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Hearing Disorders: HELP
Articles from Switzerland
Based on 298 articles published since 2009
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These are the 298 published articles about Hearing Disorders that originated from Switzerland during 2009-2019.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2 · 3 · 4 · 5 · 6 · 7 · 8 · 9 · 10 · 11 · 12
1 Editorial Public health approach to hearing across the life course: a call-for-papers. 2018

Chadha, Shelly / Cieza, Alarcos / Reyes, Karen. ·Management of Noncommunicable Diseases, Disability, Violence and Injury Prevention, World Health Organization, avenue Appia 20, 1211 Geneva 27, Switzerland. ·Bull World Health Organ · Pubmed #30262937.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

2 Editorial Global hearing health: future directions. 2018

Chadha, Shelly / Cieza, Alarcos / Krug, Etienne. ·Blindness Deafness Prevention, Disability and Rehabilitation Unit, Department for Management of Noncommunicable Diseases, Disability, Violence and Injury Prevention World Health Organization, 20 Avenue Appia, 1211 Geneva 27, Switzerland. · Department for Management of Noncommunicable Diseases, Disability, Violence and Injury Prevention, World Health Organization, Geneva, Switzerland. ·Bull World Health Organ · Pubmed #29531409.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

3 Editorial Promoting global action on hearing loss: World hearing day. 2017

Chadha, Shelly / Cieza, Alarcos. ·a WHO Department for Management of NCDs , Disability, Violence and Injury Prevention World Health Organization Geneva , Geneva , Switzerland. ·Int J Audiol · Pubmed #28262049.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

4 Editorial Guest Editorial: Promoting Global Action On Hearing Loss: World Hearing Day. 2017

Chadha, Shelly / Cieza, Alarcos. ·WHO Department for Management of NCDs, Disability, Violence and Injury Prevention, World Health Organization, Geneva, Switzerland. ·Ear Hear · Pubmed #28225360.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

5 Editorial Do cochlear implants play a role in the induction of brain tumors? 2016

Mindermann, Thomas. ·Neurosurgery, Klinik Im Park, Seestrasse 220, 8027, Zurich, Switzerland. tmindermann@hin.ch. ·Acta Neurochir (Wien) · Pubmed #26842977.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

6 Editorial Pathology of Tinnitus and Hyperacusis-Clinical Implications. 2015

Moller, Aage R / Salvi, Richard / De Ridder, Dirk / Kleinjung, Tobias / Vanneste, Sven. ·The University of Texas, Richardson, TX 75080, USA. · University of Buffalo, Buffalo, NY 14214, USA. · University of Otago, Dunedin 9016, New Zealand. · University of Zürich, Zürich, CH 8091, Switzerland. ·Biomed Res Int · Pubmed #26587541.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

7 Editorial International perspective: reducing hearing loss. 2015

Chadha, Shelly. ·Prevention of Deafness and Hearing Loss, World Health Organization, Geneva, Switzerland. chadhas@who.int. ·J Prim Health Care · Pubmed #25770710.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

8 Editorial Plasticity of neural systems in tinnitus. 2014

Meyer, Martin / Langguth, Berthold / Kleinjung, Tobias / Møller, Aage R. ·University of Zürich, Psychological Institute, Neuroplasticity and Learning in the Healthy Aging Brain, Andreasstraße 15/Box 2, 8050 Zürich, Switzerland. · Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, University of Regensburg, Universitaetsstraße 84, 93053 Regensburg, Germany. · Department of Otorhinolaryngology, University of Zürich, Frauenklinikstraße 24, 8091 Zürich, Switzerland. · School of Behavioral and Brain Sciences, University of Texas at Dallas, 800 W. Campbell Road, Richardson, TX 75080, USA. ·Neural Plast · Pubmed #25313339.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

9 Editorial International Ear Care Day--3rd March. 2014

Chadha, Shelly. ·Technical Officer, Prevention of Blindness and Deafness, WHO HQ, Geneva. ·J Laryngol Otol · Pubmed #24576428.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

