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Pancreatic Neoplasms: HELP
Articles by Bilal Al-Sarireh
Based on 9 articles published since 2010
(Why 9 articles?)
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Between 2010 and 2020, B. Al-Sarireh wrote the following 9 articles about Pancreatic Neoplasms.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Editorial Pancreatic cancer tissue banks: where are we heading? 2016

Balarajah, Vickna / Ambily, Archana / Dayem Ullah, Abu Z / Imrali, Ahmet / Dowe, Thomas / Al-Sarireh, Bilal / Abu Hilal, Mohammed / Davidson, Brian R / Soonawalla, Zahir / Metcalfe, Matthew / Chin Aleong, Jo-Anne / Chelala, Claude / Kocher, Hemant M. ·Barts Cancer Institute - a Cancer Research UK Centre of Excellence, Queen Mary University of London, London, UK. · Barts Health NHS Trust, London, UK. · Abertawe Bro Morgannwg University Health Board, Port Talbot, UK. · University Hospital Southampton NHS Foundation Trust, Southampton, UK. · Royal Free London NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK. · Oxford University Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Oxford, UK. · University Hospital of Leicester NHS Trust, Leicester, UK. ·Future Oncol · Pubmed #27541064.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

2 Article Multicentre observational cohort study of implementation and outcomes of laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy. 2019

Lof, S / Moekotte, A L / Al-Sarireh, B / Ammori, B / Aroori, S / Durkin, D / Fusai, G K / French, J J / Gomez, D / Marangoni, G / Marudanayagam, R / Soonawalla, Z / Sutcliffe, R / White, S A / Abu Hilal, M / Anonymous4471159. ·Department of Surgery, University Hospital Southampton NHS Foundation Trust, Southampton, UK. · Department of Surgery, Morriston Hospital, Swansea, UK. · Department of Surgery, University of Manchester and Salford University Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Manchester, UK. · Department of Surgery, Plymouth Hospitals NHS Trust, Plymouth, UK. · Department of Surgery, Royal Stoke University Hospital, Stoke-on-Trent, UK. · Hepatopancreatobiliary and Liver Transplant Unit, Royal Free London, London, UK. · Department of Surgery, Newcastle Upon Tyne Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK. · Department of Surgery, Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust, Nottingham, UK. · Department of Surgery, University Hospitals Coventry and Warwickshire NHS Trust, Coventry, UK. · Department of Surgery, Oxford University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Oxford, UK. · Department of Surgery, University Hospitals Birmingham NHS Foundation Trust, Birmingham, UK. ·Br J Surg · Pubmed #31454072.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy (LDP) is increasingly being performed as an alternative to open surgery. Whether the implementation and corresponding learning curve of LDP have an impact on patient outcome is unknown. The aim was to investigate the temporal trends in practice across UK centres. METHODS: This was a retrospective multicentre observational cohort study of LDP in 11 tertiary referral centres in the UK between 2006 and 2016. The learning curve was analysed by pooling data for the first 15 consecutive patients who had LDP and examining trends in surgical outcomes in subsequent patients. RESULTS: In total, 570 patients underwent LDP, whereas 888 underwent open resection. For LDP the median duration of operation was 240 min, with 200 ml blood loss. The conversion rate was 12·1 per cent. Neuroendocrine tumours (26·7 per cent) and mucinous cystic neoplasms (19·7 per cent) were commonest indications. The proportion of LDPs increased from 24·4 per cent in 2006-2009 (P1) to 46·0 per cent in 2014-2016 (P3) (P < 0·001). LDP was increasingly performed for patients aged 70 years or more (16 per cent in P1 versus 34·4 per cent in P3; P = 0·002), pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (6 versus 19·1 per cent; P = 0·005) and advanced malignant tumours (27 versus 52 per cent; P = 0·016). With increasing experience, there was a trend for a decrease in blood transfusion rate (14·1 per cent for procedures 1-15 to 3·5 per cent for procedures 46-75; P = 0·008), ICU admissions (32·7 to 19·2 per cent; P = 0·021) and median duration of hospital stay (7 (i.q.r. 5-9) to 6 (4-7) days; P = 0·002). After 30 procedures, a decrease was noted in rates of both overall morbidity (57·7 versus 42·2 per cent for procedures 16-30 versus 46-75 respectively; P = 0·009) and severe morbidity (18·8 versus 9·7 per cent; P = 0·031). CONCLUSION: LDP has increased as a treatment option for lesions of the distal pancreas as indications for the procedure have expanded. Perioperative outcomes improved with the number of procedures performed.

