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Hearing Disorders: HELP
Articles from Ohio State University
Based on 117 articles published since 2010
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These are the 117 published articles about Hearing Disorders that originated from Ohio State University during 2010-2020.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2 · 3 · 4 · 5
1 Guideline ACR Appropriateness Criteria 2018

Anonymous7200967 / Sharma, Aseem / Kirsch, Claudia F E / Aulino, Joseph M / Chakraborty, Santanu / Choudhri, Asim F / Germano, Isabelle M / Kendi, A Tuba / Kim, H Jeffrey / Lee, Ryan K / Liebeskind, David S / Luttrull, Michael D / Moritani, Toshio / Murad, Gregory J A / Shah, Lubdha M / Shih, Robert Y / Symko, Sophia C / Bykowski, Julie. ·Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, Saint Louis, Missouri. Electronic address: sharmaa@mir.wustl.edu. · Panel Chair, North Shore-Long Island Jewish Hospital, Hofstra Medical School, Hempstead, New York. · Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee. · Ottawa Hospital Research Institute and the Department of Radiology, The University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. · Le Bonheur Children's Hospital, University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, Tennessee. · Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, New York; neurosurgical consultant. · Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota. · Georgetown University Hospital, Washington, District of Columbia; American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery. · Einstein Healthcare Network, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. · University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California; American Academy of Neurology. · The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Columbus, Ohio. · University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Iowa City, Iowa. · University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida; neurosurgical consultant. · University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah. · Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, Bethesda, Maryland. · Neuroradiology consultant, Denver, Colorado. · Specialty Chair, UC San Diego Health, San Diego, California. ·J Am Coll Radiol · Pubmed #30392601.

ABSTRACT: This article presents guidelines for imaging utilization in patients presenting with hearing loss or vertigo, symptoms that sometimes occur concurrently due to proximity of receptors and neural pathways responsible for hearing and balance. These guidelines take into account the superiority of CT in providing bony details and better soft-tissue resolution offered by MRI. It should be noted that a dedicated temporal bone CT rather than a head CT best achieves delineation of disease in many of these patients. Similarly, optimal assessment often requires a dedicated high-resolution protocol designed to assess temporal bone and internal auditory canals even though such a study will be requested and billed as a brain MRI. Angiographic techniques are helpful in some patients, especially in the setting of vertigo. The American College of Radiology Appropriateness Criteria are evidence-based guidelines for specific clinical conditions that are reviewed annually by a multidisciplinary expert panel. The guideline development and revision include an extensive analysis of current medical literature from peer reviewed journals and the application of well-established methodologies (RAND/UCLA Appropriateness Method and Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation or GRADE) to rate the appropriateness of imaging and treatment procedures for specific clinical scenarios. In those instances where evidence is lacking or equivocal, expert opinion may supplement the available evidence to recommend imaging or treatment.

2 Guideline ACR Appropriateness Criteria 2017

Anonymous6420925 / Kessler, Marcus M / Moussa, Marwan / Bykowski, Julie / Kirsch, Claudia F E / Aulino, Joseph M / Berger, Kevin L / Choudhri, Asim F / Fife, Terry D / Germano, Isabelle M / Kendi, A Tuba / Kim, Jeffrey H / Luttrull, Michael D / Nunez, Diego / Shah, Lubdha M / Sharma, Aseem / Shetty, Vilaas S / Symko, Sophia C / Cornelius, Rebecca S. ·Principal Author, AllegiantMD, Tampa, Florida. Electronic address: mail@drkessler.info. · Research Author, University of Ankansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, Arkansas. · Panel Chair, UC San Diego Health, San Diego, California. · Panel Vice Chair North Shore-Long Island Jewish Hospital, Hofstra Medical School, Hempstead, New York. · Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee. · Chesapeake Medical Imaging, Annapolis, Maryland. · Le Bonheur Children's Hospital, University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, Tennessee. · Barrow Neurological Institute, Phoenix, Arizona; American Academy of Neurology. · Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, New York; neurosurgical consultant. · Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota. · Georgetown University Hospital, Washington, District of Columbia; American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery. · The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Columbus, Ohio. · Brigham & Women's Hospital & Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. · University of Utah Health Care, Salt Lake City, Utah. · Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, Saint Louis, Missouri. · Saint Louis University Hospital, Saint Louis, Missouri. · Kaiser Permanente Franklin Medical Offices, Denver, Colorado. · Specialty Chair, University of Cincinnati Medical Center, Cincinnati, Ohio. ·J Am Coll Radiol · Pubmed #29101995.

ABSTRACT: Tinnitus is the perception of sound in the absence of an external source. It is a common symptom that can be related to hearing loss and other benign causes. However, tinnitus may be disabling and can be the only symptom in a patient with a central nervous system process disorder. History and physical examination are crucial first steps to determine the need for imaging. CT and MRI are useful in the setting of pulsatile tinnitus to evaluate for an underlying vascular anomaly or abnormality. If there is concomitant asymmetric hearing loss, neurologic deficit, or head trauma, imaging should be guided by those respective ACR Appropriateness Criteria

3 Editorial Editorial: New Advances in Electrocochleography for Clinical and Basic Investigation. 2018

Pienkowski, Martin / Adunka, Oliver F / Lichtenhan, Jeffery T. ·Salus University, Elkins Park, PA, United States. · Wexner Medical Center, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, United States. · School of Medicine, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, MO, United States. ·Front Neurosci · Pubmed #29867322.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

4 Editorial Encouraging postnatal cytomegalovirus (CMV) screening: the time is NOW for universal screening! 2017

Ronchi, Andrea / Shimamura, Masako / Malhotra, Prashant S / Sánchez, Pablo J. ·a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, Department of Clinical Sciences and Community Health , Fondazione IRCCS Ca' Granda Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Università degli Studi di Milano , Milan , Italy. · b Division of Pediatric Infectious Diseases, Department of Pediatrics, Center for Vaccines and Immunity , The Research Institute at Nationwide Children's Hospital, Nationwide Children's Hospital, The Ohio State University College of Medicine , Columbus , OH , USA. · c Department of Pediatric Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery , Nationwide Children's Hospital, The Ohio State University College of Medicine , Columbus , OH , USA. · d Divisions of Neonatology and Pediatric Infectious Diseases, Center for Perinatal Research, The Research Institute at Nationwide Children's Hospital ; Nationwide Children's Hospital, The Ohio State University College of Medicine , Columbus , OH , USA. ·Expert Rev Anti Infect Ther · Pubmed #28277819.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