10 Review [Thiamine-responsive megaloblastic anemia or Rogers syndrome: A literature review]. 2019

Lu, H / Lu, H / Vaucher, J / Tran, C / Vollenweider, P / Castioni, J. ·Service de médecine interne, centre hospitalier universitaire vaudois (CHUV), rue du Bugnon, 46, 1011 Lausanne, Suisse. Electronic address: henri.lu@chuv.ch. · Service des urgences adultes, centre hospitalier universitaire Antoine-Béclère, Assistance publique-Hôpitaux de Paris (AP-HP), 157, rue de la Porte de Trivaux, 92140 Clamart, France. · Service de médecine interne, centre hospitalier universitaire vaudois (CHUV), rue du Bugnon, 46, 1011 Lausanne, Suisse. · Service de médecine génétique, centre hospitalier universitaire vaudois (CHUV), rue du Bugnon, 46, 1011 Lausanne, Suisse. ·Rev Med Interne · Pubmed #30031565.

ABSTRACT: Thiamine-responsive megaloblastic anemia (TRMA), also known as Rogers syndrome, is a rare autosomal recessive disease characterized by three main components: megaloblastic anemia, diabetes mellitus and sensorineural deafness. Those features occur in infancy but may arise during adolescence. Diagnosis relies on uncovering genetic variations (alleles) in the SLC19A2 gene, encoding for a high affinity thiamine transporter. This transporter is essentially present in hematopoietic stem cells, pancreatic beta cells and inner ear cells, explaining the clinical manifestations of the disease. Based on a multidisciplinary approach, treatment resides on lifelong thiamine oral supplementation at pharmacological doses, which reverses anemia and may delay development of diabetes. However, thiamine supplementation does not alleviate already existing hearing defects.

11 Review Neuromodulation for tinnitus treatment: an overview of invasive and non-invasive techniques. 2019

Peter, Nicole / Kleinjung, Tobias. ·Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, University Hospital Zürich, Zürich 8091, Switzerland. ·J Zhejiang Univ Sci B · Pubmed #29770647.

ABSTRACT: Tinnitus is defined as a perception of sound without any external sound source. Chronic tinnitus is a frequent condition that can affect the quality of life. So far, no causal cure for tinnitus has been documented, and most pharmacologic and psychosomatic treatment modalities aim to diminish tinnitus' impact on the quality of life. Neuromodulation, a novel therapeutic modality, which aims at alternating nerve activity through a targeted delivery of a stimulus, has emerged as a potential option in tinnitus treatment. This review provides a brief overview of the current neuromodulation techniques as tinnitus treatment options. The main intention is to provide updated knowledge especially for medical professionals counselling tinnitus patients in this emerging field of medicine. Non-invasive methods such as repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation, transcranial electrical stimulation, neurofeedback, and transcutaneous vagus nerve stimulation were included, as well as invasive methods such as implanted vagus nerve stimulation and invasive brain stimulation. Some of these neuromodulation techniques revealed promising results; nevertheless, further research is needed, especially regarding the pathophysiological principle as to how these neuromodulation techniques work and what neuronal change they induce. Various studies suggest that individually different brain states and networks are involved in the generation and perception of tinnitus. Therefore, in the future, individually tailored neuromodulation strategies could be a promising approach in tinnitus treatment for achieving a more substantial and longer lasting improvement of complaints.

12 Review Hearing, Emotion, Amplification, Research, and Training Workshop: Current Understanding of Hearing Loss and Emotion Perception and Priorities for Future Research. 2018

Picou, Erin M / Singh, Gurjit / Goy, Huiwen / Russo, Frank / Hickson, Louise / Oxenham, Andrew J / Buono, Gabrielle H / Ricketts, Todd A / Launer, Stefan. ·1 Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN, USA. · 2 Phonak Canada, Mississauga, ON, Canada. · 3 Department of Speech-Language Pathology, University of Toronto, ON, Canada. · 4 Department of Psychology, Ryerson University, Toronto, ON, Canada. · 5 School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia. · 6 Department of Psychology, University of Minnesota, MN, USA. · 7 Sonova AG, Stäfa, Switzerland. ·Trends Hear · Pubmed #30270810.