3 Article Minimally Invasive versus Open Distal Pancreatectomy for Ductal Adenocarcinoma (DIPLOMA): A Pan-European Propensity Score Matched Study. 2019

van Hilst, Jony / de Rooij, Thijs / Klompmaker, Sjors / Rawashdeh, Majd / Aleotti, Francesca / Al-Sarireh, Bilal / Alseidi, Adnan / Ateeb, Zeeshan / Balzano, Gianpaolo / Berrevoet, Frederik / Björnsson, Bergthor / Boggi, Ugo / Busch, Olivier R / Butturini, Giovanni / Casadei, Riccardo / Del Chiaro, Marco / Chikhladze, Sophia / Cipriani, Federica / van Dam, Ronald / Damoli, Isacco / van Dieren, Susan / Dokmak, Safi / Edwin, Bjørn / van Eijck, Casper / Fabre, Jean-Marie / Falconi, Massimo / Farges, Olivier / Fernández-Cruz, Laureano / Forgione, Antonello / Frigerio, Isabella / Fuks, David / Gavazzi, Francesca / Gayet, Brice / Giardino, Alessandro / Groot Koerkamp, Bas / Hackert, Thilo / Hassenpflug, Matthias / Kabir, Irfan / Keck, Tobias / Khatkov, Igor / Kusar, Masa / Lombardo, Carlo / Marchegiani, Giovanni / Marshall, Ryne / Menon, Krish V / Montorsi, Marco / Orville, Marion / de Pastena, Matteo / Pietrabissa, Andrea / Poves, Ignaci / Primrose, John / Pugliese, Raffaele / Ricci, Claudio / Roberts, Keith / Røsok, Bård / Sahakyan, Mushegh A / Sánchez-Cabús, Santiago / Sandström, Per / Scovel, Lauren / Solaini, Leonardo / Soonawalla, Zahir / Souche, F Régis / Sutcliffe, Robert P / Tiberio, Guido A / Tomazic, Aleš / Troisi, Roberto / Wellner, Ulrich / White, Steven / Wittel, Uwe A / Zerbi, Alessandro / Bassi, Claudio / Besselink, Marc G / Abu Hilal, Mohammed / Anonymous5620925. ·Department of Surgery, Cancer Center Amsterdam, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. · Department of Surgery, Southampton University Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Southampton, United Kingdom. · Department of Surgery, San Raffaele Hospital, Milan, Italy. · Department of Surgery, Morriston Hospital, Swansea, United Kingdom. · Department of Surgery, Virginia Mason Medical Center, Seattle, United States. · Department of Surgery, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden. · Department of General and HPB surgery and liver transplantation, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent, Belgium. · Department of Surgery, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden. · Department of Surgery, Universitá di Pisa, Pisa, Italy. · Department of Surgery, Pederzoli Hospital, Peschiera, Italy. · Department of Surgery, S. Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, Bologna, Italy. · Department of Surgery, Universitätsklinikum Freiburg, Freiburg, Germany. · Department of Surgery, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht, the Netherlands. · Department of Surgery, Pancreas Institute, Verona University Hospital, Verona, Italy. · Department of Surgery, Hospital of Beaujon, Clichy, France. · Department of Surgery, Oslo University Hospital and Institute for Clinical Medicine, Oslo, Norway. · Department of Surgery, Erasmus MC, Rotterdam, the Netherlands. · Department of Surgery, Hopital Saint Eloi, Montpellier, France. · Department of Surgery, Hospital Clínic