5 Review Does Cochlear Implantation Improve Cognitive Function? 2019

Moberly, Aaron C / Doerfer, Karl / Harris, Michael S. ·Department of Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery, The Ohio State Wexner Medical Center, Columbus, Ohio, U.S.A. · Department of Otolaryngology & Communication Sciences, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, U.S.A. ·Laryngoscope · Pubmed #31199514.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

6 Review Hearing health access in developing countries. 2017

Harris, Michael S / Dodson, Edward E. ·Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Columbus, Ohio, USA. ·Curr Opin Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg · Pubmed #28678066.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The developing world carries a disproportionate burden of hearing loss. Individuals with hearing loss in austere settings worldwide are also potentially impacted by their impairment to a greater extent owing to underdeveloped or nonexistent hearing health infrastructure. The purpose of this review is to examine the state of the literature on hearing health access in developing countries and identify areas for improvement. RECENT FINDINGS: Over the last 10 years progress has been made in some areas, whereas other aspects of hearing health in developing countries have changed very little. There has been expansion of efforts to train primary care and local hearing healthcare providers to recognize and appropriately treat preventable causes of hearing loss in the developing world. Applications of telehealth to connect providers and patients in rural locales have grown. Adaptions of newborn hearing screening programs that better fit local resources and customs have been reported. There has been a considerable increase in interest, including cost-benefit analyses, with regard to the use of cochlear implants in the developing world. SUMMARY: In spite of progress, the developing world still shoulders a disproportionate amount of the world's hearing loss, in particular chronic ear disease, and there is a paucity of well trained local hearing healthcare professionals to deal with the challenge. The role of international humanitarian efforts, telemedicine, and education is highlighted.

7 Review The Enigma of Poor Performance by Adults With Cochlear Implants. 2016

Moberly, Aaron C / Bates, Chelsea / Harris, Michael S / Pisoni, David B. ·*Department of Otolaryngology, The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Ohio†Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, Indiana University, Indiana. ·Otol Neurotol · Pubmed #27631833.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: Considerable unexplained variability and large individual differences exist in speech recognition outcomes for postlingually deaf adults who use cochlear implants (CIs), and a sizeable fraction of CI users can be considered "poor performers." This article summarizes our current knowledge of poor CI performance, and provides suggestions to clinicians managing these patients. METHOD: Studies are reviewed pertaining to speech recognition variability in adults with hearing loss. Findings are augmented by recent studies in our laboratories examining outcomes in postlingually deaf adults with CIs. RESULTS: In addition to conventional clinical predictors of CI performance (e.g., amount of residual hearing, duration of deafness), factors pertaining to both "bottom-up" auditory sensitivity to the spectro-temporal details of speech, and "top-down" linguistic knowledge and neurocognitive functions contribute to CI outcomes. CONCLUSIONS: The broad array of factors that contribute to speech recognition performance in adult CI users suggests the potential both for novel diagnostic assessment batteries to explain poor performance, and also new rehabilitation strategies for patients who exhibit poor outcomes. Moreover, this broad array of factors determining outcome performance suggests the need to treat individual CI patients using a personalized rehabilitation approach.

8 Review Protection from noise-induced hearing loss with Src inhibitors. 2015

Bielefeld, Eric C. ·Department of Speech and Hearing Science, The Ohio State University, 110 Pressey Hall, 1070 Carmack Road, Columbus, OH 43210, USA. Electronic address: bielefeld.6@osu.edu. ·Drug Discov Today · Pubmed #25637168.

ABSTRACT: Noise-induced hearing loss is a major cause of acquired hearing loss around the world and pharmacological approaches to protecting the ear from noise are under investigation. Noise results in a combination of mechanical and metabolic damage pathways in the cochlea. The Src family of protein tyrosine kinases could be active in both pathways and Src inhibitors have successfully prevented noise-induced cochlear damage and hearing loss in animal models. The long-term goal is to optimize delivery methods into the cochlea to reduce invasiveness and limit side-effects before human clinical testing can be considered. At their current early stage of research investigation, Src inhibitors represent an exciting class of compounds for inclusion in a multifaceted pharmacological approach to protecting the ear from noise.

9 Clinical Trial Blood Viral Load in Symptomatic Congenital Cytomegalovirus Infection. 2019

Marsico, Concetta / Aban, Immaculada / Kuo, Huichien / James, Scott H / Sanchez, Pablo J / Ahmed, Amina / Arav-Boger, Ravit / Michaels, Marian G / Ashouri, Negar / Englund, Janet A / Estrada, Benjamin / Jacobs, Richard F / Romero, José R / Sood, Sunil K / Whitworth, Suzanne / Jester, Penelope M / Whitley, Richard J / Kimberlin, David W / Anonymous2161166. ·Neonatology Unit, Department of Medical and Surgical Sciences, University of Bologna, Italy. · Department of Biostatistics, Division of Infectious Diseases, University of Alabama at Birmingham. · Department of Pediatrics, Division of Infectious Diseases, University of Alabama at Birmingham. · Department of Pediatrics, Divisions of Pediatric Infectious Diseases and Neonatology, Nationwide Children's Hospital - Ohio State University College of Medicine, Columbus. · Department of Pediatrics, Carolinas Medical Center, Charlotte, North Carolina. · Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee. · Department of Pediatrics, Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC, Pennsylvania. · Infectious Diseases, CHOC Children's Hospital, Orange, California. · University of Washington/Seattle Children's Hospital. · University of South Alabama, Mobile. · University of Arkansas, Little Rock. · Steven and Alexandra Cohen Children's Medical Center, New Hyde Park, New York. · Cook Children's Medical Center, Fort Worth, Texas. ·J Infect Dis · Pubmed #30535363.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Viral loads (VLs) frequently are followed during treatment of symptomatic congenital cytomegalovirus disease, but their predictive value is unclear. METHODS: Post hoc analysis of 2 antiviral studies was performed. Seventy-three subjects were treated for 6 weeks and 47 subjects were treated for 6 months. Whole blood VL was determined by real-time polymerase chain reaction before and during therapy. RESULTS: Higher baseline VL was associated with central nervous system involvement (3.82 log, range 1-5.65 vs 3.32 log, range 1-5.36; P = .001), thrombocytopenia (3.68 log, range 1-5.65 vs 3.43 log, range 1-5.36; P = .03), and transaminitis at presentation (3.73 log, range 1-5.60 vs 3.39 log, range 1-5.65; P = .009), but with overlap in the amount of virus detected between groups. In subjects treated for 6 months, lower VL at presentation correlated with better hearing outcomes at 12 months, but VL breakpoints predictive of hearing loss were not identified. Sustained viral suppression during 6 months of therapy correlated with better hearing outcomes at 6, 12, and 24 months (P = .01, P = .0007, P = .04), but a majority without viral suppression still had improved hearing. CONCLUSIONS: In infants with symptomatic congenital cytomegalovirus disease, higher whole blood VL before initiation of antiviral therapy has no clinically meaningful predictive value for long-term outcomes.

