division of Gastroenterology and Research Laboratory, IRCCS Scientific Institute and Regional General Hospital 'Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza', San Giovanni Rotondo, Italy. · Department of General, Visceral and Thoracic Surgery, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany. · Department of Molecular Biology of Cancer, Institute of Experimental Medicine, Academy of Sciences, Prague, Czech Republic. · 1] Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. [2] Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Epidemiology Program, University of Hawaii Cancer Center, Honolulu, Hawaii, USA. · 1] Department of Oncology, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. [2] Department of Pathology, Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. ·Nat Genet · Pubmed #26098869.

ABSTRACT: Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer death in the developed world. Both inherited high-penetrance mutations in BRCA2 (ref. 2), ATM, PALB2 (ref. 4), BRCA1 (ref. 5), STK11 (ref. 6), CDKN2A and mismatch-repair genes and low-penetrance loci are associated with increased risk. To identify new risk loci, we performed a genome-wide association study on 9,925 pancreatic cancer cases and 11,569 controls, including 4,164 newly genotyped cases and 3,792 controls in 9 studies from North America, Central Europe and Australia. We identified three newly associated regions: 17q25.1 (LINC00673, rs11655237, odds ratio (OR) = 1.26, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.19-1.34, P = 1.42 × 10(-14)), 7p13 (SUGCT, rs17688601, OR = 0.88, 95% CI = 0.84-0.92, P = 1.41 × 10(-8)) and 3q29 (TP63, rs9854771, OR = 0.89, 95% CI = 0.85-0.93, P = 2.35 × 10(-8)). We detected significant association at 2p13.3 (ETAA1, rs1486134, OR = 1.14, 95% CI = 1.09-1.19, P = 3.36 × 10(-9)), a region with previous suggestive evidence in Han Chinese. We replicated previously reported associations at 9q34.2 (ABO), 13q22.1 (KLF5), 5p15.33 (TERT and CLPTM1), 13q12.2 (PDX1), 1q32.1 (NR5A2), 7q32.3 (LINC-PINT), 16q23.1 (BCAR1) and 22q12.1 (ZNRF3). Our study identifies new loci associated with pancreatic cancer risk.

17 Article TERT gene harbors multiple variants associated with pancreatic cancer susceptibility. 2015

Campa, Daniele / Rizzato, Cosmeri / Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael / Pacetti, Paola / Vodicka, Pavel / Cleary, Sean P / Capurso, Gabriele / Bueno-de-Mesquita, H B As / Werner, Jens / Gazouli, Maria / Butterbach, Katja / Ivanauskas, Audrius / Giese, Nathalia / Petersen, Gloria M / Fogar, Paola / Wang, Zhaoming / Bassi, Claudio / Ryska, Miroslav / Theodoropoulos, George E / Kooperberg, Charles / Li, Donghui / Greenhalf, William / Pasquali, Claudio / Hackert, Thilo / Fuchs, Charles S / Mohelnikova-Duchonova, Beatrice / Sperti, Cosimo / Funel, Niccola / Dieffenbach, Aida Karina / Wareham, Nicholas J / Buring, Julie / Holcátová, Ivana / Costello, Eithne / Zambon, Carlo-Federico / Kupcinskas, Juozas / Risch, Harvey A / Kraft, Peter / Bracci, Paige M / Pezzilli, Raffaele / Olson, Sara H / Sesso, Howard D / Hartge, Patricia / Strobel, Oliver / Małecka-Panas, Ewa / Visvanathan, Kala / Arslan, Alan A / Pedrazzoli, Sergio / Souček, Pavel / Gioffreda, Domenica / Key, Timothy J / Talar-Wojnarowska, Renata / Scarpa, Aldo / Mambrini, Andrea / Jacobs, Eric J / Jamroziak, Krzysztof / Klein, Alison / Tavano, Francesca / Bambi, Franco / Landi, Stefano / Austin, Melissa A / Vodickova, Ludmila / Brenner, Hermann / Chanock, Stephen J / Delle Fave, Gianfranco / Piepoli, Ada / Cantore, Maurizio / Zheng, Wei / Wolpin, Brian M / Amundadottir, Laufey T / Canzian, Federico. ·Division of Cancer Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Genomic Epidemiology Group, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD. · Oncology Department, ASL1 Massa Carrara, Massa Carrara, Italy. · Department of Molecular Biology of Cancer, Institute of Experimental Medicine, Academy of Science of Czech Republic, Prague, Czech Republic. · Department of Surgery, University Health Network, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada. · Digestive and Liver Disease Unit, S. Andrea Hospital, 'Sapienza' University of Rome, Rome, Italy. · Department of Determinants of Chronic Diseases (DCD), National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven, The Netherlands. · Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University Medical Centre, Utrecht, The Netherlands. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom. · Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. · Department of General Surgery, University Hospital Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany. · Department of Basic Medical Science, Laboratory of Biology, School of Medicine, University of Athens, Athens, Greece. · Division of Clinical Epidemiology and Aging Research, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Department of Gastroenterology, Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, Kaunas, Lithuania. · Department of Health Sciences Research, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN. · Department of Laboratory Medicine, University Hospital of Padua, Padua, Italy. · Surgical and Oncological Department, Pancreas Institute - University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Department of Surgery, Second Faculty of Medicine, Charles University in Prague and Central Military Hospital, Prague, Czech Republic. · 1st Department of Propaedeutic Surgery, School of Medicine, University of Athens, Athens, Greece. · Division of Public Health Sciences, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA. · Department of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX. · National Institute for Health Research Liverpool Pancreas Biomedical Research Unit, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, United Kingdom. · Department of Surgery, Gastroenterology and Oncology (DISCOG), University of Padua, Padua, Italy. · Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA. · Department of Oncology, Palacky University Medical School and Teaching Hospital in Olomouc, Olomouc, Czech Republic. · Department of Surgery, Unit of Experimental Surgical Pathology, University Hospital of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. · German Cancer Consortium (DKTK), Heidelberg, Germany. · MRC Epidemiology Unit, Institute of Metabolic Science, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom. · Divisions of Preventive Medicine and Aging, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA. · Institute of Hygiene and Epidemiology, First Faculty of Medicine, Charles University in Prague, Prague, Czech Republic. · Department of Medicine - DIMED, University of Padua, Padua, Italy. · Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, CT. · Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA. · Pancreas Unit, Department of Digestive Diseases and Internal Medicine, Sant'Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, Bologna, Italy. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY. · Department of Digestive Tract Diseases, Medical University of Łodz, Łodz, Poland. · Department of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD. · Division of Epidemiology, Departments of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Environmental Medicine, and Population Health, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY. · Surgical Clinic 4, University of Padua, Padua, Italy. · Department of Toxicogenomics, National Institute of Public Health, Prague, Czech Republic. · Division of Gastroenterology and Research Laboratory, IRCCS Scientific Institute and Regional General Hospital "Casa Sollievo Della Sofferenza,", San Giovanni Rotondo, Italy. · Cancer Epidemiology Unit, Nuffield Department of Population Health, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom. · ARC-NET: Centre for Applied Research on Cancer, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Epidemiology Research Program, American Cancer Society, Atlanta, GA. · Department of Hematology, Institute of Hematology and Transfusion Medicine, Warsaw, Poland. · Department of Oncology, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD. · Blood Transfusion Service, Azienda Ospedaliero Universitaria Meyer, Florence, Italy. · Department of Biology, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. · Department of Epidemiology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA. · Department of Medicine and Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN. ·Int J Cancer · Pubmed #25940397.

