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Pancreatic Neoplasms: HELP
Articles by Demetrius Albanes
Based on 34 articles published since 2010
(Why 34 articles?)
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Between 2010 and 2020, D. Albanes wrote the following 34 articles about Pancreatic Neoplasms.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2
1 Review Vitamin D and Cancer Risk and Mortality: State of the Science, Gaps, and Challenges. 2017

Mondul, Alison M / Weinstein, Stephanie J / Layne, Tracy M / Albanes, Demetrius. · ·Epidemiol Rev · Pubmed #28486651.

ABSTRACT: There has been substantial enthusiasm recently regarding the potential role of vitamin D in the primary and secondary prevention of cancer. Laboratory studies demonstrate a range of anticarcinogenic effects for vitamin D compounds, but human studies have yielded little consistent evidence supporting a protective association. Higher circulating levels of vitamin D (i.e., 25-hydroxyvitamin D or 25(OH)D) appear to be associated with reduced risk of colorectal and bladder malignancies, but higher risk of prostate and possibly pancreatic cancers, with no clear association for most other organ sites examined. Despite there being no official institutional recommendations regarding the use of vitamin D supplements for cancer prevention, screenings for vitamin D deficiency and vitamin D supplement use have increased substantially over the past decade. These widespread practices demonstrate that population sociobehavioral changes are often adopted before scientifically well-informed policies and recommendations are available. This review critically examines the currently available epidemiologic literature regarding the associations between circulating 25(OH)D, vitamin D supplementation, and vitamin D-related genetic variation and cancer risk and mortality, with a particular emphasis on prospective studies. We identify several important gaps in our scientific knowledge that should be addressed in order to provide sufficient reproducible data to inform evidence-based recommendations related to optimal 25(OH)D concentrations (and any role for vitamin D supplementation) for the primary and secondary prevention of cancer. With few exceptions, such recommendations cannot be made at this time.

2 Review Circulating Leptin and Risk of Pancreatic Cancer: A Pooled Analysis From 3 Cohorts. 2015

Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael Z / Newton, Christina C / Silverman, Debra T / Pollak, Michael / Nogueira, Leticia M / Weinstein, Stephanie J / Albanes, Demetrius / Männistö, Satu / Jacobs, Eric J. · ·Am J Epidemiol · Pubmed #26085045.

ABSTRACT: Adiposity is associated with pancreatic cancer; however, the underlying mechanism(s) is uncertain. Leptin is an adipokine involved in metabolic regulation, and obese individuals have higher concentrations. We conducted a pooled, nested case-control study of cohort participants from the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial, the Alpha-Tocopherol, Beta-Carotene Cancer Prevention Study, and the Cancer Prevention Study II Nutrition Cohort to investigate whether prediagnostic serum leptin was associated with pancreatic cancer. A total of 731 pancreatic adenocarcinoma cases that occurred between 1986 and 2010 were included (maximum follow-up, 23 years). Incidence density-selected controls (n = 909) were matched to cases by cohort, age, sex, race, and blood draw date. Conditional logistic regression was used to calculate odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals. Sex-specific quintiles were based on the distribution of the controls. Overall, serum leptin was not associated with pancreatic cancer (quintile 5 vs. quintile 1: odds ratio = 1.13, 95% confidence interval: 0.75, 1.71; Ptrend = 0.38). There was a significant interaction by follow-up time (P = 0.003), such that elevated risk was apparent only during follow-up of more than 10 years after blood draw (quintile 5 vs. quintile 1: odds ratio = 2.55, 95% confidence interval: 1.23, 5.27; Ptrend = 0.004). Our results support an association between increasing leptin concentration and pancreatic cancer; however, long follow-up is necessary to observe the relationship. Subclinical disease may explain the lack of association during early follow-up.

3 Review Dairy products and pancreatic cancer risk: a pooled analysis of 14 cohort studies. 2014

Genkinger, J M / Wang, M / Li, R / Albanes, D / Anderson, K E / Bernstein, L / van den Brandt, P A / English, D R / Freudenheim, J L / Fuchs, C S / Gapstur, S M / Giles, G G / Goldbohm, R A / Håkansson, N / Horn-Ross, P L / Koushik, A / Marshall, J R / McCullough, M L / Miller, A B / Robien, K / Rohan, T E / Schairer, C / Silverman, D T / Stolzenberg-Solomon, R Z / Virtamo, J / Willett, W C / Wolk, A / Ziegler, R G / Smith-Warner, S A. ·Department of Epidemiology, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University, New York jg3081@columbia.edu. · Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston Department of Biostatistics, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston. · Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston. · Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, NIH, DHHS, Bethesda. · Division of Epidemiology and Community Health, School of Public Health, Masonic Cancer Center, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis. · Division of Cancer Etiology, Department of Population Science, Beckman Research Institute and City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, USA. · Department of Epidemiology, School for Oncology and Developmental Biology (GROW), Maastricht University, Maastricht, The Netherlands. · Cancer Epidemiology Centre, Cancer Council of Victoria, Centre for Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Melbourne School of Population and Global Health, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia. · Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, University at Buffalo, State University of New York, Buffalo. · Division of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston. · Epidemiology Research Program, American Cancer Society, Atlanta, USA. · Department of Prevention and Health, TNO Quality of Life, Leiden, The Netherlands. · Division of Nutritional Epidemiology, National Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden. · Cancer Prevention Institute of California, Fremont, USA. · Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, University of Montreal, Montreal. · Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health and Health Services, George Washington University, Washington, DC. · Department of Epidemiology and Population Health, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, USA. · Department of Chronic Disease Prevention, National Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland. · Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston Department of Nutrition, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, USA. · Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston Department of Nutrition, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, USA. ·Ann Oncol · Pubmed #24631943.

ABSTRACT: Pancreatic cancer has few early symptoms, is usually diagnosed at late stages, and has a high case-fatality rate. Identifying modifiable risk factors is crucial to reducing pancreatic cancer morbidity and mortality. Prior studies have suggested that specific foods and nutrients, such as dairy products and constituents, may play a role in pancreatic carcinogenesis. In this pooled analysis of the primary data from 14 prospective cohort studies, 2212 incident pancreatic cancer cases were identified during follow-up among 862 680 individuals. Adjusting for smoking habits, personal history of diabetes, alcohol intake, body mass index (BMI), and energy intake, multivariable study-specific hazard ratios (MVHR) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using the Cox proportional hazards models and then pooled using a random effects model. There was no association between total milk intake and pancreatic cancer risk (MVHR = 0.98, 95% CI = 0.82-1.18 comparing ≥500 with 1-69.9 g/day). Similarly, intakes of low-fat milk, whole milk, cheese, cottage cheese, yogurt, and ice-cream were not associated with pancreatic cancer risk. No statistically significant association was observed between dietary (MVHR = 0.96, 95% CI = 0.77-1.19) and total calcium (MVHR = 0.89, 95% CI = 0.71-1.12) intake and pancreatic cancer risk overall when comparing intakes ≥1300 with <500 mg/day. In addition, null associations were observed for dietary and total vitamin D intake and pancreatic cancer risk. Findings were consistent within sex, smoking status, and BMI strata or when the case definition was limited to pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Overall, these findings do not support the hypothesis that consumption of dairy foods, calcium, or vitamin D during adulthood is associated with pancreatic cancer risk.

4 Review Folate intake and risk of pancreatic cancer: pooled analysis of prospective cohort studies. 2011

Bao, Ying / Michaud, Dominique S / Spiegelman, Donna / Albanes, Demetrius / Anderson, Kristin E / Bernstein, Leslie / van den Brandt, Piet A / English, Dallas R / Freudenheim, Jo L / Fuchs, Charles S / Giles, Graham G / Giovannucci, Edward / Goldbohm, R Alexandra / Håkansson, Niclas / Horn-Ross, Pamela L / Jacobs, Eric J / Kitahara, Cari M / Marshall, James R / Miller, Anthony B / Robien, Kim / Rohan, Thomas E / Schatzkin, Arthur / Stevens, Victoria L / Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael Z / Virtamo, Jarmo / Wolk, Alicja / Ziegler, Regina G / Smith-Warner, Stephanie A. ·Channing Laboratory, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA. ·J Natl Cancer Inst · Pubmed #22034634.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Epidemiological studies evaluating the association between folate intake and risk of pancreatic cancer have produced inconsistent results. The statistical power to examine this association has been limited in previous studies partly because of small sample size and limited range of folate intake in some studies. METHODS: We analyzed primary data from 14 prospective cohort studies that included 319,716 men and 542,948 women to assess the association between folate intake and risk of pancreatic cancer. Folate intake was assessed through a validated food-frequency questionnaire at baseline in each study. Study-specific relative risks (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated using Cox proportional hazards models and then pooled using a random effects model. All statistical tests were two-sided. RESULTS: During 7-20 years of follow-up across studies, 2195 pancreatic cancers were identified. No association was observed between folate intake and risk of pancreatic cancer in men and women (highest vs lowest quintile: dietary folate intake, pooled multivariable RR = 1.06, 95% CI = 0.90 to 1.25, P(trend) = .47; total folate intake [dietary folate and supplemental folic acid], pooled multivariable RR = 0.96, 95% CI = 0.80 to 1.16, P(trend) = .90). No between-study heterogeneity was observed (for dietary folate, P(heterogeneity) = .15; for total folate, P(heterogeneity) = .22). CONCLUSION: Folate intake was not associated with overall risk of pancreatic cancer in this large pooled analysis.

5 Article Pancreatic cancer risk is modulated by inflammatory potential of diet and ABO genotype: a consortia-based evaluation and replication study. 2018

Antwi, Samuel O / Bamlet, William R / Pedersen, Katrina S / Chaffee, Kari G / Risch, Harvey A / Shivappa, Nitin / Steck, Susan E / Anderson, Kristin E / Bracci, Paige M / Polesel, Jerry / Serraino, Diego / La Vecchia, Carlo / Bosetti, Cristina / Li, Donghui / Oberg, Ann L / Arslan, Alan A / Albanes, Demetrius / Duell, Eric J / Huybrechts, Inge / Amundadottir, Laufey T / Hoover, Robert / Mannisto, Satu / Chanock, Stephen J / Zheng, Wei / Shu, Xiao-Ou / Stepien, Magdalena / Canzian, Federico / Bueno-de-Mesquita, Bas / Quirós, José Ramon / Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne / Bruinsma, Fiona / Milne, Roger L / Giles, Graham G / Hébert, James R / Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael Z / Petersen, Gloria M. ·Division of Epidemiology, Department of Health Sciences Research, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA. · Division of Biomedical Statistics and Informatics, Department of Health Sciences Research, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA. · Division of Oncology, Washington University, St. Louis, MO, USA. · Department of Chronic Disease Epidemiology, Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, CT, USA. · Cancer Prevention and Control Program, USA. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Arnold School of Public Health, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC, USA. · Division of Epidemiology and Community Health, School of Public Health, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, USA. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, USA. · Unit of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Centro di Riferimento Oncologico, Aviano (PN), Italy. · Department of Clinical Sciences and Community Health, University of Milan, Milan, Italy. · Department of Oncology, IRCCS-Istituto di Ricerche Farmacologiche Mario Negri, Milan, Italy. · Department of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology, The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, USA. · Department of Environmental Medicine, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY, USA. · Department of Population Health, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY, USA. · Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY, USA. · Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Department of Health and Human Services, Bethesda, MD, USA. · Unit of Nutrition and Cancer, Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute-IDIBELL, Catalan Institute of Oncology-ICO. L'Hospitalet de Llobregat, Barcelona, Spain. · International Agency for Research on Cancer, World Health Organization, France. · Department of Public Health Solutions, National Institute for Health and Welfare Helsinki, Finland. · Division of Epidemiology, Department of Medicine, Vanderbilt Epidemiology Center, and Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN, USA. · Genomic Epidemiology Group, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, St Mary's Campus, Norfolk Place, London, UK. · Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Pantai Valley, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. · Public Health Directorate, Asturias, Spain. · Perlmutter Cancer Center, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY, USA. · Cancer Epidemiology and Intelligence Division, Cancer Council Victoria, and Centre for Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Melbourne School of Global and Population Health, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia. ·Carcinogenesis · Pubmed #29800239.