10 Clinical Trial What to Do When Cochlear Implant Users Plateau in Performance: a Pilot Study of Clinician-guided Aural Rehabilitation. 2018

Moberly, Aaron C / Vasil, Kara / Baxter, Jodi / Ray, Christin. ·Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center. · Department of Speech and Hearing Science, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio. ·Otol Neurotol · Pubmed #30199497.

ABSTRACT: HYPOTHESIS: For experienced adult cochlear implant (CI) users who have reached a plateau in performance, a clinician-guided aural rehabilitation (CGAR) approach can improve speech recognition and hearing-related quality of life (QOL). BACKGROUND: A substantial number of CI users do not reach optimal performance in terms of speech recognition ability and/or personal communication goals. Although self-guided computerized auditory training programs have grown in popularity, compliance and efficacy for these programs are poor. We propose that CGAR can improve speech recognition and hearing-related QOL in experienced CI users. METHODS: Twelve adult CI users were enrolled in an 8-week CGAR program guided by a speech-language pathologist and audiologist. Nine patients completed the program along with pre-AR and immediate post-AR testing of speech recognition (AzBio sentences in quiet and in multitalker babble, Consonant-Nucleus-Consonant words in quiet), QOL (Nijmegen Cochlear Implant Questionnaire, Hearing Handicap Inventory for Adults/Elderly, and Speech, Spatial and Qualities of Hearing Scale), and neurocognitive functioning (working memory capacity, information-processing speed, inhibitory control, speed of lexical/phonological access, and nonverbal reasoning). Pilot data for these nine patients are presented. RESULTS: From pre-CGAR to post-CGAR, group mean improvements in word recognition were found. Improvements were also demonstrated on some composite and subscale measures of QOL. Patients who demonstrated improvements in word recognition were those who performed most poorly at baseline. CONCLUSIONS: CGAR represents a potentially efficacious approach to improving speech recognition and QOL for experienced CI users. Limitations and considerations in implementing and studying aural rehabilitation approaches are discussed.

11 Clinical Trial Evaluation of a revised indication for determining adult cochlear implant candidacy. 2017

Sladen, Douglas P / Gifford, René H / Haynes, David / Kelsall, David / Benson, Aaron / Lewis, Kristen / Zwolan, Teresa / Fu, Qian-Jie / Gantz, Bruce / Gilden, Jan / Westerberg, Brian / Gustin, Cindy / O'Neil, Lori / Driscoll, Colin L. ·Department of Otolaryngology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, U.S.A. · Department of Hearing and Speech Sciences, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee, U.S.A. · Department of Otolaryngology, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee. · Rocky Mountain Ear Center, Englewood, Colorado, U.S.A. · Department of Otolaryngology, The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Ohio, U.S.A. · Midwest Ear Institute, Kansas City, Missouri, U.S.A. · University of Michigan Cochlear Implant Program, Ann Arbor, Michigan, U.S.A. · Department of Head and Neck Surgery, University of California, Los Angeles, California, U.S.A. · Department of Otolaryngology, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa, U.S.A. · Houston Ear Research Foundation, Houston, Texas. · Department of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery, Vancouver Children's Hospital, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. · Department of Otolaryngology, Vancouver Children's Hospital, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. · Cochlear Americas, Centennial, Colorado, U.S.A. ·Laryngoscope · Pubmed #28233910.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the use of monosyllabic word recognition versus sentence recognition to determine candidacy and long-term benefit for cochlear implantation. STUDY DESIGN: Prospective multi-center single-subject design. METHODS: A total of 21 adults aged 18 years and older with bilateral moderate to profound sensorineural hearing loss and low monosyllabic word scores received unilateral cochlear implantation. The consonant-nucleus-consonant (CNC) word test was the central measure of pre- and postoperative performance. Additional speech understanding tests included the Hearing in Noise Test sentences in quiet and AzBio sentences in +5 dB signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Quality of life (QoL) was measured using the Abbreviated Profile of Hearing Aid Benefit and Health Utilities Index. RESULTS: Performance on sentence recognition reached the ceiling of the test after only 3 months of implant use. In contrast, none of the participants in this study reached a score of 80% on CNC word recognition, even at the 12-month postoperative test interval. Measures of QoL related to hearing were also significantly improved following implantation. CONCLUSION: Results of this study demonstrate that monosyllabic words are appropriate for determining preoperative candidate and measuring long-term postoperative speech recognition performance. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: 2c. Laryngoscope, 127:2368-2374, 2017.

