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Pancreatic Neoplasms: HELP
Articles by Naomi E. Allen
Based on 13 articles published since 2010
(Why 13 articles?)
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Between 2010 and 2020, N. Allen wrote the following 13 articles about Pancreatic Neoplasms.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Article An absolute risk model to identify individuals at elevated risk for pancreatic cancer in the general population. 2013

Klein, Alison P / Lindström, Sara / Mendelsohn, Julie B / Steplowski, Emily / Arslan, Alan A / Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas / Fuchs, Charles S / Gallinger, Steven / Gross, Myron / Helzlsouer, Kathy / Holly, Elizabeth A / Jacobs, Eric J / Lacroix, Andrea / Li, Donghui / Mandelson, Margaret T / Olson, Sara H / Petersen, Gloria M / Risch, Harvey A / Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael Z / Zheng, Wei / Amundadottir, Laufey / Albanes, Demetrius / Allen, Naomi E / Bamlet, William R / Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine / Buring, Julie E / Bracci, Paige M / Canzian, Federico / Clipp, Sandra / Cotterchio, Michelle / Duell, Eric J / Elena, Joanne / Gaziano, J Michael / Giovannucci, Edward L / Goggins, Michael / Hallmans, Göran / Hassan, Manal / Hutchinson, Amy / Hunter, David J / Kooperberg, Charles / Kurtz, Robert C / Liu, Simin / Overvad, Kim / Palli, Domenico / Patel, Alpa V / Rabe, Kari G / Shu, Xiao-Ou / Slimani, Nadia / Tobias, Geoffrey S / Trichopoulos, Dimitrios / Van Den Eeden, Stephen K / Vineis, Paolo / Virtamo, Jarmo / Wactawski-Wende, Jean / Wolpin, Brian M / Yu, Herbert / Yu, Kai / Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne / Chanock, Stephen J / Hoover, Robert N / Hartge, Patricia / Kraft, Peter. ·Department of Oncology, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins, Baltimore, Maryland, United States of America ; Department of Pathology, Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, United States of America ; Department of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland, United States of America. ·PLoS One · Pubmed #24058443.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: We developed an absolute risk model to identify individuals in the general population at elevated risk of pancreatic cancer. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Using data on 3,349 cases and 3,654 controls from the PanScan Consortium, we developed a relative risk model for men and women of European ancestry based on non-genetic and genetic risk factors for pancreatic cancer. We estimated absolute risks based on these relative risks and population incidence rates. RESULTS: Our risk model included current smoking (multivariable adjusted odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval: 2.20 [1.84-2.62]), heavy alcohol use (>3 drinks/day) (OR: 1.45 [1.19-1.76]), obesity (body mass index >30 kg/m(2)) (OR: 1.26 [1.09-1.45]), diabetes >3 years (nested case-control OR: 1.57 [1.13-2.18], case-control OR: 1.80 [1.40-2.32]), family history of pancreatic cancer (OR: 1.60 [1.20-2.12]), non-O ABO genotype (AO vs. OO genotype) (OR: 1.23 [1.10-1.37]) to (BB vs. OO genotype) (OR 1.58 [0.97-2.59]), rs3790844(chr1q32.1) (OR: 1.29 [1.19-1.40]), rs401681(5p15.33) (OR: 1.18 [1.10-1.26]) and rs9543325(13q22.1) (OR: 1.27 [1.18-1.36]). The areas under the ROC curve for risk models including only non-genetic factors, only genetic factors, and both non-genetic and genetic factors were 58%, 57% and 61%, respectively. We estimate that fewer than 3/1,000 U.S. non-Hispanic whites have more than a 5% predicted lifetime absolute risk. CONCLUSION: Although absolute risk modeling using established risk factors may help to identify a group of individuals at higher than average risk of pancreatic cancer, the immediate clinical utility of our model is limited. However, a risk model can increase awareness of the various risk factors for pancreatic cancer, including modifiable behaviors.