ABSTRACT: Diets with high inflammatory potential are suspected to increase risk for pancreatic cancer (PC). Using pooled analyses, we examined whether this association applies to populations from different geographic regions and population subgroups with varying risks for PC, including variation in ABO blood type. Data from six case-control studies (cases, n = 2414; controls, n = 4528) in the Pancreatic Cancer Case-Control Consortium (PanC4) were analyzed, followed by replication in five nested case-control studies (cases, n = 1268; controls, n = 4215) from the Pancreatic Cancer Cohort Consortium (PanScan). Two polymorphisms in the ABO locus (rs505922 and rs8176746) were used to infer participants' blood types. Dietary questionnaire-derived nutrient/food intake was used to compute energy-adjusted dietary inflammatory index (E-DII®) scores to assess inflammatory potential of diet. Pooled odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using multivariable-adjusted logistic regression. Higher E-DII scores, reflecting greater inflammatory potential of diet, were associated with increased PC risk in PanC4 [ORQ5 versus Q1=2.20, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.85-2.61, Ptrend < 0.0001; ORcontinuous = 1.20, 95% CI = 1.17-1.24], and PanScan (ORQ5 versus Q1 = 1.23, 95% CI = 0.92-1.66, Ptrend = 0.008; ORcontinuous = 1.09, 95% CI = 1.02-1.15). As expected, genotype-derived non-O blood type was associated with increased PC risk in both the PanC4 and PanScan studies. Stratified analyses of associations between E-DII quintiles and PC by genotype-derived ABO blood type did not show interaction by blood type (Pinteraction = 0.10 in PanC4 and Pinteraction=0.13 in PanScan). The results show that consuming a pro-inflammatory diet and carrying non-O blood type are each individually, but not interactively, associated with increased PC risk.

6 Article Genome-wide meta-analysis identifies five new susceptibility loci for pancreatic cancer. 2018

Klein, Alison P / Wolpin, Brian M / Risch, Harvey A / Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael Z / Mocci, Evelina / Zhang, Mingfeng / Canzian, Federico / Childs, Erica J / Hoskins, Jason W / Jermusyk, Ashley / Zhong, Jun / Chen, Fei / Albanes, Demetrius / Andreotti, Gabriella / Arslan, Alan A / Babic, Ana / Bamlet, William R / Beane-Freeman, Laura / Berndt, Sonja I / Blackford, Amanda / Borges, Michael / Borgida, Ayelet / Bracci, Paige M / Brais, Lauren / Brennan, Paul / Brenner, Hermann / Bueno-de-Mesquita, Bas / Buring, Julie / Campa, Daniele / Capurso, Gabriele / Cavestro, Giulia Martina / Chaffee, Kari G / Chung, Charles C / Cleary, Sean / Cotterchio, Michelle / Dijk, Frederike / Duell, Eric J / Foretova, Lenka / Fuchs, Charles / Funel, Niccola / Gallinger, Steven / M Gaziano, J Michael / Gazouli, Maria / Giles, Graham G / Giovannucci, Edward / Goggins, Michael / Goodman, Gary E / Goodman, Phyllis J / Hackert, Thilo / Haiman, Christopher / Hartge, Patricia / Hasan, Manal / Hegyi, Peter / Helzlsouer, Kathy J / Herman, Joseph / Holcatova, Ivana / Holly, Elizabeth A / Hoover, Robert / Hung, Rayjean J / Jacobs, Eric J / Jamroziak, Krzysztof / Janout, Vladimir / Kaaks, Rudolf / Khaw, Kay-Tee / Klein, Eric A / Kogevinas, Manolis / Kooperberg, Charles / Kulke, Matthew H / Kupcinskas, Juozas / Kurtz, Robert J / Laheru, Daniel / Landi, Stefano / Lawlor, Rita T / Lee, I-Min / LeMarchand, Loic / Lu, Lingeng / Malats, Núria / Mambrini, Andrea / Mannisto, Satu / Milne, Roger L / Mohelníková-Duchoňová, Beatrice / Neale, Rachel E / Neoptolemos, John P / Oberg, Ann L / Olson, Sara H / Orlow, Irene / Pasquali, Claudio / Patel, Alpa V / Peters, Ulrike / Pezzilli, Raffaele / Porta, Miquel / Real, Francisco X / Rothman, Nathaniel / Scelo, Ghislaine / Sesso, Howard D / Severi, Gianluca / Shu, Xiao-Ou / Silverman, Debra / Smith, Jill P / Soucek, Pavel / Sund, Malin / Talar-Wojnarowska, Renata / Tavano, Francesca / Thornquist, Mark D / Tobias, Geoffrey S / Van Den Eeden, Stephen K / Vashist, Yogesh / Visvanathan, Kala / Vodicka, Pavel / Wactawski-Wende, Jean / Wang, Zhaoming / Wentzensen, Nicolas / White, Emily / Yu, Herbert / Yu, Kai / Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne / Zheng, Wei / Kraft, Peter / Li, Donghui / Chanock, Stephen / Obazee, Ofure / Petersen, Gloria M / Amundadottir, Laufey T. ·Department of Oncology, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, 21231, USA. aklein1@jhmi.edu. · Department of Pathology, Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, 21287, USA. aklein1@jhmi.edu. · Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA, 02215, USA. · Department of Chronic Disease Epidemiology, Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, CT, 06520, USA. · Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, 20892, USA. · Department of Oncology, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, 21231, USA. · Laboratory of Translational Genomics, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, 20892, USA. · Genomic Epidemiology Group, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), 69120, Heidelberg, Germany. · Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY, 10016, USA. · Department of Population Health, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY, 10016, USA. · Department of Environmental Medicine, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY, 10016, USA. · Department of Health Sciences Research, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN, 55905, USA. · Department of Pathology, Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, 21287, USA. · Lunenfeld-Tanenbaum Research Institute of Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, M5G 1×5, Canada. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, 94158, USA. · International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), 69372, Lyon, France. · Division of Clinical Epidemiology and Aging Research, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), 69120, Heidelberg, Germany. · Division of Preventive Oncology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), 69120, Heidelberg, Germany. · National Center for Tumor Diseases (NCT), 69120, Heidelberg, Germany. · Department for Determinants of Chronic Diseases (DCD), National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), 3720 BA, Bilthoven, The Netherlands. · Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University Medical Centre, 3584 CX, Utrecht, The Netherlands. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, SW7 2AZ, UK. · Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, 50603, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. · Division of Preventive Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA, 02215, USA. · Department of Epidemiology, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA, 02115, USA. · Department of Biology, University of Pisa, 56126, Pisa, Italy. · Digestive and Liver Disease Unit, 'Sapienza' University of Rome, 00185, Rome, Italy. · Gastroenterology and Gastrointestinal Endoscopy Unit, Vita-Salute San Raffaele University, IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, 20132, Milan, Italy. · Cancer Genomics Research Laboratory, National Cancer Institute, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, Leidos Biomedical Research Inc., Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research, Frederick, MD, 21702, USA. · Cancer Care Ontario, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, M5G 2L7, Canada. · Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, M5T 3M7, Canada. · Department of Pathology, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, 1007 MB, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Unit of Nutrition and Cancer, Cancer Epidemiology Research Program, Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute (IDIBELL), Catalan Institute of Oncology (ICO), Barcelona, 08908, Spain. · Department of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, Masaryk Memorial Cancer Institute, 65653, Brno, Czech Republic. · Yale Cancer Center, New Haven, CT, 06510, USA. · Department of Translational Research and The New Technologies in Medicine and Surgery, University of Pisa, 56126, Pisa, Italy. · Division of Aging, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA, 02115, USA. · Boston VA Healthcare System, Boston, MA, 02132, USA. · Department of Basic Medical Sciences, Laboratory of Biology, Medical School, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, 106 79, Athens, Greece. · Cancer Epidemiology and Intelligence Division, Cancer Council Victoria, Melbourne, VIC, 3004, Australia. · Centre for Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Melbourne School of Population and Global Health, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC, 3010, Australia. · Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, Monash University, Melbourne, VIC, 3004, Australia. · Division of Public Health Sciences, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA, 98109, USA. · SWOG Statistical Center, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA, 98109, USA. · Department of General Surgery, University Hospital Heidelberg, 69120, Heidelberg, Germany. · Department of Preventive Medicine, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, 90032, USA. · Department of Epidemiology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, 77230, USA. · First Department of Medicine, University of Szeged, 6725, Szeged, Hungary. · Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, 20892, USA. · Department of Radiation Oncology, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, 21231, USA. · Institute of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, Charles University, 2nd Faculty of Medicine, 150 06, Prague 5, Czech Republic. · Epidemiology Research Program, American Cancer Society, Atlanta, GA, 30303, USA. · Department of Hematology, Institute of Hematology and Transfusion Medicine, 02-776, Warsaw, Poland. · Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Faculty of Medicine, University of Ostrava, 701 03, Ostrava, Czech Republic. · Faculty of Medicine, University of Olomouc, 771 47, Olomouc, Czech Republic. · Division of Cancer Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), 69120, Heidelberg, Germany. · School of Clinical Medicine, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, CB2 0SP, UK. · Glickman Urological and Kidney Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH, 44195, USA. · ISGlobal, Centre for Research in Environmental Epidemiology (CREAL), 08003, Barcelona, Spain. · CIBER Epidemiología y Salud Pública (CIBERESP), 08003, Barcelona, Spain. · Hospital del Mar Institute of Medical Research (IMIM), Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, 08003, Barcelona, Spain. · Universitat Pompeu Fabra (UPF), 08002, Barcelona, Spain. · Department of Gastroenterology, Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, 44307, Kaunas, Lithuania. · Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY, 10065, USA. · ARC-NET: Centre for Applied Research on Cancer, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, 37134, Verona, Italy. · Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA, 02115, USA. · Cancer Epidemiology Program, University of Hawaii Cancer Center, Honolulu, HI, 96813, USA. · Genetic and Molecular Epidemiology Group, Spanish National Cancer Research Center (CNIO), 28029, Madrid, Spain. · CIBERONC, 28029, Madrid, Spain. · Oncology Department, ASL1 Massa Carrara, Carrara, 54033, Italy. · Department of Public Health Solutions, National Institute for Health and Welfare, 00271, Helsinki, Finland. · Department of Oncology, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, Palacky University Olomouc and University Hospital, 775 20, Olomouc, Czech Republic. · Population Health Department, QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Brisbane, 4029, Australia. · Department of General Surgery, University of Heidelburg, Heidelberg, Germany. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY, 10065, USA. · Department of Surgery, Oncology and Gastroenterology (DiSCOG), University of Padua, 35124, Padua, Italy. · Pancreas Unit, Department of Digestive Diseases and Internal Medicine, Sant'Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, 40138, Bologna, Italy. · Epithelial Carcinogenesis Group, Spanish National Cancer Research Centre-CNIO, 28029, Madrid, Spain. · Departament de Ciències Experimentals i de la Salut, Universitat Pompeu Fabra, 08002, Barcelona, Spain. · Centre de Recherche en Épidémiologie et Santé des Populations (CESP, Inserm U1018), Facultés de Medicine, Université Paris-Saclay, UPS, UVSQ, Gustave Roussy, 94800, Villejuif, France. · Division of Epidemiology, Department of Medicine, Vanderbilt Epidemiology Center, Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN, 37232, USA. · Department of Medicine, Georgetown University, Washington, 20057, USA. · Laboratory for Pharmacogenomics, Biomedical Center, Faculty of Medicine in Pilsen, Charles University, 323 00, Pilsen, Czech Republic. · Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Umeå University, 901 85, Umeå, Sweden. · Department of Digestive Tract Diseases, Medical University of Łodz, 90-647, Łodz, Poland. · Division of Gastroenterology and Research Laboratory, IRCCS Scientific Institute and Regional General Hospital "Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza", 71013, San Giovanni Rotondo, FG, Italy. · Division of Research, Kaiser Permanente Northern California, Oakland, CA, 94612, USA. · Department of General, Visceral and Thoracic Surgery, University Hamburg-Eppendorf, 20246, Hamburg, Germany. · Department of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD, 21205, USA. · Department of Molecular Biology of Cancer, Institute of Experimental Medicine, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, 142 20, Prague 4, Czech Republic. · Department of Epidemiology and Environmental Health, University at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY, 14214, USA. · Department of Computational Biology, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, TN, 38105, USA. · Department of Epidemiology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, 98195, USA. · Perlmutter Cancer Center, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY, 10016, USA. · Department of Biostatistics, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA, 02115, USA. · Department of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, 77030, USA. · Laboratory of Translational Genomics, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, 20892, USA. amundadottirl@mail.nih.gov. ·Nat Commun · Pubmed #29422604.