12 Clinical Trial Quality standards for bone conduction implants. 2015

Gavilan, Javier / Adunka, Oliver / Agrawal, Sumit / Atlas, Marcus / Baumgartner, Wolf-Dieter / Brill, Stefan / Bruce, Iain / Buchman, Craig / Caversaccio, Marco / De Bodt, Marc T / Dillon, Meg / Godey, Benoit / Green, Kevin / Gstoettner, Wolfgang / Hagen, Rudolf / Hagr, Abdulrahman / Han, Demin / Kameswaran, Mohan / Karltorp, Eva / Kompis, Martin / Kuzovkov, Vlad / Lassaletta, Luis / Li, Yongxin / Lorens, Artur / Martin, Jane / Manoj, Manikoth / Mertens, Griet / Mlynski, Robert / Mueller, Joachim / O'Driscoll, Martin / Parnes, Lorne / Pulibalathingal, Sasidharan / Radeloff, Andreas / Raine, Christopher H / Rajan, Gunesh / Rajeswaran, Ranjith / Schmutzhard, Joachim / Skarzynski, Henryk / Skarzynski, Piotr / Sprinzl, Georg / Staecker, Hinrich / Stephan, Kurt / Sugarova, Serafima / Tavora, Dayse / Usami, Shin-Ichi / Yanov, Yuri / Zernotti, Mario / Zorowka, Patrick / de Heyning, Paul Van. ·a 1 Hospital La Paz , Madrid, Spain. · b 2 The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery , Columbus, OH, USA. · c 3 London Health Sciences Centre , London-Ontario, Canada. · d 4 Ear Science Institute Australia, University of Western Australia , Subiaco, Australia. · e 5 Ear, Nose and Throat Department, University Clinic Vienna , Austria. · f 6 Ear, Nose and Throat Clinic and Polyclinic, Würzburg University , Würzburg, Germany. · g 7 Manchester Auditory Implant, Central Manchester University Hospitals , Manchester, UK. · h 8 The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine , Chapel Hill, NC, USA. · i 9 Bern University Hospital, University Clinic for Ear, Nose, Throat, Head and Neck Surgery , Bern, Switzerland. · j 10 Antwerp University Hospital , Antwerp, Belgium. · k 11 University Hospital of Rennes , Rennes, France. · l 12 King Abdulaziz University Hospital, King Saud University KSU , Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. · m 13 Beijing Tongren Hospital, Capital Medical University , Beijing, PR China. · o 15 Karolinska University Hospital , Stockholm, Sweden. · p 16 St. Petersburg ENT and Speech Research Institute , St. Petersburg, Russia. · q 17 Institute of Physiology and Pathology of Hearing , Kajetany, Poland. · r 18 Bradford Royal Infirmary , Bradford, UK. · s 19 ENT Super Specialty Institute and Research Center , Kozhikode, India. · t 20 Ear, Nose and Throat Clinic and Polyclinic, Rostock Medical University , Rostock, Germany. · u 21 Ear, Nose and Throat Clinic and Polyclinic, Ludwig-Maximilians-University , Munich, Germany. · n 14 Madras ENT Research Foundation , Chennai, India. · v 22 Innsbruck University Ear, Nose and Throat Clinic , Innsbruck, Austria. · w 23 Ear, Nose and Throat Department, University Clinic St. Poelten , St. Poelten, Austria. · x 24 Kansas University Center for Balance and Hearing Disorders , Kansas City, USA. · y 25 Shinshu University School of Medicine , Matsumoto, Japan. · z 26 Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Sanatorium Allende , Cordoba, Argentina. ·Acta Otolaryngol · Pubmed #26223816.

ABSTRACT: CONCLUSION: Bone conduction implants are useful in patients with conductive and mixed hearing loss for whom conventional surgery or hearing aids are no longer an option. They may also be used in patients affected by single-sided deafness. OBJECTIVES: To establish a consensus on the quality standards required for centers willing to create a bone conduction implant program. METHOD: To ensure a consistently high level of service and to provide patients with the best possible solution the members of the HEARRING network have established a set of quality standards for bone conduction implants. These standards constitute a realistic minimum attainable by all implant clinics and should be employed alongside current best practice guidelines. RESULTS: Fifteen items are thoroughly analyzed. They include team structure, accommodation and clinical facilities, selection criteria, evaluation process, complete preoperative and surgical information, postoperative fitting and assessment, follow-up, device failure, clinical management, transfer of care and patient complaints.

13 Article Mutations in PLS1, encoding fimbrin, cause autosomal dominant nonsyndromic hearing loss. 2019

Morgan, Anna / Koboldt, Daniel C / Barrie, Elizabeth S / Crist, Erin R / García García, Gema / Mezzavilla, Massimo / Faletra, Flavio / Mihalic Mosher, Theresa / Wilson, Richard K / Blanchet, Catherine / Manickam, Kandamurugu / Roux, Anne-Francoise / Gasparini, Paolo / Dell'Orco, Daniele / Girotto, Giorgia. ·Department of Medicine, Surgery and Health Sciences, University of Trieste, Trieste, Italy. · Institute for Genomic Medicine, Nationwide Children's Hospital, Columbus, Ohio. · Department of Pediatrics, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio. · Division of Genetic and Genomic Medicine, Nationwide Children's Hospital, Columbus, Ohio. · Laboratory of Molecular Genetics, CHU Montpellier, University of Montpellier, Montpellier, France. · Institute for Maternal and Child Health - IRCCS, Burlo Garofolo, Trieste, Italy. · Centre of Reference for Genetic Sensory Diseases, CHU Montpellier, University of Montpellier, Montpellier, France. · Department of Neurosciences, Biomedicine and Movement Sciences, Section of Biological Chemistry, University of Verona, Verona, Italy. ·Hum Mutat · Pubmed #31397523.

ABSTRACT: Nonsyndromic hearing loss (NSHL), a common sensory disorder, is characterized by high clinical and genetic heterogeneity (i.e., approximately 115 genes and 170 loci so far identified). Nevertheless, almost half of patients submitted for genetic testing fail to receive a conclusive molecular diagnosis. We used next-generation sequencing to identify causal variants in PLS1 (c.805G>A, p.[E269K]; c.713G>T, p.[L238R], and c.383T>C, p.[F128S]) in three unrelated families of European ancestry with autosomal dominant NSHL. PLS1 encodes Plastin 1 (also called fimbrin), one of the most abundant actin-bundling proteins of the stereocilia. In silico protein modeling suggests that all variants destabilize the structure of the actin-binding domain 1, likely reducing the protein's ability to bind F actin. The role of PLS1 gene in hearing function is further supported by the recent demonstration that Pls1

14 Article Isolated malleus fixation: A pediatric case series. 2019

Zhan, Kevin Y / Mattingly, Jameson K / Adunka, Oliver F. ·Department of Otolaryngology - Head & Neck Surgery, Division of Pediatric Otology & Hearing Program, Nationwide Children's Hospital, Columbus, OH, USA; Department of Otolaryngology - Head & Neck Surgery, Division of Otology, Neurotology & Cranial Base Surgery, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USA. ·Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol · Pubmed #31136915.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: The goal of this review was to review our series of isolated malleus fixation in pediatric patients, a rare entity causing conductive hearing loss. Malleolar fixation is poorly described in this patient population. METHODS: A retrospective review of pediatric tympanoplasties by the senior author over a four-year period was performed. Only cases with isolated fixation of the malleus were reviewed. Primary outcome of interest was post-operative hearing. Paired t-tests were used to calculate pre- and post-operative hearing outcomes. RESULTS: Five cases were analyzed. Mean age at time of surgery was 9.1 years (range 4.4-16.0 years). Average follow-up after surgery was 13.9 months (range 4.4-31.2 months). Patients were otherwise healthy and typically presented after a failed school hearing test despite previously good hearing. Three out of five cases showed radiographic evidence of bony fixation (60%) on computerized tomography (CT). Otoscopy was unremarkable in all cases. Average procedure time was 41.2 min and consisted of transcanal tympanoplasty with excision of fixed bony segment. A significant improvement in both pre- and post-operative air bone gaps was observed (p = 0.005)., with average ABG of 14.75 dB. CONCLUSIONS: Isolated pediatric malleolar fixation is an uncommon cause of pediatric conductive hearing loss. CT scan is useful for identifying this abnormality, and surgical correction results in improved post-operative hearing outcomes, potentially obviating the need for hearing amplification.