2 Article Diabetes and risk of pancreatic cancer: a pooled analysis from the pancreatic cancer cohort consortium. 2013

Elena, Joanne W / Steplowski, Emily / Yu, Kai / Hartge, Patricia / Tobias, Geoffrey S / Brotzman, Michelle J / Chanock, Stephen J / Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael Z / Arslan, Alan A / Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas / Helzlsouer, Kathy / Jacobs, Eric J / LaCroix, Andrea / Petersen, Gloria / Zheng, Wei / Albanes, Demetrius / Allen, Naomi E / Amundadottir, Laufey / Bao, Ying / Boeing, Heiner / Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine / Buring, Julie E / Gaziano, J Michael / Giovannucci, Edward L / Duell, Eric J / Hallmans, Göran / Howard, Barbara V / Hunter, David J / Hutchinson, Amy / Jacobs, Kevin B / Kooperberg, Charles / Kraft, Peter / Mendelsohn, Julie B / Michaud, Dominique S / Palli, Domenico / Phillips, Lawrence S / Overvad, Kim / Patel, Alpa V / Sansbury, Leah / Shu, Xiao-Ou / Simon, Michael S / Slimani, Nadia / Trichopoulos, Dimitrios / Visvanathan, Kala / Virtamo, Jarmo / Wolpin, Brian M / Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne / Fuchs, Charles S / Hoover, Robert N / Gross, Myron. ·Division of Cancer Control and Population Science, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Department of Health and Human Services, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA. elenajw@mail.nih.gov ·Cancer Causes Control · Pubmed #23112111.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: Diabetes is a suspected risk factor for pancreatic cancer, but questions remain about whether it is a risk factor or a result of the disease. This study prospectively examined the association between diabetes and the risk of pancreatic adenocarcinoma in pooled data from the NCI pancreatic cancer cohort consortium (PanScan). METHODS: The pooled data included 1,621 pancreatic adenocarcinoma cases and 1,719 matched controls from twelve cohorts using a nested case-control study design. Subjects who were diagnosed with diabetes near the time (<2 years) of pancreatic cancer diagnosis were excluded from all analyses. All analyses were adjusted for age, race, gender, study, alcohol use, smoking, BMI, and family history of pancreatic cancer. RESULTS: Self-reported diabetes was associated with a forty percent increased risk of pancreatic cancer (OR = 1.40, 95 % CI: 1.07, 1.84). The association differed by duration of diabetes; risk was highest for those with a duration of 2-8 years (OR = 1.79, 95 % CI: 1.25, 2.55); there was no association for those with 9+ years of diabetes (OR = 1.02, 95 % CI: 0.68, 1.52). CONCLUSIONS: These findings provide support for a relationship between diabetes and pancreatic cancer risk. The absence of association in those with the longest duration of diabetes may reflect hypoinsulinemia and warrants further investigation.

3 Article Menstrual and reproductive factors in women, genetic variation in CYP17A1, and pancreatic cancer risk in the European prospective investigation into cancer and nutrition (EPIC) cohort. 2013

Duell, Eric J / Travier, Noémie / Lujan-Barroso, Leila / Dossus, Laure / Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine / Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise / Tumino, Rosario / Masala, Giovanna / Krogh, Vittorio / Panico, Salvatore / Ricceri, Fulvio / Redondo, Maria Luisa / Dorronsoro, Miren / Molina-Montes, Esther / Huerta, José M / Barricarte, Aurelio / Khaw, Kay-Tee / Wareham, Nick J / Allen, Naomi E / Travis, Ruth / Siersema, Peter D / Peeters, Petra H M / Trichopoulou, Antonia / Fragogeorgi, Eirini / Oikonomou, Eleni / Boeing, Heiner / Schuetze, Madlen / Canzian, Federico / Lukanova, Annekatrin / Tjønneland, Anne / Roswall, Nina / Overvad, Kim / Weiderpass, Elisabete / Gram, Inger Torhild / Lund, Eiliv / Lindkvist, Björn / Johansen, Dorthe / Ye, Weimin / Sund, Malin / Fedirko, Veronika / Jenab, Mazda / Michaud, Dominique S / Riboli, Elio / Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas. ·Unit of Nutrition, Environment and Cancer, Catalan Institute of Oncology, Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute (IDIBELL), Barcelona, Spain. eduell@iconcologia.net ·Int J Cancer · Pubmed #23015357.

ABSTRACT: Menstrual and reproductive factors and exogenous hormone use have been investigated as pancreatic cancer risk factors in case-control and cohort studies, but results have been inconsistent. We conducted a prospective examination of menstrual and reproductive factors, exogenous hormone use and pancreatic cancer risk (based on 304 cases) in 328,610 women from the EPIC cohort. Then, in a case-control study nested within the EPIC cohort, we examined 12 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in CYP17A1 (an essential gene in sex steroid metabolism) for association with pancreatic cancer in women and men (324 cases and 353 controls). Of all factors analyzed, only younger age at menarche (<12 vs. 13 years) was moderately associated with an increased risk of pancreatic cancer in the full cohort; however, this result was marginally significant (HR = 1.44; 95% CI = 0.99-2.10). CYP17A1 rs619824 was associated with HRT use (p value = 0.037) in control women; however, none of the SNPs alone, in combination, or as haplotypes were associated with pancreatic cancer risk. In conclusion, with the possible exception of an early age of menarche, none of the menstrual and reproductive factors, and none of the 12 common genetic variants we evaluated at the CYP17A1 locus makes a substantial contribution to pancreatic cancer susceptibility in the EPIC cohort.