ABSTRACT: In 2020, 146,063 deaths due to pancreatic cancer are estimated to occur in Europe and the United States combined. To identify common susceptibility alleles, we performed the largest pancreatic cancer GWAS to date, including 9040 patients and 12,496 controls of European ancestry from the Pancreatic Cancer Cohort Consortium (PanScan) and the Pancreatic Cancer Case-Control Consortium (PanC4). Here, we find significant evidence of a novel association at rs78417682 (7p12/TNS3, P = 4.35 × 10

7 Article Circulating vitamin D concentration and risk of seven cancers: Mendelian randomisation study. 2017

Dimitrakopoulou, Vasiliki I / Tsilidis, Konstantinos K / Haycock, Philip C / Dimou, Niki L / Al-Dabhani, Kawthar / Martin, Richard M / Lewis, Sarah J / Gunter, Marc J / Mondul, Alison / Shui, Irene M / Theodoratou, Evropi / Nimptsch, Katharina / Lindström, Sara / Albanes, Demetrius / Kühn, Tilman / Key, Timothy J / Travis, Ruth C / Vimaleswaran, Karani Santhanakrishnan / Anonymous2200925 / Anonymous2210925 / Anonymous2220925 / Kraft, Peter / Pierce, Brandon L / Schildkraut, Joellen M. ·Department of Hygiene and Epidemiology, School of Medicine, University of Ioannina, Ioannina, Greece. · School of Mathematics and Statistics, University College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland. · Department of Hygiene and Epidemiology, School of Medicine, University of Ioannina, Ioannina, Greece ktsilidi@cc.uoi.gr. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, UK. · School of Social and Community Medicine, University of Bristol, Bristol, UK. · MRC Integrative Epidemiology Unit, University of Bristol, Bristol, UK. · National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Bristol Nutritional Biomedical Research Unit, University Hospitals Bristol NHS Foundation Trust and the University of Bristol, Bristol, UK. · International Agency for Research on Cancer, Lyon, France. · Department of Epidemiology, University of Michigan School of Public Health, Ann Arbor, MI, USA. · Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA. · Centre of Global Health Research, Usher Institute for Population Health Sciences and Informatics, University of Edinburg, Edinburgh, UK. · Molecular Epidemiology Research Group, Max Delbrück Centre for Molecular Medicine (MDC), Berlin, Germany. · Department of Epidemiology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA. · Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD, USA. · Division of Cancer Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Centre (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Cancer Epidemiology Unit, Nuffield Department of Population Health, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK. · Department of Food and Nutritional Sciences, Hugh Sinclair Unit of Human Nutrition and Institute for Cardiovascular and Metabolic Research (ICMR), University of Reading, Reading, UK. · Program in Genetic Epidemiology and Statistical Genetics, Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA. · Department of Public Health Sciences, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA. · Department of Human Genetics, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA. · Department of Public Health Sciences, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA, USA. ·BMJ · Pubmed #29089348.

ABSTRACT:

8 Article Serum C-peptide, Total and High Molecular Weight Adiponectin, and Pancreatic Cancer: Do Associations Differ by Smoking? 2017

Nogueira, Leticia M / Newton, Christina C / Pollak, Michael / Silverman, Debra T / Albanes, Demetrius / Männistö, Satu / Weinstein, Stephanie J / Jacobs, Eric J / Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael Z. ·Texas Cancer Registry, Department of State Health Services, Austin, Texas. · Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, NIH, Rockville, Rockville, Maryland. · Epidemiology Research Program, American Cancer Society, Atlanta Georgia. · Department of Oncology, Lady Davis Research Institute of the Jewish General Hospital and McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. · Department of Health, National Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland. · Epidemiology Research Program, American Cancer Society, Atlanta Georgia. rs221z@nih.gov Eric.jacobs@cancer.org. · Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, NIH, Rockville, Rockville, Maryland. rs221z@nih.gov Eric.jacobs@cancer.org. ·Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev · Pubmed #28096201.

ABSTRACT:

9 Article Three new pancreatic cancer susceptibility signals identified on chromosomes 1q32.1, 5p15.33 and 8q24.21. 2016

Zhang, Mingfeng / Wang, Zhaoming / Obazee, Ofure / Jia, Jinping / Childs, Erica J / Hoskins, Jason / Figlioli, Gisella / Mocci, Evelina / Collins, Irene / Chung, Charles C / Hautman, Christopher / Arslan, Alan A / Beane-Freeman, Laura / Bracci, Paige M / Buring, Julie / Duell, Eric J / Gallinger, Steven / Giles, Graham G / Goodman, Gary E / Goodman, Phyllis J / Kamineni, Aruna / Kolonel, Laurence N / Kulke, Matthew H / Malats, Núria / Olson, Sara H / Sesso, Howard D / Visvanathan, Kala / White, Emily / Zheng, Wei / Abnet, Christian C / Albanes, Demetrius / Andreotti, Gabriella / Brais, Lauren / Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas / Basso, Daniela / Berndt, Sonja I / Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine / Bijlsma, Maarten F / Brenner, Hermann / Burdette, Laurie / Campa, Daniele / Caporaso, Neil E / Capurso, Gabriele / Cavestro, Giulia Martina / Cotterchio, Michelle / Costello, Eithne / Elena, Joanne / Boggi, Ugo / Gaziano, J Michael / Gazouli, Maria / Giovannucci, Edward L / Goggins, Michael / Gross, Myron / Haiman, Christopher A / Hassan, Manal / Helzlsouer, Kathy J / Hu, Nan / Hunter, David J / Iskierka-Jazdzewska, Elzbieta / Jenab, Mazda / Kaaks, Rudolf / Key, Timothy J / Khaw, Kay-Tee / Klein, Eric A / Kogevinas, Manolis / Krogh, Vittorio / Kupcinskas, Juozas / Kurtz, Robert C / Landi, Maria T / Landi, Stefano / Le Marchand, Loic / Mambrini, Andrea / Mannisto, Satu / Milne, Roger L / Neale, Rachel E / Oberg, Ann L / Panico, Salvatore / Patel, Alpa V / Peeters, Petra H M / Peters, Ulrike / Pezzilli, Raffaele / Porta, Miquel / Purdue, Mark / Quiros, J Ramón / Riboli, Elio / Rothman, Nathaniel / Scarpa, Aldo / Scelo, Ghislaine / Shu, Xiao-Ou / Silverman, Debra T / Soucek, Pavel / Strobel, Oliver / Sund, Malin / Małecka-Panas, Ewa / Taylor, Philip R / Tavano, Francesca / Travis, Ruth C / Thornquist, Mark / Tjønneland, Anne / Tobias, Geoffrey S / Trichopoulos, Dimitrios / Vashist, Yogesh / Vodicka, Pavel / Wactawski-Wende, Jean / Wentzensen, Nicolas / Yu, Herbert / Yu, Kai / Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne / Kooperberg, Charles / Risch, Harvey A / Jacobs, Eric J / Li, Donghui / Fuchs, Charles / Hoover, Robert / Hartge, Patricia / Chanock, Stephen J / Petersen, Gloria M / Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael S / Wolpin, Brian M / Kraft, Peter / Klein, Alison P / Canzian, Federico / Amundadottir, Laufey T. ·Laboratory of Translational Genomics, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA. · Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA. · Cancer Genomics Research Laboratory, National Cancer Institute, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, Leidos Biomedical Research, Inc., Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research, Frederick, Maryland, USA. · Department of Computational Biology, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee, USA. · Genomic Epidemiology Group, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Department of Oncology, the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. · Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York, USA. · Department of Environmental Medicine, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York, USA. · New York University Cancer Institute, New York, New York, USA,. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California, USA. · Division of Preventive Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Division of Aging, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Unit of Nutrition and Cancer, Cancer Epidemiology Research Program, Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute (IDIBELL), Catalan Institute of Oncology (ICO), Barcelona, Spain. · Lunenfeld Tanenbaum Research Institute, Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Cancer Epidemiology Centre, Cancer Council Victoria, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. · Centre for Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Melbourne School of Population and Global Health, The University of Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. · Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, Monash University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. · Division of Public Health Sciences, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, Washington, USA. · Southwest Oncology Group Statistical Center, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, Washington, USA. · Group Health Research Institute, Seattle, Washington, USA,. · Cancer Epidemiology Program, University of Hawaii Cancer Center, Honolulu, Hawaii, USA. · Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Genetic and Molecular Epidemiology Group, CNIO-Spanish National Cancer Research Centre, Madrid, Spain. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York, USA. · Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. · Department of Epidemiology, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USA. · Division of Epidemiology, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee, USA. · Vanderbilt Epidemiology Center, Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee, USA. · Department for Determinants of Chronic Diseases (DCD), National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven, The Netherlands. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom. · Department of Social & Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. · Department of Laboratory Medicine, University Hospital of Padova, Padua, Italy,. · Inserm, Centre for Research in Epidemiology and Population Health (CESP), U1018, Nutrition, Hormones and Women's Health Team, F-94805, Villejuif, France. · University Paris Sud, UMRS 1018, F-94805, Villejuif, France. · IGR, F-94805, Villejuif, France. · Laboratory for Experimental Oncology and Radiobiology, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Division of Clinical Epidemiology and Aging Research, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Division of Preventive Oncology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ) and National Center for Tumor Diseases (NCT), Heidelberg, Germany. · German Cancer Consortium (DKTK), German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Department of Biology, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. · Digestive and Liver Disease Unit, 'Sapienza' University of Rome, Rome, Italy. · Gastroenterology and Gastrointestinal Endoscopy Unit, Vita-Salute San Raffaele University, IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy. · Prevention and Cancer Control, Cancer Care Ontario, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · National Institute for Health Research Liverpool Pancreas Biomedical Research Unit, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, United Kingdom. · Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA. · Department of Surgery, Unit of Experimental Surgical Pathology, University Hospital of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. · Massachusetts Veteran's Epidemiology, Research, and Information Center, Geriatric Research Education and Clinical Center, Veterans Affairs Boston Healthcare System, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Department of Basic Medical Sciences, Laboratory of Biology, Medical School, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece. · Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Department of Nutrition, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Department of Pathology, Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center and Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. · Department of Medicine, Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center and Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. · Department of Oncology, Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center and Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. · Laboratory of Medicine and Pathology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA. · Preventive Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California, USA. · Department of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas, USA. · Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Department of Hematology, Medical University of Łodz, Łodz, Poland. · International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), Lyon, France. · Division of Cancer Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Cancer Epidemiology Unit, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom. · School of Clinical Medicine, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom. · Glickman Urological and Kidney Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio, USA. · Centre de Recerca en Epidemiologia Ambiental (CREAL), CIBER Epidemiología y Salud Pública (CIBERESP), Spain. · Hospital del Mar Institute of Medical Research (IMIM), Barcelona, Spain. · National School of Public Health, Athens, Greece. · Epidemiology and Prevention Unit, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan, Italy. · Department of Gastroenterology, Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, Kaunas, Lithuania. · Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York, USA. · Oncology Department, ASL1 Massa Carrara, Massa Carrara, Italy. · National Institute for Health and Welfare, Department of Chronic Disease Prevention, Helsinki, Finland. · Department of Population Health, QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. · Division of Biomedical Statistics and Informatics, Department of Health Sciences Research, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, USA. · Dipartimento di Medicina Clinica E Chirurgia, Federico II Univeristy, Naples, Italy. · Epidemiology Research Program, American Cancer Society, Atlanta, Georgia, USA. · Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands. · Pancreas Unit, Department of Digestive Diseases and Internal Medicine, Sant'Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, Bologna, Italy. · School of Medicine, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain. · CIBER de Epidemiología y Salud Pública (CIBERESP), Madrid, Spain. · Public Health and Participation Directorate, Asturias, Spain. · ARC-NET: Centre for Applied Research on Cancer, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Laboratory of Pharmacogenomics, Biomedical Center, Faculty of Medicine in Pilsen, Charles University in Prague, Pilsen, Czech Republic. · Department of General Surgery, University Hospital Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany. · Department of Surgical and Peroperative Sciences, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden. · Department of Digestive Tract Diseases, Medical University of Łodz, Łodz, Poland. · Division of Gastroenterology and Research Laboratory, IRCCS Scientific Institute and Regional General Hospital "Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza", San Giovanni Rotondo, Italy. · Institute of Cancer Epidemiology, Danish Cancer Society, Copenhagen, Denmark. · Bureau of Epidemiologic Research, Academy of Athens, Athens, Greece. · Hellenic Health Foundation, Athens, Greece. · Department of General, Visceral and Thoracic Surgery, University Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany. · Department of Molecular Biology of Cancer, Institute of Experimental Medicine, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Prague, Czech Republic. · Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, University at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York, USA. · New York University Cancer Institute, New York, New York, USA. · Division of Public Health Sciences, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, Washington, USA,. · Department of Chronic Disease Epidemiology, Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, Connecticut, USA. · Division of Epidemiology, Department of Health Sciences Research, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, USA. · Department of Biostatistics, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Department of Epidemiology, the Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. ·Oncotarget · Pubmed #27579533.