ABSTRACT: The question of how hearing loss and hearing rehabilitation affect patients' momentary emotional experiences is one that has received little attention but has considerable potential to affect patients' psychosocial function. This article is a product from the Hearing, Emotion, Amplification, Research, and Training workshop, which was convened to develop a consensus document describing research on emotion perception relevant for hearing research. This article outlines conceptual frameworks for the investigation of emotion in hearing research; available subjective, objective, neurophysiologic, and peripheral physiologic data acquisition research methods; the effects of age and hearing loss on emotion perception; potential rehabilitation strategies; priorities for future research; and implications for clinical audiologic rehabilitation. More broadly, this article aims to increase awareness about emotion perception research in audiology and to stimulate additional research on the topic.

13 Review Zika virus exposure in pregnancy and its association with newborn visual anomalies and hearing loss. 2018

Peloggia, Alessandra / Ali, Moazzam / Nanda, Kavita / Bahamondes, Luis. ·Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Faculty of Medical Sciences, University of Campinas, Campinas, Brazil. · Department of Reproductive Health and Research, World Health Organization, Geneva, Switzerland. · Contraceptive Technology Innovation Department, Durham, NC, USA. ·Int J Gynaecol Obstet · Pubmed #30191558.

ABSTRACT: Exposure to Zika virus (ZIKV) in pregnancy leads to a spectrum of congenital effects in the newborn. Recent studies have begun to evaluate the impact of ZIKV during pregnancy. Among 39 relevant studies, nine were related specifically to clinical studies of ophthalmologic disorders and one was related to hearing loss impairment; most of these studies were case reports and case series reports. Importantly, congenital toxoplasmosis was ruled out in all studies. The data show that, in addition to microcephaly, ZIKV exposure in pregnancy may result in subtle ocular impairments in the newborn. The most common anomalies are macular pigment mottling and/or chorioretinal atrophy, and optic nerve disorders. Sensorineural hearing loss has also been noted in 5.8% of infants with microcephaly. The effects of ZIKV infection during pregnancy are potentially devastating to the fetus and newborn. Although microcephaly is an important signal, the current information emphasizes the importance of ocular and auditory screenings, otherwise sight and hearing anomalies may be underestimated. Healthcare providers should fully understand the spectrum of anomalies related to ZIKV exposure in pregnancy in order to counsel pregnant women living in high-risk areas, in addition to those wanting to become pregnant.

14 Review None 2018

Spiegel, Rainer / Kalla, Roger / Mantokoudis, Georgios / Maire, Raphael / Mueller, Heiko / Hoerr, Robert / Ihl, Ralf. ·Division of Internal Medicine, Basel University Hospital, University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland. · Department of Neurology, Inselspital, Bern University Hospital, Bern, Switzerland. · Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Inselspital, Bern University Hospital, Bern, Switzerland. · Lausanne University Hospital, Lausanne, Switzerland. · Clinical Research Department, Dr Willmar Schwabe GmbH & Co. KG, Karlsruhe, Germany. · Department of Psychiatry, University of Duesseldorf, Alexian Research Center Krefeld, Krefeld, Germany. ·Clin Interv Aging · Pubmed #29942120.

ABSTRACT: Background: Tinnitus and dizziness are frequent in old age and often seen as concomitant symptoms in patients with dementia. In earlier clinical trials, Methods: Randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trials of Results: Five trials that met the inclusion criteria were included in the meta-analysis. The risk of bias was judged as low, with Jadad scores of 3 and 5. In all trials, 11-point box scales were used to assess the severity of tinnitus and dizziness. Overall, EGb 761 Conclusion: Our findings support the notion that EGb 761

15 Review The Plasma Membrane Calcium ATPases in Calcium Signaling Network. 2018

Wu, Xiaomo / Weng, Liqiang / Zhang, Jinyan / Liu, Xiaolong / Huang, Jianqing. ·Dermatology Institute of Fuzhou, Dermatology Hospital of Fuzhou, Xihong Road 243, Fuzhou 350025, China. · Department of Biomedicine, University of Basel, Klingelbergstr. 70, CH-4056 Basel, Switzerland. · The United Innovation of Mengchao Hepatobiliary Technology Key Laboratory of Fujian Province, Mengchao Hepatobiliary Hospital of Fujian Medical University, Xihong Road 312, Fuzhou 350025, China. ·Curr Protein Pept Sci · Pubmed #29663880.

ABSTRACT: The plasma membrane Ca2+ ATPases (PMCAs) are responsible for the clearance of Ca2+ out of cells after intracellular Ca2+ transients. Cooperating with Na+/Ca2+ exchangers (NCXs) and Ca2+ buffering proteins, PMCAs play an essential role in maintaining the long-term cellular Ca2+ homeostasis. The plasma membrane Ca2+ ATPase was first discovered in red blood cell membrane about 50 years ago, and then other PMCA isoforms and alternatively spliced variants had been identified from different tissues and different developmental stages, revealing a surprising complexity of the PMCA family. In mammals, there are four PMCA isoforms encoded by four distinct genes. Isoform 1 and 4 are found in virtually all tissues, whereas isoform 2 and 3 are primarily expressed in excitable cells such as neurons and myocytes. Perturbation of PMCAs function has been implicated in a variety of diseases and disorders, including hearing loss, ataxia, paraplegia, and infertility. Here, we would like to review the recent progresses in the study of the PMCAs and related disorders, in particular how these pathological conditions help us to gain an in-depth insight into the function of PMCAs and their contribution in the regulation of Ca2+ signaling network.

16 Review [Ciliopathies]. 2018

Gerth-Kahlert, Christina / Koller, Samuel. ·Augenklinik, UniversitätsSpital Zürich, Zürich, Schweiz. · Institut für Medizinische Molekulargenetik, Universität Zürich, Schlieren, Schweiz. ·Klin Monbl Augenheilkd · Pubmed #29534263.

ABSTRACT: Ciliopathies are disorders caused by ciliary dysfunction and can affect an organ system or tissues. Isolated or syndromic retinal dystrophies are the most common ocular manifestation of ciliopathies. The photoreceptor connecting cilium plays a leading role in these ciliopathy-related retinal dystrophies. Dysfunctional photoreceptor cilia cause the most severe type of retinal dystrophy: Leber's congenital amaurosis (LCA). The most common syndromic ciliopathies with an ocular manifestation are Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS) and Usher syndrome. Molecular-genetic analysis revealed a large number of cilia genes with a high phenotype heterogeneity. Diagnosis of ciliopathies require a multi-disciplinary approach. Causative treatment of ciliopathies is not yet available; therefore, rehabilitative and supportive treatment is mandatory.

17 Review World Health Organization and Its Initiative for Ear and Hearing Care. 2018

Chadha, Shelly / Cieza, Alarcos. ·WHO Department for Management of NCDs, Disability, Violence and Injury Prevention, World Health Organization, Avenue Appia 20, Geneva 1211, Switzerland. Electronic address: chadhas@who.int. · WHO Department for Management of NCDs, Disability, Violence and Injury Prevention, World Health Organization, Avenue Appia 20, Geneva 1211, Switzerland. ·Otolaryngol Clin North Am · Pubmed #29486926.

ABSTRACT: The World Health Organization (WHO) addresses ear diseases and hearing loss through its program on prevention of deafness and hearing loss. Recently, the World Health Assembly called for action at global and national levels to tackle the rising prevalence and adverse impact of unaddressed hearing loss. Following a public health approach toward this issue, WHO is focusing on i) raising awareness among policymakers and civil society; and ii) providing technical support to countries for promoting hearing care. Meeting this challenge requires a coordinated global effort with all stakeholders working together to make ear and hearing care accessible to all.

18 Review [Neurofeedback for the treatment of chronic tinnitus : Review and future perspectives]. 2018

Kleinjung, T / Thüring, C / Güntensperger, D / Neff, P / Meyer, M. ·Klinik für Ohren‑, Nasen‑, Hals- und Gesichtschirurgie, UniversitätsSpital Zürich, Frauenklinikstraße 24, 8091, Zürich, Schweiz. tobias.kleinjung@usz.ch. · Klinik für Ohren‑, Nasen‑, Hals- und Gesichtschirurgie, UniversitätsSpital Zürich, Frauenklinikstraße 24, 8091, Zürich, Schweiz. · Psychologisches Institut, Universität Zürich, Zürich, Schweiz. ·HNO · Pubmed #29143096.

ABSTRACT: Neurofeedback is a noninvasive neuromodulation technique employing real-time display of brain activity in terms of electroencephalography (EEG) signals to teach self-regulation of distinct patterns of brain activity or influence brain activity in a targeted manner. The benefit of this approach for control of symptoms in attention deficit disorders, hyperactivity, depression, and migraine has been proven. Studies in recent years have also repeatedly shown this treatment to improve tinnitus symptoms, although it has not become established as routine therapy. The primary focus of this review is the rational of EEG neurofeedback for tinnitus treatment and the currently available data from published studies. Furthermore, alternative neurofeedback protocols using real-time functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) measurements for tinnitus control are considered. Finally, this article highlights how modern EEG analysis (source localization, connectivity) and the improving understanding of tinnitus pathology can contribute to development of more focused neurofeedback protocols for more sustainable control of tinnitus.

19 Review Pathophysiology, diagnosis and treatment of inherited distal renal tubular acidosis. 2018

Mohebbi, Nilufar / Wagner, Carsten A. ·Division of Nephrology, University Hospital Zurich, Rämistrasse 100, 8091, Zurich, Switzerland. nilufar.mohebbi@usz.ch. · National Center for Competence in Research NCCR Kidney.CH, Zurich, Switzerland. nilufar.mohebbi@usz.ch. · National Center for Competence in Research NCCR Kidney.CH, Zurich, Switzerland. Wagnerca@access.uzh.ch. · Institute of Physiology, University of Zurich, Winterthurerstrasse 190, 8057, Zurich, Switzerland. Wagnerca@access.uzh.ch. ·J Nephrol · Pubmed #28994037.

ABSTRACT: Distal renal tubular acidosis (dRTA) is a tubular disorder with a primary defect of urinary acidification and acid excretion in the collecting duct system. Consequently, patients develop hyperchloremic metabolic acidosis with an inappropriately alkaline urine. Inherited forms of dRTA are due to mutations in at least three distinct genes: SLC4A1, ATP6V1B1, ATP6V0A4. Mutations in SLC4A1-(AE1) are inherited either in an autosomal dominant manner or in a recessive one. ATP6V1B and ATP6V0A4 mutations affect two different subunits of the vacuolar H

20 Review An update on drug design strategies to prevent acquired sensorineural hearing loss. 2017

Bodmer, Daniel. ·a Department of Biomedicine, Head and Neck Surgery , University of Basel Hospital , Basel , Switzerland. · b Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery , University of Basel Hospital , Basel , Switzerland. ·Expert Opin Drug Discov · Pubmed #28838250.

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: Acute sensorineural hearing loss is a dramatic event for the patient. Different pathologies might result in acute sensorineural hearing loss, such as sudden hearing loss, exposure to medications/drugs or loud sound. Current therapeutic approaches include steroids and hyperbaric oxygen in addition to other methods. Research activities of the past have shed light on the molecular mechanisms involved in damage to hair cells, the synapses at the hair cell spiral ganglion junction and the stria vascularis. Molecular events and signaling pathways which underlie damage to these structures have been discovered. Areas covered: This paper summarizes current research efforts involved in investigating the molecular mechanisms involved in acute sensorineural hearing loss. Expert opinion: While progress has been made in unraveling basic mechanisms involved in acute sensorineural hearing loss, it is difficult to translate basic concepts to the clinic. There are often conflicting data in animal and human studies on the effect of a given intervention. There is also a lack of high quality clinical trials (double blind, placebo controlled and high powered). However, this author is confident that research efforts will pay out and that some of these efforts will translate into new therapeutic options for patients with acute hearing loss.

21 Review Hearing and vision screening tools for long-term care residents with dementia: protocol for a scoping review. 2016

McGilton, Katherine S / Höbler, Fiona / Campos, Jennifer / Dupuis, Kate / Labreche, Tammy / Guthrie, Dawn M / Jarry, Jonathan / Singh, Gurjit / Wittich, Walter. ·Department of Research, Toronto Rehabilitation Institute-University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario, Canada Lawrence S. Bloomberg Faculty of Nursing, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Department of Research, Toronto Rehabilitation Institute-University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario, Canada Department of Speech-Language Pathology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Department of Research, Toronto Rehabilitation Institute-University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario, Canada Department of Psychology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Department of Psychology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada Department of Audiology, Baycrest Health Sciences, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Centre for Sight Enhancement, School of Optometry and Vision Science, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada. · Department of Kinesiology & Physical Education and Health Sciences, Faculty of Science, Wilfrid Laurier University, Ontario, Canada. · School of Optometry, University of Montréal, Montréal, Quebec, Canada. · Department of Research, Toronto Rehabilitation Institute-University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario, Canada Department of Speech-Language Pathology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada Phonak AG, Stäfa, Switzerland Department of Psychology, Ryerson University, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · School of Optometry, University of Montréal, Montréal, Quebec, Canada School of Physical and Occupational Therapy, McGill University, Montréal, Quebec, Canada CRIR/Centre de réadaptation MAB-Mackay du CIUSSS du Centre-Ouest-de-l'Île-de-Montréal. Montréal, Quebec, Canada CRIR/Institut Nazareth et Louis-Braille du CISSS de la Montérégie-Centre, Montréal, Quebec, Canada. ·BMJ Open · Pubmed #27466242.

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: Hearing and vision loss among long-term care (LTC) residents with dementia frequently goes unnoticed and untreated. Despite negative consequences for these residents, there is little information available about their sensory abilities and care assessments and practices seldom take these abilities or accessibility needs into account. Without adequate knowledge regarding such sensory loss, it is difficult for LTC staff to determine the level of an individual's residual basic competence for communication and independent functioning. We will conduct a scoping review to identify the screening measures used in research and clinical contexts that test hearing and vision in adults aged over 65 years with dementia, aiming to: (1) provide an overview of hearing and vision screening in older adults with dementia; and (2) evaluate the sensibility of the screening tools. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: This scoping review will be conducted using the framework by Arksey and O'Malley and furthered by methodological enhancements from cited researchers. We will conduct electronic database searches in CENTRAL, CINAHL, EMBASE, MEDLINE and PsycINFO. We will also carry out a 'grey literature' search for studies or materials not formally published, both online and through interview discussions with healthcare professionals and research clinicians working in the field. Our aim is to find new and existing hearing and vision screening measures used in research and by clinical professionals of optometry and audiology. Abstracts will be independently reviewed twice for acceptance by a multidisciplinary team of researchers and research clinicians. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: This review will inform health professionals working with this growing population. With the review findings, we aim to develop a toolkit and an algorithmic process to select the most appropriate hearing and vision screening assessments for LTC residents with dementia that will facilitate accurate testing and can inform care planning, thereby improving residents' quality of life.

22 Review [Conservative and surgical rehabilitation of hearing loss]. 2016

Stieger, Christof / Bodmer, Daniel / Brand, Yves. ·1 HNO-Klinik, Universitätsspital Basel. ·Ther Umsch · Pubmed #27132641.

ABSTRACT: According to WHO 360 million people are hard of hearing. Hearing disorders are not only seen in elderly but also in children. Clinically we differentiate between hearing disorders concerning the transmission of sound from the outer ear to the cochlea (conductive hearing loss) and disorders with reduced sound perception concerning the inner ear an related structures (sensorineural hearing loss). This article summarizes common surgical and technical possibilities for rehabilitation. For each pathology we graphically illustrate the generic working principle of the rehabilitation including the indication range in an exemplary audiogram.

23 Review Aging and Hearing Health: The Life-course Approach. 2016

Davis, Adrian / McMahon, Catherine M / Pichora-Fuller, Kathleen M / Russ, Shirley / Lin, Frank / Olusanya, Bolajoko O / Chadha, Shelly / Tremblay, Kelly L. ·University College London. AD Cave Solutions. · Department of Linguistics, Macquarie University, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. · Department of Psychology, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · UCLA Center for Healthier Children, Families and Communities, Los Angeles, California. · Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland. · Centre for Healthy Start Initiative, Ikoyi, Lagos, Nigeria. · World Health Organization, Geneva, Switzerland. · Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle. tremblay@uw.edu. ·Gerontologist · Pubmed #26994265.

ABSTRACT: Sensory abilities decline with age. More than 5% of the world's population, approximately 360 million people, have disabling hearing loss. In adults, disabling hearing loss is defined by thresholds greater than 40 dBHL in the better hearing ear.Hearing disability is an important issue in geriatric medicine because it is associated with numerous health issues, including accelerated cognitive decline, depression, increased risk of dementia, poorer balance, falls, hospitalizations, and early mortality. There are also social implications, such as reduced communication function, social isolation, loss of autonomy, impaired driving ability, and financial decline. Furthermore, the onset of hearing loss is gradual and subtle, first affecting the detection of high-pitched sounds and with difficulty understanding speech in noisy but not in quiet environments. Consequently, delays in recognizing and seeking help for hearing difficulties are common. Age-related hearing loss has no known cure, and technologies (hearing aids, cochlear implants, and assistive devices) improve thresholds but do not restore hearing to normal. Therefore, health care for persons with hearing loss and people within their communication circles requires education and counseling (e.g., increasing knowledge, changing attitudes, and reducing stigma), behavior change (e.g., adapting communication strategies), and environmental modifications (e.g., reducing noise). In this article, we consider the causes, consequences, and magnitude of hearing loss from a life-course perspective. We examine the concept of "hearing health," how to achieve it, and implications for policy and practice.

24 Review Clinical Practice Recommendations for the Management and Prevention of Cisplatin-Induced Hearing Loss Using Pharmacogenetic Markers. 2016

Lee, Jong W / Pussegoda, Kusala / Rassekh, Shahrad R / Monzon, Jose G / Liu, Geoffrey / Hwang, Soomi / Bhavsar, Amit P / Pritchard, Sheila / Ross, Colin J / Amstutz, Ursula / Carleton, Bruce C / Anonymous410861. ·*Center for Molecular Medicine and Therapeutics, Department of Medical Genetics, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada; †Pharmaceutical Outcomes Programme, British Columbia Children's Hospital, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada; ‡Child and Family Research Institute, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada; §Department of Pediatrics, Division of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology/Bone Marrow Transplant, British Columbia Children's Hospital, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada; ¶Department of Medical Oncology, Tom Baker Cancer Center, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada; ‖Department of Medical Oncology, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; **Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada; ††Division of Translational Therapeutics, Department of Pediatrics, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada; and ‡‡Institute of Clinical Chemistry, Inselspital Bern University Hospital, University of Bern, Bern, Switzerland. ·Ther Drug Monit · Pubmed #26960170.

ABSTRACT: Currently no pharmacogenomics-based criteria exist to guide clinicians in identifying individuals who are at risk of hearing loss from cisplatin-based chemotherapy. This review summarizes findings from pharmacogenomic studies that report genetic polymorphisms associated with cisplatin-induced hearing loss and aims to (1) provide up-to-date information on new developments in the field, (2) provide recommendations for the use of pharmacogenetic testing in the prevention, assessment, and management of cisplatin-induced hearing loss in children and adults, and (3) identify knowledge gaps to direct and prioritize future research. These practice recommendations for pharmacogenetic testing in the context of cisplatin-induced hearing loss reflect a review and evaluation of recent literature, and are designed to assist clinicians in providing optimal clinical care for patients receiving cisplatin-based chemotherapy.

25 Review Open Versus Closed Hearing-Aid Fittings: A Literature Review of Both Fitting Approaches. 2016

Winkler, Alexandra / Latzel, Matthias / Holube, Inga. ·Insitute of Hearing Technology and Audiology, Jade University of Applied Sciences and Cluster of Excellence "Hearing4All", Oldenburg, Germany alexandra.winkler@jade-hs.de. · Phonak AG, Staefa, Switzerland. · Insitute of Hearing Technology and Audiology, Jade University of Applied Sciences and Cluster of Excellence "Hearing4All", Oldenburg, Germany. ·Trends Hear · Pubmed #26879562.

ABSTRACT: One of the main issues in hearing-aid fittings is the abnormal perception of the user's own voice as too loud, "boomy," or "hollow." This phenomenon known as the occlusion effect be reduced by large vents in the earmolds or by open-fit hearing aids. This review provides an overview of publications related to open and closed hearing-aid fittings. First, the occlusion effect and its consequences for perception while using hearing aids are described. Then, the advantages and disadvantages of open compared with closed fittings and their impact on the fitting process are addressed. The advantages include less occlusion, improved own-voice perception and sound quality, and increased localization performance. The disadvantages associated with open-fit hearing aids include reduced benefits of directional microphones and noise reduction, as well as less compression and less available gain before feedback. The final part of this review addresses the need for new approaches to combine the advantages of open and closed hearing-aid fittings.

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