de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain. · Department of Surgery, Niguarda Ca' Granda Hospital, Milan, Italy. · Department of Surgery, Institut Mutualiste Montsouris, Paris, France. · Department of Surgery, Humanitas University Hospital, Milan, Italy. · Department of Surgery, Heidelberg University Hospital, Heidelberg, Germany. · Department of Surgery, Oxford University Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Oxford, United Kingdom. · Clinic for Surgery, UKSH Campus Lübeck, Lübeck, Germany. · Department of Surgery, Moscow Clinical Scientific Center, Moscow, Russian Federation. · Department of Surgery, University Medical Center Ljubljana, Ljubljana, Slovenia. · Department of Surgery, King's College Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, London, United Kingdom. · Department of Surgery, University hospital Pavia, Pavia, Italy. · Department of Surgery, Hospital del Mar, Barcelona, Spain. · Department of Surgery, University Hospital Birmingham, Birmingham, United Kingdom. · Surgical Clinic, Department of clinical and experimental sciences, University of Brescia, Brescia, Italy. · Department of Surgery, The Freeman Hospital Newcastle Upon Tyne, Newcastle, United Kingdom. ·Ann Surg · Pubmed #29099399.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to compare oncological outcomes after minimally invasive distal pancreatectomy (MIDP) with open distal pancreatectomy (ODP) in patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). BACKGROUND: Cohort studies have suggested superior short-term outcomes of MIDP vs. ODP. Recent international surveys, however, revealed that surgeons have concerns about the oncological outcomes of MIDP for PDAC. METHODS: This is a pan-European propensity score matched study including patients who underwent MIDP (laparoscopic or robot-assisted) or ODP for PDAC between January 1, 2007 and July 1, 2015. MIDP patients were matched to ODP patients in a 1:1 ratio. Main outcomes were radical (R0) resection, lymph node retrieval, and survival. RESULTS: In total, 1212 patients were included from 34 centers in 11 countries. Of 356 (29%) MIDP patients, 340 could be matched. After matching, the MIDP conversion rate was 19% (n = 62). Median blood loss [200 mL (60-400) vs 300 mL (150-500), P = 0.001] and hospital stay [8 (6-12) vs 9 (7-14) days, P < 0.001] were lower after MIDP. Clavien-Dindo grade ≥3 complications (18% vs 21%, P = 0.431) and 90-day mortality (2% vs 3%, P > 0.99) were comparable for MIDP and ODP, respectively. R0 resection rate was higher (67% vs 58%, P = 0.019), whereas Gerota's fascia resection (31% vs 60%, P < 0.001) and lymph node retrieval [14 (8-22) vs 22 (14-31), P < 0.001] were lower after MIDP. Median overall survival was 28 [95% confidence interval (CI), 22-34] versus 31 (95% CI, 26-36) months (P = 0.929). CONCLUSIONS: Comparable survival was seen after MIDP and ODP for PDAC, but the opposing differences in R0 resection rate, resection of Gerota's fascia, and lymph node retrieval strengthen the need for a randomized trial to confirm the oncological safety of MIDP.