ABSTRACT: Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified common pancreatic cancer susceptibility variants at 13 chromosomal loci in individuals of European descent. To identify new susceptibility variants, we performed imputation based on 1000 Genomes (1000G) Project data and association analysis using 5,107 case and 8,845 control subjects from 27 cohort and case-control studies that participated in the PanScan I-III GWAS. This analysis, in combination with a two-staged replication in an additional 6,076 case and 7,555 control subjects from the PANcreatic Disease ReseArch (PANDoRA) and Pancreatic Cancer Case-Control (PanC4) Consortia uncovered 3 new pancreatic cancer risk signals marked by single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) rs2816938 at chromosome 1q32.1 (per allele odds ratio (OR) = 1.20, P = 4.88x10 -15), rs10094872 at 8q24.21 (OR = 1.15, P = 3.22x10 -9) and rs35226131 at 5p15.33 (OR = 0.71, P = 1.70x10 -8). These SNPs represent independent risk variants at previously identified pancreatic cancer risk loci on chr1q32.1 ( NR5A2), chr8q24.21 ( MYC) and chr5p15.33 ( CLPTM1L- TERT) as per analyses conditioned on previously reported susceptibility variants. We assessed expression of candidate genes at the three risk loci in histologically normal ( n = 10) and tumor ( n = 8) derived pancreatic tissue samples and observed a marked reduction of NR5A2 expression (chr1q32.1) in the tumors (fold change -7.6, P = 5.7x10 -8). This finding was validated in a second set of paired ( n = 20) histologically normal and tumor derived pancreatic tissue samples (average fold change for three NR5A2 isoforms -31.3 to -95.7, P = 7.5x10 -4-2.0x10 -3). Our study has identified new susceptibility variants independently conferring pancreatic cancer risk that merit functional follow-up to identify target genes and explain the underlying biology.

10 Article Vitamin D metabolic pathway genes and pancreatic cancer risk. 2015

Arem, Hannah / Yu, Kai / Xiong, Xiaoqin / Moy, Kristin / Freedman, Neal D / Mayne, Susan T / Albanes, Demetrius / Arslan, Alan A / Austin, Melissa / Bamlet, William R / Beane-Freeman, Laura / Bracci, Paige / Canzian, Federico / Cotterchio, Michelle / Duell, Eric J / Gallinger, Steve / Giles, Graham G / Goggins, Michael / Goodman, Phyllis J / Hartge, Patricia / Hassan, Manal / Helzlsouer, Kathy / Henderson, Brian / Holly, Elizabeth A / Hoover, Robert / Jacobs, Eric J / Kamineni, Aruna / Klein, Alison / Klein, Eric / Kolonel, Laurence N / Li, Donghui / Malats, Núria / Männistö, Satu / McCullough, Marjorie L / Olson, Sara H / Orlow, Irene / Peters, Ulrike / Petersen, Gloria M / Porta, Miquel / Severi, Gianluca / Shu, Xiao-Ou / Visvanathan, Kala / White, Emily / Yu, Herbert / Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne / Zheng, Wei / Tobias, Geoffrey S / Maeder, Dennis / Brotzman, Michelle / Risch, Harvey / Sampson, Joshua N / Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael Z. ·Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, Maryland, United States of America. · Information Management Systems, Inc., Calverton, Maryland, United States of America. · Yale School of Public Health/Yale Cancer Center, New Haven, Connecticut, United States of America. · Departments of Population Health, Obstetrics and Gynecology (Obs/Gyn) and Environmental Medicine, New York University, New York, New York, United States of America. · Department of Epidemiology, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, United States of America. · Department of Epidemiology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, United States of America. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California, United States of America. · Division of Cancer Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto; Prevention and Cancer Control, Cancer Care Ontario Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Catalan Institute of Oncology (ICO-IDIBELL), Barcelona, Spain. · Samuel Lunenfeld Research Institute, Mount Sinai Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada. · Cancer Epidemiology Centre, Cancer Council Victoria and Centre for MEGA Epidemiology, School of Population Health, the University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia. · Departments of Oncology, Pathology and Medicine, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, United States of America. · Cleveland Clinic, Glickman Urological and Kidney Institute, Cleveland, Ohio, United States of America. · Department of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology, The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas, United States of America. · MD Mercy, Baltimore, Maryland, United States of America. · Department of Preventative Medicine, School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California, United States of America. · Epidemiology Research Program, American Cancer Society, Atlanta, Georgia, United States of America. · GroupHealth Research Institute, Seattle, Washington, United States of America. · University of Hawaii Cancer Center, Manoa, Hawaii, United States of America. · Molecular Pathology Program, Spanish National Cancer Research Center, Madrid, Spain. · National Institute for Health and Welfare, Department of Chronic Disease Prevention, Helsinki, Finland. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York, United States of America. · Hospital del Mar Institute of Medical Research (IMIM), and School of Medicine, Barcelona Spain. · Division of Epidemiology, Department of Medicine, Vanderbilt Epidemiology Center, and Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee, United States of America. · Cancer Genomics Research Laboratory, National Cancer Institute, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, Leidos Biomedical Research, Inc., Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research, Frederick, Maryland, United States of America. · Westat, Rockville, Maryland, United States of America. ·PLoS One · Pubmed #25799011.

ABSTRACT: Evidence on the association between vitamin D status and pancreatic cancer risk is inconsistent. This inconsistency may be partially attributable to variation in vitamin D regulating genes. We selected 11 vitamin D-related genes (GC, DHCR7, CYP2R1, VDR, CYP27B1, CYP24A1, CYP27A1, RXRA, CRP2, CASR and CUBN) totaling 213 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), and examined associations with pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Our study included 3,583 pancreatic cancer cases and 7,053 controls from the genome-wide association studies of pancreatic cancer PanScans-I-III. We used the Adaptive Joint Test and the Adaptive Rank Truncated Product statistic for pathway and gene analyses, and unconditional logistic regression for SNP analyses, adjusting for age, sex, study and population stratification. We examined effect modification by circulating vitamin D concentration (≤50, >50 nmol/L) for the most significant SNPs using a subset of cohort cases (n = 713) and controls (n = 878). The vitamin D metabolic pathway was not associated with pancreatic cancer risk (p = 0.830). Of the individual genes, none were associated with pancreatic cancer risk at a significance level of p<0.05. SNPs near the VDR (rs2239186), LRP2 (rs4668123), CYP24A1 (rs2762932), GC (rs2282679), and CUBN (rs1810205) genes were the top SNPs associated with pancreatic cancer (p-values 0.008-0.037), but none were statistically significant after adjusting for multiple comparisons. Associations between these SNPs and pancreatic cancer were not modified by circulating concentrations of vitamin D. These findings do not support an association between vitamin D-related genes and pancreatic cancer risk. Future research should explore other pathways through which vitamin D status might be associated with pancreatic cancer risk.

11 Article Determinants of concentrations of N(ε)-carboxymethyl-lysine and soluble receptor for advanced glycation end products and their associations with risk of pancreatic cancer. 2014

Duan, Zhigang / Chen, Guoqing / Chen, Liang / Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael / Weinstein, Stephanie J / Mannisto, Satu / White, Donna L / Albanes, Demetrius / Jiao, Li. ·Department of Medicine, Baylor College of Medicine Houston, TX, USA ; Section of Health Services Research (IQuESt), Michael. E DeBakey VA Medical Center Houston, TX, USA. · Division of Health Services Research, University of Kansas Medical Center Kansas City, KS, USA. · Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health Bethesda, MD, USA. · Department of Chronic Disease Prevention, National Institute for Health and Welfare Helsinki, Finland. · Department of Medicine, Baylor College of Medicine Houston, TX, USA ; Section of Health Services Research (IQuESt), Michael. E DeBakey VA Medical Center Houston, TX, USA ; Texas Medical Center Digestive Disease Center Houston, TX, USA ; Dan L. Duncan Cancer Center at Baylor College of Medicine Houston, TX, USA ; Center for Translational Research on Inflammatory Diseases (CTRID), Michael E. DeBakey Veterans Affairs Medical Center Houston, TX, USA. ·Int J Mol Epidemiol Genet · Pubmed #25379135.