4 Article Inflammation marker and risk of pancreatic cancer: a nested case-control study within the EPIC cohort. 2012

Grote, V A / Kaaks, R / Nieters, A / Tjønneland, A / Halkjær, J / Overvad, K / Skjelbo Nielsen, M R / Boutron-Ruault, M C / Clavel-Chapelon, F / Racine, A / Teucher, B / Becker, S / Pischon, T / Boeing, H / Trichopoulou, A / Cassapa, C / Stratigakou, V / Palli, D / Krogh, V / Tumino, R / Vineis, P / Panico, S / Rodríguez, L / Duell, E J / Sánchez, M-J / Dorronsoro, M / Navarro, C / Gurrea, A B / Siersema, P D / Peeters, P H M / Ye, W / Sund, M / Lindkvist, B / Johansen, D / Khaw, K-T / Wareham, N / Allen, N E / Travis, R C / Fedirko, V / Jenab, M / Michaud, D S / Chuang, S-C / Romaguera, D / Bueno-de-Mesquita, H B / Rohrmann, S. ·Division of Cancer Epidemiology (c020), German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 581, Heidelberg 69120, Germany. ·Br J Cancer · Pubmed #22617158.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Established risk factors for pancreatic cancer include smoking, long-standing diabetes, high body fatness, and chronic pancreatitis, all of which can be characterised by aspects of inflammatory processes. However, prospective studies investigating the relation between inflammatory markers and pancreatic cancer risk are scarce. METHODS: We conducted a nested case-control study within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition, measuring prediagnostic blood levels of C-reactive protein (CRP), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and soluble receptors of tumour necrosis factor-α (sTNF-R1, R2) in 455 pancreatic cancer cases and 455 matched controls. Odds ratios (ORs) were estimated using conditional logistic regression models. RESULTS: None of the inflammatory markers were significantly associated with risk of pancreatic cancer overall, although a borderline significant association was observed for higher circulating sTNF-R2 (crude OR=1.52 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.97-2.39), highest vs lowest quartile). In women, however, higher sTNF-R1 levels were significantly associated with risk of pancreatic cancer (crude OR=1.97 (95% CI 1.02-3.79)). For sTNF-R2, risk associations seemed to be stronger for diabetic individuals and those with a higher BMI. CONCLUSION: Prospectively, CRP and IL-6 do not seem to have a role in our study with respect to risk of pancreatic cancer, whereas sTNF-R1 seemed to be a risk factor in women and sTNF-R2 might be a mediator in the risk relationship between overweight and diabetes with pancreatic cancer. Further large prospective studies are needed to clarify the role of proinflammatory proteins and cytokines in the pathogenesis of exocrine pancreatic cancer.

5 Article Dietary intake of iron, heme-iron and magnesium and pancreatic cancer risk in the European prospective investigation into cancer and nutrition cohort. 2012

Molina-Montes, Esther / Wark, Petra A / Sánchez, María-José / Norat, Teresa / Jakszyn, Paula / Luján-Barroso, Leila / Michaud, Dominique S / Crowe, Francesca / Allen, Naomi / Khaw, Kay-Tee / Wareham, Nicholas / Trichopoulou, Antonia / Adarakis, George / Katarachia, Helen / Skeie, Guri / Henningsen, Maria / Broderstad, Ann Ragnhild / Berrino, Franco / Tumino, Rosario / Palli, Domenico / Mattiello, Amalia / Vineis, Paolo / Amiano, Pilar / Barricarte, Aurelio / Huerta, José-María / Duell, Eric J / Quirós, José-Ramón / Ye, Weimin / Sund, Malin / Lindkvist, Björn / Johansen, Dorthe / Overvad, Kim / Tjønneland, Anne / Roswall, Nina / Li, Kuanrong / Grote, Verena A / Steffen, Annika / Boeing, Heiner / Racine, Antoine / Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine / Carbonnel, Franck / Peeters, Petra H M / Siersema, Peter D / Fedirko, Veronika / Jenab, Mazda / Riboli, Elio / Bueno-de-Mesquita, Bas. ·Andalusian School of Public Health. Granada Cancer Registry, Spain. ·Int J Cancer · Pubmed #22438075.

ABSTRACT: Several studies support a protective effect of dietary magnesium against type 2 diabetes, but a harmful effect for iron. As diabetes has been linked to pancreatic cancer, intake of these nutrients may be also associated with this cancer. We examined the association between dietary intake of magnesium, total iron and heme-iron and pancreatic cancer risk in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cohort. In total, 142,203 men and 334,999 women, recruited between 1992 and 2000, were included. After an average follow-up of 11.3 years, 396 men and 469 women developed exocrine pancreatic cancer. Hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were obtained using Cox regression stratified by age and center, and adjusted for energy intake, smoking status, height, weight, and self-reported diabetes status. Neither intake of magnesium, total iron nor heme-iron was associated with pancreatic cancer risk. In stratified analyses, a borderline inverse association was observed among overweight men (body mass index, ≥ 25 kg/m(2) ) with magnesium (HR(per 100 mg/day increase) = 0.79, 95% CI = 0.63-1.01) although this was less apparent using calibrated intake. In female smokers, a higher intake of heme-iron was associated with a higher pancreatic cancer risk (HR (per 1 mg/day increase) = 1.38, 95% CI = 1.10-1.74). After calibration, this risk increased significantly to 2.5-fold (95% CI = 1.22-5.28). Overall, dietary magnesium, total iron and heme-iron were not associated with pancreatic cancer risk during the follow-up period. Our observation that heme-iron was associated with increased pancreatic cancer risk in female smokers warrants replication in additional study populations.