ABSTRACT: A small number of common susceptibility loci have been identified for pancreatic cancer, one of which is marked by rs401681 in the TERT-CLPTM1L gene region on chromosome 5p15.33. Because this region is characterized by low linkage disequilibrium, we sought to identify whether additional single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) could be related to pancreatic cancer risk, independently of rs401681. We performed an in-depth analysis of genetic variability of the telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) and the telomerase RNA component (TERC) genes, in 5,550 subjects with pancreatic cancer and 7,585 controls from the PANcreatic Disease ReseArch (PANDoRA) and the PanScan consortia. We identified a significant association between a variant in TERT and pancreatic cancer risk (rs2853677, odds ratio = 0.85; 95% confidence interval = 0.80-0.90, p = 8.3 × 10(-8)). Additional analysis adjusting rs2853677 for rs401681 indicated that the two SNPs are independently associated with pancreatic cancer risk, as suggested by the low linkage disequilibrium between them (r(2) = 0.07, D' = 0.28). Three additional SNPs in TERT reached statistical significance after correction for multiple testing: rs2736100 (p = 3.0 × 10(-5) ), rs4583925 (p = 4.0 × 10(-5) ) and rs2735948 (p = 5.0 × 10(-5) ). In conclusion, we confirmed that the TERT locus is associated with pancreatic cancer risk, possibly through several independent variants.

18 Article Transcriptome analysis of pancreatic cancer reveals a tumor suppressor function for HNF1A. 2014

Hoskins, Jason W / Jia, Jinping / Flandez, Marta / Parikh, Hemang / Xiao, Wenming / Collins, Irene / Emmanuel, Mickey A / Ibrahim, Abdisamad / Powell, John / Zhang, Lizhi / Malats, Nuria / Bamlet, William R / Petersen, Gloria M / Real, Francisco X / Amundadottir, Laufey T. ·Laboratory of Translational Genomics, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA, Epithelial Carcinogenesis Group, CNIO-Spanish National Cancer Research Centre, E-28029 Madrid, Spain, Lymphoid Malignancies Branch, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute and Bioinformatics and Molecular Analysis Section, Division of Computational Bioscience, Center for Information Technology, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA, Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology and Division of Epidemiology, Department of Health Sciences Research, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN 55905, USA and Departament de Ciències Experimentals i de la Salut, Universitat Pompeu Fabra, 08003 Barcelona, Spain. · Epithelial Carcinogenesis Group, CNIO-Spanish National Cancer Research Centre, E-28029 Madrid, Spain. · Lymphoid Malignancies Branch, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute and. · Bioinformatics and Molecular Analysis Section, Division of Computational Bioscience, Center for Information Technology, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA. · Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology and. · Division of Epidemiology, Department of Health Sciences Research, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN 55905, USA and. · Epithelial Carcinogenesis Group, CNIO-Spanish National Cancer Research Centre, E-28029 Madrid, Spain, Departament de Ciències Experimentals i de la Salut, Universitat Pompeu Fabra, 08003 Barcelona, Spain. · Laboratory of Translational Genomics, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA, Epithelial Carcinogenesis Group, CNIO-Spanish National Cancer Research Centre, E-28029 Madrid, Spain, Lymphoid Malignancies Branch, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute and Bioinformatics and Molecular Analysis Section, Division of Computational Bioscience, Center for Information Technology, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA, Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology and Division of Epidemiology, Department of Health Sciences Research, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN 55905, USA and Departament de Ciències Experimentals i de la Salut, Universitat Pompeu Fabra, 08003 Barcelona, Spain amundadottirl@mail.nih.gov. ·Carcinogenesis · Pubmed #25233928.