ABSTRACT: The soluble receptor for advanced glycation end-products (sRAGE) is shown to mitigate pro-inflammatory effects triggered by ligation of RAGE with N(ε)-carboxymethyl-lysine (CML)-AGE or other ligands. We examined the associations among host, lifestyle, and genetic determinants of CML-AGE or sRAGE and risk of pancreatic cancer in the prospective ATBC Study. We obtained baseline exposure information, data on serological and genetic biomarkers from 141 patients with pancreatic cancer and 141 subcohort controls. Stepwise linear and logistic regression models were used for data analysis. Multiple linear regression analyses showed that CML-AGE concentrations were independently inversely correlated with the minor allele of rs640742 of DDOST, physical activity, alcohol consumption, diastolic blood pressure (BP), and positively correlated with heart rate, serum sRAGE and HDL concentrations (P < 0.05). sRAGE concentrations were independently inversely correlated with the 82Ser allele of rs2070600 of RAGE, age, body mass index, heart rate, and serum HDL; and positively correlated with serum CML-AGE, sucrose consumption, and diastolic BP (P < 0.05). The minor allele of rs1035786 of RAGE was associated with reduced risk of pancreatic cancer (any T compared with CC: multivariate OR = 0.61, 95% CI: 0.38-0.98). We identified host metabolic profile, lifestyle and genetic factors that explained approximately 50% of variability of CML-AGE or sRAGE in Finnish men smokers. The association between RAGE SNPs and pancreatic cancer risk warrants further investigation.

12 Article Genome-wide association study identifies multiple susceptibility loci for pancreatic cancer. 2014

Wolpin, Brian M / Rizzato, Cosmeri / Kraft, Peter / Kooperberg, Charles / Petersen, Gloria M / Wang, Zhaoming / Arslan, Alan A / Beane-Freeman, Laura / Bracci, Paige M / Buring, Julie / Canzian, Federico / Duell, Eric J / Gallinger, Steven / Giles, Graham G / Goodman, Gary E / Goodman, Phyllis J / Jacobs, Eric J / Kamineni, Aruna / Klein, Alison P / Kolonel, Laurence N / Kulke, Matthew H / Li, Donghui / Malats, Núria / Olson, Sara H / Risch, Harvey A / Sesso, Howard D / Visvanathan, Kala / White, Emily / Zheng, Wei / Abnet, Christian C / Albanes, Demetrius / Andreotti, Gabriella / Austin, Melissa A / Barfield, Richard / Basso, Daniela / Berndt, Sonja I / Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine / Brotzman, Michelle / Büchler, Markus W / Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas / Bugert, Peter / Burdette, Laurie / Campa, Daniele / Caporaso, Neil E / Capurso, Gabriele / Chung, Charles / Cotterchio, Michelle / Costello, Eithne / Elena, Joanne / Funel, Niccola / Gaziano, J Michael / Giese, Nathalia A / Giovannucci, Edward L / Goggins, Michael / Gorman, Megan J / Gross, Myron / Haiman, Christopher A / Hassan, Manal / Helzlsouer, Kathy J / Henderson, Brian E / Holly, Elizabeth A / Hu, Nan / Hunter, David J / Innocenti, Federico / Jenab, Mazda / Kaaks, Rudolf / Key, Timothy J / Khaw, Kay-Tee / Klein, Eric A / Kogevinas, Manolis / Krogh, Vittorio / Kupcinskas, Juozas / Kurtz, Robert C / LaCroix, Andrea / Landi, Maria T / Landi, Stefano / Le Marchand, Loic / Mambrini, Andrea / Mannisto, Satu / Milne, Roger L / Nakamura, Yusuke / Oberg, Ann L / Owzar, Kouros / Patel, Alpa V / Peeters, Petra H M / Peters, Ulrike / Pezzilli, Raffaele / Piepoli, Ada / Porta, Miquel / Real, Francisco X / Riboli, Elio / Rothman, Nathaniel / Scarpa, Aldo / Shu, Xiao-Ou / Silverman, Debra T / Soucek, Pavel / Sund, Malin / Talar-Wojnarowska, Renata / Taylor, Philip R / Theodoropoulos, George E / Thornquist, Mark / Tjønneland, Anne / Tobias, Geoffrey S / Trichopoulos, Dimitrios / Vodicka, Pavel / Wactawski-Wende, Jean / Wentzensen, Nicolas / Wu, Chen / Yu, Herbert / Yu, Kai / Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne / Hoover, Robert / Hartge, Patricia / Fuchs, Charles / Chanock, Stephen J / Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael S / Amundadottir, Laufey T. ·1] Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. [2] Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. [3]. · 1] Genomic Epidemiology Group, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. [2]. · 1] Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. [2] Department of Biostatistics, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. [3]. · 1] Division of Public Health Sciences, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, Washington, USA. [2]. · 1] Division of Epidemiology, Department of Health Sciences Research, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, USA. [2]. · 1] Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA. [2] Cancer Genomics Research Laboratory, National Cancer Institute, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, Leidos Biomedical Research, Inc., Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research, Frederick, Maryland, USA. · 1] Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York, USA. [2] Department of Environmental Medicine, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York, USA. [3] New York University Cancer Institute, New York, New York, USA. · Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California, USA. · 1] Division of Preventive Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. [2] Division of Aging, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Genomic Epidemiology Group, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Unit of Nutrition, Environment and Cancer, Cancer Epidemiology Research Program, Catalan Institute of Oncology (ICO), Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute (IDIBELL), Barcelona, Spain. · Samuel Lunenfeld Research Institute, Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · 1] Cancer Epidemiology Centre, Cancer Council Victoria, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. [2] Centre for Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Melbourne School of Population and Global Health, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. [3] Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, Monash University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. · Division of Public Health Sciences, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, Washington, USA. · Southwest Oncology Group Statistical Center, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, Washington, USA. · Epidemiology Research Program, American Cancer Society, Atlanta, Georgia, USA. · Group Health Research Institute, Seattle, Washington, USA. · 1] Department of Oncology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. [2] Department of Epidemiology, Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. · The Cancer Research Center of Hawaii (retired), Honolulu, Hawaii, USA. · Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Department of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas, USA. · Genetic and Molecular Epidemiology Group, CNIO-Spanish National Cancer Research Centre, Madrid, Spain. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York, USA. · Department of Chronic Disease Epidemiology, Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, Connecticut, USA. · 1] Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. [2] Division of Preventive Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. [3] Division of Aging, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Department of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. · 1] Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, Washington, USA. [2] Department of Epidemiology, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USA. · 1] Department of Medicine, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee, USA. [2] Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee, USA. · Department of Epidemiology, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USA. · Department of Biostatistics, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Department of Laboratory Medicine, University Hospital of Padova, Padua, Italy. · 1] INSERM, Centre for Research in Epidemiology and Population Health (CESP), Nutrition, Hormones and Women's Health Team, Villejuif, France. [2] University Paris Sud, UMRS 1018, Villejuif, France. [3] Institut Gustave Roussy (IGR), Villejuif, France. · Westat, Rockville, Maryland, USA. · Department of General Surgery, University Hospital Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany. · 1] National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven, the Netherlands. [2] Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University Medical Centre Utrecht, Utrecht, the Netherlands. [3] Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, the Netherlands. · Institute of Transfusion Medicine and Immunology, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, German Red Cross Blood Service Baden-Württemberg-Hessen, Mannheim, Germany. · Division of Cancer Epidemiology, DKFZ, Heidelberg, Germany. · Digestive and Liver Disease Unit, 'Sapienza' University of Rome, Rome, Italy. · 1] Cancer Care Ontario, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. [2] Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · National Institute for Health Research Liverpool Pancreas Biomedical Research Unit, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK. · Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA. · Department of Surgery, Unit of Experimental Surgical Pathology, University Hospital of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. · 1] Division of Preventive Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. [2] Division of Aging, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. [3] Massachusetts Veteran's Epidemiology, Research and Information Center, Geriatric Research Education and Clinical Center, Veterans Affairs Boston Healthcare System, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · 1] Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. [2] Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. [3] Department of Nutrition, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · 1] Department of Pathology, Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center and Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. [2] Department of Medicine, Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center and Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. [3] Department of Oncology, Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center and Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. · Laboratory of Medicine and Pathology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA. · Preventive Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California, USA. · Prevention and Research Center, Mercy Medical Center, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. · Cancer Prevention, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California, USA. · 1] Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. [2] Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. [3] Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · The University of North Carolina Eshelman School of Pharmacy, Center for Pharmacogenomics and Individualized Therapy, Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA. · International Agency for Research on Cancer, Lyon, France. · Cancer Epidemiology Unit, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK. · School of Clinical Medicine, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK. · Glickman Urological and Kidney Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio, USA. · 1] Centre de Recerca en Epidemiologia Ambiental (CREAL), CIBER Epidemiología y Salud Pública (CIBERESP), Barcelona, Spain. [2] Hospital del Mar Institute of Medical Research (IMIM), Barcelona, Spain. [3] Department of Nutrition, National School of Public Health, Athens, Greece. · Epidemiology and Prevention Unit, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan, Italy. · Department of Gastroenterology, Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, Kaunas, Lithuania. · Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York, USA. · Department of Biology, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. · Cancer Epidemiology Program, University of Hawaii Cancer Center, Honolulu, Hawaii, USA. · Oncology Department, ASL1 Massa Carrara, Massa Carrara, Italy. · Department of Chronic Disease Prevention, National Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland. · 1] Cancer Epidemiology Centre, Cancer Council Victoria, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. [2] Centre for Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Melbourne School of Population and Global Health, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. · Human Genome Center, Institute of Medical Science, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan. · Alliance Statistics and Data Center, Division of Biomedical Statistics and Informatics, Department of Health Sciences Research, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, USA. · Alliance Statistics and Data Center, Department of Biostatistics and Bioinformatics, Duke Cancer Institute, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina, USA. · 1] Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, the Netherlands. [2] Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, UK. · Department of Epidemiology, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, Washington, USA. · Pancreas Unit, Department of Digestive Diseases and Internal Medicine, Sant'Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, Bologna, Italy. · Department of Gastroenterology, Scientific Institute and Regional General Hospital 'Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza', Opera di Padre Pio da Pietrelcina, San Giovanni Rotondo, Italy. · 1] Hospital del Mar Institute of Medical Research (IMIM), Barcelona, Spain. [2] Department of Epidemiology, School of Medicine, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain. [3] CIBERESP, Madrid, Spain. · 1] Epithelial Carcinogenesis Group, CNIO-Spanish National Cancer Research Centre, Madrid, Spain. [2] Departament de Ciències i de la Salut, Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, UK. · ARC-NET: Centre for Applied Research on Cancer, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Toxicogenomics Unit, Center for Toxicology and Safety, National Institute of Public Health, Prague, Czech Republic. · Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden. · Department of Digestive Tract Diseases, Medical University of Łodz, Łodz, Poland. · 1st Propaideutic Surgical Department, Hippocration University Hospital, Athens, Greece. · Institute of Cancer Epidemiology, Danish Cancer Society, Copenhagen, Denmark. · 1] Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. [2] Bureau of Epidemiologic Research, Academy of Athens, Athens, Greece. [3] Hellenic Health Foundation, Athens, Greece. · Department of Molecular Biology of Cancer, Institute of Experimental Medicine, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Prague, Czech Republic. · Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, University at Buffalo, State University of New York, Buffalo, New York, USA. · Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · 1] Department of Environmental Medicine, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York, USA. [2] New York University Cancer Institute, New York, New York, USA. · 1] Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA. [2]. · 1] Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. [2] Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. [3]. · 1] Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA. [2] Cancer Genomics Research Laboratory, National Cancer Institute, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, Leidos Biomedical Research, Inc., Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research, Frederick, Maryland, USA. [3]. ·Nat Genet · Pubmed #25086665.

