Pick Topic
Review Topic
List Experts
Examine Expert
Save Expert
  Site Guide ··   
Hearing Disorders: HELP
Articles by Nancy Melinda Young
Based on 11 articles published since 2010
(Why 11 articles?)
||||

Between 2010 and 2020, Nancy Young wrote the following 11 articles about Hearing Disorders.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Guideline International Pediatric Otolaryngology Group (IPOG) consensus recommendations: Hearing loss in the pediatric patient. 2016

Liming, Bryan J / Carter, John / Cheng, Alan / Choo, Daniel / Curotta, John / Carvalho, Daniela / Germiller, John A / Hone, Stephen / Kenna, Margaret A / Loundon, Natalie / Preciado, Diego / Schilder, Anne / Reilly, Brian J / Roman, Stephane / Strychowsky, Julie / Triglia, Jean-Michel / Young, Nancy / Smith, Richard J H. ·Department of Otolaryngology -Head and Neck Surgery, University of Iowa Health Care, Iowa City, IA, USA. Electronic address: Bryan-liming@uiowa.edu. · Department of Otolaryngology- Head and Neck Surgery, Ochsner Medical Center, New Orleans, LA, USA. · Sydney Children's Hospital Network, Sydney, Australia. · Cincinnati Children's Hospital, Cincinnati, OH, USA. · Rady Children's Hospital, San Diego, CA, USA. · Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia PA, USA. · Our Lady's Children's Hospital, Crumlin, Dublin, Ireland. · Department of Otolaryngology and Communication Enhancement, Boston Children's Hospital, Boston MA, USA. · Pediatric ENT Department, Hopital Necker-Enfants Malades, AP-HP Universite Paris Descartes, Paris, France. · Department of Otolaryngology, Children's National Hospital, Washington DC, USA. · Evident, UCL Ear Institute, Royal National Throat, Nose and Ear Hospital, London UK. · Department of Pediatric Otolaryngology, La Timone Children's Hospital, Aix-Marseille Universite', Marseille, France. · Paediatric Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery-Children's Hospital at London Health Sciences Centre, London, Ontario, Canada. · Division of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago, Chicago IL, USA. · Department of Otolaryngology -Head and Neck Surgery, University of Iowa Health Care, Iowa City, IA, USA. ·Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol · Pubmed #27729144.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To provide recommendations for the workup of hearing loss in the pediatric patient. METHODS: Expert opinion by the members of the International Pediatric Otolaryngology Group. RESULTS: Consensus recommendations include initial screening and diagnosis as well as the workup of sensorineural, conductive and mixed hearing loss in children. The consensus statement discusses the role of genetic testing and imaging and provides algorithms to guide the workup of children with hearing loss. CONCLUSION: The workup of children with hearing loss can be guided by the recommendations provided herein.

2 Editorial Evolution of pediatric cochlear implantation. 2013

Young, Nancy M / Kirk, Karen Iler. · ·Otol Neurotol · Pubmed #23446326.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

3 Review Preoperative imaging of sensorineural hearing loss in pediatric candidates for cochlear implantation. 2014

Young, Joseph Y / Ryan, Maura E / Young, Nancy M. ·From the Department of Radiology (J.Y.Y., M.E.R.) and Department of Otolaryngology- Head and Neck Surgery (N.M.Y.), Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Ill · Department of Medical Imaging (J.Y.Y., M.E.R.) and Division of Pediatric Otolaryngology (N.M.Y.), Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago, 225 E Chicago Ave, Chicago, IL 60611 · and Knowles Hearing Center, School of Communication, Northwestern University, Evanston, Ill (N.M.Y.). ·Radiographics · Pubmed #25208295.

ABSTRACT: Cochlear implantation is the only U.S. Food and Drug Administration-approved treatment for children with marked bilateral sensorineural hearing loss. It provides auditory benefits that range from simple sound detection to substantial word understanding. Improved hearing through cochlear implantation has been demonstrated to enhance the rate of language acquisition, enable development of spoken language, and advance literacy in deaf children. Magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography both have roles in the preoperative assessment of inner-ear abnormalities, cochlear nerve deficiency, and variant anatomy that may affect the decision to implant and the prognosis for auditory improvement and increase the risk for complications. Most cochlear abnormalities may be successfully treated with cochlear implantation, but the presence of a cochlear malformation may increase the risk for intraoperative cerebrospinal fluid leakage and postoperative bacterial meningitis. Eighth-nerve deficiency correlates with poor auditory outcomes and may affect eligibility for cochlear implantation. Another important consideration for implantation is the presence of labyrinthitis ossificans in some children with deafness resulting from bacterial meningitis, which may cause obstruction that limits electrode insertion. Anatomic variations of the facial nerve or middle-ear cavity, which are more common in syndromic patients, may also affect the surgical approach and make implantation difficult.