ABSTRACT: Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is driven by the accumulation of somatic mutations, epigenetic modifications and changes in the micro-environment. New approaches to investigating disruptions of gene expression networks promise to uncover key regulators and pathways in carcinogenesis. We performed messenger RNA-sequencing in pancreatic normal (n = 10) and tumor (n = 8) derived tissue samples, as well as in pancreatic cancer cell lines (n = 9), to determine differential gene expression (DE) patterns. Sub-network enrichment analyses identified HNF1A as the regulator of the most significantly and consistently dysregulated expression sub-network in pancreatic tumor tissues and cells (median P = 7.56×10(-7), median rank = 1, range = 1-25). To explore the effects of HNF1A expression in pancreatic tumor-derived cells, we generated stable HNF1A-inducible clones in two pancreatic cancer cell lines (PANC-1 and MIA PaCa-2) and observed growth inhibition (5.3-fold, P = 4.5×10(-5) for MIA PaCa-2 clones; 7.2-fold, P = 2.2×10(-5) for PANC-1 clones), and a G0/G1 cell cycle arrest and apoptosis upon induction. These effects correlated with HNF1A-induced down-regulation of 51 of 84 cell cycle genes (e.g. E2F1, CDK2, CDK4, MCM2/3/4/5, SKP2 and CCND1), decreased expression of anti-apoptotic genes (e.g. BIRC2/5/6 and AKT) and increased expression of pro-apoptotic genes (e.g. CASP4/9/10 and APAF1). In light of the established role of HNF1A in the regulation of pancreatic development and homeostasis, our data suggest that it also functions as an important tumor suppressor in the pancreas.