4 Article PET-PANC: multicentre prospective diagnostic accuracy and health economic analysis study of the impact of combined modality 18fluorine-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose positron emission tomography with computed tomography scanning in the diagnosis and management of pancreatic cancer. 2018

Ghaneh, Paula / Hanson, Robert / Titman, Andrew / Lancaster, Gill / Plumpton, Catrin / Lloyd-Williams, Huw / Yeo, Seow Tien / Edwards, Rhiannon Tudor / Johnson, Colin / Abu Hilal, Mohammed / Higginson, Antony P / Armstrong, Tom / Smith, Andrew / Scarsbrook, Andrew / McKay, Colin / Carter, Ross / Sutcliffe, Robert P / Bramhall, Simon / Kocher, Hemant M / Cunningham, David / Pereira, Stephen P / Davidson, Brian / Chang, David / Khan, Saboor / Zealley, Ian / Sarker, Debashis / Al Sarireh, Bilal / Charnley, Richard / Lobo, Dileep / Nicolson, Marianne / Halloran, Christopher / Raraty, Michael / Sutton, Robert / Vinjamuri, Sobhan / Evans, Jonathan / Campbell, Fiona / Deeks, Jon / Sanghera, Bal / Wong, Wai-Lup / Neoptolemos, John P. ·Department of Molecular and Clinical Cancer Medicine, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK. · Liverpool Cancer Research UK Cancer Trials Unit, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK. · Department of Mathematics and Statistics, Lancaster University, Lancaster, UK. · Centre for Health Economics and Medicines Evaluation, Bangor University, Bangor, UK. · Faculty of Medicine, University of Southampton, Southampton, UK. · Department of Surgery, University Hospital Southampton NHS Foundation Trust, Southampton, UK. · Department of Radiology, Portsmouth Hospitals NHS Trust, Portsmouth, UK. · Department of Gastrointestinal Surgery, Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, Leeds, UK. · Department of Radiology, Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, Leeds, UK. · Department of Surgery, Glasgow Royal Infirmary, NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde, Glasgow, UK. · Department of Surgery, University Hospitals Birmingham NHS Foundation Trust, Birmingham, UK. · Department of General Surgery, Wye Valley NHS Trust, Hereford, UK. · Barts Cancer Institute, Barts and the London School of Medicine and Dentistry, London, UK. · Gastrointestinal and Lymphoma Unit, Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK. · Institute for Liver and Digestive Health, University College London Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK. · Department of Surgery, Royal Free London NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK. · Department of Surgery, Royal Blackburn Hospital, East Lancashire Hospitals NHS Trust, Blackburn, UK. · Department of Surgery, University Hospitals Coventry and Warwickshire NHS Trust, Coventry, UK. · Department of Surgery, Ninewells Hospital and Medical School, NHS Tayside, Dundee, UK. · Department of Oncology, King's College Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK. · Department of Surgery, Morriston Hospital, Abertawe Bro Morgannwg University Health Board, Swansea, UK. · Department of Surgery, Newcastle Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK. · Faculty of Medicine and Life Sciences, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, UK. · Department of Oncology, Aberdeen Royal Infirmary, NHS Grampian, Aberdeen, UK. · Department of Surgery, Royal Liverpool and Broadgreen University Hospitals NHS Trust, Liverpool, UK. · Department of Nuclear Medicine, Royal Liverpool and Broadgreen University Hospitals NHS Trust, Liverpool, UK. · Department of Radiology, Royal Liverpool and Broadgreen University Hospitals NHS Trust, Liverpool, UK. · Department of Pathology, Royal Liverpool and Broadgreen University Hospitals NHS Trust, Liverpool, UK. · Institute of Applied Health Research, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, UK. · Paul Strickland Scanner Centre, Mount Vernon Hospital, Middlesex, UK. ·Health Technol Assess · Pubmed #29402376.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Pancreatic cancer diagnosis and staging can be difficult in 10-20% of patients. Positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) adds precise anatomical localisation to functional data. The use of PET/CT may add further value to the diagnosis and staging of pancreatic cancer. OBJECTIVE: To determine the incremental diagnostic accuracy and impact of PET/CT in addition to standard diagnostic work-up in patients with suspected pancreatic cancer. DESIGN: A multicentre prospective diagnostic accuracy and clinical value study of PET/CT in suspected pancreatic malignancy. PARTICIPANTS: Patients with suspected pancreatic malignancy. INTERVENTIONS: All patients to undergo PET/CT following standard diagnostic work-up. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The primary outcome was the incremental diagnostic value of PET/CT in addition to standard diagnostic work-up with multidetector computed tomography (MDCT). Secondary outcomes were (1) changes in patients' diagnosis, staging and management as a result of PET/CT; (2) changes in the costs and effectiveness of patient management as a result of PET/CT; (3) the incremental diagnostic value of PET/CT in chronic pancreatitis; (4) the identification of groups of patients who would benefit most from PET/CT; and (5) the incremental diagnostic value of PET/CT in other pancreatic tumours. RESULTS: Between 2011 and 2013, 589 patients with suspected pancreatic cancer underwent MDCT and PET/CT, with 550 patients having complete data and in-range PET/CT. Sensitivity and specificity for the diagnosis of pancreatic cancer were 88.5% and 70.6%, respectively, for MDCT and 92.7% and 75.8%, respectively, for PET/CT. The maximum standardised uptake value (SUV CONCLUSION: PET/CT provided a significant incremental diagnostic benefit in the diagnosis of pancreatic cancer and significantly influenced the staging and management of patients. PET/CT had limited utility in chronic pancreatitis and other pancreatic tumours. PET/CT is likely to be cost-effective at current reimbursement rates for PET/CT to the UK NHS. This was not a randomised controlled trial and therefore we do not have any information from patients who would have undergone MDCT only for comparison. In addition, there were issues in estimating costs for PET/CT. Future work should evaluate the role of PET/CT in intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm and prognosis and response to therapy in patients with pancreatic cancer. STUDY REGISTRATION: Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN73852054 and UKCRN 8166. FUNDING: The National Institute for Health Research Health Technology Assessment programme.