4 Article Neural preservation underlies speech improvement from auditory deprivation in young cochlear implant recipients. 2018

Feng, Gangyi / Ingvalson, Erin M / Grieco-Calub, Tina M / Roberts, Megan Y / Ryan, Maura E / Birmingham, Patrick / Burrowes, Delilah / Young, Nancy M / Wong, Patrick C M. ·Department of Linguistics and Modern Languages, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR, China. · Brain and Mind Institute, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR, China. · School of Communication Science and Disorders, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32301. · Department of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL 60611. · Roxelyn and Richard Pepper Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208. · Knowles Hearing Center, School of Communication, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208. · Department of Radiology, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL 60611. · Department of Medical Imaging, Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60611. · Department of Anesthesiology, Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60611. · Department of Anesthesiology, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL 60611. · Division of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery, Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60611. · Department of Linguistics and Modern Languages, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR, China; p.wong@cuhk.edu.hk. · Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR, China. ·Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A · Pubmed #29339512.

ABSTRACT: Although cochlear implantation enables some children to attain age-appropriate speech and language development, communicative delays persist in others, and outcomes are quite variable and difficult to predict, even for children implanted early in life. To understand the neurobiological basis of this variability, we used presurgical neural morphological data obtained from MRI of individual pediatric cochlear implant (CI) candidates implanted younger than 3.5 years to predict variability of their speech-perception improvement after surgery. We first compared neuroanatomical density and spatial pattern similarity of CI candidates to that of age-matched children with normal hearing, which allowed us to detail neuroanatomical networks that were either affected or unaffected by auditory deprivation. This information enables us to build machine-learning models to predict the individual children's speech development following CI. We found that regions of the brain that were unaffected by auditory deprivation, in particular the auditory association and cognitive brain regions, produced the highest accuracy, specificity, and sensitivity in patient classification and the most precise prediction results. These findings suggest that brain areas unaffected by auditory deprivation are critical to developing closer to typical speech outcomes. Moreover, the findings suggest that determination of the type of neural reorganization caused by auditory deprivation before implantation is valuable for predicting post-CI language outcomes for young children.

5 Article Outcomes and Time to Emergence of Auditory Skills After Cochlear Implantation of Children With Charge Syndrome. 2017

Young, Nancy M / Tournis, Elizabeth / Sandy, Jenelle / Hoff, Stephen R / Ryan, Maura. ·*Division of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Ann and Robert H Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago †Department Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago ‡Knowles Hearing Center, Northwestern University School of Communication, Evanston §Department of Audiology ||Department of Medical Imaging, Ann and Robert H Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago ¶Department of Medical Imaging, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois. ·Otol Neurotol · Pubmed #28657954.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: Review perioperative complications, benefits, and the timeframe over which auditory skills develop in children with CHARGE syndrome who receive a cochlear implant (CI). STUDY DESIGN: IRB-approved retrospective chart review of children with CHARGE syndrome who had at least 12 months of cochlear implant use. SETTING: Tertiary care children's hospital. PATIENTS: Twelve children, seven males and five females. Mean age implant = 3.5 years (1.7-8.2 yr); mean duration follow-up = 4.7 years (1.5-10.1 yr). INTERVENTION: Cochlear implantation. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Auditory skills categorized into four levels, temporal bone imaging findings, perioperative complications, time to emergence of speech perception, expressive communication mode. RESULTS: All children imaged with magnetic resonance imaging had cochlear nerve deficiency in at least one ear. Speech awareness threshold improved with the CI compared with aided preoperative in 83% of children, with means of 51.7 dB SAT preoperative and 27.1 dB with the CI (p ≤ 0.002). Overall, four children improved to auditory Level 2 (improved detection), three obtained Level 3 (closed-set speech perception), and three had open-set speech perception with their CIs (Level 4) that was first evident at 3.5, 3.3, and 0.8 years postimplant testing. Two children had minimal or limited improvement. One child with hypoplasia of the cochlear nerve obtained open-set levels. CONCLUSION: Auditory skills may develop slowly in children with CHARGE syndrome who receive a CI but most can achieve at least improved detection. In our series, half acquired some speech perception ability. Cochlear nerve deficiency is frequent, but should not be a contraindication to implantation.