19 Article Genome-wide association study identifies multiple susceptibility loci for pancreatic cancer. 2014

Wolpin, Brian M / Rizzato, Cosmeri / Kraft, Peter / Kooperberg, Charles / Petersen, Gloria M / Wang, Zhaoming / Arslan, Alan A / Beane-Freeman, Laura / Bracci, Paige M / Buring, Julie / Canzian, Federico / Duell, Eric J / Gallinger, Steven / Giles, Graham G / Goodman, Gary E / Goodman, Phyllis J / Jacobs, Eric J / Kamineni, Aruna / Klein, Alison P / Kolonel, Laurence N / Kulke, Matthew H / Li, Donghui / Malats, Núria / Olson, Sara H / Risch, Harvey A / Sesso, Howard D / Visvanathan, Kala / White, Emily / Zheng, Wei / Abnet, Christian C / Albanes, Demetrius / Andreotti, Gabriella / Austin, Melissa A / Barfield, Richard / Basso, Daniela / Berndt, Sonja I / Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine / Brotzman, Michelle / Büchler, Markus W / Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas / Bugert, Peter / Burdette, Laurie / Campa, Daniele / Caporaso, Neil E / Capurso, Gabriele / Chung, Charles / Cotterchio, Michelle / Costello, Eithne / Elena, Joanne / Funel, Niccola / Gaziano, J Michael / Giese, Nathalia A / Giovannucci, Edward L / Goggins, Michael / Gorman, Megan J / Gross, Myron / Haiman, Christopher A / Hassan, Manal / Helzlsouer, Kathy J / Henderson, Brian E / Holly, Elizabeth A / Hu, Nan / Hunter, David J / Innocenti, Federico / Jenab, Mazda / Kaaks, Rudolf / Key, Timothy J / Khaw, Kay-Tee / Klein, Eric A / Kogevinas, Manolis / Krogh, Vittorio / Kupcinskas, Juozas / Kurtz, Robert C / LaCroix, Andrea / Landi, Maria T / Landi, Stefano / Le Marchand, Loic / Mambrini, Andrea / Mannisto, Satu / Milne, Roger L / Nakamura, Yusuke / Oberg, Ann L / Owzar, Kouros / Patel, Alpa V / Peeters, Petra H M / Peters, Ulrike / Pezzilli, Raffaele / Piepoli, Ada / Porta, Miquel / Real, Francisco X / Riboli, Elio / Rothman, Nathaniel / Scarpa, Aldo / Shu, Xiao-Ou / Silverman, Debra T / Soucek, Pavel / Sund, Malin / Talar-Wojnarowska, Renata / Taylor, Philip R / Theodoropoulos, George E / Thornquist, Mark / Tjønneland, Anne / Tobias, Geoffrey S / Trichopoulos, Dimitrios / Vodicka, Pavel / Wactawski-Wende, Jean / Wentzensen, Nicolas / Wu, Chen / Yu, Herbert / Yu, Kai / Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne / Hoover, Robert / Hartge, Patricia / Fuchs, Charles / Chanock, Stephen J / Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael S / Amundadottir, Laufey T. ·1] Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. [2] Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. [3]. · 1] Genomic Epidemiology Group, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. [2]. · 1] Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. [2] Department of Biostatistics, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. [3]. · 1] Division of Public Health Sciences, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, Washington, USA. [2]. · 1] Division of Epidemiology, Department of Health Sciences Research, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, USA. [2]. · 1] Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA. [2] Cancer Genomics Research Laboratory, National Cancer Institute, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, Leidos Biomedical Research, Inc., Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research, Frederick, Maryland, USA. · 1] Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York, USA. [2] Department of Environmental Medicine, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York, USA. [3] New York University Cancer Institute, New York, New York, USA. · Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California, USA. · 1] Division of Preventive Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. [2] Division of Aging, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Genomic Epidemiology Group, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Unit of Nutrition, Environment and Cancer, Cancer Epidemiology Research Program, Catalan Institute of Oncology (ICO), Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute (IDIBELL), Barcelona, Spain. · Samuel Lunenfeld Research Institute, Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · 1] Cancer Epidemiology Centre, Cancer Council Victoria, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. [2] Centre for Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Melbourne School of Population and Global Health, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. [3] Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, Monash University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. · Division of Public Health Sciences, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, Washington, USA. · Southwest Oncology Group Statistical Center, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, Washington, USA. · Epidemiology Research Program, American Cancer Society, Atlanta, Georgia, USA. · Group Health Research Institute, Seattle, Washington, USA. · 1] Department of Oncology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. [2] Department of Epidemiology, Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. · The Cancer Research Center of Hawaii (retired), Honolulu, Hawaii, USA. · Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Department of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas, USA. · Genetic and Molecular Epidemiology Group, CNIO-Spanish National Cancer Research Centre, Madrid, Spain. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York, USA. · Department of Chronic Disease Epidemiology, Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, Connecticut, USA. · 1] Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. [2] Division of Preventive Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. [3] Division of Aging, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Department of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. · 1] Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, Washington, USA. [2] Department of Epidemiology, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USA. · 1] Department of Medicine, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee, USA. [2] Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee, USA. · Department of Epidemiology, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USA. · Department of Biostatistics, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Department of Laboratory Medicine, University Hospital of Padova, Padua, Italy. · 1] INSERM, Centre for Research in Epidemiology and Population Health (CESP), Nutrition, Hormones and Women's Health Team, Villejuif, France. [2] University Paris Sud, UMRS 1018, Villejuif, France. [3] Institut Gustave Roussy (IGR), Villejuif, France. · Westat, Rockville, Maryland, USA. · Department of General Surgery, University Hospital Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany. · 1] National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven, the Netherlands. [2] Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University Medical Centre Utrecht, Utrecht, the Netherlands. [3] Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, the Netherlands. · Institute of Transfusion Medicine and Immunology, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, German Red Cross Blood Service Baden-Württemberg-Hessen, Mannheim, Germany. · Division of Cancer Epidemiology, DKFZ, Heidelberg, Germany. · Digestive and Liver Disease Unit, 'Sapienza' University of Rome, Rome, Italy. · 1] Cancer Care Ontario, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. [2] Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · National Institute for Health Research Liverpool Pancreas Biomedical Research Unit, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK. · Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA. · Department of Surgery, Unit of Experimental Surgical Pathology, University Hospital of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. · 1] Division of Preventive Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. [2] Division of Aging, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. [3] Massachusetts Veteran's Epidemiology, Research and Information Center, Geriatric Research Education and Clinical Center, Veterans Affairs Boston Healthcare System, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · 1] Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. [2] Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. [3] Department of Nutrition, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · 1] Department of Pathology, Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center and Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. [2] Department of Medicine, Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center and Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. [3] Department of Oncology, Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center and Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. · Laboratory of Medicine and Pathology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA. · Preventive Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California, USA. · Prevention and Research Center, Mercy Medical Center, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. · Cancer Prevention, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California, USA. · 1] Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. [2] Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. [3] Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · The University of North Carolina Eshelman School of Pharmacy, Center for Pharmacogenomics and Individualized Therapy, Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA. · International Agency for Research on Cancer, Lyon, France. · Cancer Epidemiology Unit, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK. · School of Clinical Medicine, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK. · Glickman Urological and Kidney Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio, USA. · 1] Centre de Recerca en Epidemiologia Ambiental (CREAL), CIBER Epidemiología y Salud Pública (CIBERESP), Barcelona, Spain. [2] Hospital del Mar Institute of Medical Research (IMIM), Barcelona, Spain. [3] Department of Nutrition, National School of Public Health, Athens, Greece. · Epidemiology and Prevention Unit, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan, Italy. · Department of Gastroenterology, Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, Kaunas, Lithuania. · Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York, USA. · Department of Biology, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. · Cancer Epidemiology Program, University of Hawaii Cancer Center, Honolulu, Hawaii, USA. · Oncology Department, ASL1 Massa Carrara, Massa Carrara, Italy. · Department of Chronic Disease Prevention, National Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland. · 1] Cancer Epidemiology Centre, Cancer Council Victoria, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. [2] Centre for Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Melbourne School of Population and Global Health, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. · Human Genome Center, Institute of Medical Science, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan. · Alliance Statistics and Data Center, Division of Biomedical Statistics and Informatics, Department of Health Sciences Research, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, USA. · Alliance Statistics and Data Center, Department of Biostatistics and Bioinformatics, Duke Cancer Institute, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina, USA. · 1] Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, the Netherlands. [2] Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, UK. · Department of Epidemiology, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, Washington, USA. · Pancreas Unit, Department of Digestive Diseases and Internal Medicine, Sant'Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, Bologna, Italy. · Department of Gastroenterology, Scientific Institute and Regional General Hospital 'Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza', Opera di Padre Pio da Pietrelcina, San Giovanni Rotondo, Italy. · 1] Hospital del Mar Institute of Medical Research (IMIM), Barcelona, Spain. [2] Department of Epidemiology, School of Medicine, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain. [3] CIBERESP, Madrid, Spain. · 1] Epithelial Carcinogenesis Group, CNIO-Spanish National Cancer Research Centre, Madrid, Spain. [2] Departament de Ciències i de la Salut, Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, UK. · ARC-NET: Centre for Applied Research on Cancer, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Toxicogenomics Unit, Center for Toxicology and Safety, National Institute of Public Health, Prague, Czech Republic. · Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden. · Department of Digestive Tract Diseases, Medical University of Łodz, Łodz, Poland. · 1st Propaideutic Surgical Department, Hippocration University Hospital, Athens, Greece. · Institute of Cancer Epidemiology, Danish Cancer Society, Copenhagen, Denmark. · 1] Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. [2] Bureau of Epidemiologic Research, Academy of Athens, Athens, Greece. [3] Hellenic Health Foundation, Athens, Greece. · Department of Molecular Biology of Cancer, Institute of Experimental Medicine, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Prague, Czech Republic. · Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, University at Buffalo, State University of New York, Buffalo, New York, USA. · Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · 1] Department of Environmental Medicine, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York, USA. [2] New York University Cancer Institute, New York, New York, USA. · 1] Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA. [2]. · 1] Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. [2] Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. [3]. · 1] Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA. [2] Cancer Genomics Research Laboratory, National Cancer Institute, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, Leidos Biomedical Research, Inc., Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research, Frederick, Maryland, USA. [3]. ·Nat Genet · Pubmed #25086665.