ABSTRACT: We performed a multistage genome-wide association study including 7,683 individuals with pancreatic cancer and 14,397 controls of European descent. Four new loci reached genome-wide significance: rs6971499 at 7q32.3 (LINC-PINT, per-allele odds ratio (OR) = 0.79, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.74-0.84, P = 3.0 × 10(-12)), rs7190458 at 16q23.1 (BCAR1/CTRB1/CTRB2, OR = 1.46, 95% CI 1.30-1.65, P = 1.1 × 10(-10)), rs9581943 at 13q12.2 (PDX1, OR = 1.15, 95% CI 1.10-1.20, P = 2.4 × 10(-9)) and rs16986825 at 22q12.1 (ZNRF3, OR = 1.18, 95% CI 1.12-1.25, P = 1.2 × 10(-8)). We identified an independent signal in exon 2 of TERT at the established region 5p15.33 (rs2736098, OR = 0.80, 95% CI 0.76-0.85, P = 9.8 × 10(-14)). We also identified a locus at 8q24.21 (rs1561927, P = 1.3 × 10(-7)) that approached genome-wide significance located 455 kb telomeric of PVT1. Our study identified multiple new susceptibility alleles for pancreatic cancer that are worthy of follow-up studies.

13 Article Serum transforming growth factor-β1 and risk of pancreatic cancer in three prospective cohort studies. 2014

Jacobs, Eric J / Newton, Christina C / Silverman, Debra T / Nogueira, Leticia M / Albanes, Demetrius / Männistö, Satu / Pollak, Michael / Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael Z. ·Epidemiology Research Program, American Cancer Society, National Home Office, 250 Williams Street, Atlanta, GA, 30303-1002, USA, ejacobs@cancer.org. ·Cancer Causes Control · Pubmed #24913781.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: Clinically evident chronic pancreatitis is a strong risk factor for pancreatic cancer. A small Japanese cohort study previously reported that pre-diagnostic serum transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) concentration, a potential marker of subclinical pancreatic inflammation, was associated with higher risk of pancreatic cancer. We further explored this association in a larger prospective study. METHODS: Serum TGF-β1 concentrations were measured in pre-diagnostic samples from 729 pancreatic cancer cases and 907 matched controls from a cohort of Finnish male smokers (the Alpa-Tocopherol, Beta-Carotene (ATBC) Cancer Prevention Study) and two cohorts of US men and women, the Cancer Prevention Study-II and the Prostate Lung, Colorectal and Ovarian (PLCO) Cancer Screening Trial. Multivariable-adjusted odds ratios (ORs) were estimated using conditional logistic regression. RESULTS: Overall, serum TGF-β1 concentration was not associated with a clear increase in pancreatic cancer risk (OR 1.36, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 0.98-1.88 for highest vs. lowest quintile, p trend = 0.20). However, this association differed significantly by follow-up time (p = 0.02). Serum TGF-β1 concentration was not associated with risk during the first 10 years of follow-up, but was associated with higher risk during follow-up after 10 years (OR 2.13, 95 % CI 1.23-3.68 for highest vs. lowest quintile, p trend = 0.001). During follow-up after 10 years, serum TGF-β1 was associated with higher risk only in the ATBC cohort, although most subjects were from ATBC during this time period and statistical evidence for heterogeneity across cohorts was limited (p = 0.14). CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that high serum TGF-β1 may be associated with increased risk of pancreatic cancer although a long follow-up period may be needed to observe this association.

14 Article Genome-wide association study of survival in patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma. 2014

Wu, Chen / Kraft, Peter / Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael / Steplowski, Emily / Brotzman, Michelle / Xu, Mousheng / Mudgal, Poorva / Amundadottir, Laufey / Arslan, Alan A / Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas / Gross, Myron / Helzlsouer, Kathy / Jacobs, Eric J / Kooperberg, Charles / Petersen, Gloria M / Zheng, Wei / Albanes, Demetrius / Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine / Buring, Julie E / Canzian, Federico / Cao, Guangwen / Duell, Eric J / Elena, Joanne W / Gaziano, J Michael / Giovannucci, Edward L / Hallmans, Goran / Hutchinson, Amy / Hunter, David J / Jenab, Mazda / Jiang, Guoliang / Khaw, Kay-Tee / LaCroix, Andrea / Li, Zhaoshen / Mendelsohn, Julie B / Panico, Salvatore / Patel, Alpa V / Qian, Zhi Rong / Riboli, Elio / Sesso, Howard / Shen, Hongbing / Shu, Xiao-Ou / Tjonneland, Anne / Tobias, Geoffrey S / Trichopoulos, Dimitrios / Virtamo, Jarmo / Visvanathan, Kala / Wactawski-Wende, Jean / Wang, Chengfeng / Yu, Kai / Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne / Chanock, Stephen / Hoover, Robert / Hartge, Patricia / Fuchs, Charles S / Lin, Dongxin / Wolpin, Brian M. ·Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, , Boston, Massachusetts, USA. ·Gut · Pubmed #23180869.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Survival of patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma is limited and few prognostic factors are known. We conducted a two-stage genome-wide association study (GWAS) to identify germline variants associated with survival in patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma. METHODS: We analysed overall survival in relation to single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) among 1005 patients from two large GWAS datasets, PanScan I and ChinaPC. Cox proportional hazards regression was used in an additive genetic model with adjustment for age, sex, clinical stage and the top four principal components of population stratification. The first stage included 642 cases of European ancestry (PanScan), from which the top SNPs (p≤10(-5)) were advanced to a joint analysis with 363 additional patients from China (ChinaPC). RESULTS: In the first stage of cases of European descent, the top-ranked loci were at chromosomes 11p15.4, 18p11.21 and 1p36.13, tagged by rs12362504 (p=1.63×10(-7)), rs981621 (p=1.65×10(-7)) and rs16861827 (p=3.75×10(-7)), respectively. 131 SNPs with p≤10(-5) were advanced to a joint analysis with cases from the ChinaPC study. In the joint analysis, the top-ranked SNP was rs10500715 (minor allele frequency, 0.37; p=1.72×10(-7)) on chromosome 11p15.4, which is intronic to the SET binding factor 2 (SBF2) gene. The HR (95% CI) for death was 0.74 (0.66 to 0.84) in PanScan I, 0.79 (0.65 to 0.97) in ChinaPC and 0.76 (0.68 to 0.84) in the joint analysis. CONCLUSIONS: Germline genetic variation in the SBF2 locus was associated with overall survival in patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma of European and Asian ancestry. This association should be investigated in additional large patient cohorts.

15 Article Seropositivity to Helicobacter pylori and risk of pancreatic cancer. 2013

Yu, Guoqin / Murphy, Gwen / Michel, Angelika / Weinstein, Stephanie J / Männistö, Satu / Albanes, Demetrius / Pawlita, Michael / Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael Z. ·Authors' Affiliations: Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, NIH, Bethesda, Maryland; Division of Genome Modifications and Carcinogenesis, Research Program Infection and Cancer, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg, Germany; and Department of Chronic Disease Prevention, National Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland. ·Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev · Pubmed #24089457.

ABSTRACT: Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) seropositivity has been inconsistently associated with pancreatic cancer. We, therefore, investigated the association between H. pylori seropositivity and pancreatic cancer in a case-control study nested within Alpha-Tocopherol, Beta-Carotene Cancer Prevention Study (ATBC) cohort of Finnish male smokers. Pancreatic cancer cases (n = 353) and control subjects (n = 353) were matched on date of baseline serum collection, age at randomization, and follow-up time (up to 23.9 years). We used a multiplex serology assay to determine the sero-status of antibodies against 15 H. pylori-specific antigens in fasting serum samples. Conditional logistic regression was used to calculate the odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). Neither targeted H. pylori antigens in serum nor the combination of all was associated with development of pancreatic cancer (combination of all: OR, 0.85; 95% CI, 0.49-1.49). Our results suggest that H. pylori is not a risk factor for pancreatic cancer.

16 Article An absolute risk model to identify individuals at elevated risk for pancreatic cancer in the general population. 2013

Klein, Alison P / Lindström, Sara / Mendelsohn, Julie B / Steplowski, Emily / Arslan, Alan A / Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas / Fuchs, Charles S / Gallinger, Steven / Gross, Myron / Helzlsouer, Kathy / Holly, Elizabeth A / Jacobs, Eric J / Lacroix, Andrea / Li, Donghui / Mandelson, Margaret T / Olson, Sara H / Petersen, Gloria M / Risch, Harvey A / Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael Z / Zheng, Wei / Amundadottir, Laufey / Albanes, Demetrius / Allen, Naomi E / Bamlet, William R / Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine / Buring, Julie E / Bracci, Paige M / Canzian, Federico / Clipp, Sandra / Cotterchio, Michelle / Duell, Eric J / Elena, Joanne / Gaziano, J Michael / Giovannucci, Edward L / Goggins, Michael / Hallmans, Göran / Hassan, Manal / Hutchinson, Amy / Hunter, David J / Kooperberg, Charles / Kurtz, Robert C / Liu, Simin / Overvad, Kim / Palli, Domenico / Patel, Alpa V / Rabe, Kari G / Shu, Xiao-Ou / Slimani, Nadia / Tobias, Geoffrey S / Trichopoulos, Dimitrios / Van Den Eeden, Stephen K / Vineis, Paolo / Virtamo, Jarmo / Wactawski-Wende, Jean / Wolpin, Brian M / Yu, Herbert / Yu, Kai / Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne / Chanock, Stephen J / Hoover, Robert N / Hartge, Patricia / Kraft, Peter. ·Department of Oncology, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins, Baltimore, Maryland, United States of America ; Department of Pathology, Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, United States of America ; Department of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland, United States of America. ·PLoS One · Pubmed #24058443.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: We developed an absolute risk model to identify individuals in the general population at elevated risk of pancreatic cancer. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Using data on 3,349 cases and 3,654 controls from the PanScan Consortium, we developed a relative risk model for men and women of European ancestry based on non-genetic and genetic risk factors for pancreatic cancer. We estimated absolute risks based on these relative risks and population incidence rates. RESULTS: Our risk model included current smoking (multivariable adjusted odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval: 2.20 [1.84-2.62]), heavy alcohol use (>3 drinks/day) (OR: 1.45 [1.19-1.76]), obesity (body mass index >30 kg/m(2)) (OR: 1.26 [1.09-1.45]), diabetes >3 years (nested case-control OR: 1.57 [1.13-2.18], case-control OR: 1.80 [1.40-2.32]), family history of pancreatic cancer (OR: 1.60 [1.20-2.12]), non-O ABO genotype (AO vs. OO genotype) (OR: 1.23 [1.10-1.37]) to (BB vs. OO genotype) (OR 1.58 [0.97-2.59]), rs3790844(chr1q32.1) (OR: 1.29 [1.19-1.40]), rs401681(5p15.33) (OR: 1.18 [1.10-1.26]) and rs9543325(13q22.1) (OR: 1.27 [1.18-1.36]). The areas under the ROC curve for risk models including only non-genetic factors, only genetic factors, and both non-genetic and genetic factors were 58%, 57% and 61%, respectively. We estimate that fewer than 3/1,000 U.S. non-Hispanic whites have more than a 5% predicted lifetime absolute risk. CONCLUSION: Although absolute risk modeling using established risk factors may help to identify a group of individuals at higher than average risk of pancreatic cancer, the immediate clinical utility of our model is limited. However, a risk model can increase awareness of the various risk factors for pancreatic cancer, including modifiable behaviors.