15 Article Effects of children's hearing loss on the synchrony between parents' object naming and children's attention. 2019

Chen, Chi-Hsin / Castellanos, Irina / Yu, Chen / Houston, Derek M. ·Department of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery, The Ohio State University, 915 Olentangy River Road, Columbus, Ohio 43212, United States. Electronic address: Chi-Hsin.Chen@osumc.edu. · Department of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery, The Ohio State University, 915 Olentangy River Road, Columbus, Ohio 43212, United States; Nationwide Children's Hospital, 700 Children's Dr, Columbus, Ohio 43205, United States. · Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, Indiana University, 1101 E. 10th Street, Bloomington, Indiana 47405, United States. ·Infant Behav Dev · Pubmed #31102946.

ABSTRACT: Children's attentional state during parent-child interactions is important for word learning. The current study examines the real-time attentional patterns of toddlers with and without hearing loss (N = 15, age range: 12-37 months) in parent-child interactions. High-density gaze data recorded from head-mounted eye-trackers were used to investigate the synchrony between parents' naming of novel objects and children's sustained attention on the named objects in joint play. Results show that the sheer quantities of parents' naming and children's sustained attention episodes were comparable in children with hearing loss and their peers with normal hearing. However, parents' naming and children's sustained attention episodes were less synchronized in the hearing loss group compared to children with normal hearing. Possible implications are discussed.

16 Article Association of Demographic and Hearing-Related Factors With Cochlear Implant-Related Quality of Life. 2019

McRackan, Theodore R / Hand, Brittany N / Velozo, Craig A / Dubno, Judy R. ·Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston. · School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, The Ohio State University, Columbus. · Division of Occupational Therapy, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston. ·JAMA Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg · Pubmed #30896742.

ABSTRACT: Importance: Only limited evidence is available describing the contribution of patient-related factors to quality of life in adults with cochlear implants. Objective: Assess the association between demographic, hearing-related, and cochlear implant-related factors and quality of life by using a new Cochlear Implant Quality of Life (CIQOL) item bank, which was developed to meet rigorous psychometric standards. Design, Setting, and Participants: Multicenter cross-sectional study of adults 18 to 89 years of age who had at least 1 year of cochlear implant use and who were recruited through a consortium of 20 cochlear implant centers in the United States. Using an online format, questionnaires were sent to the first 500 participants who contacted the research team. Of these participants, 371 (74.2%) completed the questionnaire. Demographic, hearing-related, and cochlear implant-related data were obtained along with responses to each of the 81 items in the CIQOL item bank. Multivariable linear regression was used to examine demographic, hearing-related, and cochlear implant-related factors associated with scores in each of the 6 CIQOL domains (communication, emotional, entertainment, environment, listening effort, and social). Main Outcomes and Measures: Association among demographic, hearing-related, and cochlear implant-related factors and CIQOL scores for each of 6 domains. Results: Of the 371 participants who completed the questionnaire, 222 (59.8%) were women, and the mean (SD) age was 59.5 (14.9) years. The CIQOL scores were normally distributed across the 6 domains. Being employed, having higher household income, longer duration of hearing loss prior to cochlear implantation, and having bilateral rather than unilateral cochlear implantation were associated with higher CIQOL scores in 1 or more domains, but the effect size varied widely (β, 0.1-6.9). Better sentence recognition ability (using AzBio to measure speech recognition) was associated with only a small positive effect size for the communication (β, 0.0 [95% CI, 0.0-0.1]), entertainment (β, 0.0 [95% CI, 0.0-0.1]), and environmental (β, 0.0 [95% CI, 0.0-0.0]) domains. Increased age was associated with lower CIQOL in the entertainment domain (β, -0.3 [95% CI, -1.5 to -0.4]). The demographic, hearing-related, and cochlear implant-related factors included in the multivariable regression models accounted for only a small percentage of the variance in CIQOL domain scores (R2, 0.08-0.17). Conclusions and Relevance: Several factors were found to predict higher or lower CIQOL scores in specific domains, with speech-recognition ability having only a minimal association. Despite evaluating a large number of demographic, hearing-related, and cochlear implant-related factors, the multivariable models accounted for only a small amount of CIQOL variance. This suggests that patient or other characteristics that contribute to cochlear implant-related quality of life remain largely unknown.

17 Article Audiometric findings in children with unilateral enlarged vestibular aqueduct. 2019

Macielak, Robert J / Mattingly, Jameson K / Findlen, Ursula M / Moberly, Aaron C / Malhotra, Prashant S / Adunka, Oliver F. ·The Hearing Program in the Pediatric Otolaryngology Department, Nationwide Children's Hospital, 700 Children's Dr, Columbus, OH, 43205, USA; College of Medicine, The Ohio State University, 370 W 9th Ave, Columbus, OH, 43210, USA; Department of Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery, The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, 410 W 10th Ave, Columbus, OH, 43210, USA. · The Hearing Program in the Pediatric Otolaryngology Department, Nationwide Children's Hospital, 700 Children's Dr, Columbus, OH, 43205, USA; Department of Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery, The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, 410 W 10th Ave, Columbus, OH, 43210, USA. Electronic address: jameson.mattingly@osumc.edu. · The Hearing Program in the Pediatric Otolaryngology Department, Nationwide Children's Hospital, 700 Children's Dr, Columbus, OH, 43205, USA; Department of Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery, The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, 410 W 10th Ave, Columbus, OH, 43210, USA. ·Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol · Pubmed #30753978.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the prevalence of bilateral hearing loss in children with unilateral enlarged vestibular aqueduct (EVA) at a single institution. METHODS: A retrospective case review was performed at a tertiary care pediatric referral center involving children with radiologic findings of unilateral EVA and normal labyrinthine anatomy of the contralateral ear diagnosed via CT and/or MRI. The main outcome measure of interest is the number of patients with unilateral EVA who were diagnosed with bilateral hearing loss. RESULTS: Sixty-one pediatric patients were identified. The mean audiometric follow-up was 48.2 months (0-150). Three (4.9%) patients with unilateral EVA were noted to have bilateral hearing loss, and this rate was not significantly different (p = 1.0) from the rate reported in a comparison group of patients with contralateral hearing loss (6.0%) without an EVA. The pure-tone average (defined as the average dB HL at 500, 1000, 2000, and 4000 Hz) in the group with bilateral hearing loss was 31.3 dB HL in the better hearing ear and 79.6 dB HL in the worse hearing ear, with the difference being statistically significant (p = 0.02). In the unilateral EVA patients without contralateral hearing loss (n = 56, 91.8%), the PTA was 9.4 dB HL in the better hearing ear and 51.9 dB HL in the worse hearing ear, with the difference being statistically significant (p < 0.001). Two patients (3.3%) with unilateral EVA were found to have hearing within normal limits bilaterally. The EVA was ipsilateral to the worse hearing ear in all cases. CONCLUSION: The prevalence of bilateral hearing loss in children with unilateral EVA appears to be low. Specifically, it may be no different than the rate of contralateral hearing loss in children with unilateral hearing loss without an EVA. The present report is somewhat different than the previously described prevalence in the literature. This difference could be related to the imaging type and diagnostic criteria used, the patients included, the source of the identified patents, and the overall population of patients studied.