ABSTRACT: We performed a multistage genome-wide association study including 7,683 individuals with pancreatic cancer and 14,397 controls of European descent. Four new loci reached genome-wide significance: rs6971499 at 7q32.3 (LINC-PINT, per-allele odds ratio (OR) = 0.79, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.74-0.84, P = 3.0 × 10(-12)), rs7190458 at 16q23.1 (BCAR1/CTRB1/CTRB2, OR = 1.46, 95% CI 1.30-1.65, P = 1.1 × 10(-10)), rs9581943 at 13q12.2 (PDX1, OR = 1.15, 95% CI 1.10-1.20, P = 2.4 × 10(-9)) and rs16986825 at 22q12.1 (ZNRF3, OR = 1.18, 95% CI 1.12-1.25, P = 1.2 × 10(-8)). We identified an independent signal in exon 2 of TERT at the established region 5p15.33 (rs2736098, OR = 0.80, 95% CI 0.76-0.85, P = 9.8 × 10(-14)). We also identified a locus at 8q24.21 (rs1561927, P = 1.3 × 10(-7)) that approached genome-wide significance located 455 kb telomeric of PVT1. Our study identified multiple new susceptibility alleles for pancreatic cancer that are worthy of follow-up studies.

20 Article CLPTM1L promotes growth and enhances aneuploidy in pancreatic cancer cells. 2014

Jia, Jinping / Bosley, Allen D / Thompson, Abbey / Hoskins, Jason W / Cheuk, Adam / Collins, Irene / Parikh, Hemang / Xiao, Zhen / Ylaya, Kris / Dzyadyk, Marta / Cozen, Wendy / Hernandez, Brenda Y / Lynch, Charles F / Loncarek, Jadranka / Altekruse, Sean F / Zhang, Lizhi / Westlake, Christopher J / Factor, Valentina M / Thorgeirsson, Snorri / Bamlet, William R / Hewitt, Stephen M / Petersen, Gloria M / Andresson, Thorkell / Amundadottir, Laufey T. ·Authors' Affiliations: Laboratory of Translational Genomics, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics; Pediatric Oncology Branch; Laboratory of Pathology; Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences; Laboratory of Experimental Carcinogenesis, National Cancer Institute, NIH, Department of Health and Human Services, Bethesda; Laboratory of Proteomics and Analytical Technologies, Leidos Biomedical Research, Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research; Laboratory of Protein Dynamics and Signaling and Laboratory of Cell & Developmental Signaling, NCI-Frederick, Frederick, Maryland; Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California; University of Hawaii Cancer Center, Honolulu, Hawaii; Department of Epidemiology, College of Public Health, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa; and Department of Health Sciences Research, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota. · Authors' Affiliations: Laboratory of Translational Genomics, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics; Pediatric Oncology Branch; Laboratory of Pathology; Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences; Laboratory of Experimental Carcinogenesis, National Cancer Institute, NIH, Department of Health and Human Services, Bethesda; Laboratory of Proteomics and Analytical Technologies, Leidos Biomedical Research, Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research; Laboratory of Protein Dynamics and Signaling and Laboratory of Cell & Developmental Signaling, NCI-Frederick, Frederick, Maryland; Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California; University of Hawaii Cancer Center, Honolulu, Hawaii; Department of Epidemiology, College of Public Health, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa; and Department of Health Sciences Research, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota amundadottirl@mail.nih.gov. ·Cancer Res · Pubmed #24648346.