17 Article A prospective analysis of telomere length and pancreatic cancer in the alpha-tocopherol beta-carotene cancer (ATBC) prevention study. 2013

Lynch, Shannon M / Major, Jacqueline M / Cawthon, Richard / Weinstein, Stephanie J / Virtamo, Jarmo / Lan, Qing / Rothman, Nathaniel / Albanes, Demetrius / Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael Z. ·Nutritional Epidemiology Branch, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD; Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Center for Genetics and Complex Traits, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA. ·Int J Cancer · Pubmed #23674344.

ABSTRACT: Smoking and diabetes, consistent risk factors for pancreatic cancer, are also factors that influence telomere length maintenance. To test whether telomere length is associated with pancreatic cancer risk, we conducted a nested case-control study in the Alpha-Tocopherol, Beta-Carotene Cancer Prevention (ATBC) Study cohort of male smokers, aged 50-69 years at baseline. Between 1992 and 2004, 193 incident cases of pancreatic adenocarcinoma occurred (mean follow-up from blood draw: 6.3 years) among participants with whole blood samples available for telomere length assays. For these cases and 660 controls, we calculated odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals using unconditional logistic regression, adjusting for age, number of years smoked regularly, and history of diabetes mellitus. Telomere length was categorized into quartiles (shortest to longest) and analyzed as both a categorical and a continuous normal variable (reported per 0.2 unit increase in telomere length). All statistical tests were two-sided. Longer telomere length was significantly associated with increased pancreatic cancer risk (continuous OR = 1.26 95% CI = 1.09-1.46; highest quartile compared to lowest, OR = 1.57, 95% CI = 1.01-2.43, p-trend = 0.007). This association remained for subjects diagnosed within the first five years of blood draw (continuous OR = 1.46, 95% CI = 1.19-1.79 highest quartile OR = 2.92, 95% CI = 1.47-5.77, p-trend = 0.002), but not those diagnosed greater than five years after blood draw (continuous OR = 1.03, 95% CI = 0.85-1.22; highest quartile OR = 1.04, 95% CI = 0.60-1.79). This is the first prospective study to suggest an association between longer blood leukocyte telomere length and increased pancreatic cancer risk.

18 Article Polymorphisms in genes related to one-carbon metabolism are not related to pancreatic cancer in PanScan and PanC4. 2013

Leenders, Max / Bhattacharjee, Samsiddhi / Vineis, Paolo / Stevens, Victoria / Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas / Shu, Xiao-Ou / Amundadottir, Laufey / Gross, Myron / Tobias, Geoffrey S / Wactawski-Wende, Jean / Arslan, Alan A / Duell, Eric J / Fuchs, Charles S / Gallinger, Steven / Hartge, Patricia / Hoover, Robert N / Holly, Elizabeth A / Jacobs, Eric J / Klein, Alison P / Kooperberg, Charles / LaCroix, Andrea / Li, Donghui / Mandelson, Margaret T / Olson, Sara H / Petersen, Gloria / Risch, Harvey A / Yu, Kai / Wolpin, Brian M / Zheng, Wei / Agalliu, Ilir / Albanes, Demetrius / Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine / Bracci, Paige M / Buring, Julie E / Canzian, Federico / Chang, Kenneth / Chanock, Stephen J / Cotterchio, Michelle / Gaziano, J Michael / Giovanucci, Edward L / Goggins, Michael / Hallmans, Göran / Hankinson, Susan E / Hoffman-Bolton, Judith A / Hunter, David J / Hutchinson, Amy / Jacobs, Kevin B / Jenab, Mazda / Khaw, Kay-Tee / Kraft, Peter / Krogh, Vittorio / Kurtz, Robert C / McWilliams, Robert R / Mendelsohn, Julie B / Patel, Alpa V / Rabe, Kari G / Riboli, Elio / Tjønneland, Anne / Trichopoulos, Dimitrios / Virtamo, Jarmo / Visvanathan, Kala / Elena, Joanne W / Yu, Herbert / Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne / Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael Z. ·Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Imperial College, London, UK. M.Leenders-6@umcutrecht.nl ·Cancer Causes Control · Pubmed #23334854.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: The evidence of a relation between folate intake and one-carbon metabolism (OCM) with pancreatic cancer (PanCa) is inconsistent. In this study, the association between genes and single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) related to OCM and PanCa was assessed. METHODS: Using biochemical knowledge of the OCM pathway, we identified thirty-seven genes and 834 SNPs to examine in association with PanCa. Our study included 1,408 cases and 1,463 controls nested within twelve cohorts (PanScan). The ten SNPs and five genes with lowest p values (<0.02) were followed up in 2,323 cases and 2,340 controls from eight case-control studies (PanC4) that participated in PanScan2. The correlation of SNPs with metabolite levels was assessed for 649 controls from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition. RESULTS: When both stages were combined, we observed suggestive associations with PanCa for rs10887710 (MAT1A) (OR 1.13, 95 %CI 1.04-1.23), rs1552462 (SYT9) (OR 1.27, 95 %CI 1.02-1.59), and rs7074891 (CUBN) (OR 1.91, 95 %CI 1.12-3.26). After correcting for multiple comparisons, no significant associations were observed in either the first or second stage. The three suggested SNPs showed no correlations with one-carbon biomarkers. CONCLUSIONS: This is the largest genetic study to date to examine the relation between germline variations in OCM-related genes polymorphisms and the risk of PanCa. Suggestive evidence for an association between polymorphisms and PanCa was observed among the cohort-nested studies, but this did not replicate in the case-control studies. Our results do not strongly support the hypothesis that genes related to OCM play a role in pancreatic carcinogenesis.

19 Article Diabetes and risk of pancreatic cancer: a pooled analysis from the pancreatic cancer cohort consortium. 2013

Elena, Joanne W / Steplowski, Emily / Yu, Kai / Hartge, Patricia / Tobias, Geoffrey S / Brotzman, Michelle J / Chanock, Stephen J / Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael Z / Arslan, Alan A / Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas / Helzlsouer, Kathy / Jacobs, Eric J / LaCroix, Andrea / Petersen, Gloria / Zheng, Wei / Albanes, Demetrius / Allen, Naomi E / Amundadottir, Laufey / Bao, Ying / Boeing, Heiner / Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine / Buring, Julie E / Gaziano, J Michael / Giovannucci, Edward L / Duell, Eric J / Hallmans, Göran / Howard, Barbara V / Hunter, David J / Hutchinson, Amy / Jacobs, Kevin B / Kooperberg, Charles / Kraft, Peter / Mendelsohn, Julie B / Michaud, Dominique S / Palli, Domenico / Phillips, Lawrence S / Overvad, Kim / Patel, Alpa V / Sansbury, Leah / Shu, Xiao-Ou / Simon, Michael S / Slimani, Nadia / Trichopoulos, Dimitrios / Visvanathan, Kala / Virtamo, Jarmo / Wolpin, Brian M / Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne / Fuchs, Charles S / Hoover, Robert N / Gross, Myron. ·Division of Cancer Control and Population Science, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Department of Health and Human Services, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA. elenajw@mail.nih.gov ·Cancer Causes Control · Pubmed #23112111.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: Diabetes is a suspected risk factor for pancreatic cancer, but questions remain about whether it is a risk factor or a result of the disease. This study prospectively examined the association between diabetes and the risk of pancreatic adenocarcinoma in pooled data from the NCI pancreatic cancer cohort consortium (PanScan). METHODS: The pooled data included 1,621 pancreatic adenocarcinoma cases and 1,719 matched controls from twelve cohorts using a nested case-control study design. Subjects who were diagnosed with diabetes near the time (<2 years) of pancreatic cancer diagnosis were excluded from all analyses. All analyses were adjusted for age, race, gender, study, alcohol use, smoking, BMI, and family history of pancreatic cancer. RESULTS: Self-reported diabetes was associated with a forty percent increased risk of pancreatic cancer (OR = 1.40, 95 % CI: 1.07, 1.84). The association differed by duration of diabetes; risk was highest for those with a duration of 2-8 years (OR = 1.79, 95 % CI: 1.25, 2.55); there was no association for those with 9+ years of diabetes (OR = 1.02, 95 % CI: 0.68, 1.52). CONCLUSIONS: These findings provide support for a relationship between diabetes and pancreatic cancer risk. The absence of association in those with the longest duration of diabetes may reflect hypoinsulinemia and warrants further investigation.

20 Article Intake of fruits and vegetables and risk of pancreatic cancer in a pooled analysis of 14 cohort studies. 2012

Koushik, Anita / Spiegelman, Donna / Albanes, Demetrius / Anderson, Kristin E / Bernstein, Leslie / van den Brandt, Piet A / Bergkvist, Leif / English, Dallas R / Freudenheim, Jo L / Fuchs, Charles S / Genkinger, Jeanine M / Giles, Graham G / Goldbohm, R Alexandra / Horn-Ross, Pamela L / Männistö, Satu / McCullough, Marjorie L / Millen, Amy E / Miller, Anthony B / Robien, Kim / Rohan, Thomas E / Schatzkin, Arthur / Shikany, James M / Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael Z / Willett, Walter C / Wolk, Alicja / Ziegler, Regina G / Smith-Warner, Stephanie A. ·University of Montreal Hospital Research Centre (CRCHUM), Montreal, Quebec, Canada. anita.koushik@umontreal.ca ·Am J Epidemiol · Pubmed #22875754.

ABSTRACT: Fruit and vegetable intake may protect against pancreatic cancer, since fruits and vegetables are rich in potentially cancer-preventive nutrients. Most case-control studies have found inverse associations between fruit and vegetable intake and pancreatic cancer risk, although bias due to reporting error cannot be ruled out. In most prospective studies, inverse associations have been weaker and imprecise because of small numbers of cases. The authors examined fruit and vegetable intake in relation to pancreatic cancer risk in a pooled analysis of 14 prospective studies from North America, Europe, and Australia (study periods between 1980 and 2005). Relative risks and 2-sided 95% confidence intervals were estimated separately for the 14 studies using the Cox proportional hazards model and were then pooled using a random-effects model. Of 862,584 men and women followed for 7-20 years, 2,212 developed pancreatic cancer. The pooled multivariate relative risks of pancreatic cancer per 100-g/day increase in intake were 1.01 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.99, 1.03) for total fruits and vegetables, 1.01 (95% CI: 0.99, 1.03) for total fruits, and 1.02 (95% CI: 0.99, 1.06) for total vegetables. Associations were similar for men and women separately and across studies. These results suggest that fruit and vegetable intake during adulthood is not associated with a reduced pancreatic cancer risk.

21 Article Pathway analysis of genome-wide association study data highlights pancreatic development genes as susceptibility factors for pancreatic cancer. 2012

Li, Donghui / Duell, Eric J / Yu, Kai / Risch, Harvey A / Olson, Sara H / Kooperberg, Charles / Wolpin, Brian M / Jiao, Li / Dong, Xiaoqun / Wheeler, Bill / Arslan, Alan A / Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas / Fuchs, Charles S / Gallinger, Steven / Gross, Myron / Hartge, Patricia / Hoover, Robert N / Holly, Elizabeth A / Jacobs, Eric J / Klein, Alison P / LaCroix, Andrea / Mandelson, Margaret T / Petersen, Gloria / Zheng, Wei / Agalliu, Ilir / Albanes, Demetrius / Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine / Bracci, Paige M / Buring, Julie E / Canzian, Federico / Chang, Kenneth / Chanock, Stephen J / Cotterchio, Michelle / Gaziano, J Michael / Giovannucci, Edward L / Goggins, Michael / Hallmans, Göran / Hankinson, Susan E / Hoffman Bolton, Judith A / Hunter, David J / Hutchinson, Amy / Jacobs, Kevin B / Jenab, Mazda / Khaw, Kay-Tee / Kraft, Peter / Krogh, Vittorio / Kurtz, Robert C / McWilliams, Robert R / Mendelsohn, Julie B / Patel, Alpa V / Rabe, Kari G / Riboli, Elio / Shu, Xiao-Ou / Tjønneland, Anne / Tobias, Geoffrey S / Trichopoulos, Dimitrios / Virtamo, Jarmo / Visvanathan, Kala / Watters, Joanne / Yu, Herbert / Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne / Amundadottir, Laufey / Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael Z. ·Department of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology, The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, USA. ·Carcinogenesis · Pubmed #22523087.