6 Article Concentrations of IGF-I and IGFBP-3 and pancreatic cancer risk in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition. 2012

Rohrmann, S / Grote, V A / Becker, S / Rinaldi, S / Tjønneland, A / Roswall, N / Grønbæk, H / Overvad, K / Boutron-Ruault, M C / Clavel-Chapelon, F / Racine, A / Teucher, B / Boeing, H / Drogan, D / Dilis, V / Lagiou, P / Trichopoulou, A / Palli, D / Tagliabue, G / Tumino, R / Vineis, P / Mattiello, A / Rodríguez, L / Duell, E J / Molina-Montes, E / Dorronsoro, M / Huerta, J-M / Ardanaz, E / Jeurnink, S / Peeters, P H M / Lindkvist, B / Johansen, D / Sund, M / Ye, W / Khaw, K-T / Wareham, N J / Allen, N E / Crowe, F L / Fedirko, V / Jenab, M / Michaud, D S / Norat, T / Riboli, E / Bueno-de-Mesquita, H B / Kaaks, R. ·Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Prevention, Institute of Social and Preventive Medicine, University of Zurich, Hirschengraben 84, Zürich 8001, Switzerland. sabine.rohrmann@ifspm.uzh.ch ·Br J Cancer · Pubmed #22315049.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) and their binding proteins (BPs) regulate cell differentiation, proliferation and apoptosis, and may have a role in the aetiology of various cancers. Information on their role in pancreatic cancer is limited and was examined here in a case-control study nested within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition. METHODS: Serum concentrations of IGF-I and IGFBP-3 were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays in 422 cases and 422 controls matched on age, sex, study centre, recruitment date, and time since last meal. Conditional logistic regression was used to compute odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) adjusted for confounding variables. RESULTS: Neither circulating levels of IGF-I (OR=1.21, 95% CI 0.75-1.93 for top vs bottom quartile, P-trend 0.301), IGFBP-3 (OR=1.00, 95% CI 0.66-1.51, P-trend 0.79), nor the molar IGF-I/IGFBP-3 ratio, an indicator of free IGF-I level (OR=1.22, 95% CI 0.75-1.97, P-trend 0.27), were statistically significantly associated with the risk of pancreatic cancer. In a cross-classification, however, a high concentration of IGF-I with concurrently low levels of IGFBP-3 was related to an increased risk of pancreatic cancer (OR=1.72, 95% CI 1.05-2.83; P-interaction=0.154). CONCLUSION: On the basis of these results, circulating levels of components of the IGF axis do not appear to be the risk factors for pancreatic cancer. However, on the basis of the results of a subanalysis, it cannot be excluded that a relatively large amount of IGF-1 together with very low levels of IGFBP-3 might still be associated with an increase in pancreatic cancer risk.

7 Article The associations of advanced glycation end products and its soluble receptor with pancreatic cancer risk: a case-control study within the prospective EPIC Cohort. 2012

Grote, Verena A / Nieters, Alexandra / Kaaks, Rudolf / Tjønneland, Anne / Roswall, Nina / Overvad, Kim / Nielsen, Michael R Skjelbo / Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise / Boutron-Ruault, Marie Christine / Racine, Antoine / Teucher, Birgit / Lukanova, Annekatrin / Boeing, Heiner / Drogan, Dagmar / Trichopoulou, Antonia / Trichopoulos, Dimitrios / Lagiou, Pagona / Palli, Domenico / Sieri, Sabina / Tumino, Rosario / Vineis, Paolo / Mattiello, Amalia / Argüelles Suárez, Marcial Vicente / Duell, Eric J / Sánchez, María-José / Dorronsoro, Miren / Huerta Castaño, José María / Barricarte, Aurelio / Jeurnink, Suzanne M / Peeters, Petra H M / Sund, Malin / Ye, Weimin / Regner, Sara / Lindkvist, Björn / Khaw, Kay-Tee / Wareham, Nick / Allen, Naomi E / Crowe, Francesca L / Fedirko, Veronika / Jenab, Mazda / Romaguera, Dora / Siddiq, Afshan / Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas / Rohrmann, Sabine. ·Division of Cancer Epidemiology c020, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 581, Heidelberg, Germany. ·Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev · Pubmed #22301828.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Advanced glycation end products (AGE) and their receptors (RAGE) have been implicated in cancer development through their proinflammatory capabilities. However, prospective data on their association with cancer of specific sites, including pancreatic cancer, are limited. METHODS: Prediagnostic blood levels of the AGE product Nε-(carboxymethyl)lysine (CML) and the endogenous secreted receptor for AGE (esRAGE) were measured using ELISA in 454 patients with exocrine pancreatic cancer and individually matched controls within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). Pancreatic cancer risk was estimated by calculating ORs with corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CI). RESULTS: Elevated CML levels tended to be associated with a reduction in pancreatic cancer risk [OR = 0.57 (95% CI, 0.32-1.01) comparing highest with lowest quintile), whereas no association was observed for esRAGE (OR = 0.98; 95% CI, 0.62-1.54). Adjustments for body mass index and smoking attenuated the inverse associations of CML with pancreatic cancer risk (OR = 0.78; 95% CI, 0.41-1.49). There was an inverse association between esRAGE and risk of pancreatic cancer for cases that were diagnosed within the first 2 years of follow-up [OR = 0.46 (95% CI, 0.22-0.96) for a doubling in concentration], whereas there was no association among those with a longer follow-up (OR = 1.11; 95% CI, 0.88-1.39; P(interaction) = 0.002). CONCLUSIONS AND IMPACT: Our results do not provide evidence for an association of higher CML or lower esRAGE levels with risk of pancreatic cancer. The role of AGE/RAGE in pancreatic cancer would benefit from further investigations.