ABSTRACT: Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of 10 different cancers have identified pleiotropic cancer predisposition loci across a region of chromosome 5p15.33 that includes the TERT and CLPTM1L genes. Of these, susceptibility alleles for pancreatic cancer have mapped to the CLPTM1L gene, thus prompting an investigation of the function of CLPTM1L in the pancreas. Immunofluorescence analysis indicated that CLPTM1L localized to the endoplasmic reticulum where it is likely embedded in the membrane, in accord with multiple predicted transmembrane domains. Overexpression of CLPTM1L enhanced growth of pancreatic cancer cells in vitro (1.3-1.5-fold; PDAY7 < 0.003) and in vivo (3.46-fold; PDAY68 = 0.039), suggesting a role in tumor growth; this effect was abrogated by deletion of two hydrophilic domains. Affinity purification followed by mass spectrometry identified an interaction between CLPTM1L and non-muscle myosin II (NMM-II), a protein involved in maintaining cell shape, migration, and cytokinesis. The two proteins colocalized in the cytoplasm and, after treatment with a DNA-damaging agent, at the centrosomes. Overexpression of CLPTM1L and depletion of NMM-II induced aneuploidy, indicating that CLPTM1L may interfere with normal NMM-II function in regulating cytokinesis. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed enhanced staining of CLPTM1L in human pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (n = 378) as compared with normal pancreatic tissue samples (n = 17; P = 1.7 × 10(-4)). Our results suggest that CLPTM1L functions as a growth-promoting gene in the pancreas and that overexpression may lead to an abrogation of normal cytokinesis, indicating that it should be considered as a plausible candidate gene that could explain the effect of pancreatic cancer susceptibility alleles on chr5p15.33.

21 Article Variants associated with susceptibility to pancreatic cancer and melanoma do not reciprocally affect risk. 2014

Wu, Lang / Goldstein, Alisa M / Yu, Kai / Yang, Xiaohong Rose / Rabe, Kari G / Arslan, Alan A / Canzian, Federico / Wolpin, Brian M / Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael / Amundadottir, Laufey T / Petersen, Gloria M. ·Authors' Affiliations: Department of Health Sciences Research, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota; Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, NIH, Bethesda, Maryland; Departments of Obstetrics and Gynecology and Environmental Medicine, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York; Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts; and Genomic Epidemiology Group, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Authors' Affiliations: Department of Health Sciences Research, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota; Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, NIH, Bethesda, Maryland; Departments of Obstetrics and Gynecology and Environmental Medicine, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York; Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts; and Genomic Epidemiology Group, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany Petersen.Gloria@mayo.edu. ·Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev · Pubmed #24642353.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Melanoma cases may exist in pancreatic cancer kindreds, whereas there is increased risk of pancreatic cancer in familial melanoma. The two cancers may share genetic susceptibility variants in common. METHODS: Three dbGaP (datasets in Genotypes and Phenotypes)-deposited GWAS (genome-wide association study) datasets (MD Anderson melanoma, PanScan 1, and PanScan 2 for pancreatic cancer) were used. Thirty-seven melanoma susceptibility variants in 22 genomic regions from published GWAS, plus melanoma-related genes and pathways were examined for pancreatic cancer risk in the PanScan datasets. Conversely, nine known pancreatic cancer susceptibility variants were examined for melanoma risk in the MD Anderson dataset. RESULTS: In the PanScan data, initial associations were found with melanoma susceptibility variants in NCOA6 [rs4911442; OR, 1.32; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.03-1.70; P = 0.03], YWHAZP5 (rs17119461; OR, 2.62; 95% CI, 1.08-6.35; P = 0.03), and YWHAZP5 (rs17119490; OR, 2.62; 95% CI, 1.08-6.34; P = 0.03), TYRP1 (P = 0.04), and IFNA13 (P = 0.04). In the melanoma dataset, two pancreatic cancer susceptibility variants were associated: NR5A2 (rs12029406; OR, 1.39; 95% CI, 1.01-1.92; P = 0.04) and CLPTM1L-TERT (rs401681; OR, 1.16; 95% CI, 1.01-1.34; P = 0.04). None of these associations remained significant after correcting for multiple comparisons. CONCLUSION: Reported variants of melanoma genes and pathways do not play a role in pancreatic cancer predisposition. Reciprocally, pancreatic cancer susceptibility variants are not associated with melanoma risk. IMPACT: Known melanoma-related genes and pathways, as well as GWAS-derived susceptibility variants of melanoma and pancreatic cancer, do not explain the shared genetic etiology of these two cancers. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 23(6); 1121-4. ©2014 AACR.

