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Pancreatic Neoplasms: HELP
Articles by Lene A. Åsli
Based on 2 articles published since 2010
(Why 2 articles?)
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Between 2010 and 2020, L. A. Åsli wrote the following 2 articles about Pancreatic Neoplasms.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Review Potato consumption and risk of pancreatic cancer in the HELGA cohort. 2018

Åsli, Lene A / Braaten, Tonje / Olsen, Anja / Tjønneland, Anne / Overvad, Kim / Nilsson, Lena Maria / Renström, Frida / Lund, Eiliv / Skeie, Guri. ·1Department of Community Medicine,University of Tromsø - The Arctic University of Norway,N-9037 Tromsø,Norway. · 2Danish Cancer Society Research Center,Strandboulevarden 49,2100 Copenhagen,Denmark. · 3Department of Public Health,Section for Epidemiology,Bartholins Alle 2,8000 Aarhus C,Denmark. · 4Arctic Research Centre at Umeå University (Arcum),901 87 Umeå,Sweden. · 6Department of Biobank Research,Umeå University,901 87 Umeå,Sweden. ·Br J Nutr · Pubmed #29845900.

ABSTRACT: Potatoes have been a staple food in many countries throughout the years. Potatoes have a high glycaemic index (GI) score, and high GI has been associated with several chronic diseases and cancers. Still, the research on potatoes and health is scarce and contradictive, and we identified no prospective studies that had investigated the association between potatoes as a single food and the risk of pancreatic cancer. The aim of this study was to prospectively investigate the association between potato consumption and pancreatic cancer among 114 240 men and women in the prospective HELGA cohort, using Cox proportional hazard models. Information on diet (validated FFQ's), lifestyle and health was collected by means of a questionnaire, and 221 pancreatic cancer cases were identified through cancer registries. The mean follow-up time was 11·4 (95 % CI 0·3, 16·9) years. High consumption of potatoes showed a non-significantly higher risk of pancreatic cancer in the adjusted model (hazard ratio (HR) 1·44; 95 % CI 0·93, 2·22, P for trend 0·030) when comparing the highest v. the lowest quartile of potato consumption. In the sex-specific analyses, significant associations were found for females (HR 2·00; 95 % CI 1·07, 3·72, P for trend 0·020), but not for males (HR 1·01; 95 % CI 0·56, 1·84, P for trend 0·34). In addition, we explored the associations by spline regression, and the absence of dose-response effects was confirmed. In this study, high potato consumption was not consistently associated with a higher risk of pancreatic cancer. Further studies with larger populations are needed to explore the possible sex difference.

2 Article Dietary intake of acrylamide and pancreatic cancer risk in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cohort. 2013

Obón-Santacana, M / Slimani, N / Lujan-Barroso, L / Travier, N / Hallmans, G / Freisling, H / Ferrari, P / Boutron-Ruault, M C / Racine, A / Clavel, F / Saieva, C / Pala, V / Tumino, R / Mattiello, A / Vineis, P / Argüelles, M / Ardanaz, E / Amiano, P / Navarro, C / Sánchez, M J / Molina Montes, E / Key, T / Khaw, K-T / Wareham, N / Peeters, P H / Trichopoulou, A / Bamia, C / Trichopoulos, D / Boeing, H / Kaaks, R / Katzke, V / Ye, W / Sund, M / Ericson, U / Wirfält, E / Overvad, K / Tjønneland, A / Olsen, A / Skeie, G / Åsli, L A / Weiderpass, E / Riboli, E / Bueno-de-Mesquita, H B / Duell, E J. ·Unit of Nutrition, Environment and Cancer, Cancer Epidemiology Research Program, Catalan Institute of Oncology (ICO-IDIBELL), Barcelona, Spain. ·Ann Oncol · Pubmed #23857962.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: In 1994, acrylamide (AA) was classified as a probable human carcinogen by the International Agency for Research on Cancer. In 2002, AA was discovered at relatively high concentrations in some starchy, plant-based foods cooked at high temperatures. PATIENTS AND METHODS: A prospective analysis was conducted to evaluate the association between the dietary intake of AA and ductal adenocarcinoma of the exocrine pancreatic cancer (PC) risk in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cohort using Cox regression modeling. EPIC includes >500,000 men and women aged 35-75 at enrollment from 10 European countries. AA intake was estimated for each participant by combining questionnaire-based food consumption data with a harmonized AA database derived from the EU monitoring database of AA levels in foods, and evaluated in quintiles and continuously. RESULTS: After a mean follow-up of 11 years, 865 first incident adenocarcinomas of the exocrine pancreas were observed and included in the present analysis. At baseline, the mean dietary AA intake in EPIC was 26.22 µg/day. No overall association was found between continuous or quintiles of dietary AA intake and PC risk in EPIC (HR:0.95, 95%CI:0.89-1.01 per 10 µg/day). There was no effect measure modification by smoking status, sex, diabetes, alcohol intake or geographic region. However, there was an inverse association (HR: 0.73, 95% CI: 0.61-0.88 per 10 µg/day) between AA intake and PC risk in obese persons as defined using the body mass index (BMI, ≥ 30 kg/m(2)), but not when body fatness was defined using waist and hip circumference or their ratio. CONCLUSIONS: Dietary intake of AA was not associated with an increased risk of PC in the EPIC cohort.