6 Article Auditory-cognitive training improves language performance in prelingually deafened cochlear implant recipients. 2014

Ingvalson, Erin M / Young, Nancy M / Wong, Patrick C M. ·Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL, United States. · Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL, United States; Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago, Chicago, IL, United States; Roxelyn and Richard Pepper Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, Northwestern University, United States; Knowles Hearing Center, School of Communication, Northwestern University, United States. · Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL, United States; Roxelyn and Richard Pepper Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, Northwestern University, United States; Department of Linguistics and Modern Languages, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong; CUHK-Utrecht University Joint Centre for Language, Mind and Brain, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong. Electronic address: p.wong@cuhk.edu.hk. ·Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol · Pubmed #25109453.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: Phonological and working memory skills have been shown to be important for the development of spoken language. Children who use a cochlear implant (CI) show performance deficits relative to normal hearing (NH) children on all constructs: phonological skills, working memory, and spoken language. Given that phonological skills and working memory have been shown to be important for spoken language development in NH children, we hypothesized that training these foundational skills would result in improved spoken language performance in CI-using children. DESIGN: Nineteen prelingually deafened CI-using children aged 4- to 7-years-old participated. All children had been using their implants for at least one year and were matched on pre-implant hearing thresholds, hearing thresholds at study enrollment, and non-verbal IQ. Children were assessed on expressive vocabulary, listening language, spoken language, and composite language. Ten children received four weeks of training on phonological skills including rhyme, sound blending, and sound discrimination and auditory working memory. The remaining nine children continued with their normal classroom activities for four weeks. Language assessments were repeated following the training/control period. RESULTS: Children who received combined phonological-working memory training showed significant gains on expressive and composite language scores. Children who did not receive training showed no significant improvements at post-test. On average, trained children had gain scores of 6.35 points on expressive language and gain scores of 6.15 points whereas the untrained children had test-retest gain scores of 2.89 points for expressive language and 2.56 for composite language. CONCLUSION: Our results suggest that training to improve the phonological and working memory skills in CI-using children may lead to improved language performance.

7 Article Usher syndrome: characteristics and outcomes of pediatric cochlear implant recipients. 2013

Jatana, Kris R / Thomas, Denise / Weber, Lisa / Mets, Marilyn B / Silverman, Josh B / Young, Nancy M. ·Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Nationwide Children's Hospital and The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio, USA. ·Otol Neurotol · Pubmed #23442567.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the characteristics and outcomes of pediatric cochlear implant recipients diagnosed with Usher syndrome (US). STUDY DESIGN: Retrospective study of consecutive pediatric cochlear implant recipients (1991-2010). SETTING: Tertiary care children's hospital. PATIENTS: Children who received a cochlear implant who were diagnosed with US either before or after implantation. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Electroretinography and ophthalmologic findings, cochlear anatomy based on preoperative imaging, age of independent ambulation, age at implantation, speech perception level, and communication method. RESULTS: Approximately 26 (3.7%) of 712 cochlear implant recipients were diagnosed with US based on the results of electroretinography and/or genetic testing. Preoperative imaging revealed no evidence of cochlear malformations. Average age of independent ambulation was 21.9 months (range, 12-30). Average age at implantation was 3.3 years (range, 6 mo to 11.6 yr). Mean follow-up after implantation was 7.8 years (range, 10 mo to 15.6 yr). Open-set speech perception was present in 92% of children, with use of a primarily oral communication mode in 69.2%. CONCLUSION: In this large series of patients with the diagnosis of US who have undergone cochlear implantation, CT and MRI imaging were normal. Significant delay in independent ambulation was present in this population secondary to abnormal vestibular function associated with US Type I. A majority of children developed significant open-set speech perception and oral communication skills. Implantation of US children provides them with the opportunity to develop useful hearing and oral communication.

8 Article Pediatric cochlear implantation of children with eighth nerve deficiency. 2012

Young, Nancy M / Kim, Francine M / Ryan, Maura E / Tournis, Elizabeth / Yaras, Stephanie. ·Section of Otology and Neurotology, Division of Pediatric Otolaryngology, Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago, United States. nyoung@luriechildrens.org ·Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol · Pubmed #22921779.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the auditory outcomes of children implanted in an ear with eighth nerve hypoplasia or aplasia and to determine whether preoperative characteristics are predictive of auditory performance achieved. STUDY DESIGN: retrospective case review. SETTING: tertiary care medical center. PATIENTS: ten children implanted in an ear with eighth nerve hypoplasia or aplasia, as determined by high resolution magnetic resonance imaging. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Neural response test measurements, detection and speech awareness thresholds, Meaningful Auditory Integration Scale scores, as well as speech perception level achieved. RESULTS: Post-implantation, three children demonstrated little to no detection of sound, three had improved detection and awareness of environmental sounds, one developed closed-set speech perception and spoken language, and three developed open-set speech perception and spoken language. No imaging findings appeared related to outcomes. Significantly better implant detection thresholds and Meaningful Auditory Integration Scale scores were found in children who had preoperative aided auditory detection (p's ≤ 0.02-0.05). CONCLUSION: Some children with eighth nerve hypoplasia or aplasia may derive significant benefit from a cochlear implant. In our study high resolution magnetic resonance imaging was more sensitive than high resolution computer tomography in detecting neural deficiency. However, no imaging findings were predictive of auditory performance level achieved post-implantation.