8 Article Plasma cotinine levels and pancreatic cancer in the EPIC cohort study. 2012

Leenders, Max / Chuang, Shu-Chun / Dahm, Christina C / Overvad, Kim / Ueland, Per Magne / Midttun, Oivind / Vollset, Stein Emil / Tjønneland, Anne / Halkjaer, Jytte / Jenab, Mazda / Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise / Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine / Kaaks, Rudolf / Canzian, Federico / Boeing, Heiner / Weikert, Cornelia / Trichopoulou, Antonia / Bamia, Christina / Naska, Androniki / Palli, Domenico / Pala, Valeria / Mattiello, Amalia / Tumino, Rosario / Sacerdote, Carlotta / van Duijnhoven, Fränzel J B / Peeters, Petra H M / van Gils, Carla H / Lund, Eiliv / Rodriguez, Laudina / Duell, Eric J / Pérez, María-José Sánchez / Molina-Montes, Esther / Castaño, José María Huerta / Barricarte, Aurelio / Larrañaga, Nerea / Johansen, Dorthe / Lindkvist, Björn / Sund, Malin / Ye, Weimin / Khaw, Kay-Tee / Wareham, Nicholas J / Michaud, Dominique S / Riboli, Elio / Xun, Wei W / Allen, Naomi E / Crowe, Francesca L / Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas / Vineis, Paolo. ·School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, UK. m.leenders-6@umcutrecht.nl ·Int J Cancer · Pubmed #21953524.

ABSTRACT: Smoking is an established risk factor for pancreatic cancer, previously investigated by the means of questionnaires. Using cotinine as a biomarker for tobacco exposure allows more accurate quantitative analyses to be performed. This study on pancreatic cancer, nested within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC cohort), included 146 cases and 146 matched controls. Using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, plasma cotinine levels were analyzed on average 8.0 years before cancer onset (5-95% range: 2.8-12.0 years). The relation between plasma cotinine levels and pancreatic cancer was analyzed with conditional logistic regression for different levels of cotinine in a population of never and current smokers. This was also done for the self-reported number of smoked cigarettes per day at baseline. Every increase of 350 nmol/L of plasma cotinine was found to significantly elevate risk of pancreatic cancer [odds ratio (OR): 1.33, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.11-1.60]. People with a cotinine level over 1187.8 nmol/L, a level comparable to smoking 17 cigarettes per day, have an elevated risk of pancreatic cancer, compared to people with cotinine levels below 55 nmol/L (OR: 3.66, 95% CI: 1.44-9.26). The results for self-reported smoking at baseline also show an increased risk of pancreatic cancer from cigarette smoking based on questionnaire information. People who smoke more than 30 cigarettes per day showed the highest risk compared to never smokers (OR: 4.15, 95% CI: 1.02-16.42). This study is the first to show that plasma cotinine levels are strongly related to pancreatic cancer.

9 Article Diabetes mellitus, glycated haemoglobin and C-peptide levels in relation to pancreatic cancer risk: a study within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cohort. 2011

Grote, V A / Rohrmann, S / Nieters, A / Dossus, L / Tjønneland, A / Halkjær, J / Overvad, K / Fagherazzi, G / Boutron-Ruault, M C / Morois, S / Teucher, B / Becker, S / Sluik, D / Boeing, H / Trichopoulou, A / Lagiou, P / Trichopoulos, D / Palli, D / Pala, V / Tumino, R / Vineis, P / Panico, S / Rodríguez, L / Duell, E J / Molina-Montes, E / Dorronsoro, M / Huerta, J M / Ardanaz, E / Jeurnink, S M / Beulens, J W J / Peeters, P H M / Sund, M / Ye, W / Lindkvist, B / Johansen, D / Khaw, K T / Wareham, N / Allen, N / Crowe, F / Jenab, M / Romieu, I / Michaud, D S / Riboli, E / Romaguera, D / Bueno-de-Mesquita, H B / Kaaks, R. ·Division of Cancer Epidemiology c020, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 581, 69120 Heidelberg, Germany. ·Diabetologia · Pubmed #21953276.