22 Article Genome-wide association study of survival in patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma. 2014

Wu, Chen / Kraft, Peter / Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael / Steplowski, Emily / Brotzman, Michelle / Xu, Mousheng / Mudgal, Poorva / Amundadottir, Laufey / Arslan, Alan A / Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas / Gross, Myron / Helzlsouer, Kathy / Jacobs, Eric J / Kooperberg, Charles / Petersen, Gloria M / Zheng, Wei / Albanes, Demetrius / Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine / Buring, Julie E / Canzian, Federico / Cao, Guangwen / Duell, Eric J / Elena, Joanne W / Gaziano, J Michael / Giovannucci, Edward L / Hallmans, Goran / Hutchinson, Amy / Hunter, David J / Jenab, Mazda / Jiang, Guoliang / Khaw, Kay-Tee / LaCroix, Andrea / Li, Zhaoshen / Mendelsohn, Julie B / Panico, Salvatore / Patel, Alpa V / Qian, Zhi Rong / Riboli, Elio / Sesso, Howard / Shen, Hongbing / Shu, Xiao-Ou / Tjonneland, Anne / Tobias, Geoffrey S / Trichopoulos, Dimitrios / Virtamo, Jarmo / Visvanathan, Kala / Wactawski-Wende, Jean / Wang, Chengfeng / Yu, Kai / Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne / Chanock, Stephen / Hoover, Robert / Hartge, Patricia / Fuchs, Charles S / Lin, Dongxin / Wolpin, Brian M. ·Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, , Boston, Massachusetts, USA. ·Gut · Pubmed #23180869.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Survival of patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma is limited and few prognostic factors are known. We conducted a two-stage genome-wide association study (GWAS) to identify germline variants associated with survival in patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma. METHODS: We analysed overall survival in relation to single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) among 1005 patients from two large GWAS datasets, PanScan I and ChinaPC. Cox proportional hazards regression was used in an additive genetic model with adjustment for age, sex, clinical stage and the top four principal components of population stratification. The first stage included 642 cases of European ancestry (PanScan), from which the top SNPs (p≤10(-5)) were advanced to a joint analysis with 363 additional patients from China (ChinaPC). RESULTS: In the first stage of cases of European descent, the top-ranked loci were at chromosomes 11p15.4, 18p11.21 and 1p36.13, tagged by rs12362504 (p=1.63×10(-7)), rs981621 (p=1.65×10(-7)) and rs16861827 (p=3.75×10(-7)), respectively. 131 SNPs with p≤10(-5) were advanced to a joint analysis with cases from the ChinaPC study. In the joint analysis, the top-ranked SNP was rs10500715 (minor allele frequency, 0.37; p=1.72×10(-7)) on chromosome 11p15.4, which is intronic to the SET binding factor 2 (SBF2) gene. The HR (95% CI) for death was 0.74 (0.66 to 0.84) in PanScan I, 0.79 (0.65 to 0.97) in ChinaPC and 0.76 (0.68 to 0.84) in the joint analysis. CONCLUSIONS: Germline genetic variation in the SBF2 locus was associated with overall survival in patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma of European and Asian ancestry. This association should be investigated in additional large patient cohorts.

23 Article An absolute risk model to identify individuals at elevated risk for pancreatic cancer in the general population. 2013

Klein, Alison P / Lindström, Sara / Mendelsohn, Julie B / Steplowski, Emily / Arslan, Alan A / Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas / Fuchs, Charles S / Gallinger, Steven / Gross, Myron / Helzlsouer, Kathy / Holly, Elizabeth A / Jacobs, Eric J / Lacroix, Andrea / Li, Donghui / Mandelson, Margaret T / Olson, Sara H / Petersen, Gloria M / Risch, Harvey A / Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael Z / Zheng, Wei / Amundadottir, Laufey / Albanes, Demetrius / Allen, Naomi E / Bamlet, William R / Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine / Buring, Julie E / Bracci, Paige M / Canzian, Federico / Clipp, Sandra / Cotterchio, Michelle / Duell, Eric J / Elena, Joanne / Gaziano, J Michael / Giovannucci, Edward L / Goggins, Michael / Hallmans, Göran / Hassan, Manal / Hutchinson, Amy / Hunter, David J / Kooperberg, Charles / Kurtz, Robert C / Liu, Simin / Overvad, Kim / Palli, Domenico / Patel, Alpa V / Rabe, Kari G / Shu, Xiao-Ou / Slimani, Nadia / Tobias, Geoffrey S / Trichopoulos, Dimitrios / Van Den Eeden, Stephen K / Vineis, Paolo / Virtamo, Jarmo / Wactawski-Wende, Jean / Wolpin, Brian M / Yu, Herbert / Yu, Kai / Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne / Chanock, Stephen J / Hoover, Robert N / Hartge, Patricia / Kraft, Peter. ·Department of Oncology, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins, Baltimore, Maryland, United States of America ; Department of Pathology, Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, United States of America ; Department of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland, United States of America. ·PLoS One · Pubmed #24058443.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: We developed an absolute risk model to identify individuals in the general population at elevated risk of pancreatic cancer. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Using data on 3,349 cases and 3,654 controls from the PanScan Consortium, we developed a relative risk model for men and women of European ancestry based on non-genetic and genetic risk factors for pancreatic cancer. We estimated absolute risks based on these relative risks and population incidence rates. RESULTS: Our risk model included current smoking (multivariable adjusted odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval: 2.20 [1.84-2.62]), heavy alcohol use (>3 drinks/day) (OR: 1.45 [1.19-1.76]), obesity (body mass index >30 kg/m(2)) (OR: 1.26 [1.09-1.45]), diabetes >3 years (nested case-control OR: 1.57 [1.13-2.18], case-control OR: 1.80 [1.40-2.32]), family history of pancreatic cancer (OR: 1.60 [1.20-2.12]), non-O ABO genotype (AO vs. OO genotype) (OR: 1.23 [1.10-1.37]) to (BB vs. OO genotype) (OR 1.58 [0.97-2.59]), rs3790844(chr1q32.1) (OR: 1.29 [1.19-1.40]), rs401681(5p15.33) (OR: 1.18 [1.10-1.26]) and rs9543325(13q22.1) (OR: 1.27 [1.18-1.36]). The areas under the ROC curve for risk models including only non-genetic factors, only genetic factors, and both non-genetic and genetic factors were 58%, 57% and 61%, respectively. We estimate that fewer than 3/1,000 U.S. non-Hispanic whites have more than a 5% predicted lifetime absolute risk. CONCLUSION: Although absolute risk modeling using established risk factors may help to identify a group of individuals at higher than average risk of pancreatic cancer, the immediate clinical utility of our model is limited. However, a risk model can increase awareness of the various risk factors for pancreatic cancer, including modifiable behaviors.