5 Article A meta-analysis of the utility of the neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio in predicting survival after pancreatic cancer resection. 2018

Mowbray, Nicholas G / Griffith, David / Hammoda, Mohammed / Shingler, Guy / Kambal, Amir / Al-Sarireh, Bilal. ·Swansea University, Singleton Park, Swansea SA2 8PP, UK. Electronic address: ngmowbray@doctors.org.uk. · Royal Devon & Exeter Hospital, Barrack Road, Exeter EX2 5DW, UK. · Morriston Hospital, Heol Maes Eglwys, Morriston, Swansea SA6 6NL, UK. ·HPB (Oxford) · Pubmed #29336893.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR) is thought to reflect cancer disease burden. To assess the prognostic ability of the NLR on overall survival in patients with resectable, pancreatic cancer a meta-analysis of published literature was undertaken. METHOD: A systematic review was performed independently by two authors using PubMed, Ovid MEDLINE and Embase databases. Included studies detailed the pre-operative NLR and overall survival of pancreatic cancer patients. RESULTS: Of the 214 studies retrieved using the search strategy, 8 studies involving 1519 patients were included in the meta-analysis. Only one study did not find a statistically significant association between a high NLR and OS. The pooled Hazard Ratio was 1.77 (95% CI [1.45-2.15]; p < 0.01). The NLR cut-off values ranged from 2 to 5. There was low to moderate inter-study heterogeneity (I CONCLUSIONS: A high pre-operative NLR indicates a worse prognosis than in patients with a low NLR. There is potential to use the NLR to direct therapies. A specific cut-off value has not been established from this study and so further research is required.

6 Article Comparison of the composition of bile acids in bile of patients with adenocarcinoma of the pancreas and benign disease. 2017

Rees, David O / Crick, Peter J / Jenkins, Gareth J / Wang, Yuqin / Griffiths, William J / Brown, Tim H / Al-Sarireh, Bilal. ·Swansea University Medical School, ILS1 Building, Singleton Park, Swansea SA2 8PP, UK; Department of Surgery, Morriston Hospital, Swansea, SA6 6NL, UK. · Swansea University Medical School, ILS1 Building, Singleton Park, Swansea SA2 8PP, UK. · Swansea University Medical School, ILS1 Building, Singleton Park, Swansea SA2 8PP, UK. Electronic address: w.j.griffiths@swansea.ac.uk. · Department of Surgery, Morriston Hospital, Swansea, SA6 6NL, UK. ·J Steroid Biochem Mol Biol · Pubmed #29031685.

ABSTRACT: Bile acids have been implicated in the development of gastrointestinal malignancies. Both the specific nature of individual bile acids and their concentration appear key factors in the carcinogenic potency of bile. Using liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS) we performed quantitative profiling of bile extracted directly from the common bile duct in 30 patients (15 patients with pancreatic cancer and 15 patients with benign disease). Separation and detection of bile acids was performed using a 1.7μm particle size reversed-phase C

7 Article Psoriasin promotes invasion, aggregation and survival of pancreatic cancer cells; association with disease progression. 2017

Liu, Ying / Bunston, Carly / Hodson, Nicholas / Resaul, Jeyna / Sun, Ping-Hui / Cai, Shuo / Chen, Gang / Gu, Yanan / Satherley, Lucy K / Bosanquet, David C / Al-Sarireh, Bilal / Tian, Xiuyun / Hao, Chunyi / Jiang, Wen G / Ye, Lin. ·Metastasis and Angiogenesis Research Group, Cardiff China Medical Research Collaborative, Division of Cancer and Genetics, Cardiff University School of Medicine, Cardiff, CF14 4XN, UK. · Department of Surgery, Morriston Hospital, ABM University Health Board, Swansea, SA6 6NL, UK. · Key Laboratory of Carcinogenesis and Translational Research (Ministry of Education/Beijing), Department of Hepato-Pancreato-Biliary Surgery, Peking University Cancer Hospital and Institute, Beijing 100142, P.R. China. ·Int J Oncol · Pubmed #28393239.