ABSTRACT: AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: There has been long-standing debate about whether diabetes is a causal risk factor for pancreatic cancer or a consequence of tumour development. Prospective epidemiological studies have shown variable relationships between pancreatic cancer risk and blood markers of glucose and insulin metabolism, overall and as a function of lag times between marker measurements (blood donation) and date of tumour diagnosis. METHODS: Pre-diagnostic levels of HbA(1c) and C-peptide were measured for 466 participants with pancreatic cancer and 466 individually matched controls within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition. Conditional logistic regression models were used to estimate ORs for pancreatic cancer. RESULTS: Pancreatic cancer risk gradually increased with increasing pre-diagnostic HbA(1c) levels up to an OR of 2.42 (95% CI 1.33, 4.39 highest [≥ 6.5%, 48 mmol/mol] vs lowest [≤ 5.4%, 36 mmol/mol] category), even for individuals with HbA(1c) levels within the non-diabetic range. C-peptide levels showed no significant relationship with pancreatic cancer risk, irrespective of fasting status. Analyses showed no clear trends towards increasing hyperglycaemia (as marked by HbA(1c) levels) or reduced pancreatic beta cell responsiveness (as marked by C-peptide levels) with decreasing time intervals from blood donation to cancer diagnosis. CONCLUSIONS/INTERPRETATION: Our data on HbA(1c) show that individuals who develop exocrine pancreatic cancer tend to have moderate increases in HbA(1c) levels, relatively independently of obesity and insulin resistance-the classic and major risk factors for type 2 diabetes. While there is no strong difference by lag time, more data are needed on this in order to reach a firm conclusion.

10 Article Variant ABO blood group alleles, secretor status, and risk of pancreatic cancer: results from the pancreatic cancer cohort consortium. 2010

Wolpin, Brian M / Kraft, Peter / Xu, Mousheng / Steplowski, Emily / Olsson, Martin L / Arslan, Alan A / Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas / Gross, Myron / Helzlsouer, Kathy / Jacobs, Eric J / LaCroix, Andrea / Petersen, Gloria / Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael Z / Zheng, Wei / Albanes, Demetrius / Allen, Naomi E / Amundadottir, Laufey / Austin, Melissa A / Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine / Buring, Julie E / Canzian, Federico / Chanock, Stephen J / Gaziano, J Michael / Giovannucci, Edward L / Hallmans, Göran / Hankinson, Susan E / Hoover, Robert N / Hunter, David J / Hutchinson, Amy / Jacobs, Kevin B / Kooperberg, Charles / Mendelsohn, Julie B / Michaud, Dominique S / Overvad, Kim / Patel, Alpa V / Sanchéz, Maria-José / Sansbury, Leah / Shu, Xiao-Ou / Slimani, Nadia / Tobias, Geoffrey S / Trichopoulos, Dimitrios / Vineis, Paolo / Visvanathan, Kala / Virtamo, Jarmo / Wactawski-Wende, Jean / Watters, Joanne / Yu, Kai / Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne / Hartge, Patricia / Fuchs, Charles S. ·Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, 44 Binney Street, Boston, MA 02115, USA. bwolpin@partners.org ·Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev · Pubmed #20971884.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Subjects with non-O ABO blood group alleles have increased risk of pancreatic cancer. Glycosyltransferase activity is greater for the A(1) versus A(2) variant, whereas O01 and O02 variants are nonfunctioning. We hypothesized: 1) A(1) allele would confer greater risk than A(2) allele, 2) protective effect of the O allele would be equivalent for O01 and O02 variants, 3) secretor phenotype would modify the association with risk. METHODS: We determined ABO variants and secretor phenotype from single nucleotide polymorphisms in ABO and FUT2 genes in 1,533 cases and 1,582 controls from 12 prospective cohort studies. Adjusted odds ratios (OR) for pancreatic cancer were calculated using logistic regression. RESULTS: An increased risk was observed in participants with A(1) but not A(2) alleles. Compared with subjects with genotype O/O, genotypes A(2)/O, A(2)/A(1), A(1)/O, and A(1)/A(1) had ORs of 0.96 (95% CI, 0.72-1.26), 1.46 (95% CI, 0.98-2.17), 1.48 (95% CI, 1.23-1.78), and 1.71 (95% CI, 1.18-2.47). Risk was similar for O01 and O02 variant O alleles. Compared with O01/O01, the ORs for each additional allele of O02, A(1), and A(2) were 1.00 (95% CI, 0.87-1.14), 1.38 (95% CI, 1.20-1.58), and 0.96 (95% CI, 0.77-1.20); P, O01 versus O02 = 0.94, A(1) versus A(2) = 0.004. Secretor phenotype was not an effect modifier (P-interaction = 0.63). CONCLUSIONS: Among participants in a large prospective cohort consortium, ABO allele subtypes corresponding to increased glycosyltransferase activity were associated with increased pancreatic cancer risk. IMPACT: These data support the hypothesis that ABO glycosyltransferase activity influences pancreatic cancer risk rather than actions of other nearby genes on chromosome 9q34.

11 Article Alcohol intake and pancreatic cancer: a pooled analysis from the pancreatic cancer cohort consortium (PanScan). 2010

Michaud, Dominique S / Vrieling, Alina / Jiao, Li / Mendelsohn, Julie B / Steplowski, Emily / Lynch, Shannon M / Wactawski-Wende, Jean / Arslan, Alan A / Bas Bueno-de-Mesquita, H / Fuchs, Charles S / Gross, Myron / Helzlsouer, Kathy / Jacobs, Eric J / Lacroix, Andrea / Petersen, Gloria / Zheng, Wei / Allen, Naomi / Ammundadottir, Laufey / Bergmann, Manuela M / Boffetta, Paolo / Buring, Julie E / Canzian, Federico / Chanock, Stephen J / Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise / Clipp, Sandra / Freiberg, Matthew S / Michael Gaziano, J / Giovannucci, Edward L / Hankinson, Susan / Hartge, Patricia / Hoover, Robert N / Allan Hubbell, F / Hunter, David J / Hutchinson, Amy / Jacobs, Kevin / Kooperberg, Charles / Kraft, Peter / Manjer, Jonas / Navarro, Carmen / Peeters, Petra H M / Shu, Xiao-Ou / Stevens, Victoria / Thomas, Gilles / Tjønneland, Anne / Tobias, Geoffrey S / Trichopoulos, Dimitrios / Tumino, Rosario / Vineis, Paolo / Virtamo, Jarmo / Wallace, Robert / Wolpin, Brian M / Yu, Kai / Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne / Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael Z. ·Division of Epidemiology, Public Health and Primary Care, Imperial College London, London, UK. d.michaud@imperial.ac.uk ·Cancer Causes Control · Pubmed #20373013.

ABSTRACT: The literature has consistently reported no association between low to moderate alcohol consumption and pancreatic cancer; however, a few studies have shown that high levels of intake may increase risk. Most single studies have limited power to detect associations even in the highest alcohol intake categories or to examine associations by alcohol type. We analyzed these associations using 1,530 pancreatic cancer cases and 1,530 controls from the Pancreatic Cancer Cohort Consortium (PanScan) nested case-control study. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were calculated using unconditional logistic regression, adjusting for potential confounders. We observed no significant overall association between total alcohol (ethanol) intake and pancreatic cancer risk (OR = 1.38, 95% CI = 0.86-2.23, for 60 or more g/day vs. >0 to <5 g/day). A statistically significant increase in risk was observed among men consuming 45 or more grams of alcohol from liquor per day (OR = 2.23, 95% CI = 1.02-4.87, compared to 0 g/day of alcohol from liquor, P-trend = 0.12), but not among women (OR = 1.35, 95% CI = 0.63-2.87, for 30 or more g/day of alcohol from liquor, compared to none). No associations were noted for wine or beer intake. Overall, no significant increase in risk was observed, but a small effect among heavy drinkers cannot be ruled out.

12 Article Pancreatic cancer risk and ABO blood group alleles: results from the pancreatic cancer cohort consortium. 2010

Wolpin, Brian M / Kraft, Peter / Gross, Myron / Helzlsouer, Kathy / Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas / Steplowski, Emily / Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael Z / Arslan, Alan A / Jacobs, Eric J / Lacroix, Andrea / Petersen, Gloria / Zheng, Wei / Albanes, Demetrius / Allen, Naomi E / Amundadottir, Laufey / Anderson, Garnet / Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine / Buring, Julie E / Canzian, Federico / Chanock, Stephen J / Clipp, Sandra / Gaziano, John Michael / Giovannucci, Edward L / Hallmans, Göran / Hankinson, Susan E / Hoover, Robert N / Hunter, David J / Hutchinson, Amy / Jacobs, Kevin / Kooperberg, Charles / Lynch, Shannon M / Mendelsohn, Julie B / Michaud, Dominique S / Overvad, Kim / Patel, Alpa V / Rajkovic, Aleksandar / Sanchéz, Maria-José / Shu, Xiao-Ou / Slimani, Nadia / Thomas, Gilles / Tobias, Geoffrey S / Trichopoulos, Dimitrios / Vineis, Paolo / Virtamo, Jarmo / Wactawski-Wende, Jean / Yu, Kai / Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne / Hartge, Patricia / Fuchs, Charles S. ·Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, 44 Binney Street, Boston, MA 02115, USA. bwolpin@partners.org ·Cancer Res · Pubmed #20103627.