18 Article Visual habituation in deaf and hearing infants. 2019

Monroy, Claire / Shafto, Carissa / Castellanos, Irina / Bergeson, Tonya / Houston, Derek. ·Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Columbus, Ohio, United States of America. · Nationwide Children's Hospital, Columbus, Ohio, United States of America. · Insight Data Science, New York City, New York, United States of America. · Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, Butler University, Indianapolis, Indiana, United States of America. ·PLoS One · Pubmed #30726230.

ABSTRACT: Early cognitive development relies on the sensory experiences that infants acquire as they explore their environment. Atypical experience in one sensory modality from birth may result in fundamental differences in general cognitive abilities. The primary aim of the current study was to compare visual habituation in infants with profound hearing loss, prior to receiving cochlear implants (CIs), and age-matched peers with typical hearing. Two complementary measures of cognitive function and attention maintenance were assessed: the length of time to habituate to a visual stimulus, and look-away rate during habituation. Findings revealed that deaf infants were slower to habituate to a visual stimulus and demonstrated a lower look-away rate than hearing infants. For deaf infants, habituation measures correlated with language outcomes on standardized assessments before cochlear implantation. These findings are consistent with prior evidence suggesting that habituation and look-away rates reflect efficiency of information processing and may suggest that deaf infants take longer to process visual stimuli relative to the hearing infants. Taken together, these findings are consistent with the hypothesis that hearing loss early in infancy influences aspects of general cognitive functioning.

19 Article Pediatric lateral graft tympanoplasty A review of 78 cases. 2019

Zhan, Kevin Y / Rawlins, Kasey W / Mattingly, Jameson K / Malhotra, Prashant S / Adunka, Oliver F. ·Department of Otolaryngology - Head & Neck Surgery, Division of Pediatric Otology & Hearing Program, Nationwide Children's Hospital, Columbus, OH, USA; Department of Otolaryngology - Head & Neck Surgery, Division of Otology, Neurotology & Cranial Base Surgery, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USA. ·Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol · Pubmed #30711838.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: The optimal timing and technique for repairing chronic tympanic membrane (TM) perforations in pediatric patients remains controversial. The objectives are to determine the surgical and hearing outcomes of pediatric lateral graft tympanoplasty at a tertiary teaching hospital. METHODS: A retrospective review was conducted for pediatric lateral graft tympanoplasties performed for chronic TM perforations by a single surgeon over a four-year period. Primary and secondary outcomes were graft failure rate and hearing outcomes, respectively. RESULTS: 78 cases were analyzed. The mean age at time of surgery was 10.3 years (range 5-18 years). Mean follow-up was 11.0 months; 27 patients had follow-up >1 yr. Most patients were non-syndromic (85.9%), had a history of bilateral Eustachian tube dysfunction (ETD) (59%) and presented with marked myringosclerosis (73.1%). Thirty-three percent of cases were revision tympanoplasties. A learner surgeon (resident or fellow) was present in 89.7% of cases. Successful closure of the TM was achieved in 97.4% (76/78) of cases and 92.6% (25/27) of cases with >1-year follow-up. No obvious difference in graft failure was noted with regards to age at time of surgery, perforation size, history of bilateral ETD, presence of a learner surgeon, myringosclerosis, presence of syndromic features, or history of prior tympanoplasty. Ninety-one percent of patients either improved hearing or preserved their conductive hearing deficit. Poorer hearing outcomes were only associated with post-operative blunting. CONCLUSIONS: Pediatric lateral graft tympanoplasty is effective in repairing chronic perforations with excellent hearing outcomes. Common quoted predictors of surgical outcome such as age at the time of surgery, syndromic features, history of previous myringoplasty, perforation size, and ETD dysfunction were not associated with graft failure in our series.

20 Article Parent perspectives on multidisciplinary pediatric hearing healthcare. 2019

Findlen, Ursula M / Malhotra, Prashant S / Adunka, Oliver F. ·Nationwide Children's Hospital- Division of Clinical Therapies, 700 Children's Drive, Suite T3D, Columbus, OH, 43205, USA; The Ohio State Wexner Medical Center, College of Medicine, Department of Otolaryngology - Head & Neck Surgery, OSU Eye and Ear Institute, 915 Olentangy River Road, Columbus, OH, 43212, USA. Electronic address: ursula.findlen@nationwidechildrens.org. · The Ohio State Wexner Medical Center, College of Medicine, Department of Otolaryngology - Head & Neck Surgery, OSU Eye and Ear Institute, 915 Olentangy River Road, Columbus, OH, 43212, USA; Nationwide Children's Hospital- Pediatric Otology & Hearing Program, 700 Children's Drive, Suite 2A, Columbus, OH, 43205, USA. ·Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol · Pubmed #30554685.

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: Family-centered healthcare demands that families provide input regarding the care of their children. Very little is known, however, about how families perceive their experience in different types of multidisciplinary team models, and specifically, in the multidisciplinary setting currently utilized in many pediatric hearing clinics. METHODS: Quantitative and qualitative parent survey responses were collected and analyzed in a tertiary care pediatric medical center after a one-day multidisciplinary assessment clinical appointment. Questions pertained to information across five domains, including overall experience, diagnosis, treatment plan formulation, additional testing, and resources. Quantitative responses were analyzed descriptively while qualitative responses were evaluated using content analysis to derive themes. Quantitative and qualitative data were evaluated separately and then compared to delineate themes for strengths and weaknesses. RESULTS: Overall, high satisfaction was evident in both quantitative and qualitative responses. Results suggested that a one-day multidisciplinary assessment appointment may contribute to parents feeling overwhelmed by information shared and not fully understanding which disciplines are providing care. Analysis revealed a specific area of weakness in our particular setting was inadequate provision of information about functional hearing (e.g., listening socially and academically). Results contributed to a change from a multidisciplinary team model to an interdisciplinary care coordination approach to pediatric hearing healthcare. CONCLUSIONS: Understanding parent perspectives and expectations is the corner stone of family-centered care and may ultimately influence a child's developmental outcome. A systematic way of evaluating parent perspectives on the clinical process can influence service delivery and help children with hearing loss meet their potential.

21 Article Intracochlear Electrocochleography: Response Patterns During Cochlear Implantation and Hearing Preservation. 2019

Giardina, Christopher K / Brown, Kevin D / Adunka, Oliver F / Buchman, Craig A / Hutson, Kendall A / Pillsbury, Harold C / Fitzpatrick, Douglas C. ·Department of Otolaryngology/Head and Neck Surgery, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, NC. · Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and North Carolina State University, Chapel Hill, NC. · Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH. · Department of Otolaryngology, Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, MO. ·Ear Hear · Pubmed #30335669.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: Electrocochleography (ECochG) obtained through a cochlear implant (CI) is increasingly being tested as an intraoperative monitor during implantation with the goal of reducing surgical trauma. Reducing trauma should aid in preserving residual hearing and improve speech perception overall. The purpose of this study was to characterize intracochlear ECochG responses throughout insertion in a range of array types and, when applicable, relate these measures to hearing preservation. The ECochG signal in cochlear implant subjects is complex, consisting of hair cell and neural generators with differing distributions depending on the etiology and history of hearing loss. Consequently, a focus was to observe and characterize response changes as an electrode advances. DESIGN: In 36 human subjects, responses to 90 dB nHL tone bursts were recorded both at the round window (RW) and then through the apical contact of the CI as the array advanced into the cochlea. The specific setup used a sterile clip in the surgical field, attached to the ground of the implant with a software-controlled short to the apical contact. The end of the clip was then connected to standard audiometric recording equipment. The stimuli were 500 Hz tone bursts at 90 dB nHL. Audiometry for cases with intended hearing preservation (12/36 subjects) was correlated with intraoperative recordings. RESULTS: Successful intracochlear recordings were obtained in 28 subjects. For the eight unsuccessful cases, the clip introduced excessive line noise, which saturated the amplifier. Among the successful subjects, the initial intracochlear response was a median 5.8 dB larger than the response at the RW. Throughout insertion, modiolar arrays showed median response drops after stylet removal while in lateral wall arrays the maximal median response magnitude was typically at the deepest insertion depth. Four main patterns of response magnitude were seen: increases > 5 dB (12/28), steady responses within 5 dB (4/28), drops > 5 dB (from the initial response) at shallow insertion depths (< 15 mm deep, 7/28), or drops > 5 dB occurring at deeper depths (5/28). Hearing preservation, defined as < 80 dB threshold at 250 Hz, was successful in 9/12 subjects. In these subjects, an intracochlear loss of response magnitude afforded a prediction model with poor sensitivity and specificity, which improved when phase, latency, and proportion of neural components was considered. The change in hearing thresholds across cases was significantly correlated with various measures of the absolute magnitudes of response, including RW response, starting response, maximal response, and final responses (p's < 0.05, minimum of 0.0001 for the maximal response, r's > 0.57, maximum of 0.80 for the maximal response). CONCLUSIONS: Monitoring the cochlea with intracochlear ECochG during cochlear implantation is feasible, and patterns of response vary by device type. Changes in magnitude alone did not account for hearing preservation rates, but considerations of phase, latency, and neural contribution can help to interpret the changes seen and improve sensitivity and specificity. The correlation between the absolute magnitude obtained either before or during insertion of the ECochG and the hearing threshold changes suggest that cochlear health, which varies by subject, plays an important role.

22 Article Residual Cochlear Function in Adults and Children Receiving Cochlear Implants: Correlations With Speech Perception Outcomes. 2019

Fontenot, Tatyana Elizabeth / Giardina, Christopher Kenneth / Dillon, Margaret / Rooth, Meredith A / Teagle, Holly F / Park, Lisa R / Brown, Kevin David / Adunka, Oliver F / Buchman, Craig A / Pillsbury, Harold C / Fitzpatrick, Douglas C. ·Department of Otolaryngology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA. · University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA. · Department of Otolaryngology, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio, USA. · Department of Otolaryngology, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, Missouri, USA. ·Ear Hear · Pubmed #30169463.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: Variability in speech perception outcomes with cochlear implants remains largely unexplained. Recently, electrocochleography, or measurements of cochlear potentials in response to sound, has been used to assess residual cochlear function at the time of implantation. Our objective was to characterize the potentials recorded preimplantation in subjects of all ages, and evaluate the relationship between the responses, including a subjective estimate of neural activity, and speech perception outcomes. DESIGN: Electrocochleography was recorded in a prospective cohort of 284 candidates for cochlear implant at University of North Carolina (10 months to 88 years of ages). Measurement of residual cochlear function called the "total response" (TR), which is the sum of magnitudes of spectral components in response to tones of different stimulus frequencies, was obtained for each subject. The TR was then related to results on age-appropriate monosyllabic word score tests presented in quiet. In addition to the TR, the electrocochleography results were also assessed for neural activity in the forms of the compound action potential and auditory nerve neurophonic. RESULTS: The TR magnitude ranged from a barely detectable response of about 0.02 µV to more than 100 µV. In adults (18 to 79 years old), the TR accounted for 46% of variability in speech perception outcome by linear regression (r = 0.46; p < 0.001). In children between 6 and 17 years old, the variability accounted for was 36% (p < 0.001). In younger children, the TR accounted for less of the variability, 15% (p = 0.012). Subjects over 80 years old tended to perform worse for a given TR than younger adults at the 6-month testing interval. The subjectively assessed neural activity did not increase the information compared with the TR alone, which is primarily composed of the cochlear microphonic produced by hair cells. CONCLUSIONS: The status of the auditory periphery, particularly of hair cells rather than neural activity, accounts for a large fraction of variability in speech perception outcomes in adults and older children. In younger children, the relationship is weaker, and the elderly differ from other adults. This simple measurement can be applied with high throughput so that peripheral status can be assessed to help manage patient expectations, create individually-tailored treatment plans, and identify subjects performing below expectations based on residual cochlear function.