24 Article An integrated transcriptome and epigenome analysis identifies a novel candidate gene for pancreatic cancer. 2013

Jia, Jinping / Parikh, Hemang / Xiao, Wenming / Hoskins, Jason W / Pflicke, Holger / Liu, Xuelu / Collins, Irene / Zhou, Weiyin / Wang, Zhaoming / Powell, John / Thorgeirsson, Snorri S / Rudloff, Udo / Petersen, Gloria M / Amundadottir, Laufey T. ·Laboratory of Translational Genomics, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA. amundadottirl@mail.nih.gov. ·BMC Med Genomics · Pubmed #24053169.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Pancreatic cancer is a highly lethal cancer with limited diagnostic and therapeutic modalities. METHODS: To begin to explore the genomic landscape of pancreatic cancer, we used massively parallel sequencing to catalog and compare transcribed regions and potential regulatory elements in two human cell lines derived from normal and cancerous pancreas. RESULTS: By RNA-sequencing, we identified 2,146 differentially expressed genes in these cell lines that were enriched in cancer related pathways and biological processes that include cell adhesion, growth factor and receptor activity, signaling, transcription and differentiation. Our high throughput Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) sequence analysis furthermore identified over 100,000 regions enriched in epigenetic marks, showing either positive (H3K4me1, H3K4me3, RNA Pol II) or negative (H3K27me3) correlation with gene expression. Notably, an overall enrichment of RNA Pol II binding and depletion of H3K27me3 binding were seen in the cancer derived cell line as compared to the normal derived cell line. By selecting genes for further assessment based on this difference, we confirmed enhanced expression of aldehyde dehydrogenase 1A3 (ALDH1A3) in two larger sets of pancreatic cancer cell lines and in tumor tissues as compared to normal derived tissues. CONCLUSIONS: As aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) activity is a key feature of cancer stem cells, our results indicate that a member of the ALDH superfamily, ALDH1A3, may be upregulated in pancreatic cancer, where it could mark pancreatic cancer stem cells.

25 Article Polymorphisms in genes related to one-carbon metabolism are not related to pancreatic cancer in PanScan and PanC4. 2013

Leenders, Max / Bhattacharjee, Samsiddhi / Vineis, Paolo / Stevens, Victoria / Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas / Shu, Xiao-Ou / Amundadottir, Laufey / Gross, Myron / Tobias, Geoffrey S / Wactawski-Wende, Jean / Arslan, Alan A / Duell, Eric J / Fuchs, Charles S / Gallinger, Steven / Hartge, Patricia / Hoover, Robert N / Holly, Elizabeth A / Jacobs, Eric J / Klein, Alison P / Kooperberg, Charles / LaCroix, Andrea / Li, Donghui / Mandelson, Margaret T / Olson, Sara H / Petersen, Gloria / Risch, Harvey A / Yu, Kai / Wolpin, Brian M / Zheng, Wei / Agalliu, Ilir / Albanes, Demetrius / Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine / Bracci, Paige M / Buring, Julie E / Canzian, Federico / Chang, Kenneth / Chanock, Stephen J / Cotterchio, Michelle / Gaziano, J Michael / Giovanucci, Edward L / Goggins, Michael / Hallmans, Göran / Hankinson, Susan E / Hoffman-Bolton, Judith A / Hunter, David J / Hutchinson, Amy / Jacobs, Kevin B / Jenab, Mazda / Khaw, Kay-Tee / Kraft, Peter / Krogh, Vittorio / Kurtz, Robert C / McWilliams, Robert R / Mendelsohn, Julie B / Patel, Alpa V / Rabe, Kari G / Riboli, Elio / Tjønneland, Anne / Trichopoulos, Dimitrios / Virtamo, Jarmo / Visvanathan, Kala / Elena, Joanne W / Yu, Herbert / Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne / Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael Z. ·Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Imperial College, London, UK. M.Leenders-6@umcutrecht.nl ·Cancer Causes Control · Pubmed #23334854.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: The evidence of a relation between folate intake and one-carbon metabolism (OCM) with pancreatic cancer (PanCa) is inconsistent. In this study, the association between genes and single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) related to OCM and PanCa was assessed. METHODS: Using biochemical knowledge of the OCM pathway, we identified thirty-seven genes and 834 SNPs to examine in association with PanCa. Our study included 1,408 cases and 1,463 controls nested within twelve cohorts (PanScan). The ten SNPs and five genes with lowest p values (<0.02) were followed up in 2,323 cases and 2,340 controls from eight case-control studies (PanC4) that participated in PanScan2. The correlation of SNPs with metabolite levels was assessed for 649 controls from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition. RESULTS: When both stages were combined, we observed suggestive associations with PanCa for rs10887710 (MAT1A) (OR 1.13, 95 %CI 1.04-1.23), rs1552462 (SYT9) (OR 1.27, 95 %CI 1.02-1.59), and rs7074891 (CUBN) (OR 1.91, 95 %CI 1.12-3.26). After correcting for multiple comparisons, no significant associations were observed in either the first or second stage. The three suggested SNPs showed no correlations with one-carbon biomarkers. CONCLUSIONS: This is the largest genetic study to date to examine the relation between germline variations in OCM-related genes polymorphisms and the risk of PanCa. Suggestive evidence for an association between polymorphisms and PanCa was observed among the cohort-nested studies, but this did not replicate in the case-control studies. Our results do not strongly support the hypothesis that genes related to OCM play a role in pancreatic carcinogenesis.

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