9 Article Assessing spoken word recognition in children who are deaf or hard of hearing: a translational approach. 2012

Kirk, Karen Iler / Prusick, Lindsay / French, Brian / Gotch, Chad / Eisenberg, Laurie S / Young, Nancy. ·Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242, USA. karen-kirk@uiowa.edu ·J Am Acad Audiol · Pubmed #22668766.

ABSTRACT: Under natural conditions, listeners use both auditory and visual speech cues to extract meaning from speech signals containing many sources of variability. However, traditional clinical tests of spoken word recognition routinely employ isolated words or sentences produced by a single talker in an auditory-only presentation format. The more central cognitive processes used during multimodal integration, perceptual normalization, and lexical discrimination that may contribute to individual variation in spoken word recognition performance are not assessed in conventional tests of this kind. In this article, we review our past and current research activities aimed at developing a series of new assessment tools designed to evaluate spoken word recognition in children who are deaf or hard of hearing. These measures are theoretically motivated by a current model of spoken word recognition and also incorporate "real-world" stimulus variability in the form of multiple talkers and presentation formats. The goal of this research is to enhance our ability to estimate real-world listening skills and to predict benefit from sensory aid use in children with varying degrees of hearing loss.

10 Article Limitations of universal newborn hearing screening in early identification of pediatric cochlear implant candidates. 2011

Young, Nancy Melinda / Reilly, Brian Kip / Burke, Larisa. ·Division of Pediatric Otolaryngology, Section of Otology and Neurotology, Children’s Memorial Hospital, 2300 Children's Plaza, Box 265, Chicago, IL 60614-3394, USA. ·Arch Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg · Pubmed #21422305.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: To determine whether implementation of universal newborn hearing screening (UNHS) in the state of Illinois has affected the ages at diagnosis of hearing loss and implantation in children receiving cochlear implants and to determine how often children undergoing implantation had UNHS results with no indication of hearing loss (pass). DESIGN: Retrospective case review of 417 randomly selected pediatric implant recipients born before and after UNHS was mandated by law in Illinois. Data analyzed included hearing screening status, ages at initial diagnosis of sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) and severe to profound SNHL, and age at implantation. SETTING: Tertiary care medical center. PATIENTS: Children receiving implants from 1991 through 2008. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Ages at diagnosis of SNHL and implantation. RESULTS: Children born after legally mandated UNHS had significantly younger ages at diagnosis and implantation. However, a younger age at diagnosis of SNHL was not achieved in children who had passed UNHS or who were not screened. Approximately 30% of pediatric implant recipients passed UNHS, regardless of the cause of hearing loss or the presence or absence of known risk factors. CONCLUSIONS: Almost one-third of our pediatric implant recipients pass UNHS and are older at the time of initial diagnosis and implantation than their peers who fail UNHS. Delayed onset of SNHL limits our ability to achieve early diagnosis and implantation of a significant number of deaf children. This problem will not be solved by the current design of universal hearing screening programs.

11 Article Current techniques in management of postmeningitic deafness in children. 2010

Young, Nancy M / Tan, Tina Q. ·Division of Pediatric Otolaryngology, Section of Otology and Neurotology, Children's Memorial Hospital, 2300 Children's Plaza, Box 265, Chicago, IL 60614, USA. nyoung@childrensmemorial.org ·Arch Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg · Pubmed #20956746.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: To determine pneumococcal vaccination status of children with recent postmeningitic deafness and to review our current approach for achieving early implantation in this special population that is at significant risk for cochlear ossification. DESIGN: Review of imaging studies and test results. SETTING: Tertiary care/referral children's hospital. PATIENTS: Five children ranging in age from 15 months to 10 years who experienced recent onset of profound bilateral sensorineural hearing loss due to pneumococcal meningitis. INTERVENTIONS: All children underwent preoperative magnetic resonance imaging with 3-dimensional heavily T2-weighted steady-state free precession sequences. Four children underwent auditory steady-state response testing. All underwent bilateral cochlear implantation. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Degree of electrode insertion using standard surgical procedures. RESULTS: All children developed meningitis despite a history of pneumococcal vaccination. Complete electrode insertion in both ears was achieved. CONCLUSIONS: Pneumococcal vaccination has reduced but not eliminated childhood deafness secondary to pneumococcal disease. Auditory steady-state response testing and 3-dimensional steady-state free precession imaging are modalities that expedite candidacy evaluation of this population. Early bilateral simultaneous implantation increases the likelihood of binaural hearing and ensures implantation of the better ear in this population of children whose course is often complicated by formation of scar tissue and ossification within the cochlea.