23 Article Early Hearing Detection and Intervention: Timely Diagnosis, Timely Management. 2019

Findlen, Ursula M / Hounam, Gina M / Alexy, Emily / Adunka, Oliver F. ·Division of Clinical Therapies, Audiology Department, Nationwide Children's Hospital, Columbus, Ohio, USA. · Department of Otolaryngology, Head & Neck Surgery, The Ohio State Wexner Medical Center, Columbus, Ohio, USA. · Research Institute Biostatistics, Nationwide Children's Hospital, Columbus, Ohio, USA. · Pediatric Otology & Hearing Program, Nationwide Children's Hospital, Columbus, Ohio, USA. ·Ear Hear · Pubmed #30134352.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: A quality improvement study was completed to assess the impact of three clinical practice changes on the timing of diagnosis and intervention for congenital hearing loss. DESIGN: A retrospective chart review was conducted for 800 infants evaluated for congenital hearing loss before and after implementing three clinical practice changes: the use of Kalman-weighted signal averaging for auditory brainstem response testing, a tone burst-prioritized testing protocol, and expediting scheduling of initial assessment. The impact of middle ear involvement on age at diagnosis and history of neonatal intensive care unit stay on age at treatment was also examined. RESULTS: The use of Kalman-weighted signal averaging for auditory brainstem response testing, a tone burst-prioritized testing protocol, and expedited scheduling of initial assessment each resulted in a decrease of age at diagnosis. Ultimately, the age at initial assessment was the only significant predictor related to decreased timeline for diagnosis. Middle ear pathology significantly increased age at diagnosis, while history of time in the neonatal intensive care unit significantly increased the age at provision of amplification as a treatment for permanent hearing loss. CONCLUSIONS: The technology used for assessment, clinical protocol, and timing of assessment of infants can impact the timeline for diagnosis and treatment of congenital hearing impairment. Given the significant sequelae of delayed or missed diagnosis of hearing loss in infancy, implementing clinical practice changes should be considered at pediatric diagnostic centers.

24 Article Neurocognitive Factors Contributing to Cochlear Implant Candidacy. 2018

Moberly, Aaron C / Castellanos, Irina / Mattingly, Jameson K. ·Department of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery, The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Columbus, Ohio. ·Otol Neurotol · Pubmed #30444846.

ABSTRACT: HYPOTHESIS: Clinical adult cochlear implant (CI) candidacy evaluations rely heavily on measures of sentence recognition under the best-aided listening conditions. The hypothesis tested in this study was that nonauditory measures of neurocognitive processes would contribute to scores on preoperative sentence recognition for CI candidates, above and beyond hearing ability as assessed using pure-tone average (PTA). Support for this hypothesis would suggest that best-aided sentence recognition is not simply a measure of hearing ability; rather, neurocognitive functions contribute to performance and should be considered while counseling patients during CI candidacy evaluation about postoperative rehabilitative and outcome expectations. BACKGROUND: Neurocognitive functions, such as working memory capacity, inhibition-concentration, information processing speed, and nonverbal reasoning contribute to aided speech recognition outcomes in adults with hearing loss. This study examined the roles of these neurocognitive factors on preoperative speech recognition performance in adults evaluated for CI candidacy. METHODS: Thirty-one postlingually deafened adult CI candidates were enrolled. Participants were assessed using nonauditory measures of working memory capacity, inhibition-concentration, information processing speed, and nonverbal reasoning. Measures of sentence recognition in quiet and in multitalker babble (AzBio sentences) as well as sentences from the City University of New York in quiet were collected under best-aided conditions. RESULTS: AzBio sentence recognition scores in babble were predicted significantly by scores of working memory capacity after accounting for PTA. Similarly, the City University of New York sentence recognition scores were predicted significantly by nonverbal reasoning after accounting for PTA. CONCLUSIONS: Findings support the idea that clinical measures of sentence recognition may be affected to varying degrees by neurocognitive functions, and these functions should be considered during evaluation for CI candidacy.

25 Article Nonverbal Reasoning as a Contributor to Sentence Recognition Outcomes in Adults With Cochlear Implants. 2018

Mattingly, Jameson K / Castellanos, Irina / Moberly, Aaron C. ·Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio. ·Otol Neurotol · Pubmed #30444843.

ABSTRACT: HYPOTHESIS: Significant variability in speech recognition persists among postlingually deafened adults with cochlear implants (CIs). We hypothesize that scores of nonverbal reasoning predict sentence recognition in adult CI users. BACKGROUND: Cognitive functions contribute to speech recognition outcomes in adults with hearing loss. These functions may be particularly important for CI users who must interpret highly degraded speech signals through their devices. This study used a visual measure of reasoning (the ability to solve novel problems), the Raven's Progressive Matrices (RPM), to predict sentence recognition in CI users. METHODS: Participants were 39 postlingually deafened adults with CIs and 43 age-matched normal-hearing (NH) controls. CI users were assessed for recognition of words in sentences in quiet, and NH controls listened to eight-channel vocoded versions to simulate the degraded signal delivered by a CI. A computerized visual task of the RPM, requiring participants to identify the correct missing piece in a 3×3 matrix of geometric designs, was also performed. Particular items from the RPM were examined for their associations with sentence recognition abilities, and a subset of items on the RPM was tested for the ability to predict degraded sentence recognition in the NH controls. RESULTS: The overall number of items answered correctly on the 48-item RPM significantly correlated with sentence recognition in CI users (r = 0.35-0.47) and NH controls (r = 0.36-0.57). An abbreviated 12-item version of the RPM was created and performance also correlated with sentence recognition in CI users (r = 0.40-0.48) and NH controls (r = 0.49-0.56). CONCLUSIONS: Nonverbal reasoning skills correlated with sentence recognition in both CI and NH subjects. Our findings provide further converging evidence that cognitive factors contribute to speech processing by adult CI users and can help explain variability in outcomes. Our abbreviated version of the RPM may serve as a clinically meaningful assessment for predicting sentence recognition outcomes in CI users.

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