ABSTRACT: Four loci have been associated with pancreatic cancer through genome-wide association studies (GWAS). Pathway-based analysis of GWAS data is a complementary approach to identify groups of genes or biological pathways enriched with disease-associated single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) whose individual effect sizes may be too small to be detected by standard single-locus methods. We used the adaptive rank truncated product method in a pathway-based analysis of GWAS data from 3851 pancreatic cancer cases and 3934 control participants pooled from 12 cohort studies and 8 case-control studies (PanScan). We compiled 23 biological pathways hypothesized to be relevant to pancreatic cancer and observed a nominal association between pancreatic cancer and five pathways (P < 0.05), i.e. pancreatic development, Helicobacter pylori lacto/neolacto, hedgehog, Th1/Th2 immune response and apoptosis (P = 2.0 × 10(-6), 1.6 × 10(-5), 0.0019, 0.019 and 0.023, respectively). After excluding previously identified genes from the original GWAS in three pathways (NR5A2, ABO and SHH), the pancreatic development pathway remained significant (P = 8.3 × 10(-5)), whereas the others did not. The most significant genes (P < 0.01) in the five pathways were NR5A2, HNF1A, HNF4G and PDX1 for pancreatic development; ABO for H.pylori lacto/neolacto; SHH for hedgehog; TGFBR2 and CCL18 for Th1/Th2 immune response and MAPK8 and BCL2L11 for apoptosis. Our results provide a link between inherited variation in genes important for pancreatic development and cancer and show that pathway-based approaches to analysis of GWAS data can yield important insights into the collective role of genetic risk variants in cancer.

22 Article Impact of circulating vitamin D binding protein levels on the association between 25-hydroxyvitamin D and pancreatic cancer risk: a nested case-control study. 2012

Weinstein, Stephanie J / Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael Z / Kopp, William / Rager, Helen / Virtamo, Jarmo / Albanes, Demetrius. ·Nutritional Epidemiology Branch, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD 20982, USA. ·Cancer Res · Pubmed #22232734.

ABSTRACT: High concentrations of circulating 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] have been associated with elevated pancreatic cancer risk. As this is contrary to an expected inverse association between vitamin D status and cancer, we examined whether vitamin D binding protein (DBP), the primary carrier of vitamin D compounds in circulation, plays a role in this relationship. Prediagnostic serum DBP and 25(OH)D were studied in relation to risk of pancreatic cancer in a nested case-control study of 234 cases and 234 controls in the Alpha-Tocopherol, Beta-Carotene Cancer Prevention Study of Finnish men. ORs and 95% CIs were estimated using logistic regression, and statistical tests were two-sided. We found that DBP and 25(OH)D were correlated (r = 0.27, P < 0.0001), and DBP was inversely associated with pancreatic cancer risk (OR = 0.66, 95% CI = 0.39-1.12, for the highest vs. lowest quartile; P(trend) = 0.02). Importantly, this association seemed to have a threshold between quartiles 2 to 4 and quartile 1, and was primarily evident among men with concurrent high 25(OH)D concentrations (OR = 0.33, 95% CI = 0.16-0.70 for highest vs. lowest quartile; P(trend) = 0.002), with no association in men with lower serum 25(OH)D (OR = 1.28, 95% CI = 0.62-2.61 for highest vs. lowest quartile, P(trend) 0.63, P(interaction) = 0.01). Men with higher 25(OH)D concentrations and serum DBP below the median showed greatly elevated risk of pancreatic cancer (OR = 5.01, 95% CI 2.33-10.78, for highest vs. lowest quartile; P(trend) < 0.0001), while risk was weakly inversely associated with serum 25(OH)D when DBP concentrations were higher (P(interaction) = 0.001). Taken together, our findings indicate that higher DBP concentrations may sequester more 25(OH)D and reduce free 25(OH)D bioavailability. Simultaneous examination of DBP and 25(OH)D may be important in determining the association of vitamin D with cancer risk.

23 Article Coffee, tea, and sugar-sweetened carbonated soft drink intake and pancreatic cancer risk: a pooled analysis of 14 cohort studies. 2012

Genkinger, Jeanine M / Li, Ruifeng / Spiegelman, Donna / Anderson, Kristin E / Albanes, Demetrius / Bergkvist, Leif / Bernstein, Leslie / Black, Amanda / van den Brandt, Piet A / English, Dallas R / Freudenheim, Jo L / Fuchs, Charles S / Giles, Graham G / Giovannucci, Edward / Goldbohm, R Alexandra / Horn-Ross, Pamela L / Jacobs, Eric J / Koushik, Anita / Männistö, Satu / Marshall, James R / Miller, Anthony B / Patel, Alpa V / Robien, Kim / Rohan, Thomas E / Schairer, Catherine / Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael / Wolk, Alicja / Ziegler, Regina G / Smith-Warner, Stephanie A. ·Mailman School of Public Health, 722 w 168th St, Rm 803, New York, NY 10032, USA. jg3081@columbia.edu ·Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev · Pubmed #22194529.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Coffee has been hypothesized to have pro- and anticarcinogenic properties, whereas tea may contain anticarcinogenic compounds. Studies assessing coffee intake and pancreatic cancer risk have yielded mixed results, whereas findings for tea intake have mostly been null. Sugar-sweetened carbonated soft drink (SSB) intake has been associated with higher circulating levels of insulin, which may promote carcinogenesis. Few prospective studies have examined SSB intake and pancreatic cancer risk; results have been heterogeneous. METHODS: In this pooled analysis from 14 prospective cohort studies, 2,185 incident pancreatic cancer cases were identified among 853,894 individuals during follow-up. Multivariate (MV) study-specific relative risks (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated using Cox proportional hazards models and then pooled using a random-effects model. RESULTS: No statistically significant associations were observed between pancreatic cancer risk and intake of coffee (MVRR = 1.10; 95% CI, 0.81-1.48 comparing ≥900 to <0 g/d; 237g ≈ 8oz), tea (MVRR = 0.96; 95% CI, 0.78-1.16 comparing ≥400 to 0 g/d; 237g ≈ 8oz), or SSB (MVRR = 1.19; 95% CI, 0.98-1.46 comparing ≥250 to 0 g/d; 355g ≈ 12oz; P value, test for between-studies heterogeneity > 0.05). These associations were consistent across levels of sex, smoking status, and body mass index. When modeled as a continuous variable, a positive association was evident for SSB (MVRR = 1.06; 95% CI, 1.02-1.12). CONCLUSION AND IMPACT: Overall, no associations were observed for intakes of coffee or tea during adulthood and pancreatic cancer risk. Although we were only able to examine modest intake of SSB, there was a suggestive, modest positive association for risk of pancreatic cancer for intakes of SSB.

24 Article Mitochondrial DNA copy number and pancreatic cancer in the alpha-tocopherol beta-carotene cancer prevention study. 2011

Lynch, Shannon M / Weinstein, Stephanie J / Virtamo, Jarmo / Lan, Qing / Liu, Chin-San / Cheng, Wen-Ling / Rothman, Nathaniel / Albanes, Demetrius / Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael Z. ·Nutritional Epidemiology Branch, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, 6120 Executive Blvd., Rockville, MD 20852, USA. ·Cancer Prev Res (Phila) · Pubmed #21859925.

ABSTRACT: Diabetes, obesity, and cigarette smoke, consistent risk factors for pancreatic cancer, are sources of oxidative stress in humans that could cause mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) damage and increase mtDNA copy number. To test whether higher mtDNA copy number is associated with increased incident pancreatic cancer, we conducted a nested case-control study in the Alpha-Tocopherol Beta Carotene Cancer Prevention (ATBC) Study cohort of male smokers, aged 50 to 69 years at baseline. Between 1992 and 2004, 203 incident cases of pancreatic adenocarcinoma occurred (follow-up: 12 years) among participants, with whole blood samples used for mtDNA extraction. For these cases and 656 controls, we calculated ORs and 95% CIs using unconditional logistic regression, adjusting for age, smoking, and diabetes history. All statistical tests were two sided. Higher mtDNA copy number was significantly associated with increased pancreatic cancer risk (highest vs. lowest mtDNA copy number quintile, OR = 1.64, 95% CI = 1.01-2.67, continuous OR = 1.14, 95% CI 1.06-1.23), particularly for cases diagnosed during the first 7 years of follow-up (OR = 2.14, 95% CI = 1.16-3.96, P(trend) = 0.01, continuous OR = 1.21, 95% CI = 1.10-1.33), but not for cases occurring during follow-up of 7 years or greater (OR = 1.14, 95% CI = 0.53-2.45, continuous OR = 1.05, 95% CI = 0.93-1.18). Our results support the hypothesis that mtDNA copy number is associated with pancreatic cancer and could possibly serve as a biomarker for pancreatic cancer development.

25 Article Evidence that serum levels of the soluble receptor for advanced glycation end products are inversely associated with pancreatic cancer risk: a prospective study. 2011

Jiao, Li / Weinstein, Stephanie J / Albanes, Demetrius / Taylor, Philip R / Graubard, Barry I / Virtamo, Jarmo / Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael Z. ·Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA. jiao@bcm.edu ·Cancer Res · Pubmed #21540233.

ABSTRACT: Cigarette smoking, obesity, type 2 diabetes, and, to a lesser extent, meat cooked at high temperatures are associated with pancreatic cancer. Cigarette smoke and foods cooked at higher temperatures are major environmental sources of advanced glycation end products (AGE). AGEs accumulate during hyperglycemia and elicit oxidative stress and inflammation through interaction with the receptor for AGEs (RAGE). Soluble RAGE (sRAGE) acts as an anti-inflammatory factor to neutralize AGEs and block the effects mediated by RAGE. In this study, we investigated the associations of prediagnostic measures of N(ε)-(carboxymethyl)-lysine (CML)-AGE and sRAGE with pancreatic cancer in a case-cohort study within a cohort of 29,133 Finnish male smokers. Serum samples and exposure information were collected at baseline (1985-1988). We measured CML-AGE, sRAGE, glucose, and insulin concentrations in fasting serum from 255 incident pancreatic cancer cases that arose through April 2005 and from 485 randomly sampled subcohort participants. Weighted Cox proportional hazard regression models were used to calculate relative risks (RR) and 95% CI, adjusted for age, years of smoking, and body mass index. CML-AGE and sRAGE were mutually adjusted. CML-AGE levels were not associated with pancreatic cancer [fifth compared with first quintile, RR (95% CI): 0.68 (0.38-1.22), P(trend) = 0.27]. In contrast, sRAGE levels were inversely associated with pancreatic cancer [fifth compared with first quintile, RR (95% CI): 0.46 (0.23-0.73), P(trend) = 0.002]. Further adjustment for glucose or insulin levels did not change the observed associations. Our findings suggest that sRAGE is inversely associated with pancreatic cancer risk among Finnish male smokers.

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