ABSTRACT: A recent genome-wide association study (PanScan) identified significant associations at the ABO gene locus with risk of pancreatic cancer, but the influence of specific ABO genotypes remains unknown. We determined ABO genotypes (OO, AO, AA, AB, BO, and BB) in 1,534 cases and 1,583 controls from 12 prospective cohorts in PanScan, grouping participants by genotype-derived serologic blood type (O, A, AB, and B). Adjusted odds ratios (ORs) for pancreatic cancer by ABO alleles were calculated using logistic regression. Compared with blood type O, the ORs for pancreatic cancer in subjects with types A, AB, and B were 1.38 [95% confidence interval (95% CI), 1.18-1.62], 1.47 (95% CI, 1.07-2.02), and 1.53 (95% CI, 1.21-1.92), respectively. The incidence rates for blood types O, A, AB, and B were 28.9, 39.9, 41.8, and 44.5 cases per 100,000 subjects per year. An increase in risk was noted with the addition of each non-O allele. Compared with OO genotype, subjects with AO and AA genotype had ORs of 1.33 (95% CI, 1.13-1.58) and 1.61 (95% CI, 1.22-2.18), whereas subjects with BO and BB genotypes had ORs of 1.45 (95% CI, 1.14-1.85) and 2.42 (1.28-4.57). The population attributable fraction for non-O blood type was 19.5%. In a joint model with smoking, current smokers with non-O blood type had an adjusted OR of 2.68 (95% CI, 2.03-3.54) compared with nonsmokers of blood type O. We concluded that ABO genotypes were significantly associated with pancreatic cancer risk.

13 Article Family history of cancer and risk of pancreatic cancer: a pooled analysis from the Pancreatic Cancer Cohort Consortium (PanScan). 2010

Jacobs, Eric J / Chanock, Stephen J / Fuchs, Charles S / Lacroix, Andrea / McWilliams, Robert R / Steplowski, Emily / Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael Z / Arslan, Alan A / Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas / Gross, Myron / Helzlsouer, Kathy / Petersen, Gloria / Zheng, Wei / Agalliu, Ilir / Allen, Naomi E / Amundadottir, Laufey / Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine / Buring, Julie E / Canzian, Federico / Clipp, Sandra / Dorronsoro, Miren / Gaziano, J Michael / Giovannucci, Edward L / Hankinson, Susan E / Hartge, Patricia / Hoover, Robert N / Hunter, David J / Jacobs, Kevin B / Jenab, Mazda / Kraft, Peter / Kooperberg, Charles / Lynch, Shannon M / Sund, Malin / Mendelsohn, Julie B / Mouw, Tracy / Newton, Christina C / Overvad, Kim / Palli, Domenico / Peeters, Petra H M / Rajkovic, Aleksandar / Shu, Xiao-Ou / Thomas, Gilles / Tobias, Geoffrey S / Trichopoulos, Dimitrios / Virtamo, Jarmo / Wactawski-Wende, Jean / Wolpin, Brian M / Yu, Kai / Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne. ·Department of Epidemiology, American Cancer Society, Atlanta, GA, USA. ejacobs@cancer.org ·Int J Cancer · Pubmed #20049842.

ABSTRACT: A family history of pancreatic cancer has consistently been associated with increased risk of pancreatic cancer. However, uncertainty remains about the strength of this association. Results from previous studies suggest a family history of select cancers (i.e., ovarian, breast and colorectal) could also be associated, although not as strongly, with increased risk of pancreatic cancer. We examined the association between a family history of 5 types of cancer (pancreas, prostate, ovarian, breast and colorectal) and risk of pancreatic cancer using data from a collaborative nested case-control study conducted by the Pancreatic Cancer Cohort Consortium. Cases and controls were from cohort studies from the United States, Europe and China, and a case-control study from the Mayo Clinic. Analyses of family history of pancreatic cancer included 1,183 cases and 1,205 controls. A family history of pancreatic cancer in a parent, sibling or child was associated with increased risk of pancreatic cancer [multivariate-adjusted odds ratios (ORs) = 1.76, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.19-2.61]. A family history of prostate cancer was also associated with increased risk (OR = 1.45, 95% CI = 1.12-1.89). There were no statistically significant associations with a family history of ovarian cancer (OR = 0.82, 95% CI = 0.52-1.31), breast cancer (OR = 1.21, 95% CI = 0.97-1.51) or colorectal cancer (OR = 1.17, 95% CI = 0.93-1.47). Our results confirm a moderate sized association between a family history of pancreatic cancer and risk of pancreatic cancer and also provide evidence for an association with a family history of prostate cancer worth further study.