ABSTRACT: Psoriasin (S100A7) is an 11-kDa small calcium binding protein initially isolated from psoriatic skin lesions. It belongs to the S100 family of proteins which play an important role in a range of cell functions including proliferation, differentiation, migration and apoptosis. Aberrant Psoriasin expression has been implicated in a range of cancers and is often associated with poor prognosis. This study examined the role of Psoriasin on pancreatic cancer cell functions and the implication in progression of the disease. Expression of Psoriasin was determined in a cohort of pancreatic tissues comprised of 126 pancreatic tumours and 114 adjacent non-tumour pancreatic tissues. Knockdown and overexpression of Psoriasin in pancreatic cancer cells was performed using specifically constructed plasmids, which either had anti-Psoriasin ribozyme transgene or the full length human Psoriasin coding sequence. Psoriasin knockdown and overexpression was verified using conventional RT-PCR and qPCR. The effect of manipulating Psoriasin expression on pancreatic cancer cell functions was assessed using several in vitro cell function assays. Local invasive pancreatic cancers extended beyond the pancreas expressed higher levels of Psoriasin transcripts compared with the cancers confined to the pancreas. Primary tumours with distant metastases exhibited a reduced expression of Psoriasin. Psoriasin overexpression cell lines exhibited significantly increased growth and migration compared to control cells. In addition, Psoriasin overexpression resulted in increased pancreatic cancer cell invasion which was associated with upregulation of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) and MMP-9. Overexpression of Psoriasin also promoted aggregation and survival of pancreatic cancer cells when they lost anchorage. Taken together, higher expression of Psoriasin was associated with local invasion in pancreatic cancers. Psoriasin expression is associated with pancreatic cancer cell growth, migration, cell-matrix adhesion, and invasion via regulation of MMPs. As such, the proposed implications of Psoriasin in invasion, disease progression and as a potential therapeutic target warrant further investigation.

8 Article Laparoscopic Left Pancreatectomy in the United Kingdom: Analysis of a Six-Year Experience in a Single Tertiary Center. 2016

Mowbray, Nicholas George / Al-Sarira, Ali / Al-Sarireh, Bilal. ·From the *Department of Surgery, Morriston Hospital, Swansea, UK; and †Department of Surgery, Hashemite University, Zagra, Jordan. ·Pancreas · Pubmed #26784910.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: Laparoscopic techniques have been slow to establish a role in pancreatic surgery. Worldwide, laparoscopic left pancreatectomy (LLP) is gaining in popularity; however, there remains little published data from the United Kingdom.We aimed to evaluate the results of LLP performed in a single UK pancreatic unit. METHODS: Patients undergoing LLP for lesions in the body and tail of the pancreas between April 2009 and April 2015 were identified. Patient records were reviewed retrospectively. RESULTS: Laparoscopic left pancreatectomy was performed on 46 patients, median age, 62 years (range, 19-84). The spleen was preserved in 27 patients (93% of planned), and 6 (13%) operations were converted to open. The overall morbidity rate was 39%; 28 patients had no complications. Significant complications were seen in 7 (15%) patients; this included 3 pancreatic fistula (6.5%) and 1 mortality (2%). Median length of stay was 6 days (range, 3-28). Histology revealed 15 neuroendocrine tumors, 8 adenocarcinomas, 4 mucinous cystadenomas, 1 intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm, 2 metastases, and 16 other benign pathologies. CONCLUSIONS: Laparoscopic pancreatic surgery has a low risk of significant complications. Our results offer encouragement to identify LLP as the gold standard approach for premalignant lesions. Further work should clarify the outcomes for malignant lesions.

9 Minor Glucagon cell adenomatosis without glucagon receptor mutation. 2013

Al-Sarireh, Bilal / Haidermota, Mustafa / Verbeke, Caroline / Rees, Dafydd Aled / Yu, Run / Griffiths, Anthony Paul. · ·Pancreas · Pubmed #23407487.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --